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Turkish Supremo Erdogan Doesn't Murder Journalists, He Just Imprisons Them
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As of early 2018, Turkey had 245 journalists locked up, the most in the world. On the other hand, I haven’t heard of Turkey murdering any journalists, the way the Saudis murdered Jamal Khashoggi in Saudi Arabia’s consulate in Istanbul.

Okay, Wikipedia has a list of “Journalists Killed in Turkey,” which lists 9 journalists who have died violently in Turkey in Erdogan’s 15 years in power, but some of those were apparently murdered by non-government criminals.

From DW:

US denies it will deport Erdogan foe Fethullah Gulen to reduce heat on Saudis

The State Department has denied a report claiming the Trump administration was mulling how to deport Gulen. The move was reportedly designed to ease pressure on ally Saudi Arabia after a journalist was murdered.

Gulen is a sort of one man iSteve meme come to life. He is an Islamic cult leader who has been holed up in Saylorsburg in the Poconos since the 1990s. My guess is that he is the American deep state’s pro-American Turkish government-in-waiting. His followers run well over 100 charter schools in the U.S., where they are accused of skimming money through immigration fraud and other sharp dealing. The FBI was raiding the Gulen charter school racket in 2014, but then the scandal disappeared. My baseless speculation is that the CIA explained to the FBI that, sure, local American taxpayers were being ripped off by Gulen’s charter school, but it was all in the good cause of having a friendly potential government for the Straits of Constantinople.

He used to be Erdogan’s ally in battling the secularist military, because Gulen’s followers had taken over the police in Turkey via running the test prep centers. Gulen’s guys framed the generals for Erdogan in various show trials, but then they turned on Erdogan over his corruption in 2013, releasing incriminating wiretaps of Erdogan saying he had no more room in his house to store all the bales of money he has ripped off.

Erdogan blamed Gulen for the failed 2016 coup, although I haven’t seen much evidence that it wasn’t just the military, as in previous coups.

Anyway, don’t deport Gulen, but reopen the FBI investigation into his charter schools.

 
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  1. OT, but this sounds like a film worth a review!

    https://palladiummag.com/2018/09/29/bolsonaro-and-the-populist-crisis-in-brazil/

    “There is, then, a huge disconnect between how the Brazilian elite, including the media, remembers military rule, and how the Brazilian people, especially the middle classes, remember it. The return of military rule isn’t on the table—despite all the hysteria, Bolsonaro isn’t and hasn’t proposed anything of the sort—but this disconnect over the meaning of the real Brazil or whether Brazil needs to be made “great again,” has much to do with the Bolsonaro phenomenon.

    One of the episodes that revealed this elite-popular divide most vividly took place in 2007 when the movie Elite Squad came out, which dramatized the story of a militarized police unit fighting drug traffickers.

    The movie was widely condemned as fascist both in Brazilian and international media. But in Brazil itself, audiences broke out in applause at the punishment dealt out to criminals, and especially at a scene where a crime-enabling, community organizing NGO leader in the favelas is met with a grisly end. The reaction to this scene especially shocked journalists worldwide, because it showed what the Brazilian middle class felt about a foot soldier of elite institutions and elite opinions. “

    • Replies: @L Woods
    , @J.Ross
  2. In Soviet America, journalist TELLS YOU what to do. You have a hard time just to kick him out of the White House.

  3. LondonBob says:

    From what I read the secularists declined the Gulenists invitation to join the coup, for obvious reasons, and have made their peace with Erdogan.

  4. IHTG says:

    Whoops! Having run out of Russian collusion to investigate, Mueller’s team stumbles across the wrong kind of collusion: https://www.thedailybeast.com/top-cheney-aide-in-muellers-sights-as-probe-expands

    • Replies: @Corvinus
    , @Colin Wright
  5. Clyde says:

    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That’s nobody’s business but the Turks.

    Steve needs to stop harassing them.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  6. Ah, yes, the CIA.

    What ever happened to this television series starring one of the Bridges Brothers and this other, bald guy, what was it called, The Company or The Lobby or the Langley Losers? One of the two was the DCI and the other was the National Security Advisor and part of the drama was the one thought the other one was intellectually disabled?

    I watched one suspenseful episode where Bridges and the Bald Guy prevent a nuclear war between Pakistan and India, which was cool. The second episode was about a super-popular Indonesian religious leader whom the CIA wants to thwart in his rise to political control.

    The scheme involves publically distributing photos of the guy in, ahem, a compromising position to take the wind out of the sails of his religious appeal. Only the photos won’t be of the guy but of a Langley stand-in.

    So they do this massive search through government records, and they find this Indonesian American Marine who is a dead ringer for the religious leader. They pair him up with this still-attractive divorced Indonesian “older woman” who agrees to close her eyes and think of Indonesia for the CIA cameras.

    After that, the episode ran off the rails into embarrassing sit-com plot territory. The Marine, although reminded of Marine traditions of doing one’s duty, whines that he can’t get “in the mood” because his film partner “is just not my type”, which annoys Indonesian lady, who is conservatively religious like everyone else in Indonesia and is only doing this because she is a patriot and can’t figure out why the American dude can’t do something to serve his country, and what’s the matter, you think I am old and ugly? The Marine stomps outside the tent-with-the-bed-and-film crew to smoke a cigarette and get his head together, muttering Marine Corps motto “Semper Fi! Semper Fi!” to get up is courage.

    A bystander sees Religious Leader Body Double speaking English with an American accent, and we can already see this “operation” getting Foxtrot Uniform. I switched the TV off at that point.

    I mean, what kind of Marine needs to get the courage to get it on with a foxy older lady? I thought that to get into the Marine Corps you had to be willing to have relations with anyone with two X chromosomes, if need be, or am I confusing the Corps with the Army 101st Airborne, which recruits men who have had relations with their mothers and is proud of it? And what was with Indonesian Patriot Lady with moral qualms — Indonesia might be conservatively religious, but don’t they have any fetching young women willing to be patriotic at the drop of a few rupiah?

    So, how did that episode end?

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  7. Sammler says: • Website

    Another insanely reasonable, middle-of-road proposal from Steve. But our government will instead send Gulen to Turkey, while allowing his scam-school network to grow unmolested.

  8. Tiny Duck says:

    Is their ANYTHING Trump does right.

    You guys are miserable human beings

    • Troll: Mr. Rational
  9. I’m clearly not Turkish and have only a cursory knowledge of the place but I know enough to find the idea that the Turkish people would tolerate an American puppet regime ludicrous. The French, Poles and Russians are likelier than the Turkish to do so.

    Whenever situations like this come up, I ask myself, what exactly is America’s role in the M/E.

    Were Trump really who most of you here seem to think he is, he’d leave the M/E to the Europeans, it is their geographically bound problem. Let their new army solve it.

    “Hey Angela”, don’t say I never gave you nothing” or something along those lines.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    , @Bill
  10. The United States plans on incarcerating the journalist running the on-line publication known as WikiLeaks. The Feds are currently trying to find crimes

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  11. I must disagree. PLEASE deport him. We have enough problems in the USA and don’t need this creep training homegrown jihadis.

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  12. Svigor says:

    I’m tempted to say that in places where journalists deserve this (E.g., the West) they’re instead treated with respect, and in the places where they deserve respect, they’re treated like this.

    But nah, they’re probably agents of hostile powers in Turkey, too.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  13. Lugash says:

    My guess is that he is the American deep state’s pro-American Turkish government-in-waiting.

    He’s definitely a government in waiting, but I doubt he’s pro-American. He probably mouths the right words about freedom and democracy to naive Congressmen, but his true interest lies in what’s good for him. I don’t see much upside to keeping this creep around.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Bill
  14. Anon[204] • Disclaimer says:

    Brahmin Fragility

  15. rufus says:

    Dead or in Prison. Just like the hood…

    Straight outa Istanbul

  16. In the US the president not only isn’t allowed to imprison “journalists”, apparently he isn’t even allowed to kick them out of the White House for being pompous jerks.

    I’d always thought “freedom of the press” meant anyone could print up whatever heck opinion they wanted. But no, it means there’s an exalted class of being who has these extra-constitutional rights i don’t have.

    As to plain old, printing up what you want to say … those same people very much frown on that. When your opinions are “inappropriate” or “hateful” you very much need to be silenced.

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @Svigor
  17. AndrewR says:

    I am not happy with the kritarchy finding a “right” for obnoxious activists like Acosta to be allowed into the White House. Frankly I think we could learn something from the Turks and Saudis about how to deal with “journalists.”

    • Agree: BenKenobi, Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @jim jones
  18. Corvinus says:
    @IHTG

    “Whoops! Having run out of Russian collusion to investigate…”

    Actually, there is plenty to investigate. Read “Proof Of Collusion” by Seth Abramson. Wait until Mueller starts dropping down the indictment hammer.

    NOTICE how Mr. Sailer steers clear of commenting on this matter. Even he knows it probably will not end up well for Trump.

    • Troll: IHTG
  19. Bill B. says:

    OT

    I may have found the reason why the Economist, for one, is so sanguine about the sub-Saharan invasion of Europe. Sperm. Without an invasion of dusky super-men Europe will expire from a sperm shortage. The Economist’s Mandingo moment starts at about 1′ 15″:

    (Who are the Economist making these sh*tty videos for? Talk about low bandwidth.)

  20. sb057 says:

    Re: “I haven’t seen much evidence that it wasn’t just the military, as in previous coups.”
    I highly recommend reading the Stockholm Center for Freedom’s paper “15 July: Erdogan’s Coup”. There’s some pretty strong evidence that it was a setup.

  21. @IHTG

    ‘…Mueller’s team stumbles across the wrong kind of collusion…’

    ‘…and Joel Zamel, a self-proclaimed social-media guru with deep ties to Israeli intelligence…’

    This is — more or less — what keeps happening. The road leads to Moscow — so far, so good. However, then it rather awkwardly continues to Tel Aviv. Can’t go there. So the investigation has to back up and follow another trail…which leads to Tel Aviv again.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  22. Corvinus says:

    “My baseless speculation is that the CIA explained to the FBI that, sure, local American taxpayers were being ripped off by Gulen’s charter school, but it was all in the good cause of having a friendly potential government for the Straits of Constantinople.”

    Classic example here of Sailer’s “Plausible Undeniability”–Incorporate “winks and nods” in the narrative for your audience to understand your admittance of wild speculation is, in reality, an acknowledgement of that something to be a stone cold truth.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  23. kihowi says:

    He does not belong in America. Why is he there at all? Neither do his schools. There are 300 million people in America I believe, the idea that they need the Turks to start a school is beyond preposterous. Out, out, out!

  24. @Clyde

    Why did Constantinople get the works?
    That’s nobody’s business but the Turks.

    Steve needs to stop harassing them.

    Those words are from Ulsterman Jimmy Kennedy, who also gave us “South of the Border” and “Teddy Bears’ Picnic”.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  25. JLK says:

    It’s funny how we don’t hear anything these days of the vaunted Turkish lobby and spy network in the US that Sibel Edmonds blew the whistle on.

    You’d think that we’d be rounding them up since Turkey is allegedly no longer aligned with Israel.

  26. Anon[627] • Disclaimer says:

    https://www.amren.com/news/2018/11/its-a-crisis-of-civilization-in-mexico-250000-dead-37400-missing/

    Some 37,000 people in Mexico are categorized as “missing” by the government. The vast majority are believed to be dead, victims of the country’s spiraling violence that has claimed more than 250,000 lives since 2006.

    Too many nice and passive Guillermos won’t stand up to nasty and mean Calveras. Mexico need more people like Wyatt Earp and Wild Bill.

  27. Whiskey says: • Website

    Journalists are priests hence sacred.

  28. Anon[204] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lugash

    Pro-American???

    How about pro-Armenian?

  29. @Svigor

    Somewhat OT, but a Trump appointee just ruled CNN’s Acosta has to be granted access back into the White House. From what I’ve read, the judge’s hands were pretty much tied because of precedent. The WH has dedicated facilities for the press, and Acosta, as a practicing member of the press, has a right to be allowed in, but not necessarily to be called upon to ask questions.

    One of the exceptions, though, is being denied access for “good cause.” My question is, isn’t being an asshole good cause. Mr. Acosta is rather notorious for being one, even amongst his colleagues.

    • Replies: @Svigor
    , @Bill Jones
    , @Mr. Anon
  30. @Rick Derris

    Rick, how about we ask Canada, our harsh critic to the north, to do the right thing and take him in. Trudeau wants a place on the world stage so take on some world class problems. Also, I wish to deport some Canadian snow birds so I can find a reasonably priced condo on Longboat Key.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  31. anon[394] • Disclaimer says:

    “He used to be Erdogan’s ally in battling the secularist military, because Gulen’s followers had taken over the police in Turkey via running the test prep centers.”

    Sounds a bit like some of our captains of industry over here. How many people control what percentage of the media again?

  32. @Buffalo Joe

    Can’t wait to hear “Blame Canada” in Turkish!

  33. Can we get Jim Acosta switched to the Turkey beat?

  34. eah says:

    Let us know when he nukes them.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    , @Joe Stalin
    , @eah
  35. OT Most Americans are probably not aware that Turkish soldiers were part of the UN forces that fought in Korea. I met a Turkish captain who had a very ferocious appearance, in this regard I heard the Turkish soldiers gave no quarter when they engaged the Norks in battle.

    • Replies: @black sea
  36. anon[244] • Disclaimer says:

    “Somewhat OT, but a Trump appointee just ruled CNN’s Acosta has to be granted access back into the White House.”

    That sounds like a judicial overreach, precedent aside. Can anyone just get access to these things? There can’t be infinite space. Is everyone who calls himself a “journalist” entitled to be at these things? Honestly, I don’t see how simply not letting a guy appear before him is any kind violation of the First Amendment (it isn’t, certainly not as intended). What good is a press pass in that case. Obama himself wanted to kick out Fox News. Granted, the media did the right thing there but still, I can imagine president Kamala Harris doing the same in 2021 and being celebrated by these same people. And who legitimized Acosta, a political activist, as a “journalist”? I think Trump should appeal or perhaps even ignore the order entirely, perhaps by foregoing future press conferences entirely, both by himself and Huckabee. These people have proved by now they are political activists and the internet has made them largely obsolete anyway.

  37. anon[244] • Disclaimer says:

    “Classic example here of Sailer’s “Plausible Undeniability”–Incorporate…”

    Or perhaps a bit of humor. Low IQs tend not to get it.

  38. jim jones says:
    @AndrewR

    The Donald says his name is really “Abilio”, perhaps someone in the know could say whether this is true.

  39. J.Ross says: • Website

    The cave shadows are humiliating (which is probably the point, per Dalrymple). How can a person with a college education call Khaashaqjj a “journalist” and “government critic”? How can a person with any education at all be outraged, let alone continuously outraged for months, that a divine right monarchy with no concept of freedom of speech killed a “journalist”? How is anyone still talking about this? How is the Atticus Finch of this story a dictator who is different from the “bad guys” solely by alphabet?
    —–
    >I want to destroy the United States of America in nuclear fire.
    >If we talk to our friends and family I am sure we can find common ground.
    Can these statements be resolved? Sure they can, he clearly means he wants to nuke California.

    https://postimg.cc/rDGXRWzz

  40. Meanwhile, across the Mediterranean, another nation thrown into a constitutional crisis:

    Bishop will have to abdicate as co-prince of Andorra if nation legalises abortion, Vatican says

  41. AndrewR says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist

    “puppet regime of state x” is not the same as “regime that’s generally less hostile to state x”

    • Replies: @Nigerian Nationalist
  42. AndrewR says:
    @eah

    Not that we shouldn’t hold congressmen to a very high standard of non-ignorance, but it’s pretty common among progscum to claim/imply that the government’s bombers, fighter jets, tanks and nuclear weapons mean that the government can force the American people to do anything.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Anonymous
    , @Bill
  43. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    Gulen is a CIA asset, just like Khashoggi was, and the charter schools were used to fund his ops.

  44. @eah

    Well, there is no doubt the US government under the control of the Cosmopolitans would attempt the duplicate the actions of the Kaiser in Belgium, which is all the more reason to encourage civilian possession and training (“well-regulated”) with semi-automatic rifles (Project Appleseed – RWVA.org).

  45. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Those words are from Ulsterman Jimmy Kennedy, who also gave us “South of the Border” and “Teddy Bears’ Picnic”.

    South of the Border (1939 song)
    From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    “South of the Border” is a popular song describing a trip to Mexico, written by Jimmy Kennedy and Michael Carr and published in 1939 for the film of the same name starring country star Gene Autry.[1]

    In the lyrics, a man looks back with regret and pain for having lied to the woman he can’t forget (“…and now as I wander, my thoughts ever stray…”) and returned far too late, to discover she had become a nun.[2] The lyric is in juxtaposition with the music, which swings with syncopated joy.[citation needed]

    The song was a hit in 1939 for Shep Fields, vocal by Hal Derwin.[3] Other successful recordings in 1939 were by Guy Lombardo, Gene Autry, Ambrose (vocal by Denny Dennis) and Tony Martin.[4]

    Frank Sinatra recorded the song on April 30, 1953[5] for Capitol Records and it reached the Billboard charts with a top position of #18 in a 4-week stay.[6]

    Members of the Western Writers of America chose it as one of the Top 100 Western songs of all time.[7]

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  46. J.Ross says: • Website
    @YetAnotherAnon

    BOPE: Tropa da Elite and its sequel are excellent films (derived from the work of a journalist) and they are mainly about how hard it is to do anything right in Brazil. One sequence is about a “pogue” cop attached to the squad to fix cars. In order to obtain necessary parts to keep the vehicles running he must steal: going through normal resupply procedures is pointless, because of colleagues stealing government materials. The sequel goes a little bit into the crime-enabling cluelessness of the upper class.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  47. J.Ross says: • Website
    @AndrewR

    Right, which shows how much they understand their own ideas. Somewhere there’s a meme pointing out that you cannot hold a city street corner with a jet, followed by a picture of a jet that was parked within a built-up area for some reason. But you get the idea.

  48. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @AndrewR

    The whole idea of having really effective weapons-whether it be submarines, small arms, tanks, artillery, aircraft, or whatever-when the acquisitions and financing processes are in the control of 535 people most of whom are technical , strategic, and tactical idiots and whose goal is to get re-elected by providing overpaid and generally cushy defense jobs to as many people in their district or state as possible to provide a body of voters who will have a big incentive to support them-does seem a little ridiculous, does it not?

  49. athEIst says:

    The real comparison; how many journalists did Erdogan kill in the Turkish consulate in Ridayh

  50. @AndrewR

    My impression is that local Turkish opinion is in itself hostile to America and Americanism.

    Your interests no longer align after the Cold War. Eg with the Kurds, so less hostility on the part of the Turks would require Americans capitulating on parts of your key M/E Foreign Policy.

  51. black sea says:
    @Simply Simon

    The behavior of Turkish POWs in the Korean War is a point of national pride.

    Of the 229 Turkish captives held by the North Koreans, not one collaborated with the enemy, and not one died.

    The Turkish officers insisted that they would maintain their hierarchy of command within the POW camps, and that even though their captors might kill them, the Turks would not abandon this hierarchy until their last soldier had been killed. This ensured that sick captives were cared for, and food was shared equally. It also ensured that anyone who showed signs of collaboration would be beaten by his fellow soldiers.

    By contrast 38% of US POWs died in captivity.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  52. 1661er says:

    So Gulan is the modern day Sultan Cem?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sultan_Cem#Rome

    Pope Innocent VIII unsuccessfully attempted to use Cem to begin a new crusade against the Ottomans.[4] The Pope also tried to convert Cem to Christianity, without success. Cem’s presence in Rome was useful nevertheless, because whenever Bayezid intended to launch a military campaign against Christian nations of the Balkans, the Pope would threaten to release his brother.

    In exchange for maintaining the custody of Cem, Bayezid paid Innocent VIII 120,000 crowns (at the time, equal to all other annual sources of papal revenue combined), a relic of the Holy Lance (which allegedly had pierced the side of Christ), one hundred Moorish slaves, and an annual fee of 45,000 ducats. Much of the costs associated with the Sistine Chapel were paid with funds from the Ottoman ransoms.[5]

    Maybe Trump should ask Erdogan for the Boeing 747-8i plane recently “gifted” to Turky by Qatar, as a condition for keeping Gulan in the US, rather than dropping him in Syrian/Turkish border on a “sealed train to St. Petersburg.”

  53. Svigor says:
    @South Texas Guy

    Trump should tell the Secret Service to keep that bum out. Let the appointee muster his legions, if he doesn’t like it.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  54. Svigor says:
    @AnotherDad

    “Journalists” kinda remind me of another group that’s always shocked when the animosity dam finally bursts.

  55. George says:

    What’s going on with that Australian character under house arrest in that South American Embassy in that European island nation?

  56. Anonymous[168] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    Sounds like the Soviet Union in its last years.

  57. Anonymous[168] • Disclaimer says:
    @black sea

    That’s nice, but the communists didn’t care enough about Turks to want to break them. If Americans had tried that, the response would have been merciless.

    Dutch POWs of the Japanese in WWII had higher survival rates than Brits for similar reasons.

  58. @South Texas Guy

    The solution is to close the “dedicated facilities”.

  59. @Inquiring Mind

    The second episode was about a super-popular Indonesian religious leader whom the CIA wants to thwart in his rise to political control.

    The scheme involves publicly distributing photos of the guy in, ahem, a compromising position to take the wind out of the sails of his religious appeal. Only the photos won’t be of the guy but of a Langley stand-in.”

    I.M., that episode was taken straight from real life!

    Indonesia’s Sukarno – a noted womanizer and a man who resisted the CIA’s earlier attempts to manipulate him – was himself the subject of a CIA plot to impersonate him during a porno movie to discredit him in the eyes of ordinary Indonesians.

    Because the CIA couldn’t find an actor who looked enough like Sukarno to use in their movie, they made a “Mission Impossible” mask for the stand-in (!!!) to wear during his big (!!!!) scene.

    Now that – how the CIA tried to frame a world leader with a fake porno – would be a movie worth reviewing!

    https://medium.com/war-is-boring/the-cia-and-kgb-tried-to-blackmail-this-world-leader-with-sex-tapes-927fc7ddbd48

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Clyde
  60. @Anonymous

    Oh, and how could I forget that other Kennedy classic, “Istanbul, Not Constantinople”?

  61. @Svigor

    Trump should tell the Secret Service to keep that bum out. Let the appointee muster his legions, if he doesn’t like it.

    The Swiss Guards would never let anyone talk to His Holiness like that.

  62. Mr. Anon says:
    @Colin Wright

    If one really wanted to get an idea about the extent of actual foreign meddling in an election, one could just ask James O’Keefe to get a few of his people into an AIPAC meeting, or talk to whomever the Saudi or Israeli ambassadors are talking to.

    Or just read the foreign press.

  63. Mr. Anon says:
    @Slugger O’Toole

    The United States plans on incarcerating the journalist running the on-line publication known as WikiLeaks. The Feds are currently trying to find crimes.

    This is what elite opinion tells us:

    Jim Acosta – bloviating windbag who hijacks press conferences to harange the President: Reporter

    Julian Assange – man who actually brings government scandals to light: Not a Reporter

    • Agree: Bill
  64. Mr. Anon says:
    @South Texas Guy

    One of the exceptions, though, is being denied access for “good cause.” My question is, isn’t being an asshole good cause. Mr. Acosta is rather notorious for being one, even amongst his colleagues.

    In this country, you can end up in a cell or on a no-fly list just for talking to a TSA agent the way that Jim Acosta behaved when he berated the President. Maybe even for talking to a gate attendant or a stewardess that way. And yet somehow, behaving that way in the White House is exercising your 1st amendment rights. I guess journalists have 1st amendment rights, but the rest of us peons don’t.

  65. Mr. Anon says:
    @Corvinus

    Classic example here of Sailer’s “Plausible Undeniability”–Incorporate “winks and nods” in the narrative for your audience to understand your admittance of wild speculation is, in reality, an acknowledgement of that something to be a stone cold truth.

    Steve’s speculations are always interesting. That’s why he has a popular website.

    In contrast, the drivel you spew is banal and uninteresting. That’s why your posts are met with almost nothing but ridicule.

    Asshat.

  66. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Paul Jolliffe

    And now we have deepfaking like was demonstrated in Forrest Gump. No mess, no fuss.

  67. Bill says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist

    I’m clearly not Turkish and have only a cursory knowledge of the place but I know enough to find the idea that the Turkish people would tolerate an American puppet regime ludicrous.

    OK, now I think NN is a parody account.

  68. Bill says:
    @Lugash

    The Gulenists are certainly pro-some-country-which-is-neither-Turkey-nor-America.

  69. Bill says:
    @AndrewR

    There was that unpleasantness in the middle of the 19th Century . . .

  70. eah says:
    @eah

  71. Jordi says:

    Commenter number 1 is trying to hijack the comments with a text about Brazil, and a quote about Bolsonaro.

    The quote is excellent, extremely isnightfull and it would make sense for our respected host to have an article on this topic.

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The sources of America’s immigration problems—and a possible solution
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Hundreds of POWs may have been left to die in Vietnam, abandoned by their government—and our media.