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Tucker Carlson Likes Liz Warren's "Plan for Economic Patriotism"
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  1. Start with a $150/hr minimum wage for immigrants.

    I don’t think Liz would support that.

    Embargoes work better than tariffs. Outlaw China altogether. We did once before.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Or special payroll tax.
  2. Anonymous[934] • Disclaimer says:

    We got Gekkonomics.

  3. Anon[770] • Disclaimer says:

    I really like Tucker, but he does have an about-to-pop-a-vein thing going with his face. Remember when the big criticism of Trump was that he was angry? I never found any video of him being angry. But Tucker looks angry.

    Now angry is in: Women and blacks … and black women … need to be angry, the progressives tell us:

    “The power of angry women.”

    “Women are angry. This is why.”

    “Women are reclaiming anger.”

    “The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women.”

    “Yes, I Am Absolutely An Angry Black Woman (And Here’s Why).”

    “Unapologetic Black Anger Can Change the World for the Better.”

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna


    “The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women.”
     
    Oh yeah. Story of my life.
    , @WowJustWow
    His main weakness is trying too hard to look serious: whenever a guest is speaking on his show, he furrows his brow, crosses his eyes, and lets his mouth hang open, motionless, looking like his batteries just popped out. In his monologues his "serious" tone and cadence can start to feel a bit monotonous, but people still seem to appreciate the message more than the delivery.
  4. eah says:

    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the ‘Rust Belt’ developed — this did not happen overnight — the scale of the attendant economic devastation, the job loss and human misery, is difficult to overstate.

    • Replies: @eah
    And it was all accompanied by the de-Americanization of America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D8Q8KMpXYAAph6a.png
    , @Ricardo Cruz
    Do you have a per-capita version of that graphic?
    Dividing by the number of household can be misleading due to the growing number of single parent households.
    , @Digital Samizdat

    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the ‘Rust Belt’ developed ...
     
    Did nothing? Are you kidding? The establishment made the Rust Belt happen through 'free' trade treaties, off-shoring and cheap credit. This was no oversight, eah; this was deliberate.
    , @indocon
    There is an element to the divergence between economic growth and income that I have not seen mentioned anywhere - lack of any new true scientific innovation that's leads to the establishment of a new industry. The last such that I can recall is the growth of mobile industry in the 1990s, which coincidentally was the last time when incomes truly went up while we still had prayed and immigration.

    Would we really at the end of the great scientific age which started with the intention of steam engine? Yes I am aware of all those famous prognostications from the past - everything that could be invented has been invented already, nobody will ever want to PC in their home. But this relentless growth of technology that has been going on for last 200+ years was going to end at some point anyway.

    When we talk about trade and immigration, we should bring into the discussion this question of lack of new scientific innovation. When you do have that true kind of scientific innovation, both trade and immigration can work in tandem to grow the economy in a way that everybody benefits, but when you don't have that but you still keep doing free trade and open borders, it's a open license on the livelihoods of your native population, which is exactly what we have seen over the last 20+ years.
  5. @eah
    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the 'Rust Belt' developed -- this did not happen overnight -- the scale of the attendant economic devastation, the job loss and human misery, is difficult to overstate.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D8Q5JW5XYAE_Y_t.png

    And it was all accompanied by the de-Americanization of America.

    • Replies: @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Well, you gotta admit, it's all going perfectly according to (((plan))).

    You've got to imagine the Specials in their secret councils all rubbing their hands together fast enough to travel through Time, all kvelling and davening and gloating, "I can't believe it was this easy! They actually FELL for it!"

    Like the guy said in Animal House: "You fucked up. You trusted us."
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    And the de-industrializion of America:

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8f_cBAudYGo/TdCxu-Gtv5I/AAAAAAAAAFg/wt0XK_Z4EmY/w1200-h630-p-nu/man-job.jpg

    And increasing trade imbalance:

    https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2015/images/cerritos-figure-1.png

    And the increase of finance as a share of the economy:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/NYUGDPFinancialShare.jpg

    And increased debt as a percentage of the economy:

    http://www.forexrazor.com/Portals/0/images/School/Charts/Total-US-Debt-As-A-Percentage-Of-GDP.jpg
  6. Warren isn’t going to get any farther with Democrats than Trump did with Republicans. Carlson says corporations fund Republicans, but the Fund Democrats too. You might get one or two politicians off the reservation, but the rest aren’t going to jeopardize their source of election funds (and, let’s face it, bribes).

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Before you take another black pill, ponder the potential of Trump’s tariffs for a moment. If he sticks to his guns, there’s a real possibility that they will move the needle before the election. Mickey Kaus made an interesting point on Twitter: companies had already been moving production from China to Mexico to avoid Trump’s China tariffs. By ratcheting up tariffs on Mexico, he can move some of that production back to the US.
    , @eah
    Warren isn’t going to get any farther with Democrats than Trump did with Republicans.

    Please review the result of the 2016 presidential vote: it isn't strictly necessary to 'get further' with your affiliated party to win the nomination and then the election.
    , @Prester John
    One of several reasons why America needs a Third Party. The two-party system is sclerotic and archaic.
  7. Anger can be a very efficacious emotion.

    Do our present circumstances and trajectory not warrant the slightest bit of anger? Complacency– going along and slavishly permitting the elites to screw the country up– is the problem.

    • Agree: eah
  8. Tucker kind of reminds me of Brett Kavanaugh; I can’t wait to see Matt Damon’s impression of a Tucker rant.

    As for Warren, a stopped clock is wrong twice a day … ok, at least once, if she is one of those globalist 24-hour clocks. The problem with “capitalism” as practised by the oligarchy running America is that they have no sense of belonging to a local community: They are the movers and shakers of the world, so of course they will disperse jobs and capital to places in the world that maximise their own personal wealth. There is no solution other than the peasants storming their gates with pitchforks and leading them to the guillotines.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
    Alarmist:

    Didn't you mean that "a stopped clock is RIGHT twice a day?"

    At least Warren has a few good ideas. What ideas do old flunkies like Mitch McConnell have? In his same rant, Tucker said that the GOP has been Trump's biggest obstacle.
    , @MBlanc46
    I wouldn’t bother with guillotines. Just bring plenty of rope and use whatever is to hand—trees, lamp-posts—to dispatch them.
  9. @Anon
    I really like Tucker, but he does have an about-to-pop-a-vein thing going with his face. Remember when the big criticism of Trump was that he was angry? I never found any video of him being angry. But Tucker looks angry.

    Now angry is in: Women and blacks ... and black women ... need to be angry, the progressives tell us:

    "The power of angry women."

    "Women are angry. This is why."

    "Women are reclaiming anger."

    "The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women."

    "Yes, I Am Absolutely An Angry Black Woman (And Here's Why)."

    "Unapologetic Black Anger Can Change the World for the Better."

    “The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women.”

    Oh yeah. Story of my life.

    • Replies: @Icy Blast
    My ex-wife acts like I left her last week. (It was 1991.)
    , @Elf Himself


    “The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women.”
     
    Oh yeah. Story of my life.
     
    Well, yeah; why do you suppose I always make sure the dishes are done?
  10. @eah
    And it was all accompanied by the de-Americanization of America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D8Q8KMpXYAAph6a.png

    Well, you gotta admit, it’s all going perfectly according to (((plan))).

    You’ve got to imagine the Specials in their secret councils all rubbing their hands together fast enough to travel through Time, all kvelling and davening and gloating, “I can’t believe it was this easy! They actually FELL for it!”

    Like the guy said in Animal House: “You fucked up. You trusted us.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Do you really think there was a plan?
  11. Anon[412] • Disclaimer says:

    “Embargoes work better than tariffs. Outlaw China altogether. We did once before.”

    I have no beef with the Chinese. If they have ever harmed my people, it has been much less so than the damage inflicted upon them by the federal government, banks, and monied interests. In fact, hating the Chinese only serves to distract the people from the problems those groups created in the first place, strengthening them in the process. I say we ignore that and put blame where it is due. Besides, if prodded the Chinese could become a great asset to us. Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet where we can’t be banned by leftist authoritarians at YouTube (have they deplatformed or demonetized any of the scores of bigoted anti-Christian left-wing channels that for years mocked religious Americans or those that make racist or sexist comments about whites and men – CultofDusty, TYT, Sam Sedar, MTV … )?

    Chinese tech might help you if you asked them to and offered up financial incentives and paid them from state coffers; side benefit: it would reduce tensions that are currently rising. I increasingly find that I have a greater affection with the Chinese and Russians than I do with Leftists like those at Vox and the Guardian. I have no loyalty at all to the left and care literally nothing about what happens to them. Also, I increasingly find that I have no loyalty to the country itself anymore; it’s not mine anymore as Sam Donaldson once claimed. Not my country? Then it’s not my problem, buddy. Solve your own China problem. Personally, I’d love a cheap but high quality Huawei phone over that overpriced Apple junk anyway. I still haven’t forgotten Tim Apple’s contribution to the SPLC, a despicable authoritarian group.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Besides, if prodded the Chinese could become a great asset to us. Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet
     
    Exactly. Instead of stocking our dollar stores with junk we could make ourselves. At home with a 3D printer, if need be.

    By the way, this "alternative Internet" already exists. Over there. We just have to hop on board. (And watch what we say about China. But that's what Korea is for.)
    , @War for Blair Mountain
    How much NATIVE BORN WHITE AMERICAN LIVING AND BREEDING SPACE does China get to colonize within the borders of America in your deal with China?
    , @Declane

    Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet where we can’t be banned by leftist authoritarians
     
    The Chinese couldn't put spying devices on our railroads.
  12. @Mr McKenna


    “The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women.”
     
    Oh yeah. Story of my life.

    My ex-wife acts like I left her last week. (It was 1991.)

    • Replies: @Olorin
    Marriage is for life.
  13. Ruling class indifference as large parts of the United States are deindustrialized, and as the cities crumble and large numbers of people in them live in the streets, is shocking.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Then you think of what the bahstahds did to men, women, and children back in the 19th century and it’s not so surprising.
  14. @eah
    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the 'Rust Belt' developed -- this did not happen overnight -- the scale of the attendant economic devastation, the job loss and human misery, is difficult to overstate.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D8Q5JW5XYAE_Y_t.png

    Do you have a per-capita version of that graphic?
    Dividing by the number of household can be misleading due to the growing number of single parent households.

    • Replies: @eah
    You make a good point and are probably correct in that marriage rates have declined and continue to do so, which means using household rather than per capita income may affect the result -- then again if a sizable fraction of single people live alone...

    But the stark reality of the 'Rust Belt' is still there for all to see -- and now the 'opioid epidemic': drug overdose is now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50.

    Drug overdose death rate in the United States in 2017, by state (per 100,000 population)

    For comparison: the traffic fatality death rate in WV was approx 17/100k -- whereas the overdose rate was approx 58/100k (both 2017).
  15. @tsotha
    Warren isn't going to get any farther with Democrats than Trump did with Republicans. Carlson says corporations fund Republicans, but the Fund Democrats too. You might get one or two politicians off the reservation, but the rest aren't going to jeopardize their source of election funds (and, let's face it, bribes).

    Before you take another black pill, ponder the potential of Trump’s tariffs for a moment. If he sticks to his guns, there’s a real possibility that they will move the needle before the election. Mickey Kaus made an interesting point on Twitter: companies had already been moving production from China to Mexico to avoid Trump’s China tariffs. By ratcheting up tariffs on Mexico, he can move some of that production back to the US.

    • Replies: @Federalist
    If Trump sticks to his guns - that's a big if. He didn't build the wall. He didn't dump illegals in sanctuary cities. He didn't do anything about birthright citizenship. He sent some military to the border but they weren't allowed to actually do anything and then after a little while, they left. I'm sure I'm forgetting some things. Nothing Trump talks about on immigration comes to pass.

    I would love to be wrong and Trump does something with Mexico tariffs, but I don't have any real hope based on past performance.
  16. @tsotha
    Warren isn't going to get any farther with Democrats than Trump did with Republicans. Carlson says corporations fund Republicans, but the Fund Democrats too. You might get one or two politicians off the reservation, but the rest aren't going to jeopardize their source of election funds (and, let's face it, bribes).

    Warren isn’t going to get any farther with Democrats than Trump did with Republicans.

    Please review the result of the 2016 presidential vote: it isn’t strictly necessary to ‘get further’ with your affiliated party to win the nomination and then the election.

    • Replies: @Federalist

    Please review the result of the 2016 presidential vote: it isn’t strictly necessary to ‘get further’ with your affiliated party to win the nomination and then the election.
     
    But then review the result of the Trump presidency. I think the point was that you have to 'get further' with your party to accomplish anything.
  17. The hysteria over tariffs is phony. The money from tariffs can help reduce budget deficits. Furthermore, people can buy American or imports from Europe and elsewhere if they are concerned about tariffs.

    • Replies: @Anon
    Vietnam and surrounding SEA countries will pick up the slack from China. F Communist China.
    , @Steve Richter

    The hysteria over tariffs is phony. The money from tariffs can help reduce budget deficits.
     
    but the budget deficit is still sky high. I like that Trump is raising tariffs on China. But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China. The trillions in wealth of Apple itself. All the computer programmers writing code for smart phones. Facebook selling ads on the phone.
  18. eah says:
    @Ricardo Cruz
    Do you have a per-capita version of that graphic?
    Dividing by the number of household can be misleading due to the growing number of single parent households.

    You make a good point and are probably correct in that marriage rates have declined and continue to do so, which means using household rather than per capita income may affect the result — then again if a sizable fraction of single people live alone…

    But the stark reality of the ‘Rust Belt’ is still there for all to see — and now the ‘opioid epidemic’: drug overdose is now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50.

    Drug overdose death rate in the United States in 2017, by state (per 100,000 population)

    For comparison: the traffic fatality death rate in WV was approx 17/100k — whereas the overdose rate was approx 58/100k (both 2017).

    • Replies: @NOTA
    The same elites DGAF when black Americans live in bleak crime-ridden ghettoes with no jobs either. It's not like real people are being hurt.
  19. In a free market, workers earn their discounted marginal value product.

    And, the productivity of American workers in manufacturing has gone through the roof in the last fifty years: my dad spent most of his adult life in manufacturing and could go on and on, very convincingly, about all the details of this productivity increase.

    So what went wrong?

    Someone had to pay for all the non-productive “workers”: the green consultants, the diversity consultants, the compliance officers, the lawyers, the education administrators, the health-care administrators, the experts in financial “technology,” the form processors, the computer facilitators, the geopolitical strategists, and all the rest.

    And who pays for the non-productive workers? One paper pusher cannot provide the goods and services consumed by another paper pusher. The cost of the non-productive workers has to be extracted from the productive workers.

    We don’t have a free market. We don’t really even have “crony capitalism. ” We have a version of the Chinese Mandarin bureaucracy, except the bureaucrats today probably out-number the productive folks supporting them.

    It’s not the fault of the Mexicans or the Chinese. Our society has become a bad joke, a Monty Python skit in real life.

    The whole thing has to come down — education, “journalism,” the “medical system,” the financial and monetary cartel, the military racket, and all the rest.

    And, I very much fear it is not going to be soft landing.

  20. The Virtuous Cycle is Henry Ford doubling wages so his workers could afford to buy what they made. That move started the American Middle class. but that was way back when our Elite$$$$$ identified with, and cared about the people they ruled. Now we are globalists and only care about shareholder value. No more virtue, no more Middle Class. It is the financialization of the American Economy, transitioning to globalism, where shifting a few billions for few basis points gains makes enough money for a Middle class family to live on for a year.
    Not so virtuous, not so Middle class.

    Tucker goes out on a limb a lot for a prime time talking head.
    How many moneyed people does he alienate with this kind of talk? He makes enemies and does not care if Elizabeth Warren is Dem.
    You know he is a target of the $$$$$ Class for talking like that,… on Prime time no less.

    Thomas Frank used to write for the WSJ, no more. Probably because he wrote paragraphs like this in his book “Whats the Matter with Kansas”
    “Grandstanding leaders never deliver, their fury mounts and mounts, and nevertheless they turn out every two years to return their right-wing heroes to office for a second, a third, a twentieth try. The trick never ages; the illusion never wears off. Vote to stop abortion; receive a rollback in capital gains taxes. Vote to make our country strong again; receive deindustrialization. Vote to screw those politically correct college professors; receive electricity deregulation. Vote to get government off our backs; receive conglomeration and monopoly everywhere from media to meatpacking. Vote to stand tall against terrorists; receive Social Security privatization. Vote to strike a blow against elitism; receive a social order in which wealth is more concentrated then ever before in our lifetimes, in which workers have been stripped of power and CEOs are rewarded in a manner beyond imagining.”

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Henry Ford doubled wages to reduce employee turnover.
  21. Tucker Carlson for President.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
    Given Tucker's excellent monologue last night, combining economic populism with conservative moral values, it sure seemed like he is thinking of throwing his hat in. Trump vs Tucker in the GOP primaries would be the Fight of the Century.
    , @Desiderius
    Love the one you’re with.
    , @bored identity
    Good Hairloom President.


    Finally.
    , @Olorin
    Whut? How is he qualified to be the chief executive of the republic?

    He's never done or produced anything other than media content. He's a literal talking head.

    And who does he actually serve?

    Also he has a yippy terrier voice. Can't stand listening to him.

    I wearied of his schtick about a year and a half ago. Then last week he opined that it was a Very Bad Thing for anyone ever to use race as a construct in political organizing and action. But he constantly goes on about this and that for blacks, for women, for hispanics...and never a word for white interests.

    Just the new, young, attractive, Mercer-and-Sons-shirted extrusion die for the same old play-d'oh.
  22. @Dave Pinsen
    Before you take another black pill, ponder the potential of Trump’s tariffs for a moment. If he sticks to his guns, there’s a real possibility that they will move the needle before the election. Mickey Kaus made an interesting point on Twitter: companies had already been moving production from China to Mexico to avoid Trump’s China tariffs. By ratcheting up tariffs on Mexico, he can move some of that production back to the US.

    If Trump sticks to his guns – that’s a big if. He didn’t build the wall. He didn’t dump illegals in sanctuary cities. He didn’t do anything about birthright citizenship. He sent some military to the border but they weren’t allowed to actually do anything and then after a little while, they left. I’m sure I’m forgetting some things. Nothing Trump talks about on immigration comes to pass.

    I would love to be wrong and Trump does something with Mexico tariffs, but I don’t have any real hope based on past performance.

    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Tariffs have been an exception. A lot of people thought Trump wouldn’t levy them on China, but he did. And he’ll do the same to Mexico on Monday, barring some major capitulation by Mexico before then.
  23. @eah
    Warren isn’t going to get any farther with Democrats than Trump did with Republicans.

    Please review the result of the 2016 presidential vote: it isn't strictly necessary to 'get further' with your affiliated party to win the nomination and then the election.

    Please review the result of the 2016 presidential vote: it isn’t strictly necessary to ‘get further’ with your affiliated party to win the nomination and then the election.

    But then review the result of the Trump presidency. I think the point was that you have to ‘get further’ with your party to accomplish anything.

    • Replies: @eah
    But then review the result of the Trump presidency.

    OK -- but at this point, given BlumpfTrump's buffoonishness, obsequiousness toward Israel, neocon-ish foreign policy, and general failure to accomplish anything related to his campaign rhetoric (which was just that apparently), I'm not really willing to gift him an excuse -- recall the last SOTU, where he said he wanted immigrants to come in greater numbers than ever before: a real "fuck you" to many of those who voted for him (not to mention the constant, obnoxious bleating about low black and Hispanic unemployment, groups who voted overwhelmingly against him) -- after the SOTU, it was obvious Trump has cucked; surrendered, virtually completely -- the shortcomings of his presidency are due to his shortcomings (which admittedly were obvious during the campaign; still one had some hope, whereas none is left now).

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D7l5gH9XkAMRgtC.jpg
  24. Glad she’s learned to mouth the words but she’s already made clear she sees White advantage as unmerited privilege. We are not the patriots she’s thinking of.

  25. Anonymous[108] • Disclaimer says:

    Thank for the update. Me, I don’t watch TV that much.

  26. @eah
    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the 'Rust Belt' developed -- this did not happen overnight -- the scale of the attendant economic devastation, the job loss and human misery, is difficult to overstate.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D8Q5JW5XYAE_Y_t.png

    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the ‘Rust Belt’ developed …

    Did nothing? Are you kidding? The establishment made the Rust Belt happen through ‘free’ trade treaties, off-shoring and cheap credit. This was no oversight, eah; this was deliberate.

    • Replies: @Olorin
    Precisely this.

    "Creative destruction," remember. We all were supposed to cheer it in the service of Hollywood puppet Ronnie Reagan honking on about Freedom.

    There was the corollary piece of course, of finding new things to turn into real estate. And into debt.

    To develop a point you made, as jobs were being offshored by the hundreds of thousands, so that the investment and ownership class could rack up billions, workers were offered ever-sh!ttier jobs, if any.

    And it was not cheap but abundant credit--mortgages, school loans, and of course the massive revolving unsecured consumer debt industry headquartered in Joe Biden's state. 15% interest isn't cheap, just because they handed it out like crack samples on Saturday night in Camden--it means the principal of the loan doubles every 5 or so years. Just in time for the crap you bought to have been landfilled for three years.

    I can understand younger people not being aware of that period...but it stymies me how guys my age seem to have forgotten all this. Also have forgotten the very real and vocal Noticing and pushback that aired in the 1980s into 1990s.

    Nonetheless the republic was handed over to the likes of Mr. Andrea Mitchell and his neocon and Alisa-Rosenbaum-worshipping buddies. And the neocons begat PNAC, and thank god for the New Pearl Harbor, which made our defense and aerospace stocks go sky high.

    How about them D-Day heroes! Fighting for banksters and total war!

    And thus new forms of real estate were developed...right up to today, where our very biology, and the ills flesh is heir to, is being monetarized and capitalized for the globalists' profit. Even our attention, opinions, and deeds are being wall-to-wall surveilled, recorded, and traded as information real estate.

    Ah well, it's a good thing you-know-who didn't win. Brits might be speaking German instead of Arabic and naming their sons Hans instead of Mohammad. What an awful thing that would be.

    , @eah
    Did nothing? Are you kidding?

    Uhh, no I'm not -- of course I meant did nothing to prevent/alleviate it -- but "whatever".

    This was no oversight, eah; this was deliberate.

    Believe that if you want -- but a more reasonable view is that the rent-seeking politicians and policy-makers behind this were and are neoliberal free trade ideologues, not sadists who wanted to see large swathes of America de-industrialized, and large numbers of Americans made destitute -- people ("public servants") with little/no empathy or feeling of responsibility toward their fellow citizens -- and the thing is, you still a LOT of the same today -- eg read the 'Marginal Revolution' blog.
  27. Journalists can only think in one dimension defined as left and right. Everything and everyone has to fit onto the one dimensional line.
    In engineering when two dimensions are used with one axis called the real axis and the second axis called the imaginary axis.
    The second axis was called imaginary because it is based on the square root of minus 1 and it was difficult for people to understand how it works.
    Hamilton extended this to three axes using quarternions with two imaginary axes, but these are rarely used except in computer graphics.
    Artificial intelligence is now known to be based on multidimensional statistics, millions of dimensions.
    In short, people with low spatial IQ’s become journalists because they can only think in a single dimension. Those with higher IQ’s think in higher dimensions and become engineers, physicists and mathematicians.
    Now with the power of computers we can create machines that can “think” in millions of dimensions.
    This scares the crap out of the low dimensional thinkers since they can soon be easily and cheaply replaced.

  28. @The Alarmist
    Tucker kind of reminds me of Brett Kavanaugh; I can't wait to see Matt Damon's impression of a Tucker rant.

    As for Warren, a stopped clock is wrong twice a day ... ok, at least once, if she is one of those globalist 24-hour clocks. The problem with "capitalism" as practised by the oligarchy running America is that they have no sense of belonging to a local community: They are the movers and shakers of the world, so of course they will disperse jobs and capital to places in the world that maximise their own personal wealth. There is no solution other than the peasants storming their gates with pitchforks and leading them to the guillotines.

    Alarmist:

    Didn’t you mean that “a stopped clock is RIGHT twice a day?”

    At least Warren has a few good ideas. What ideas do old flunkies like Mitch McConnell have? In his same rant, Tucker said that the GOP has been Trump’s biggest obstacle.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Homer nods ... duh!
  29. @SFG
    Tucker Carlson for President.

    Given Tucker’s excellent monologue last night, combining economic populism with conservative moral values, it sure seemed like he is thinking of throwing his hat in. Trump vs Tucker in the GOP primaries would be the Fight of the Century.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    ...it sure seemed like he is thinking of throwing his hat in. Trump vs Tucker in the GOP primaries would be the Fight of the Century.
     
    Tucker's not think about running next year. If he does run, it won't be until at least 2024.
  30. @tsotha
    Warren isn't going to get any farther with Democrats than Trump did with Republicans. Carlson says corporations fund Republicans, but the Fund Democrats too. You might get one or two politicians off the reservation, but the rest aren't going to jeopardize their source of election funds (and, let's face it, bribes).

    One of several reasons why America needs a Third Party. The two-party system is sclerotic and archaic.

  31. @SFG
    Tucker Carlson for President.

    Love the one you’re with.

  32. Hunter Wallace recently made this point: that the whole National Review / Conservatism Inc. orthodoxy that has defined the Republican Party for the last 40 years or more assumes that a political and economic order based on classical liberalism is the best guarantor of traditional social values, and that there is just about no actual evidence for this contention. Has this ever happened?

    A society ordered so as to please The Heritage Foundation and The Club for Growth is bound to end up with Miley Cyrus and Transliberation.

    • Agree: dfordoom
  33. @Anon
    "Embargoes work better than tariffs. Outlaw China altogether. We did once before."

    I have no beef with the Chinese. If they have ever harmed my people, it has been much less so than the damage inflicted upon them by the federal government, banks, and monied interests. In fact, hating the Chinese only serves to distract the people from the problems those groups created in the first place, strengthening them in the process. I say we ignore that and put blame where it is due. Besides, if prodded the Chinese could become a great asset to us. Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet where we can't be banned by leftist authoritarians at YouTube (have they deplatformed or demonetized any of the scores of bigoted anti-Christian left-wing channels that for years mocked religious Americans or those that make racist or sexist comments about whites and men - CultofDusty, TYT, Sam Sedar, MTV ... )?

    Chinese tech might help you if you asked them to and offered up financial incentives and paid them from state coffers; side benefit: it would reduce tensions that are currently rising. I increasingly find that I have a greater affection with the Chinese and Russians than I do with Leftists like those at Vox and the Guardian. I have no loyalty at all to the left and care literally nothing about what happens to them. Also, I increasingly find that I have no loyalty to the country itself anymore; it's not mine anymore as Sam Donaldson once claimed. Not my country? Then it's not my problem, buddy. Solve your own China problem. Personally, I'd love a cheap but high quality Huawei phone over that overpriced Apple junk anyway. I still haven't forgotten Tim Apple's contribution to the SPLC, a despicable authoritarian group.

    Besides, if prodded the Chinese could become a great asset to us. Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet

    Exactly. Instead of stocking our dollar stores with junk we could make ourselves. At home with a 3D printer, if need be.

    By the way, this “alternative Internet” already exists. Over there. We just have to hop on board. (And watch what we say about China. But that’s what Korea is for.)

  34. @Anon
    "Embargoes work better than tariffs. Outlaw China altogether. We did once before."

    I have no beef with the Chinese. If they have ever harmed my people, it has been much less so than the damage inflicted upon them by the federal government, banks, and monied interests. In fact, hating the Chinese only serves to distract the people from the problems those groups created in the first place, strengthening them in the process. I say we ignore that and put blame where it is due. Besides, if prodded the Chinese could become a great asset to us. Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet where we can't be banned by leftist authoritarians at YouTube (have they deplatformed or demonetized any of the scores of bigoted anti-Christian left-wing channels that for years mocked religious Americans or those that make racist or sexist comments about whites and men - CultofDusty, TYT, Sam Sedar, MTV ... )?

    Chinese tech might help you if you asked them to and offered up financial incentives and paid them from state coffers; side benefit: it would reduce tensions that are currently rising. I increasingly find that I have a greater affection with the Chinese and Russians than I do with Leftists like those at Vox and the Guardian. I have no loyalty at all to the left and care literally nothing about what happens to them. Also, I increasingly find that I have no loyalty to the country itself anymore; it's not mine anymore as Sam Donaldson once claimed. Not my country? Then it's not my problem, buddy. Solve your own China problem. Personally, I'd love a cheap but high quality Huawei phone over that overpriced Apple junk anyway. I still haven't forgotten Tim Apple's contribution to the SPLC, a despicable authoritarian group.

    How much NATIVE BORN WHITE AMERICAN LIVING AND BREEDING SPACE does China get to colonize within the borders of America in your deal with China?

  35. @Anon
    "Embargoes work better than tariffs. Outlaw China altogether. We did once before."

    I have no beef with the Chinese. If they have ever harmed my people, it has been much less so than the damage inflicted upon them by the federal government, banks, and monied interests. In fact, hating the Chinese only serves to distract the people from the problems those groups created in the first place, strengthening them in the process. I say we ignore that and put blame where it is due. Besides, if prodded the Chinese could become a great asset to us. Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet where we can't be banned by leftist authoritarians at YouTube (have they deplatformed or demonetized any of the scores of bigoted anti-Christian left-wing channels that for years mocked religious Americans or those that make racist or sexist comments about whites and men - CultofDusty, TYT, Sam Sedar, MTV ... )?

    Chinese tech might help you if you asked them to and offered up financial incentives and paid them from state coffers; side benefit: it would reduce tensions that are currently rising. I increasingly find that I have a greater affection with the Chinese and Russians than I do with Leftists like those at Vox and the Guardian. I have no loyalty at all to the left and care literally nothing about what happens to them. Also, I increasingly find that I have no loyalty to the country itself anymore; it's not mine anymore as Sam Donaldson once claimed. Not my country? Then it's not my problem, buddy. Solve your own China problem. Personally, I'd love a cheap but high quality Huawei phone over that overpriced Apple junk anyway. I still haven't forgotten Tim Apple's contribution to the SPLC, a despicable authoritarian group.

    Imagine Chinese tech companies helping conservative red states to build an alternative internet where we can’t be banned by leftist authoritarians

    The Chinese couldn’t put spying devices on our railroads.

  36. @SFG
    Tucker Carlson for President.

    Good Hairloom President.

    Finally.

  37. It may chafe some butt checks around these parts, but Elizabeth Warren’s economic ideas are basically correct. Yes, there is still a lot of Green nonsense and soup kitchen socialism mixed in with the package, but raising wages and breaking up Big Tech are two entirely legitimate, vital programs that every thinking person ought to be on board with. I would vote for somebody like Warren, with all her faults, if that is what it finally takes to destroy Jeff Bezos.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    If she’s not behind ending mass immigration, none of it makes any difference.
    , @NOTA
    Warren at least seems to notice and care about the existence of the left half of the bell curve (or the left 90%), which puts her massively ahead of most elites. And the truth is that the Clinton/Blair thing where they abandoned popular left-wing economic ideas and became globalist capitalists left a huge opening for the right to take those ideas over and run on them. Warren and Sanders and AOC seem to have realized this, and might actually respond in some interesting ways. OTOH, Sanders is old, Warren is less charismatic than Hillary, and AOC is both young and not all that knowledgeable (despite having a lot of natural star power and a good grasp of campainging on social media).
  38. @eah
    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the 'Rust Belt' developed -- this did not happen overnight -- the scale of the attendant economic devastation, the job loss and human misery, is difficult to overstate.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D8Q5JW5XYAE_Y_t.png

    There is an element to the divergence between economic growth and income that I have not seen mentioned anywhere – lack of any new true scientific innovation that’s leads to the establishment of a new industry. The last such that I can recall is the growth of mobile industry in the 1990s, which coincidentally was the last time when incomes truly went up while we still had prayed and immigration.

    Would we really at the end of the great scientific age which started with the intention of steam engine? Yes I am aware of all those famous prognostications from the past – everything that could be invented has been invented already, nobody will ever want to PC in their home. But this relentless growth of technology that has been going on for last 200+ years was going to end at some point anyway.

    When we talk about trade and immigration, we should bring into the discussion this question of lack of new scientific innovation. When you do have that true kind of scientific innovation, both trade and immigration can work in tandem to grow the economy in a way that everybody benefits, but when you don’t have that but you still keep doing free trade and open borders, it’s a open license on the livelihoods of your native population, which is exactly what we have seen over the last 20+ years.

  39. @Paul
    The hysteria over tariffs is phony. The money from tariffs can help reduce budget deficits. Furthermore, people can buy American or imports from Europe and elsewhere if they are concerned about tariffs.

    Vietnam and surrounding SEA countries will pick up the slack from China. F Communist China.

  40. I’m increasingly tempted to identify as a Carlsonite.

  41. Tucker isn’t “angry.”

    He is the most composed head on TV.

  42. @Reg Cæsar
    Start with a $150/hr minimum wage for immigrants.

    I don't think Liz would support that.

    Embargoes work better than tariffs. Outlaw China altogether. We did once before.

    Or special payroll tax.

  43. @eah
    And it was all accompanied by the de-Americanization of America.

    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/D8Q8KMpXYAAph6a.png

    And the de-industrializion of America:

    And increasing trade imbalance:

    And the increase of finance as a share of the economy:

    And increased debt as a percentage of the economy:

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    Two factors that get overlooked, Buzz. 1. Rhetoric aside, too many voters find industrial production "icky". For all the big corporations shipping jobs over seas talk, most of the complaining is done by individuals who consider factories too polluting, low-paying to bother keeping around. So say, replacing payroll taxes with a border-adjusted value-added tax would " just punish consumers" without getting anything in return, according to this all-too-familiar logic. 2. What did the 70s and the 00s have in common? Rising energy prices. That's a factor in de-industrialization that gets ignored. Some of the recent onshoring that has occurred is due to the US having lower energy prices than our competitors.
  44. @Paul
    The hysteria over tariffs is phony. The money from tariffs can help reduce budget deficits. Furthermore, people can buy American or imports from Europe and elsewhere if they are concerned about tariffs.

    The hysteria over tariffs is phony. The money from tariffs can help reduce budget deficits.

    but the budget deficit is still sky high. I like that Trump is raising tariffs on China. But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China. The trillions in wealth of Apple itself. All the computer programmers writing code for smart phones. Facebook selling ads on the phone.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China.
     
    Would all that value--and more--be created if Apple electronics were produced in the USA?
    , @Mr. Anon

    But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China. The trillions in wealth of Apple itself. All the computer programmers writing code for smart phones. Facebook selling ads on the phone.
     
    That isn't the production of wealth, but rather it's consumption.
  45. Anonymous[402] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Richter

    The hysteria over tariffs is phony. The money from tariffs can help reduce budget deficits.
     
    but the budget deficit is still sky high. I like that Trump is raising tariffs on China. But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China. The trillions in wealth of Apple itself. All the computer programmers writing code for smart phones. Facebook selling ads on the phone.

    But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China.

    Would all that value–and more–be created if Apple electronics were produced in the USA?

  46. Paul says:

    The cost of illegal aliens to typical Americans is large. They use much in the way of social services, and they drive down the wages of and displace American workers who then wind up on the dole. But Democrats hoping for future votes and Republicans looking for cheap labor love them.

  47. @follyofwar
    Alarmist:

    Didn't you mean that "a stopped clock is RIGHT twice a day?"

    At least Warren has a few good ideas. What ideas do old flunkies like Mitch McConnell have? In his same rant, Tucker said that the GOP has been Trump's biggest obstacle.

    Homer nods … duh!

  48. eah says:
    @Federalist

    Please review the result of the 2016 presidential vote: it isn’t strictly necessary to ‘get further’ with your affiliated party to win the nomination and then the election.
     
    But then review the result of the Trump presidency. I think the point was that you have to 'get further' with your party to accomplish anything.

    But then review the result of the Trump presidency.

    OK — but at this point, given BlumpfTrump’s buffoonishness, obsequiousness toward Israel, neocon-ish foreign policy, and general failure to accomplish anything related to his campaign rhetoric (which was just that apparently), I’m not really willing to gift him an excuse — recall the last SOTU, where he said he wanted immigrants to come in greater numbers than ever before: a real “fuck you” to many of those who voted for him (not to mention the constant, obnoxious bleating about low black and Hispanic unemployment, groups who voted overwhelmingly against him) — after the SOTU, it was obvious Trump has cucked; surrendered, virtually completely — the shortcomings of his presidency are due to his shortcomings (which admittedly were obvious during the campaign; still one had some hope, whereas none is left now).

    • Agree: Jack Hanson
  49. Hi Folks! The Ghost of Murray N. Rothbard here to remind the commenters:

    “It is no crime to be ignorant of economics, which is, after all, a specialized discipline and one that most people consider to be a ‘dismal science.’ But it is totally irresponsible to have a loud and vociferous opinion on economic subjects while remaining in this state of ignorance.”

  50. Anonymous[402] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease
    Well, you gotta admit, it's all going perfectly according to (((plan))).

    You've got to imagine the Specials in their secret councils all rubbing their hands together fast enough to travel through Time, all kvelling and davening and gloating, "I can't believe it was this easy! They actually FELL for it!"

    Like the guy said in Animal House: "You fucked up. You trusted us."

    Do you really think there was a plan?

  51. @Digital Samizdat

    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the ‘Rust Belt’ developed ...
     
    Did nothing? Are you kidding? The establishment made the Rust Belt happen through 'free' trade treaties, off-shoring and cheap credit. This was no oversight, eah; this was deliberate.

    Precisely this.

    “Creative destruction,” remember. We all were supposed to cheer it in the service of Hollywood puppet Ronnie Reagan honking on about Freedom.

    There was the corollary piece of course, of finding new things to turn into real estate. And into debt.

    To develop a point you made, as jobs were being offshored by the hundreds of thousands, so that the investment and ownership class could rack up billions, workers were offered ever-sh!ttier jobs, if any.

    And it was not cheap but abundant credit–mortgages, school loans, and of course the massive revolving unsecured consumer debt industry headquartered in Joe Biden’s state. 15% interest isn’t cheap, just because they handed it out like crack samples on Saturday night in Camden–it means the principal of the loan doubles every 5 or so years. Just in time for the crap you bought to have been landfilled for three years.

    I can understand younger people not being aware of that period…but it stymies me how guys my age seem to have forgotten all this. Also have forgotten the very real and vocal Noticing and pushback that aired in the 1980s into 1990s.

    Nonetheless the republic was handed over to the likes of Mr. Andrea Mitchell and his neocon and Alisa-Rosenbaum-worshipping buddies. And the neocons begat PNAC, and thank god for the New Pearl Harbor, which made our defense and aerospace stocks go sky high.

    How about them D-Day heroes! Fighting for banksters and total war!

    And thus new forms of real estate were developed…right up to today, where our very biology, and the ills flesh is heir to, is being monetarized and capitalized for the globalists’ profit. Even our attention, opinions, and deeds are being wall-to-wall surveilled, recorded, and traded as information real estate.

    Ah well, it’s a good thing you-know-who didn’t win. Brits might be speaking German instead of Arabic and naming their sons Hans instead of Mohammad. What an awful thing that would be.

    • Agree: Digital Samizdat
  52. eah says:
    @Digital Samizdat

    The most shameful aspect of modern American history is the way the corrupt rent-seeking political Establishment did nothing while the ‘Rust Belt’ developed ...
     
    Did nothing? Are you kidding? The establishment made the Rust Belt happen through 'free' trade treaties, off-shoring and cheap credit. This was no oversight, eah; this was deliberate.

    Did nothing? Are you kidding?

    Uhh, no I’m not — of course I meant did nothing to prevent/alleviate it — but “whatever”.

    This was no oversight, eah; this was deliberate.

    Believe that if you want — but a more reasonable view is that the rent-seeking politicians and policy-makers behind this were and are neoliberal free trade ideologues, not sadists who wanted to see large swathes of America de-industrialized, and large numbers of Americans made destitute — people (“public servants”) with little/no empathy or feeling of responsibility toward their fellow citizens — and the thing is, you still a LOT of the same today — eg read the ‘Marginal Revolution’ blog.

  53. @Icy Blast
    My ex-wife acts like I left her last week. (It was 1991.)

    Marriage is for life.

  54. @SFG
    Tucker Carlson for President.

    Whut? How is he qualified to be the chief executive of the republic?

    He’s never done or produced anything other than media content. He’s a literal talking head.

    And who does he actually serve?

    Also he has a yippy terrier voice. Can’t stand listening to him.

    I wearied of his schtick about a year and a half ago. Then last week he opined that it was a Very Bad Thing for anyone ever to use race as a construct in political organizing and action. But he constantly goes on about this and that for blacks, for women, for hispanics…and never a word for white interests.

    Just the new, young, attractive, Mercer-and-Sons-shirted extrusion die for the same old play-d’oh.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    U mad bro?
    , @William Badwhite

    Whut? How is he qualified to be the chief executive of the republic? He’s never done or produced anything other than media content. He’s a literal talking head.
     
    What qualified Obama? W? Clinton? Lets face it, the "qualified" ship sailed a long time ago. At this point someone that is not being completely bought-and-paid-for or a deranged loon (in the case of Hillary Clinton, both) is the best we're going to get.
  55. @Olorin
    Whut? How is he qualified to be the chief executive of the republic?

    He's never done or produced anything other than media content. He's a literal talking head.

    And who does he actually serve?

    Also he has a yippy terrier voice. Can't stand listening to him.

    I wearied of his schtick about a year and a half ago. Then last week he opined that it was a Very Bad Thing for anyone ever to use race as a construct in political organizing and action. But he constantly goes on about this and that for blacks, for women, for hispanics...and never a word for white interests.

    Just the new, young, attractive, Mercer-and-Sons-shirted extrusion die for the same old play-d'oh.

    U mad bro?

  56. @Olorin
    Whut? How is he qualified to be the chief executive of the republic?

    He's never done or produced anything other than media content. He's a literal talking head.

    And who does he actually serve?

    Also he has a yippy terrier voice. Can't stand listening to him.

    I wearied of his schtick about a year and a half ago. Then last week he opined that it was a Very Bad Thing for anyone ever to use race as a construct in political organizing and action. But he constantly goes on about this and that for blacks, for women, for hispanics...and never a word for white interests.

    Just the new, young, attractive, Mercer-and-Sons-shirted extrusion die for the same old play-d'oh.

    Whut? How is he qualified to be the chief executive of the republic? He’s never done or produced anything other than media content. He’s a literal talking head.

    What qualified Obama? W? Clinton? Lets face it, the “qualified” ship sailed a long time ago. At this point someone that is not being completely bought-and-paid-for or a deranged loon (in the case of Hillary Clinton, both) is the best we’re going to get.

  57. @conatus
    The Virtuous Cycle is Henry Ford doubling wages so his workers could afford to buy what they made. That move started the American Middle class. but that was way back when our Elite$$$$$ identified with, and cared about the people they ruled. Now we are globalists and only care about shareholder value. No more virtue, no more Middle Class. It is the financialization of the American Economy, transitioning to globalism, where shifting a few billions for few basis points gains makes enough money for a Middle class family to live on for a year.
    Not so virtuous, not so Middle class.

    Tucker goes out on a limb a lot for a prime time talking head.
    How many moneyed people does he alienate with this kind of talk? He makes enemies and does not care if Elizabeth Warren is Dem.
    You know he is a target of the $$$$$ Class for talking like that,... on Prime time no less.

    Thomas Frank used to write for the WSJ, no more. Probably because he wrote paragraphs like this in his book "Whats the Matter with Kansas"
    "Grandstanding leaders never deliver, their fury mounts and mounts, and nevertheless they turn out every two years to return their right-wing heroes to office for a second, a third, a twentieth try. The trick never ages; the illusion never wears off. Vote to stop abortion; receive a rollback in capital gains taxes. Vote to make our country strong again; receive deindustrialization. Vote to screw those politically correct college professors; receive electricity deregulation. Vote to get government off our backs; receive conglomeration and monopoly everywhere from media to meatpacking. Vote to stand tall against terrorists; receive Social Security privatization. Vote to strike a blow against elitism; receive a social order in which wealth is more concentrated then ever before in our lifetimes, in which workers have been stripped of power and CEOs are rewarded in a manner beyond imagining."

    Henry Ford doubled wages to reduce employee turnover.

  58. Full text at https://www.realclearpolitics.com/video/2019/06/06/tucker_carlson_elizabeth_warrens_economic_patriotism_plan_sounds_like_donald_trump_at_his_best.html

    TUCKER CARLSON, FOX NEWS: Good evening and welcome to Tucker Carlson Tonight. Let’s begin tonight with a thought experiment: What if the Republican leadership here in Washington had bothered to learn the lessons of the 2016 election? What if they’d cared enough to do that. What if they’d understood, and embraced, the economic nationalism that was at the heart of Donald Trump’s presidential campaign? What would the world look like now, two and a half years later? For starters, Republicans in congress would regularly be saying things like this. Quote:

    “I’m deeply grateful for the opportunities America has given me. But the giant ‘American’ corporations who control our economy don’t seem to feel the same way. They certainly don’t act like it. Sure, these companies wave the flag — but they have no loyalty or allegiance to America. Levi’s is an iconic American brand, but the company operates only 2% of its factories here. Dixon Ticonderoga — maker of the famous №2 pencil — has ‘moved almost all of its pencil production to Mexico and China.’ And General Electric recently shut down an industrial engine factory in Wisconsin and shipped the jobs to Canada. The list goes on and on. These ‘American’ companies show only one real loyalty: to the short-term interests of their shareholders, a third of whom are foreign investors. If they can close up an American factory and ship jobs overseas to save a nickel, that’s exactly what they will do — abandoning loyal American workers and hollowing out American cities along the way. Politicians love to say they care about American jobs. But for decades, those same politicians have cited ‘free market principles’ and refused to intervene in markets on behalf of American workers. And of course, they ignore those same supposed principles and intervene regularly to protect the interests of multinational corporations and international capital. The result? Millions of good jobs lost overseas and a generation of stagnant wages, growing inequality, and sluggish economic growth. If Washington wants to put a stop to this, it can. If we want faster growth, stronger American industry, and more good American jobs, then our government should do what other leading nations do and act aggressively to achieve those goals instead of catering to the financial interests of companies with no particular allegiance to America…. The truth is that Washington policies — not unstoppable market forces — are a key driver of the problems American workers face. From our trade agreements to our tax code, we have encouraged companies to invest abroad, ship jobs overseas, and keep wages low. All in the interest of serving multinational companies and international capital with no particular loyalty to the United States….It’s becoming easier and easier to shift capital and jobs from one country to another. That’s why our government has to care more about defending and creating American jobs than ever before — not less. We can navigate the changes ahead if we embrace economic patriotism and make American workers our highest priority, rather than continuing to cater to the interests of companies and people with no allegiance to America.”

    End quote. Now let’s say you regularly vote Republican. Ask yourself: what part of that statement did you disagree with? Was there a single word that seemed wrong? Probably not. Here’s the depressing part: Nobody you voted for said that, or would ever say it. Republicans in congress can’t promise to protect American industries. They wouldn’t dare. It might violate some principle of Austrian economics. It might make the Koch brothers angry. It might alienate the libertarian ideologues who, to this day, fund most Republican campaigns. So, no, a Republican did not say that. Sadly.

    Instead, the words you just heard are from, and brace yourself here, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts. Yesterday, Warren released what she’s calling her “plan for economic patriotism.” Amazingly, that’s pretty much exactly what it is: economic patriotism. There’s not a word about identity politics in the document. There are no hysterics about gun control or climate change. There’s no lecture about the plight of transgender illegal immigrants. It’s just pure old fashioned economics: how to preserve good-paying American jobs. Even more remarkable: Many of Warren’s policy prescriptions make obvious sense: she says the US government should buy American products when it can. Of course it should. She says we need more workplace apprenticeship programs, because four-year degrees aren’t right for everyone. That’s true. She says taxpayers ought to benefit from the research and development they fund. And yet, she writes, “we often see American companies take that researchand use it to manufacture products overseas, like Apple did with the iPhone. The companies get rich, and American taxpayers have subsidized the creation of low-wage foreign jobs.” And so on. She sounds like Donald Trump at his best. Who is this Elizabeth Warren, you ask? Not the race hustling, gun grabbing, abortion extremist you thought you knew. Unfortunately Elizabeth Warren is still all of those things too. And that is exactly the problem, not just with Warren, but with American politics. In Washington, almost nobody speaks for the majority of voters. You’re either a libertarian zealot controlled by the banks, yammering on about entrepreneurship and how we need to cut entitlements. That’s one side of the aisle. Or, worse, you’re some decadent trust fund socialist who wants to ban passenger cars and give Medicaid to illegal aliens. That’s the other side. There isn’t a caucus that represents where most Americans actually are: nationalist on economics, fairly traditional on the social issues. Imagine a politician who wanted to make your healthcare cheaper, but wasn’t ghoulishly excited about partial birth abortion. Imagine someone who genuinely respected the nuclear family, and sympathized with the culture of rural America, but at the same time was willing to take your side against rapacious credit card companies bleeding you dry at 35 percent interest. Would you vote for someone like that? My gosh. Of course. Who wouldn’t? That candidate would be elected in a landslide. Every single time. Yet that candidate is the opposite of pretty much everyone currently serving in congress. Our leadership class remains resolutely libertarian: committed to the rhetoric of markets when it serves them; utterly libertine on questions of culture. Republicans will lecture you about how payday loan scams are a critical part of a market economy. Then they’ll work to make it easier for your kids to smoke weed because, hey, freedom. Democrats will nod in total agreement. They’re on the same page.

    Just last week, the Trump administration announced an innovative new way to protect American workers from the ever-cascading tidal wave of cheap third-world labor flooding this country. Until the Mexican government stops pushing illegal aliens north over our border, we will impose tariffs on all Mexican goods we import. That’s the kind of thing you’d do to protect your country if you cared about your people. The Democrats, of course, opposed it. They don’t even pretend to care about America anymore. Here’s what the Republicans said:

    MITCH MCCONNELL: Look, I think it’s safe to say – you’ve talked to all of our members and we’re not fans of tariffs. We’re still hoping this can be avoided.

    “We’re not fans of tariffs.” Imagine a more supercilious, out of touch, infuriating response. You can’t, because there isn’t one. In other words, says Mitch McConnell, the idea may work in practice. But we’re against it, because it doesn’t work in theory. That’s the Republican Party, 2019. No wonder they keep losing. They deserve it. Will they ever change?

    • Agree: HammerJack
  59. @Buzz Mohawk
    And the de-industrializion of America:

    http://2.bp.blogspot.com/-8f_cBAudYGo/TdCxu-Gtv5I/AAAAAAAAAFg/wt0XK_Z4EmY/w1200-h630-p-nu/man-job.jpg

    And increasing trade imbalance:

    https://www.bls.gov/opub/mlr/2015/images/cerritos-figure-1.png

    And the increase of finance as a share of the economy:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/9/92/NYUGDPFinancialShare.jpg

    And increased debt as a percentage of the economy:

    http://www.forexrazor.com/Portals/0/images/School/Charts/Total-US-Debt-As-A-Percentage-Of-GDP.jpg

    Two factors that get overlooked, Buzz. 1. Rhetoric aside, too many voters find industrial production “icky”. For all the big corporations shipping jobs over seas talk, most of the complaining is done by individuals who consider factories too polluting, low-paying to bother keeping around. So say, replacing payroll taxes with a border-adjusted value-added tax would ” just punish consumers” without getting anything in return, according to this all-too-familiar logic. 2. What did the 70s and the 00s have in common? Rising energy prices. That’s a factor in de-industrialization that gets ignored. Some of the recent onshoring that has occurred is due to the US having lower energy prices than our competitors.

  60. @Mr McKenna


    “The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women.”
     
    Oh yeah. Story of my life.

    “The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women.”

    Oh yeah. Story of my life.

    Well, yeah; why do you suppose I always make sure the dishes are done?

  61. @The Alarmist
    Tucker kind of reminds me of Brett Kavanaugh; I can't wait to see Matt Damon's impression of a Tucker rant.

    As for Warren, a stopped clock is wrong twice a day ... ok, at least once, if she is one of those globalist 24-hour clocks. The problem with "capitalism" as practised by the oligarchy running America is that they have no sense of belonging to a local community: They are the movers and shakers of the world, so of course they will disperse jobs and capital to places in the world that maximise their own personal wealth. There is no solution other than the peasants storming their gates with pitchforks and leading them to the guillotines.

    I wouldn’t bother with guillotines. Just bring plenty of rope and use whatever is to hand—trees, lamp-posts—to dispatch them.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Maybe they can just use the garden tools they take from the Mexican gardners they send home? At least they'll have something useful for afterwards.
  62. @Paul
    Ruling class indifference as large parts of the United States are deindustrialized, and as the cities crumble and large numbers of people in them live in the streets, is shocking.

    Then you think of what the bahstahds did to men, women, and children back in the 19th century and it’s not so surprising.

  63. @Intelligent Dasein
    It may chafe some butt checks around these parts, but Elizabeth Warren's economic ideas are basically correct. Yes, there is still a lot of Green nonsense and soup kitchen socialism mixed in with the package, but raising wages and breaking up Big Tech are two entirely legitimate, vital programs that every thinking person ought to be on board with. I would vote for somebody like Warren, with all her faults, if that is what it finally takes to destroy Jeff Bezos.

    If she’s not behind ending mass immigration, none of it makes any difference.

  64. Here’s a question for Tucker Carlson and other patriots:

    What is better, to ship the jobs overseas, or to keep the jobs here but import millions of foreign workers to work in the US?

    To most patriots, the answer would be: keep the jobs in America and hire Americans.

    But listen to what Trump said. He said he wants to bring the jobs back, but he also wants “the largest number ever” of immigrants to come in because “we”, meaning, employers, need these workers, i.e. need to keep the salaries low.

    Where have we seen this before? That’s right, in the tech sector. We kept those jobs in America alright, but it also resulted in 10 million Asians being brought into the country since 2000 (thanks to chain migration).

    Bringing back the manufacturing jobs will result in bringing in at least another 10 million foreigners, mostly Chinese and Central Americans, to work in these factories. Then we will need another 20 million low skill Central Americans to come in and service them: build their homes, farm their food, clean their houses, mow their lawns, serve them fast food, etc.

    Where does it end? So I ask Tucker Carlson: are we better off with these manufacturing jobs back? Or are we better off keeping them in China and Mexico, and just send all the H1Bs packing so Americans can take back the office jobs? That would also allow us to send more Mexicans packing because we wouldn’t need them to service the H1Bs.

    America needs a serious population attrition, not addition. Look at our growing homeless pop. across all cities. The bigger the population, the less each life is worth. If we keep growing, eventually we will be like China and India, total dog-eat-dog, every man for himself societies. Is that what we want?

  65. @follyofwar
    Given Tucker's excellent monologue last night, combining economic populism with conservative moral values, it sure seemed like he is thinking of throwing his hat in. Trump vs Tucker in the GOP primaries would be the Fight of the Century.

    …it sure seemed like he is thinking of throwing his hat in. Trump vs Tucker in the GOP primaries would be the Fight of the Century.

    Tucker’s not think about running next year. If he does run, it won’t be until at least 2024.

    • Replies: @follyofwar
    I really don't expect Tucker to run against Trump, Kevin. I was just trying for a little levity.
  66. @Anon
    I really like Tucker, but he does have an about-to-pop-a-vein thing going with his face. Remember when the big criticism of Trump was that he was angry? I never found any video of him being angry. But Tucker looks angry.

    Now angry is in: Women and blacks ... and black women ... need to be angry, the progressives tell us:

    "The power of angry women."

    "Women are angry. This is why."

    "Women are reclaiming anger."

    "The Enduring, Messy Power Of Rage-Filled Women."

    "Yes, I Am Absolutely An Angry Black Woman (And Here's Why)."

    "Unapologetic Black Anger Can Change the World for the Better."

    His main weakness is trying too hard to look serious: whenever a guest is speaking on his show, he furrows his brow, crosses his eyes, and lets his mouth hang open, motionless, looking like his batteries just popped out. In his monologues his “serious” tone and cadence can start to feel a bit monotonous, but people still seem to appreciate the message more than the delivery.

  67. His main weakness is trying too hard to look serious: whenever a guest is speaking on his show, he furrows his brow, crosses his eyes, and lets his mouth hang open, motionless, looking like his batteries just popped out. In his monologues his “serious” tone and cadence can start to feel a bit monotonous, but people still seem to appreciate the message more than the delivery.

    I think he speaks pretty well. If he sounds serious and angry, perhaps it’s because he is serious and angry. His monlogues are head and shoulders above those of cliche-spouting moron Sean Hannity.

  68. @Steve Richter

    The hysteria over tariffs is phony. The money from tariffs can help reduce budget deficits.
     
    but the budget deficit is still sky high. I like that Trump is raising tariffs on China. But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China. The trillions in wealth of Apple itself. All the computer programmers writing code for smart phones. Facebook selling ads on the phone.

    But think of all the value that American businesses create when cheap electronics are imported from China. The trillions in wealth of Apple itself. All the computer programmers writing code for smart phones. Facebook selling ads on the phone.

    That isn’t the production of wealth, but rather it’s consumption.

  69. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    ...it sure seemed like he is thinking of throwing his hat in. Trump vs Tucker in the GOP primaries would be the Fight of the Century.
     
    Tucker's not think about running next year. If he does run, it won't be until at least 2024.

    I really don’t expect Tucker to run against Trump, Kevin. I was just trying for a little levity.

  70. @MBlanc46
    I wouldn’t bother with guillotines. Just bring plenty of rope and use whatever is to hand—trees, lamp-posts—to dispatch them.

    Maybe they can just use the garden tools they take from the Mexican gardners they send home? At least they’ll have something useful for afterwards.

  71. Tucker, like Steve, thinks the USA should be run for the benefit of its citizens. Me too.

  72. @Federalist
    If Trump sticks to his guns - that's a big if. He didn't build the wall. He didn't dump illegals in sanctuary cities. He didn't do anything about birthright citizenship. He sent some military to the border but they weren't allowed to actually do anything and then after a little while, they left. I'm sure I'm forgetting some things. Nothing Trump talks about on immigration comes to pass.

    I would love to be wrong and Trump does something with Mexico tariffs, but I don't have any real hope based on past performance.

    Tariffs have been an exception. A lot of people thought Trump wouldn’t levy them on China, but he did. And he’ll do the same to Mexico on Monday, barring some major capitulation by Mexico before then.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    On second thought,

    https://twitter.com/dpinsen/status/1137067025606553602?s=21
  73. @Dave Pinsen
    Tariffs have been an exception. A lot of people thought Trump wouldn’t levy them on China, but he did. And he’ll do the same to Mexico on Monday, barring some major capitulation by Mexico before then.

    On second thought,

  74. @eah
    You make a good point and are probably correct in that marriage rates have declined and continue to do so, which means using household rather than per capita income may affect the result -- then again if a sizable fraction of single people live alone...

    But the stark reality of the 'Rust Belt' is still there for all to see -- and now the 'opioid epidemic': drug overdose is now the leading cause of death for Americans under 50.

    Drug overdose death rate in the United States in 2017, by state (per 100,000 population)

    For comparison: the traffic fatality death rate in WV was approx 17/100k -- whereas the overdose rate was approx 58/100k (both 2017).

    The same elites DGAF when black Americans live in bleak crime-ridden ghettoes with no jobs either. It’s not like real people are being hurt.

  75. NOTA says:
    @Intelligent Dasein
    It may chafe some butt checks around these parts, but Elizabeth Warren's economic ideas are basically correct. Yes, there is still a lot of Green nonsense and soup kitchen socialism mixed in with the package, but raising wages and breaking up Big Tech are two entirely legitimate, vital programs that every thinking person ought to be on board with. I would vote for somebody like Warren, with all her faults, if that is what it finally takes to destroy Jeff Bezos.

    Warren at least seems to notice and care about the existence of the left half of the bell curve (or the left 90%), which puts her massively ahead of most elites. And the truth is that the Clinton/Blair thing where they abandoned popular left-wing economic ideas and became globalist capitalists left a huge opening for the right to take those ideas over and run on them. Warren and Sanders and AOC seem to have realized this, and might actually respond in some interesting ways. OTOH, Sanders is old, Warren is less charismatic than Hillary, and AOC is both young and not all that knowledgeable (despite having a lot of natural star power and a good grasp of campainging on social media).

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