The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Trump's Ground Game in Iowa
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the Washington Examiner:

Ragtag band picks Trump in Council Bluffs precinct

By TIMOTHY P. CARNEY (@TPCARNEY) • 2/1/16 9:43 PM

COUNCIL BLUFFS, Iowa — Turnout exceeded all expectations in Pottawattamie County’s 11th precinct Republican caucus tonight, where Donald Trump handily won, 30.7 percent to 24.5 percent for Ted Cruz.

The Trump crowd was, as Trump promised, all voters who were new to Republican caucuses — many new to electoral politics in total.

While other candidates had precinct captains who came with voter lists and yard signs to designate their section of the caucus room (the two Chris Christie voters who brought the yard sign proved to be the only two Chris Christie voters in the precinct), the Trump crowd had no such organization. There was no precinct captain. Dave Dieatrick, one of two voters who spoke in favor of Trump at the event, went up to speak extemporaneously.

Still, Trump carried the room with 44 votes out of 143 cast. When the precinct chairwoman (who doubled as Rubio’s precinct captain) announced Trump’s win about 20 minutes after voting ended, the remnant booed. Only two Trump supporters remained — a couple decked out in leather and tattoos who smilingly refused to talk to reporters. The others had all left immediately after voting, some retiring to Glory Days Bar & Grill across the street.

There, Dieatrick bought me a beer and explained that this was his first time caucusing — he’s 55 years old and a lifetime Council Bluffer (he calls himself a “Counciltuckian”). “I like the wall,” and Trump’s support for the military. “Nobody’s gonna buy him.”

Dieatrick, like thousands more across the state, registered as a Republican at the caucus site (though he’s always considered himself one, he says he wasn’t registered to vote).

Rand Paul’s precinct captain told me the expected turnout was 115. The actual turnout of 143 reflected the attendance of these new Republicans.

 
Hide 99 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. There are hundreds of billions of profits on the line in this election. TPP/trade and mass immigration enrich the elite. They’ll fight to protect their interests.

  2. Given that being a business success is one the reasons given for voting Trump this doesn’t say much for him.

    When he decides to build a building does he just wait around for some construction workers to happen to walk by his property and hope they can just end up building it?

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Given that being a business success is one the reasons given for voting Trump this doesn’t say much for him.
     
    For someone who is supposedly very good at "winning," he certainly did not show much. He had virtually no "ground game" in Iowa, and essentially ran a celebrity campaign - all free (earned) media and giant rallies, but no serious organization or grassroots/ground-pounding hard work. He ended up fitting the NYC stereotype in the Midwest - all talk, no work.

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It's not just that his locked up the "evangelicals" and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz's magna cum laude and editor of law review weren't just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.

    In Iowa, at least, Cruz showed that he could run the trains on time better than the supposed businessman with "real world" enterprise experience. New Hampshire will be a tougher slog for Cruz, for sure, but it will be VERY interesting how well his national organization performs versus Trump's yet-to-materialize infrastructure.

    As I mentioned here before, politics is a team endeavor. Candidates are merely the vessels through which the aspirations of others are channeled. I have yet to see any evidence that Trump gets this. He still seems to be stuck in the celebrity mode, not serious candidate mode, as his squabbles with a politically insignificant journalist immediately before the vote demonstrated. Calling someone else's wife a "bimbo" is never a good look for anyone let alone someone running for the land's highest elected office.
    , @anon
    My guess is he was probably told by election experts he had no chance in Iowa so he didn't organise. I expect he won't make that mistake again.
  3. Trump’s support skews non-college and first time/rare voters, so he’s going to significantly underperform the polls. He needs to invest in a serious ground game to bring up the actual votes closer to the support he’s getting in polls.

  4. Wow, I keep reading this article about Trump’s great triumph in Pottawattamie county. I guess that makes Trump…the President of Council Bluffs. Or something.

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.

    • Replies: @AndrewR

    Springsteen’s a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.
     
    That is a bold claim.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.
     
    And he could target Cruz, too, with "Born in the USA".

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist...
     
    ...with, what?, $50 million in New Jersey state bonds? On which he pays as much federal income tax as a (legal) Mexican immigrant dishwasher is subject to.
  5. And that’s why Trump needs some good campaign consultants. Karl Rove types. I know they are held in contempt by many here, and it’s true that they are often greedy and occasionally give bad advice (or simply are unable to make silk purse out of sow’s ear.) But they are essential for this kind of nuts and bolts stuff. Can you imagine how much better Trump would’ve done with competent GOTV effort?

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Or at least run some ads vs Cruz and Rubio that calls into question their competence and loyalty to the issues primary voters care about. And run those ads over and over and over in every single region of the state, on every single local network, on the radio, etc. Also do some push polls as well.

    Remember, Willie Horton was run during the Democratic primaries in '88. Trump may yet need to do a similar fade vs. his rivals in various GOP state primaries. [e.g. a similar ad with the theme: Law and Order.]

  6. Ground game? We don’t need no stinkin’ ground game!

  7. I don’t really get how Iowa caucuses work and I kinda don’t care enough to learn

  8. @J1234
    Wow, I keep reading this article about Trump's great triumph in Pottawattamie county. I guess that makes Trump...the President of Council Bluffs. Or something.

    And as you all know, Springsteen's a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.

    Springsteen’s a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.

    That is a bold claim.

  9. My impression is that the evangelicals mobilized enough of their base to secure it for Cruz. Honestly, Rubio’s turnout of the establishment base was the most impressive to me.

    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    I've about had it with these so-called Evangelicals. Useful idiots is what they are to the establishment Republicans. As long as they throw them some red meat about abortion and gay marriage, they can carry on with their open borders, enrich-the-1 percent agenda.
  10. Carney is pretty sharp. He’s highlighting this for a good reason.
    He’s been begging the Rs to go populist for a while: take an anti-crony capitalism stance after the 2008 crash…
    He was featured as a prominent anti-war “conservative” more than a decade ago.
    His insights have tracked Sailer-type insights, though Carney is more inside baseball with his ExIm bank crusade and beltway libertarianism…

  11. The Iowans of Carter Lake have to drive through Omaha, Nebraska, and cross the Missouri River to caucus at a high school in Council Bluffs. Their attendance went from 50 in 2012 to 133 this year. Trump got 63, or almost half.

    http://www.powerlineblog.com/archives/2016/02/live-from-council-bluffs-its-the-gop-caucus.php

  12. “Can you imagine how much better Trump would’ve done with competent GOTV effort?”

    GOP turnout was 50% over the highest ever. If Trump hadn’t done a good job of getting out the vote, he’d have been running neck and neck with Ben Carson.

    Cruz had a brilliant ground game. Cruz has run an excellent campaign, given his unappealing character. Rubio didnt’ turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump.

    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Rubio didn't turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump."

    Then that's a regional prejudice thing. Let's call it what it is. The same thing that worked to Cruz's advantage will hurt him in NY; NJ; New England perhaps the Upper Midwestern states and possibly in CA; OR; WA.

    Again, Trump may need to win the Northeast, the Pacific states, (except for Carly, no candidate hails from the Pacific so that region's wide open), and carry the Upper Midwest.

    Like in the November election, the Upper Midwest with its precious 60plus electoral votes, may just hold the balance for Trump to get the nomination.

    If Cruz wants to go there with his "NY values" smear, Trump can match him in the Upper Midwest and Northeast with "You really want a dumb hick in the White House? Seriously? Is he even from America?"

    Cruz started it. Let Trump finish it.

    But yep, this year the CA/Pacific along with Upper Midwest states may just hold the cards for Trump. Be interested to know when CA/WA/OR/Pacific region hosts their primaries this yr.
    , @anon

    Rubio didnt’ turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump.
     
    Nonsense.

    If they were just anti-Trump they could have voted for Cruz as the front runner not someone who the polls said was miles behind.

    And if there had been such an anti-Trump surge split 50-50 between Cruz and Rubio where was Cruz's half?

    The Rubio vote was clearly rigged by the GOP establishment for optics as separately obvious from the media spin afterwards.
  13. Now if Trump can get Silvio Dante as his backup singer….

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Now if Trump can get Silvio Dante as his backup singer…
     
    I was thinking that the perfect VP choice for Hillary Clinton would be Camille Cosby. Donald Trump would counter with Camille Paglia.
  14. Seems to me that Trump only losing by 3 points in Iowa, where he was not expected to do well, is a bullish sign for Trump.

  15. @Polynikes
    My impression is that the evangelicals mobilized enough of their base to secure it for Cruz. Honestly, Rubio's turnout of the establishment base was the most impressive to me.

    I’ve about had it with these so-called Evangelicals. Useful idiots is what they are to the establishment Republicans. As long as they throw them some red meat about abortion and gay marriage, they can carry on with their open borders, enrich-the-1 percent agenda.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    abortion and gay marriage
     
    Because mass murder of babies and destruction of the Christian values upon which the Western civilization rests mean nothing. All that matters is keeping the Mexicans out, eh?*

    *Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.
    , @NOTA
    Politics is about coalition building. The Republican coalition includes people who care a lot about abortion or gay marriage. The thing I find interesting to watch is that those voters mostly don't get anything for their support--abortion is still legal and gay marriage is recognized in all 50 states.
  16. @inertial
    And that's why Trump needs some good campaign consultants. Karl Rove types. I know they are held in contempt by many here, and it's true that they are often greedy and occasionally give bad advice (or simply are unable to make silk purse out of sow's ear.) But they are essential for this kind of nuts and bolts stuff. Can you imagine how much better Trump would've done with competent GOTV effort?

    Or at least run some ads vs Cruz and Rubio that calls into question their competence and loyalty to the issues primary voters care about. And run those ads over and over and over in every single region of the state, on every single local network, on the radio, etc. Also do some push polls as well.

    Remember, Willie Horton was run during the Democratic primaries in ’88. Trump may yet need to do a similar fade vs. his rivals in various GOP state primaries. [e.g. a similar ad with the theme: Law and Order.]

  17. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Great article. Not sure Trump’s post caucus spin is worth a damn but he claims to have held back massively in Iowa due to his advisors.

    Since Trump does have advisors after all I hope they are telling him to stop sounding like a democrat because he will implode his own campaign.

    Trump Fall 2015 = Attacking fraudulent status quo. Winning.

    Trump Winter 2016 = Hands across the aisle. Losing.

    • Replies: @Bill
    Concern troll is concerned that Trump does not sound like an establishment GOP candidate.
  18. @education realist
    "Can you imagine how much better Trump would’ve done with competent GOTV effort?"

    GOP turnout was 50% over the highest ever. If Trump hadn't done a good job of getting out the vote, he'd have been running neck and neck with Ben Carson.

    Cruz had a brilliant ground game. Cruz has run an excellent campaign, given his unappealing character. Rubio didnt' turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump.

    “Rubio didn’t turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump.”

    Then that’s a regional prejudice thing. Let’s call it what it is. The same thing that worked to Cruz’s advantage will hurt him in NY; NJ; New England perhaps the Upper Midwestern states and possibly in CA; OR; WA.

    Again, Trump may need to win the Northeast, the Pacific states, (except for Carly, no candidate hails from the Pacific so that region’s wide open), and carry the Upper Midwest.

    Like in the November election, the Upper Midwest with its precious 60plus electoral votes, may just hold the balance for Trump to get the nomination.

    If Cruz wants to go there with his “NY values” smear, Trump can match him in the Upper Midwest and Northeast with “You really want a dumb hick in the White House? Seriously? Is he even from America?”

    Cruz started it. Let Trump finish it.

    But yep, this year the CA/Pacific along with Upper Midwest states may just hold the cards for Trump. Be interested to know when CA/WA/OR/Pacific region hosts their primaries this yr.

    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe
    "Be interested to know when CA/WA/OR/Pacific region hosts their primaries this yr."

    Oregon primary, May 17th
    Washington caucus, May 24th
    California primary, June 7th
  19. Who is the rhythm guitarist in the E-Street Band who dresses like Mick Jones of the Clash: black beret, vaguely military/guerilla?

    • Replies: @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    Steven Van Zandt, also was in The Sopranos
    , @Clifford Brown
    The guitarist in the Rock the Casbah getup is the brilliantly named Nils Lofgren, who replaced Van Zandt as guitarist when Van Zandt decided to go solo in the 80's. Van Zandt played on the album track, but left the band before Born in the USA was released. Perhaps realizing his mistake, Van Zandt at least joined the band to ham it up in the Glory Days video which was directed by none other than John Sayles.

    Nils Lofgren played on Neil Young's After the Gold Rush at age 19.
    , @CJ
    Steven Van Zandt also has a syndicated radio show.

    , @Jim Don Bob
    Van Zandt also starred in Lilyhammer, a hilarious Netflix series about a US mobster who goes into hiding in Norway. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lilyhammer
  20. @Grandpa Jack
    Now if Trump can get Silvio Dante as his backup singer....

    Now if Trump can get Silvio Dante as his backup singer…

    I was thinking that the perfect VP choice for Hillary Clinton would be Camille Cosby. Donald Trump would counter with Camille Paglia.

  21. Trump is financing his own campaign and is trying to do it on the cheap. He didn’t want to spend the money needed to establish a ground game.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    He's a cheap bastard.
  22. @Steve Sailer
    Who is the rhythm guitarist in the E-Street Band who dresses like Mick Jones of the Clash: black beret, vaguely military/guerilla?

    Steven Van Zandt, also was in The Sopranos

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Steven Van Zandt, also was in The Sopranos
     
    Van Zandt is 100% Italian, and his boss, 50%.

    Miami Steve's Dutch name is from a stepfather. Springsteen is as Dutch as FDR. For a real Hollander, try the incongruously named George Baker.

    Oh, wait... he's 50% Italian, too.

  23. @J1234
    Wow, I keep reading this article about Trump's great triumph in Pottawattamie county. I guess that makes Trump...the President of Council Bluffs. Or something.

    And as you all know, Springsteen's a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.

    And he could target Cruz, too, with “Born in the USA”.

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist…

    …with, what?, $50 million in New Jersey state bonds? On which he pays as much federal income tax as a (legal) Mexican immigrant dishwasher is subject to.

    • Replies: @J1234

    And he could target Cruz, too, with “Born in the USA”.
     
    :) :) :)

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist…

    ----

    with, what?, $50 million in New Jersey state bonds? On which he pays as much federal income tax as a (legal) Mexican immigrant dishwasher is subject to.
     
    Yeah, those are the worst kind.
  24. @officious intermeddler
    Trump is financing his own campaign and is trying to do it on the cheap. He didn't want to spend the money needed to establish a ground game.

    He’s a cheap bastard.

  25. Trump didn’t have a ground game, and he flies back to NYC every night so he can sleep in his penthouse. He should focus on organization rather than trying to wing a victory through the media.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "he flies back to NYC every night so he can sleep in his penthouse"

    Is that part of his germophobia?

  26. Could Trump cause a historic realignment of the white working class into the Republican column?

    • Replies: @anon
    Yes

    and the pre-1965 black and hispanic working class too.
  27. @Anonymous
    Trump didn't have a ground game, and he flies back to NYC every night so he can sleep in his penthouse. He should focus on organization rather than trying to wing a victory through the media.

    “he flies back to NYC every night so he can sleep in his penthouse”

    Is that part of his germophobia?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    That's what I was wondering too. He also doesn't mix it up with the locals a lot either. He doesn't hang out at diners and the like much. He mostly seems to do the large speech things.
    , @Twinkie

    Is that part of his germophobia?
     
    Despite his American nationalist shtick, I suspect that he has contempt for the "flyover country" and its people. He lives the life of an über-0.001 percenter New Yorker and doesn't seem to show any genuine empathy or concern for ordinary Middle Americans. Until he decided to run for president, he never displayed any noblesse oblige toward his socio-economic inferiors or the sense of service to the country at large.

    I like much of what he says, but I do not believe a word of it because his priors demonstrate zero evidence of what he says or claims he will do. Talk is cheap, actions speak louder. I lived in NYC long enough to know not to believe New Yorkers who say "Just trust me."
  28. @Steve Sailer
    Who is the rhythm guitarist in the E-Street Band who dresses like Mick Jones of the Clash: black beret, vaguely military/guerilla?

    The guitarist in the Rock the Casbah getup is the brilliantly named Nils Lofgren, who replaced Van Zandt as guitarist when Van Zandt decided to go solo in the 80′s. Van Zandt played on the album track, but left the band before Born in the USA was released. Perhaps realizing his mistake, Van Zandt at least joined the band to ham it up in the Glory Days video which was directed by none other than John Sayles.

    Nils Lofgren played on Neil Young’s After the Gold Rush at age 19.

  29. @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    Steven Van Zandt, also was in The Sopranos

    Steven Van Zandt, also was in The Sopranos

    Van Zandt is 100% Italian, and his boss, 50%.

    Miami Steve’s Dutch name is from a stepfather. Springsteen is as Dutch as FDR. For a real Hollander, try the incongruously named George Baker.

    Oh, wait… he’s 50% Italian, too.

  30. If GOP turnout at the Iowa caucuses was up 50% (presumably due to Trump’s presence on the ballot) and Trump received about 27% of the vote, that suggests that his support lies almost entirely with the new caucusers – who may or may not be actual registered Republicans. This sounds more like the support for a promising third party candidate than a viable GOP nominee.

  31. @anony-mouse
    Given that being a business success is one the reasons given for voting Trump this doesn't say much for him.

    When he decides to build a building does he just wait around for some construction workers to happen to walk by his property and hope they can just end up building it?

    Given that being a business success is one the reasons given for voting Trump this doesn’t say much for him.

    For someone who is supposedly very good at “winning,” he certainly did not show much. He had virtually no “ground game” in Iowa, and essentially ran a celebrity campaign – all free (earned) media and giant rallies, but no serious organization or grassroots/ground-pounding hard work. He ended up fitting the NYC stereotype in the Midwest – all talk, no work.

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It’s not just that his locked up the “evangelicals” and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz’s magna cum laude and editor of law review weren’t just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.

    In Iowa, at least, Cruz showed that he could run the trains on time better than the supposed businessman with “real world” enterprise experience. New Hampshire will be a tougher slog for Cruz, for sure, but it will be VERY interesting how well his national organization performs versus Trump’s yet-to-materialize infrastructure.

    As I mentioned here before, politics is a team endeavor. Candidates are merely the vessels through which the aspirations of others are channeled. I have yet to see any evidence that Trump gets this. He still seems to be stuck in the celebrity mode, not serious candidate mode, as his squabbles with a politically insignificant journalist immediately before the vote demonstrated. Calling someone else’s wife a “bimbo” is never a good look for anyone let alone someone running for the land’s highest elected office.

    • Replies: @Pat Gilligan

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It’s not just that his locked up the “evangelicals” and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz’s magna cum laude and editor of law review weren’t just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.
     
    Ted Cruz, asshole.

    GQ reported that Cruz started a study group during his first year in Cambridge, but he announced that "he didn't want anybody from 'minor Ivies' like Penn or Brown." In an interview with the Boston Globe, another student recalled what happened when she agreed to carpool with Cruz: "We hadn't left Manhattan before he asked my IQ."

     

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you're a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust. Sorry Chief Rabbi Israel Zolli, but apparently you didn't witness what you witnessed and converted to Catholicism for no good reason, because some Jack Chick-esque fundamentalist preacher knows the truth.

    [Creepster]...Cruz made female students uncomfortable by frequently walking to their end of the floor in his freshman dorm, wearing only a paisley bathrobe. When he announced his bid for president of the school's debate society, the other members had a secret meeting to pick an anyone-but-Cruz candidate. The eventual winner later acknowledged that "my one qualification for the office was that I was not Ted...

    "I would rather have anybody else be the president of the United States," screenwriter Craig Mazin told the Daily Beast in 2013. "Anyone. I would rather pick somebody from the phone book." On Twitter, Mazin—who has called Cruz "a nightmare of a human being"—recalled that when he was a freshman sharing a dorm room with Cruz... Cruz, he notes, "was that widely loathed. It's his superpower." [Another Princeton roommate of Cruz's, Geoff Cohen, said:] "People might think Craig is exaggerating. He's not. I met Ted freshman week and loathed him within the hour."
    http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2016/01/ted-cruz-jerk-hated

     


    He was infamous for firing off mundane work e-mails in the middle of the night—it happened so often that some in the Bush campaign suspected him of writing them ahead of time and programming his computer to send while he was asleep. He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to "the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted's were only about him and were more frequent."
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    But I'm sure Ted Cruz will do well in Florida, an important battleground state the Republicans need to win. After all, he has Cuban roots. And I think the Cubans in Florida have nothing but love for what Castro and the revolution brought. They'll want to thank Ted's father for fighting to bring it about:

    He was born in Canada, in 1970, but his tale, as he likes to say, begins fourteen years earlier in a Cuban jail cell. His father, Rafael, had belonged to Castro’s rebel forces fighting to overthrow the Batista dictatorship, and on the night of Rafael’s seventeenth birthday in 1956, Batista’s goons caught up with him. "He got captured and he disappeared," Cruz told me one day over lunch at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Houston.
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

  32. @Steve Sailer
    Who is the rhythm guitarist in the E-Street Band who dresses like Mick Jones of the Clash: black beret, vaguely military/guerilla?

    Steven Van Zandt also has a syndicated radio show.

  33. @Steve Sailer
    "he flies back to NYC every night so he can sleep in his penthouse"

    Is that part of his germophobia?

    That’s what I was wondering too. He also doesn’t mix it up with the locals a lot either. He doesn’t hang out at diners and the like much. He mostly seems to do the large speech things.

  34. @Hapalong Cassidy
    I've about had it with these so-called Evangelicals. Useful idiots is what they are to the establishment Republicans. As long as they throw them some red meat about abortion and gay marriage, they can carry on with their open borders, enrich-the-1 percent agenda.

    abortion and gay marriage

    Because mass murder of babies and destruction of the Christian values upon which the Western civilization rests mean nothing. All that matters is keeping the Mexicans out, eh?*

    *Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.
     
    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever...

    To paraphrase a pessimistic dying Scot, "If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a fetal human face — forever."
    , @Hapalong Cassidy
    It's called "picking your battles". Something the Evangelicals have never understood. They can't grasp that overturning Roe v. Wade is a pipe dream. Those establishment candidates do, however, grasp this. Mainstream Republicans have been railing against abortion for decades, yet have made nary a dent. And they are fine with that. It's a pretty good setup for them. A crowd-pleasing issue which they know they'll never have to act upon, and which their useful idiot constituency will never call them out on.
    , @Bill
    The GOP is pro-choice. Open your eyes. But, but, but the platform! But, but, but the words coming out of the candidates' pie holes! Open your eyes. The Roe court was 7-2 Republican and the Republicans voted 6-1 for Roe. Every single year since then, the court has had a Republican majority. The GOP is pro-choice, and the 'gelicals are rubes.

    Hows come the GOP has managed to get the top marginal tax rate cut from 70% under Reagan to 20% now (counting the top cap gains rate as the relevant top rate), and yet have not succeeded in even slowing down the march of the cultural marxists? Is it because a) the GOP is a cultural marxist party b) the 'gelicals are rubes c) the leadership of the christian right is corrupt d) all of the above?

    If you want there to be a pro-life party, you have to get rid of the "pro-life" party.
  35. “I like the wall,” and Trump’s support for the military.

    I’ll take this opportunity to explain again the difference between Donald Trump and Ted Cruz in regard to “completing” a barrier along the USA-Mexico border.

    The USA-Mexico border is about 1,900 miles long.

    Donald Trump has proposed to extend the barrier along that entire length, except for relatively short stretches where mountains form natural barriers.

    In contrast, Cruz proposes to add merely 60 more miles to the already built 640-mile-long border. After Cruz “completes” his border barrier, its total length will be 700 miles.

    In December 2015, Cruz offered an “immigration plan” that included the following:

    Build a wall that works …. I will complete the wall.

    However, Cruz meant that he would complete the wall that Congress funded by the Secure Fence Act of 2006. This Act funded a barrier of 700 miles, but only 640 miles have been built.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mexico%E2%80%93United_States_barrier

    Cruz is promising to complete only the 700 miles, not the 1,900 miles.

    In January Cruz rewrote his “immigration plan”, and the part about the border barrier is now clarified:

    Build a wall that works. The unsecured border with Mexico invites illegal immigrants, criminals, and terrorists to tread on American soil. Millions of people from all over the world, including from hostile nations and terrorist havens, have been apprehended at our southern border – and many who make it through are never caught. This is a failure of the highest order. I will fulfill the promise Congress made to the American people almost 10 years ago by completing all 700 miles of priority fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border, and dedicate the resources necessary to replace all single-layer fencing along the U.S.-Mexico border to build a fence that keeps people out and that is technology-supported and law enforcement-accessible. If other nations, such as Israel, can build an effective border wall, the United States certainly can.

    https://www.tedcruz.org/cruz-immigration-plan/

    Below are basic costs of the barrier. I’ll round the numbers to make the arithmetic easy.

    The construction of the border barrier costs about $5 million per mile. Since the border is about 2,000 miles long, the total cost is about $10 billion.

    So far, about 640 ($3.2 billion) of that 2,000 miles have been paid for and constructed.

    The construction is a one-time expenditure, but the barrier will serve for many decades.

    Consider a period of 50 years. If the barrier cost $10 billion to build, then each year of the barrier’s service will cost about $200 million.

    In the current situation, any Central American family that crosses our border is immediately provided housing, education and other government benefits forever. Practically none of those families ever will be deported.

    If the Democrat Party wins the 2016 Presidential election, practically anybody who crosses the border will be allowed to remain in the USA permanently, will receive generous government benefits and eventually will become US citizens.

    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
  36. @Steve Sailer
    "he flies back to NYC every night so he can sleep in his penthouse"

    Is that part of his germophobia?

    Is that part of his germophobia?

    Despite his American nationalist shtick, I suspect that he has contempt for the “flyover country” and its people. He lives the life of an über-0.001 percenter New Yorker and doesn’t seem to show any genuine empathy or concern for ordinary Middle Americans. Until he decided to run for president, he never displayed any noblesse oblige toward his socio-economic inferiors or the sense of service to the country at large.

    I like much of what he says, but I do not believe a word of it because his priors demonstrate zero evidence of what he says or claims he will do. Talk is cheap, actions speak louder. I lived in NYC long enough to know not to believe New Yorkers who say “Just trust me.”

    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I think "contempt" is too strong a word. I don't care to hang out with working class white people, but I regard them as part of the bedrock of this country.

    You're also misinformed when you say Trump has never shown any regard for people in flyover country. For example, in 1986 Trump helped pay off the mortgage on a Georgia widow's farm after being moved by her story.
    http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/donald-trump-once-saved-a-womans-farm-from-foreclosure#.oxReoY50e
  37. @Twinkie

    abortion and gay marriage
     
    Because mass murder of babies and destruction of the Christian values upon which the Western civilization rests mean nothing. All that matters is keeping the Mexicans out, eh?*

    *Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.

    Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…

    To paraphrase a pessimistic dying Scot, “If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a fetal human face — forever.”

    • Replies: @rvg
    Does Trump have tiger blood? Is he winning?
    , @Twinkie

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    You assume the causation runs only one direction.

    What many rabid Trumpkins don't seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building. Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one's possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.

    I do not refer specifically to you, but others who have expressed intemperate opinions regarding Iowans here because things did not go their way. They seem to harbor fantasies of some sort of a "will to power" scenario with Trump.

    Real life - real politics, certainly - just doesn't work that way. Victory requires careful preparation, gathering of allies, sound strategy, and correction execution, all of which take hard work and iron discipline. Bombastic talking and riling up disgruntled people is the easy part.
  38. No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…

    Why can’t antiabortionists (mind you, I’m certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I’ve never understood this. It’s mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    • Replies: @rvg
    Maybe you should have been infanticided instead?
    , @Romanian
    Because they know their only comparative advantage in this world, besides assabiyah, is in numbers, which is the only advantage they need to subvert flaccid democracies.
    , @Twinkie

    Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians
     
    Many of them come from regions of the world where human life can be very cheap.

    even early infanticide
     
    That is just evil, and I do not use that word lightly.
    , @reiner Tor

    It’s mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).
     
    Though I didn't agree with you on a number of issues, I thought you were a serious thinker whose thoughts are worth reading. Up until I read this.
    , @anon

    I’ve never understood this.
     
    Everybody else does.
    , @Jimmy Docherty
    I think you would be more readily categorized as “Levantine".
    , @Jimi
    White voters expect the government to align with their values. Blacks and immigrants vote for a government that aligns with their interests.

    This means whites vote on social issues while non-whites vote for programs that benefit them.

    Steve Sailer had a post touching on this.
  39. Trump needs to put up or shut up. Stop rambling on Twitter about how much the media and the establishment sucks, get on the ground in NH and start hiring people who can get your voters out to the polls. If Trump loses NH then his campaign is over and Cruz will easily scoop up the lion’s share of those voters and stroll right to the nomination.

  40. @Stephen R. Diamond

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    Why can't antiabortionists (mind you, I'm certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I've never understood this. It's mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    Maybe you should have been infanticided instead?

  41. @Reg Cæsar

    Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.
     
    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever...

    To paraphrase a pessimistic dying Scot, "If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a fetal human face — forever."

    Does Trump have tiger blood? Is he winning?

  42. @Stephen R. Diamond

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    Why can't antiabortionists (mind you, I'm certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I've never understood this. It's mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    Because they know their only comparative advantage in this world, besides assabiyah, is in numbers, which is the only advantage they need to subvert flaccid democracies.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    They know this? Seems like a rather abstract inference to me.
  43. @Reg Cæsar

    Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.
     
    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever...

    To paraphrase a pessimistic dying Scot, "If you want a picture of the future, imagine a boot stamping on a fetal human face — forever."

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…

    You assume the causation runs only one direction.

    What many rabid Trumpkins don’t seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building. Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one’s possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.

    I do not refer specifically to you, but others who have expressed intemperate opinions regarding Iowans here because things did not go their way. They seem to harbor fantasies of some sort of a “will to power” scenario with Trump.

    Real life – real politics, certainly – just doesn’t work that way. Victory requires careful preparation, gathering of allies, sound strategy, and correction execution, all of which take hard work and iron discipline. Bombastic talking and riling up disgruntled people is the easy part.

    • Replies: @anon
    That doesn't change the core point made.

    Once you've been turned into a minority none of that will matter ergo the priority is preventing being turned into a minority.

    (where "you" is people who think and act as american-americans)
    , @officious intermeddler

    Winning requires coalition building.
     
    We hear this all the time. What is it, exactly, that we are supposed to offer to the mass of immigrants to tempt them to join our coalition? The Democrats give them free money; special affirmative-action privileges; unlimited further immigration of their families, friends and fellow countrymen; and the destruction of all of the parts that they don't like of the historic American nation. Should we offer them even more?
    , @Bill

    What many rabid Trumpkins don’t seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building.
     
    For pity's sake. SoCons have been in this coalition for fifty years. This coalition, over its run, has delivered victory after victory after victory for the smibertarians and money men. It has delivered defeat after defeat after defeat to the SoCons.

    Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one’s possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.
     
    No, a sure path to defeat is getting into bed with people who hate you and then staying there even after they beat the crap out of you every night for fifty years. That's a sure path to defeat. But, but, but once every four years they whisper nice things in my ear!

    You seriously think it is more in our interest to ally with Bryan Caplan and Sheldon Adelson than with the tatooed bikers mentioned in the story? Are you high?
  44. @Stephen R. Diamond

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    Why can't antiabortionists (mind you, I'm certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I've never understood this. It's mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians

    Many of them come from regions of the world where human life can be very cheap.

    even early infanticide

    That is just evil, and I do not use that word lightly.

  45. @Stephen R. Diamond

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    Why can't antiabortionists (mind you, I'm certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I've never understood this. It's mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    It’s mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    Though I didn’t agree with you on a number of issues, I thought you were a serious thinker whose thoughts are worth reading. Up until I read this.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    I guess one must sound crazy (or evil) to get much reaction these days. (Per Trump.)

    Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion. Entrance into human society begins personhood.

  46. @anony-mouse
    Given that being a business success is one the reasons given for voting Trump this doesn't say much for him.

    When he decides to build a building does he just wait around for some construction workers to happen to walk by his property and hope they can just end up building it?

    My guess is he was probably told by election experts he had no chance in Iowa so he didn’t organise. I expect he won’t make that mistake again.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar


    My guess is he was probably told by election experts he had no chance in Iowa so he didn’t organise. I expect he won’t make that mistake again.

     

    Minnesota holds caucuses on March 1.

    Not that anyone has paid attention to those for the last few decades.

    Still, I'd like to see some evidence of a Trump organization.
  47. anon • Disclaimer says:
    @education realist
    "Can you imagine how much better Trump would’ve done with competent GOTV effort?"

    GOP turnout was 50% over the highest ever. If Trump hadn't done a good job of getting out the vote, he'd have been running neck and neck with Ben Carson.

    Cruz had a brilliant ground game. Cruz has run an excellent campaign, given his unappealing character. Rubio didnt' turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump.

    Rubio didnt’ turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump.

    Nonsense.

    If they were just anti-Trump they could have voted for Cruz as the front runner not someone who the polls said was miles behind.

    And if there had been such an anti-Trump surge split 50-50 between Cruz and Rubio where was Cruz’s half?

    The Rubio vote was clearly rigged by the GOP establishment for optics as separately obvious from the media spin afterwards.

    • Replies: @AP
    Rubio's votes came from urban areas such as Des Moines. Those people wouldn't vote for Cruz.
  48. @Foreign Expert
    Could Trump cause a historic realignment of the white working class into the Republican column?

    Yes

    and the pre-1965 black and hispanic working class too.

  49. @Stephen R. Diamond

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    Why can't antiabortionists (mind you, I'm certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I've never understood this. It's mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    I’ve never understood this.

    Everybody else does.

    • Replies: @Stephen R. Diamond
    Or assumes it. The extrapolation bias is very strong.
  50. @Twinkie

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    You assume the causation runs only one direction.

    What many rabid Trumpkins don't seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building. Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one's possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.

    I do not refer specifically to you, but others who have expressed intemperate opinions regarding Iowans here because things did not go their way. They seem to harbor fantasies of some sort of a "will to power" scenario with Trump.

    Real life - real politics, certainly - just doesn't work that way. Victory requires careful preparation, gathering of allies, sound strategy, and correction execution, all of which take hard work and iron discipline. Bombastic talking and riling up disgruntled people is the easy part.

    That doesn’t change the core point made.

    Once you’ve been turned into a minority none of that will matter ergo the priority is preventing being turned into a minority.

    (where “you” is people who think and act as american-americans)

  51. “What many rabid Trumpkins don’t seem to get is that politics is a team sport.”

    Actually, they do. Some have been supporting “the team” for quite some time, despite the fact that the team doesn’t have a good opinion of them. Others quit going to the games.

    “The team” wants the rabid Trumpkins, but only if they root for the right guy.

    If Sean Trende is correct, a chunk of white voters have sat out one, maybe two, presidential elections.

    The GOP doesn’t appear to be able to win the Presidency without them. They don’t appear to care about that, because they don’t want to win the Presidency with them and their preferred candidate.

    So the GOP may lose either way. The issue, for Trump supporters, is just be how the loss is achieved.

    1: Trump nomination, Trump wins
    2: Trump nomination, Trump loses

    Otherwise, the outcome in which immigration debate is dramatically, permanently altered because of awareness of its relevance is preferable.

    Worst case scenario: GOP victory in which GOP offers amnesty or increased H1B

    Acceptable outcome: GOP loses after gloating about beating Trump because Trump supporters stay home. Because in that world, the Dems will be constrained in their attempts to increase immigration.

    Best case scenario, outside Trump nomination: GOP victory in which immigration restrictionists are carefully catered to.

    The GOP’s mistake lies in thinking that a Rubio victory is preferable to Trump fans than a Trump loss.

    Again, It’s the immigration, stupid

    • Agree: Anonym
  52. @Twinkie

    Given that being a business success is one the reasons given for voting Trump this doesn’t say much for him.
     
    For someone who is supposedly very good at "winning," he certainly did not show much. He had virtually no "ground game" in Iowa, and essentially ran a celebrity campaign - all free (earned) media and giant rallies, but no serious organization or grassroots/ground-pounding hard work. He ended up fitting the NYC stereotype in the Midwest - all talk, no work.

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It's not just that his locked up the "evangelicals" and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz's magna cum laude and editor of law review weren't just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.

    In Iowa, at least, Cruz showed that he could run the trains on time better than the supposed businessman with "real world" enterprise experience. New Hampshire will be a tougher slog for Cruz, for sure, but it will be VERY interesting how well his national organization performs versus Trump's yet-to-materialize infrastructure.

    As I mentioned here before, politics is a team endeavor. Candidates are merely the vessels through which the aspirations of others are channeled. I have yet to see any evidence that Trump gets this. He still seems to be stuck in the celebrity mode, not serious candidate mode, as his squabbles with a politically insignificant journalist immediately before the vote demonstrated. Calling someone else's wife a "bimbo" is never a good look for anyone let alone someone running for the land's highest elected office.

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It’s not just that his locked up the “evangelicals” and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz’s magna cum laude and editor of law review weren’t just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.

    Ted Cruz, asshole.

    GQ reported that Cruz started a study group during his first year in Cambridge, but he announced that “he didn’t want anybody from ‘minor Ivies’ like Penn or Brown.” In an interview with the Boston Globe, another student recalled what happened when she agreed to carpool with Cruz: “We hadn’t left Manhattan before he asked my IQ.”

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you’re a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust. Sorry Chief Rabbi Israel Zolli, but apparently you didn’t witness what you witnessed and converted to Catholicism for no good reason, because some Jack Chick-esque fundamentalist preacher knows the truth.

    [Creepster]…Cruz made female students uncomfortable by frequently walking to their end of the floor in his freshman dorm, wearing only a paisley bathrobe. When he announced his bid for president of the school’s debate society, the other members had a secret meeting to pick an anyone-but-Cruz candidate. The eventual winner later acknowledged that “my one qualification for the office was that I was not Ted…

    “I would rather have anybody else be the president of the United States,” screenwriter Craig Mazin told the Daily Beast in 2013. “Anyone. I would rather pick somebody from the phone book.” On Twitter, Mazin—who has called Cruz “a nightmare of a human being”—recalled that when he was a freshman sharing a dorm room with Cruz… Cruz, he notes, “was that widely loathed. It’s his superpower.” [Another Princeton roommate of Cruz's, Geoff Cohen, said:] “People might think Craig is exaggerating. He’s not. I met Ted freshman week and loathed him within the hour.”

    http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2016/01/ted-cruz-jerk-hated

    He was infamous for firing off mundane work e-mails in the middle of the night—it happened so often that some in the Bush campaign suspected him of writing them ahead of time and programming his computer to send while he was asleep. He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to “the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted’s were only about him and were more frequent.”

    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

    But I’m sure Ted Cruz will do well in Florida, an important battleground state the Republicans need to win. After all, he has Cuban roots. And I think the Cubans in Florida have nothing but love for what Castro and the revolution brought. They’ll want to thank Ted’s father for fighting to bring it about:

    He was born in Canada, in 1970, but his tale, as he likes to say, begins fourteen years earlier in a Cuban jail cell. His father, Rafael, had belonged to Castro’s rebel forces fighting to overthrow the Batista dictatorship, and on the night of Rafael’s seventeenth birthday in 1956, Batista’s goons caught up with him. “He got captured and he disappeared,” Cruz told me one day over lunch at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Houston.

    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

    • Replies: @Pat Gilligan
    Sorry, I forgot to include Rev. Rafael Cruz's comments on the Catholic Church and the Holocaust:
    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=5jEFBlMkQtc
    , @5371
    [He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to “the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted’s were only about him and were more frequent.”]

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.
    , @BB753
    Evangelicalism is Christianity for dummies. I've never met a bright -or indeed honest and trustworthy -Evangelical in my life.
    Cruz comes across as a devious, ambitious and empty suit.
    At least Rubio is a more colorful rascal, the Flamingo Kid, as Sailed puts it. Agreed, they're both scum, with Cruz probably a little bit smarter but not much more.
    , @Twinkie

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you’re a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust.
     
    First of all, let me just preface this by saying that I am still undecided between Trump and Cruz. And I have to say that what I have seen of Trump's actual political achievement is unimpressive to say the least.

    As for what Cruz said in his early 20's, really? I am pretty sure I said some asinine things when I thought I was bright young thing in grad school. A lot of smart people have. It's a combination of youthful inexperience, arrogance, insecurity, and so forth. That is a sad noose to hang on a grown man running for the presidency decades later.

    As for Rev. Cruz, he appears to be a pretty principled guy. Since I consider him a heretic who is grossly in error in matters of Christian dogma, I guess we can call it even. And you know what, Mel Gibson's father used to say nasty things about "the current occupant of St. Peter's seat" and other crazy stuff, but I still think Gibson is a gifted director and actor, and patronize his products.

    For that matter, I consider Mormons to be a bunch of insane (but very nice) cultists, but I love them as political allies. One could hardly do better with others as neighbors.

    By the way, I do think that Cruz does come off as not particularly likeable. He doesn't have that gift (which Rubio does in spades - too bad he doesn't appear to be principled). But anybody who opposes the ethanol subsidy in Iowa and wins the caucus there anyway has my political respect.
  53. @Pat Gilligan

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It’s not just that his locked up the “evangelicals” and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz’s magna cum laude and editor of law review weren’t just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.
     
    Ted Cruz, asshole.

    GQ reported that Cruz started a study group during his first year in Cambridge, but he announced that "he didn't want anybody from 'minor Ivies' like Penn or Brown." In an interview with the Boston Globe, another student recalled what happened when she agreed to carpool with Cruz: "We hadn't left Manhattan before he asked my IQ."

     

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you're a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust. Sorry Chief Rabbi Israel Zolli, but apparently you didn't witness what you witnessed and converted to Catholicism for no good reason, because some Jack Chick-esque fundamentalist preacher knows the truth.

    [Creepster]...Cruz made female students uncomfortable by frequently walking to their end of the floor in his freshman dorm, wearing only a paisley bathrobe. When he announced his bid for president of the school's debate society, the other members had a secret meeting to pick an anyone-but-Cruz candidate. The eventual winner later acknowledged that "my one qualification for the office was that I was not Ted...

    "I would rather have anybody else be the president of the United States," screenwriter Craig Mazin told the Daily Beast in 2013. "Anyone. I would rather pick somebody from the phone book." On Twitter, Mazin—who has called Cruz "a nightmare of a human being"—recalled that when he was a freshman sharing a dorm room with Cruz... Cruz, he notes, "was that widely loathed. It's his superpower." [Another Princeton roommate of Cruz's, Geoff Cohen, said:] "People might think Craig is exaggerating. He's not. I met Ted freshman week and loathed him within the hour."
    http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2016/01/ted-cruz-jerk-hated

     


    He was infamous for firing off mundane work e-mails in the middle of the night—it happened so often that some in the Bush campaign suspected him of writing them ahead of time and programming his computer to send while he was asleep. He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to "the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted's were only about him and were more frequent."
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    But I'm sure Ted Cruz will do well in Florida, an important battleground state the Republicans need to win. After all, he has Cuban roots. And I think the Cubans in Florida have nothing but love for what Castro and the revolution brought. They'll want to thank Ted's father for fighting to bring it about:

    He was born in Canada, in 1970, but his tale, as he likes to say, begins fourteen years earlier in a Cuban jail cell. His father, Rafael, had belonged to Castro’s rebel forces fighting to overthrow the Batista dictatorship, and on the night of Rafael’s seventeenth birthday in 1956, Batista’s goons caught up with him. "He got captured and he disappeared," Cruz told me one day over lunch at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Houston.
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    Sorry, I forgot to include Rev. Rafael Cruz’s comments on the Catholic Church and the Holocaust:

  54. @Twinkie

    abortion and gay marriage
     
    Because mass murder of babies and destruction of the Christian values upon which the Western civilization rests mean nothing. All that matters is keeping the Mexicans out, eh?*

    *Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.

    It’s called “picking your battles”. Something the Evangelicals have never understood. They can’t grasp that overturning Roe v. Wade is a pipe dream. Those establishment candidates do, however, grasp this. Mainstream Republicans have been railing against abortion for decades, yet have made nary a dent. And they are fine with that. It’s a pretty good setup for them. A crowd-pleasing issue which they know they’ll never have to act upon, and which their useful idiot constituency will never call them out on.

    • Replies: @EdwardM
    They have made a dent. Public opinion is around 50/50 against abortion, thanks in part of effective PR by anti-abortion activists who point out the worst of the abortion industry (e.g., Gosnell, Planned Parenthood). Majorities oppose the abortion-on-demand-in-all-circumstances that is a litmus test for the Democrat party. Some states have passed modest restrictions that have not been struck down by the courts. With another Supreme Court justice or two appointed by someone like President Cruz, it is not beyond the realm of possibility that Roe could be overturned,

    (For what it's worth, I am in what is apparently the small group of people who are not opposed to abortion morally, but think that Roe v. Wade was an outrageous decision. In America in the last half-century, it seems compulsory for most people, especially the left, to think that just because something is bad, it must be found unconstitutional or vice versa. Of course Justice Kennedy's "legal reasoning" in Obergefell was the most blatant example of this type of mentality, which Roe was able to mainstream.)
    , @Twinkie

    They can’t grasp that overturning Roe v. Wade is a pipe dream.
     
    Well, we'll see what happens when the Supreme Court is reliably majority strictly constructionist/constitutionalist. Even if one supports abortion rights, Roe v. Wade was a terrible, unconstitutional decision from a legal structural point of view.

    Mainstream Republicans have been railing against abortion for decades, yet have made nary a dent.
     
    On the contrary, the public support for abortion has fallen greatly over the decades (especially among married women). The pro-life movement has learned a great deal from the pro-Second Amendment movement, and has begun to follow an effective two track strategy: 1) publicize particularly heinous abuses of abortion and 2) pursue incremental legal steps (e.g. holding abortion clinics to the same medical quality standards as hospitals, etc.).

    The war ain't over yet.
  55. @Twinkie

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    You assume the causation runs only one direction.

    What many rabid Trumpkins don't seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building. Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one's possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.

    I do not refer specifically to you, but others who have expressed intemperate opinions regarding Iowans here because things did not go their way. They seem to harbor fantasies of some sort of a "will to power" scenario with Trump.

    Real life - real politics, certainly - just doesn't work that way. Victory requires careful preparation, gathering of allies, sound strategy, and correction execution, all of which take hard work and iron discipline. Bombastic talking and riling up disgruntled people is the easy part.

    Winning requires coalition building.

    We hear this all the time. What is it, exactly, that we are supposed to offer to the mass of immigrants to tempt them to join our coalition? The Democrats give them free money; special affirmative-action privileges; unlimited further immigration of their families, friends and fellow countrymen; and the destruction of all of the parts that they don’t like of the historic American nation. Should we offer them even more?

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    We hear this all the time. What is it, exactly, that we are supposed to offer to the mass of immigrants to tempt them to join our coalition?
     
    You might try some reading comprehension. The potential coalition partners under consideration here are white evangelicals.
  56. @Stephen R. Diamond

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    Why can't antiabortionists (mind you, I'm certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I've never understood this. It's mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    I think you would be more readily categorized as “Levantine”.

  57. @Twinkie

    Is that part of his germophobia?
     
    Despite his American nationalist shtick, I suspect that he has contempt for the "flyover country" and its people. He lives the life of an über-0.001 percenter New Yorker and doesn't seem to show any genuine empathy or concern for ordinary Middle Americans. Until he decided to run for president, he never displayed any noblesse oblige toward his socio-economic inferiors or the sense of service to the country at large.

    I like much of what he says, but I do not believe a word of it because his priors demonstrate zero evidence of what he says or claims he will do. Talk is cheap, actions speak louder. I lived in NYC long enough to know not to believe New Yorkers who say "Just trust me."

    I think “contempt” is too strong a word. I don’t care to hang out with working class white people, but I regard them as part of the bedrock of this country.

    You’re also misinformed when you say Trump has never shown any regard for people in flyover country. For example, in 1986 Trump helped pay off the mortgage on a Georgia widow’s farm after being moved by her story.

    http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/donald-trump-once-saved-a-womans-farm-from-foreclosure#.oxReoY50e

    • Replies: @AP
    That is nice, but in general, until this election, he has been stingy in terms of helping people:

    http://newsexaminer.net/politics/donald-trump-the-least-charitable-billionaire/

    Prior to this election he gave more to the Clinton Foundation than he did to veterans, for example.
  58. @anon

    Rubio didnt’ turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump.
     
    Nonsense.

    If they were just anti-Trump they could have voted for Cruz as the front runner not someone who the polls said was miles behind.

    And if there had been such an anti-Trump surge split 50-50 between Cruz and Rubio where was Cruz's half?

    The Rubio vote was clearly rigged by the GOP establishment for optics as separately obvious from the media spin afterwards.

    Rubio’s votes came from urban areas such as Des Moines. Those people wouldn’t vote for Cruz.

  59. @Harry Baldwin
    I think "contempt" is too strong a word. I don't care to hang out with working class white people, but I regard them as part of the bedrock of this country.

    You're also misinformed when you say Trump has never shown any regard for people in flyover country. For example, in 1986 Trump helped pay off the mortgage on a Georgia widow's farm after being moved by her story.
    http://www.buzzfeed.com/andrewkaczynski/donald-trump-once-saved-a-womans-farm-from-foreclosure#.oxReoY50e

    That is nice, but in general, until this election, he has been stingy in terms of helping people:

    http://newsexaminer.net/politics/donald-trump-the-least-charitable-billionaire/

    Prior to this election he gave more to the Clinton Foundation than he did to veterans, for example.

  60. This type of earned media/celebrity candidacy is a huge advantage in the bigger, delegate rich states down the line though. Specifically Florida, Texas, California, New York.

    Anyone with a car can travel Iowa shaking hands and talking in coffee shops. Nobody in Florida cares if you went to their favorite pizza shop.

    Run through the states and look at Trump’s path to win, it is mostly banking on the bigger states where so called “ground game” is a backseat to media.

  61. @Hapalong Cassidy
    It's called "picking your battles". Something the Evangelicals have never understood. They can't grasp that overturning Roe v. Wade is a pipe dream. Those establishment candidates do, however, grasp this. Mainstream Republicans have been railing against abortion for decades, yet have made nary a dent. And they are fine with that. It's a pretty good setup for them. A crowd-pleasing issue which they know they'll never have to act upon, and which their useful idiot constituency will never call them out on.

    They have made a dent. Public opinion is around 50/50 against abortion, thanks in part of effective PR by anti-abortion activists who point out the worst of the abortion industry (e.g., Gosnell, Planned Parenthood). Majorities oppose the abortion-on-demand-in-all-circumstances that is a litmus test for the Democrat party. Some states have passed modest restrictions that have not been struck down by the courts. With another Supreme Court justice or two appointed by someone like President Cruz, it is not beyond the realm of possibility that Roe could be overturned,

    (For what it’s worth, I am in what is apparently the small group of people who are not opposed to abortion morally, but think that Roe v. Wade was an outrageous decision. In America in the last half-century, it seems compulsory for most people, especially the left, to think that just because something is bad, it must be found unconstitutional or vice versa. Of course Justice Kennedy’s “legal reasoning” in Obergefell was the most blatant example of this type of mentality, which Roe was able to mainstream.)

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Likewise, most other countries have more restrictive abortion policies than the U.S., so the usual keeping up with the Joneses arguments trotted out by the Progs on health care, etc... work against them on abortion.

    Abortion is sacred to American Progs because it provides them with a means to control black population without having to talk about black population. If the latter ever becomes less radioactive, then support for abortion per se will wane. Concern with white demographic decline already weighs against across the board support for the promotion of abortion in all cases.

  62. @anon
    My guess is he was probably told by election experts he had no chance in Iowa so he didn't organise. I expect he won't make that mistake again.

    My guess is he was probably told by election experts he had no chance in Iowa so he didn’t organise. I expect he won’t make that mistake again.

    Minnesota holds caucuses on March 1.

    Not that anyone has paid attention to those for the last few decades.

    Still, I’d like to see some evidence of a Trump organization.

  63. @Twinkie

    abortion and gay marriage
     
    Because mass murder of babies and destruction of the Christian values upon which the Western civilization rests mean nothing. All that matters is keeping the Mexicans out, eh?*

    *Mind you, I am an immigration restrictionist, but the immigration issue, while of great importance, is not the only important malaise besetting the country.

    The GOP is pro-choice. Open your eyes. But, but, but the platform! But, but, but the words coming out of the candidates’ pie holes! Open your eyes. The Roe court was 7-2 Republican and the Republicans voted 6-1 for Roe. Every single year since then, the court has had a Republican majority. The GOP is pro-choice, and the ‘gelicals are rubes.

    Hows come the GOP has managed to get the top marginal tax rate cut from 70% under Reagan to 20% now (counting the top cap gains rate as the relevant top rate), and yet have not succeeded in even slowing down the march of the cultural marxists? Is it because a) the GOP is a cultural marxist party b) the ‘gelicals are rubes c) the leadership of the christian right is corrupt d) all of the above?

    If you want there to be a pro-life party, you have to get rid of the “pro-life” party.

  64. @Anonymous
    Great article. Not sure Trump's post caucus spin is worth a damn but he claims to have held back massively in Iowa due to his advisors.

    Since Trump does have advisors after all I hope they are telling him to stop sounding like a democrat because he will implode his own campaign.

    Trump Fall 2015 = Attacking fraudulent status quo. Winning.

    Trump Winter 2016 = Hands across the aisle. Losing.

    Concern troll is concerned that Trump does not sound like an establishment GOP candidate.

  65. @Romanian
    Because they know their only comparative advantage in this world, besides assabiyah, is in numbers, which is the only advantage they need to subvert flaccid democracies.

    They know this? Seems like a rather abstract inference to me.

    • Replies: @Romanian
    It's not. Not noticing demographic changes is a problem for myopic Westerners, not the people who stand to benefit from these changes. The La Raza folks crow about taking back your South West, there are plenty of videos of regular non-European migrants, but also religious authority figures openly acknowledging demographic displacement, they seem very comfortable with the idea of claiming areas where they are in a demographic majority or plurality as their own habitat where lawful institutions may not intrude etc etc. And a non-trivial minority of some of these peoples is willing to die to speed the process.

    This is a basic math that they recognize instinctively with their own eyes and then is confirmed by their elites.

  66. @anon

    I’ve never understood this.
     
    Everybody else does.

    Or assumes it. The extrapolation bias is very strong.

  67. @reiner Tor

    It’s mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).
     
    Though I didn't agree with you on a number of issues, I thought you were a serious thinker whose thoughts are worth reading. Up until I read this.

    I guess one must sound crazy (or evil) to get much reaction these days. (Per Trump.)

    Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion. Entrance into human society begins personhood.

    • Replies: @Bill
    Exactly. Killing a baby one month before it passes through the birth canal is exactly the same as killing a baby one month after it passes through the birth canal. There is no such thing as an anti-infanticide pro-choicer. Pro-choice is pro-infanticide.

    Pro-lifers trying to defend the distinction between pre-birth and post-birth infanticide are trying, with utter and complete futility, to defend a Schelling point. They won't succeed in preventing post-birth infanticide from becoming more common. They will only succeed in compromising their own arguments and becoming absurd.

    None of which changes the fact that you are evil, of course. It's just that you are evil for being pro-choice. No need to inquire about whether you recognize some silly distinction regarding birth canals.

    , @reiner Tor
    I am not exactly anti-abortion. I do, however, have a baby girl, and I don't think anybody - myself included - has a right to murder her. I think as a parent it's my obligation to provide for her.

    Birth is an arbitrary criterion.
     
    It is. Five-month-old embryos routinely punch and kick and react to their parents talking or singing to them. I don't think anyone has a right to murder them. But I do recognize that we have to introduce arbitrary criteria, or else we'd end up with a right to murder adults. Most people who think however small embryos or even zygotes are fully formed human beings (in a sense they are, we know their genes determine so much) also instinctively recognize that abortion is not totally like after-birth murder, so for example they won't propose exactly the same punishment for it as for murdering an adult. They also often recognize special cases (serious genetic or other developmental disorders or embryos conceived as a result of rape) where abortion could nevertheless be legal (though not to be encouraged even in these cases).

    I personally don't care much for zygotes and while I wouldn't personally condone abortion in my personal life except maybe in the above mentioned exceptions, I accept that it's legal to abort small embryos. I'm quite hostile to the idea of aborting older embryos, though. It's not a very important issue to me, but I'd oppose its legality.

    Entrance into human society begins personhood.
     
    My daughter entered human society when as a barely five-month-old embryo she started to react to my speech and songs by kicking and punching and being active afterwards. (My wife told me she was always more active after I talked to her for a while, and then slept through the night better, than if I didn't do that.) Both me and my wife started bonding with her. How could she not have been a member of society?
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    "Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion."

    You may characterize birth as being "arbitrary" to your heart's content, but in the real world inhabited not by ultra-rational androids and/or people who suffer from Asperger's Syndrome, people think there is actually something significant about the act of birth. It has an emotional impact on most humans, and indeed, on most other mammals. And so plenty of pro-Choice people, however foolish and misguided they may be, actually do draw a pretty significant moral distinction between an abortive procedure (one that usually takes place in the 1st, or occasionally the 2nd trimester, and almost never the 3rd), and just bludgeoning some infant to death. I'm sorry that this distinction puzzles you, but it doesn't puzzle hardly anyone else, and you're wasting our time with such distasteful glimpses into your apparently malformed psyche. I'm not trying to be cruel, or rude, but that's just the way it is. If you have these sorts of thoughts, I'd advise keeping them to yourself. Ideally, I'd advise trying to dispel them, and coming to an understanding about why they are wrong.
  68. @Twinkie

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    You assume the causation runs only one direction.

    What many rabid Trumpkins don't seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building. Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one's possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.

    I do not refer specifically to you, but others who have expressed intemperate opinions regarding Iowans here because things did not go their way. They seem to harbor fantasies of some sort of a "will to power" scenario with Trump.

    Real life - real politics, certainly - just doesn't work that way. Victory requires careful preparation, gathering of allies, sound strategy, and correction execution, all of which take hard work and iron discipline. Bombastic talking and riling up disgruntled people is the easy part.

    What many rabid Trumpkins don’t seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building.

    For pity’s sake. SoCons have been in this coalition for fifty years. This coalition, over its run, has delivered victory after victory after victory for the smibertarians and money men. It has delivered defeat after defeat after defeat to the SoCons.

    Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one’s possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.

    No, a sure path to defeat is getting into bed with people who hate you and then staying there even after they beat the crap out of you every night for fifty years. That’s a sure path to defeat. But, but, but once every four years they whisper nice things in my ear!

    You seriously think it is more in our interest to ally with Bryan Caplan and Sheldon Adelson than with the tatooed bikers mentioned in the story? Are you high?

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    You seriously think it is more in our interest to ally with Bryan Caplan and Sheldon Adelson than with the tatooed bikers mentioned in the story? Are you high?
     
    Bryan Caplan and Sheldon Adelson are evangelicals?

    And, no, I have never done any illegal controlled substances. Ever. Not even a whiff of cannabis in college. Made life much easier later with background checks.
  69. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "Rubio didn't turn voters; a lot of them came out specifically to vote for him because they hated Trump."

    Then that's a regional prejudice thing. Let's call it what it is. The same thing that worked to Cruz's advantage will hurt him in NY; NJ; New England perhaps the Upper Midwestern states and possibly in CA; OR; WA.

    Again, Trump may need to win the Northeast, the Pacific states, (except for Carly, no candidate hails from the Pacific so that region's wide open), and carry the Upper Midwest.

    Like in the November election, the Upper Midwest with its precious 60plus electoral votes, may just hold the balance for Trump to get the nomination.

    If Cruz wants to go there with his "NY values" smear, Trump can match him in the Upper Midwest and Northeast with "You really want a dumb hick in the White House? Seriously? Is he even from America?"

    Cruz started it. Let Trump finish it.

    But yep, this year the CA/Pacific along with Upper Midwest states may just hold the cards for Trump. Be interested to know when CA/WA/OR/Pacific region hosts their primaries this yr.

    Be interested to know when CA/WA/OR/Pacific region hosts their primaries this yr.

    Oregon primary, May 17th
    Washington caucus, May 24th
    California primary, June 7th

  70. @Stephen R. Diamond
    I guess one must sound crazy (or evil) to get much reaction these days. (Per Trump.)

    Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion. Entrance into human society begins personhood.

    Exactly. Killing a baby one month before it passes through the birth canal is exactly the same as killing a baby one month after it passes through the birth canal. There is no such thing as an anti-infanticide pro-choicer. Pro-choice is pro-infanticide.

    Pro-lifers trying to defend the distinction between pre-birth and post-birth infanticide are trying, with utter and complete futility, to defend a Schelling point. They won’t succeed in preventing post-birth infanticide from becoming more common. They will only succeed in compromising their own arguments and becoming absurd.

    None of which changes the fact that you are evil, of course. It’s just that you are evil for being pro-choice. No need to inquire about whether you recognize some silly distinction regarding birth canals.

  71. @Pat Gilligan

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It’s not just that his locked up the “evangelicals” and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz’s magna cum laude and editor of law review weren’t just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.
     
    Ted Cruz, asshole.

    GQ reported that Cruz started a study group during his first year in Cambridge, but he announced that "he didn't want anybody from 'minor Ivies' like Penn or Brown." In an interview with the Boston Globe, another student recalled what happened when she agreed to carpool with Cruz: "We hadn't left Manhattan before he asked my IQ."

     

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you're a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust. Sorry Chief Rabbi Israel Zolli, but apparently you didn't witness what you witnessed and converted to Catholicism for no good reason, because some Jack Chick-esque fundamentalist preacher knows the truth.

    [Creepster]...Cruz made female students uncomfortable by frequently walking to their end of the floor in his freshman dorm, wearing only a paisley bathrobe. When he announced his bid for president of the school's debate society, the other members had a secret meeting to pick an anyone-but-Cruz candidate. The eventual winner later acknowledged that "my one qualification for the office was that I was not Ted...

    "I would rather have anybody else be the president of the United States," screenwriter Craig Mazin told the Daily Beast in 2013. "Anyone. I would rather pick somebody from the phone book." On Twitter, Mazin—who has called Cruz "a nightmare of a human being"—recalled that when he was a freshman sharing a dorm room with Cruz... Cruz, he notes, "was that widely loathed. It's his superpower." [Another Princeton roommate of Cruz's, Geoff Cohen, said:] "People might think Craig is exaggerating. He's not. I met Ted freshman week and loathed him within the hour."
    http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2016/01/ted-cruz-jerk-hated

     


    He was infamous for firing off mundane work e-mails in the middle of the night—it happened so often that some in the Bush campaign suspected him of writing them ahead of time and programming his computer to send while he was asleep. He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to "the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted's were only about him and were more frequent."
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    But I'm sure Ted Cruz will do well in Florida, an important battleground state the Republicans need to win. After all, he has Cuban roots. And I think the Cubans in Florida have nothing but love for what Castro and the revolution brought. They'll want to thank Ted's father for fighting to bring it about:

    He was born in Canada, in 1970, but his tale, as he likes to say, begins fourteen years earlier in a Cuban jail cell. His father, Rafael, had belonged to Castro’s rebel forces fighting to overthrow the Batista dictatorship, and on the night of Rafael’s seventeenth birthday in 1956, Batista’s goons caught up with him. "He got captured and he disappeared," Cruz told me one day over lunch at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Houston.
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    [He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to “the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted’s were only about him and were more frequent.”]

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.

    • Replies: @PB and J
    That's insulting, and from what I've seen untrue. "Twinkie" has never come across as a creep or an "operator." There is also a difference between braggadocio and being truthful about one's successes.

    What's more interesting to me is that East Asian Americans are going to be largely turned off by Trump's style while "people of color" are more appreciative of it.
    , @iffen
    Twink got a low dose of humility. So what. What the f* have you done for us?
    , @Twinkie

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.
     
    It is grossly insulting to be likened to a member of the reptilian class that inhabits the ranks of professional politicians.

    You have no idea about Cruz's soul or mine. Only God knows.

    To me, Cruz regrettably gives off that used car salesman vibe.

    No one who knows me has ever likened me to such a character. On the contrary, I've been told I am too blunt, and my mother-in-law has been nagging me for a couple of decades that I am too honorable to get ahead in life (she thinks I need to be more "practical").

    Though I am cocky and have been so most of my life, that arrogance is greatly tempered by both my Christian faith and by the painful knowledge that better men than I gave their lives so I could breathe today and enjoy my family and friends.

    In any case, for me it comes down to Trump or Cruz. Trump has talked a lot and revealed himself to be quite vulgar, but so far has displayed no political acumen or result. Cruz, despite that used car salesmen vibe, has shown that he can organize well, work hard, and win. And he has shown some principled backbone in the Senate against the Republican establishment, so I am beginning to lean toward Cruz (even though the chance of him winning in NH and SC is low, I think).
  72. @Reg Cæsar

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist who would kill Trump if he could get away with it.
     
    And he could target Cruz, too, with "Born in the USA".

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist...
     
    ...with, what?, $50 million in New Jersey state bonds? On which he pays as much federal income tax as a (legal) Mexican immigrant dishwasher is subject to.

    And he could target Cruz, too, with “Born in the USA”.

    :) :) :)

    And as you all know, Springsteen’s a leftist…

    —-

    with, what?, $50 million in New Jersey state bonds? On which he pays as much federal income tax as a (legal) Mexican immigrant dishwasher is subject to.

    Yeah, those are the worst kind.

  73. @Stephen R. Diamond
    I guess one must sound crazy (or evil) to get much reaction these days. (Per Trump.)

    Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion. Entrance into human society begins personhood.

    I am not exactly anti-abortion. I do, however, have a baby girl, and I don’t think anybody – myself included – has a right to murder her. I think as a parent it’s my obligation to provide for her.

    Birth is an arbitrary criterion.

    It is. Five-month-old embryos routinely punch and kick and react to their parents talking or singing to them. I don’t think anyone has a right to murder them. But I do recognize that we have to introduce arbitrary criteria, or else we’d end up with a right to murder adults. Most people who think however small embryos or even zygotes are fully formed human beings (in a sense they are, we know their genes determine so much) also instinctively recognize that abortion is not totally like after-birth murder, so for example they won’t propose exactly the same punishment for it as for murdering an adult. They also often recognize special cases (serious genetic or other developmental disorders or embryos conceived as a result of rape) where abortion could nevertheless be legal (though not to be encouraged even in these cases).

    I personally don’t care much for zygotes and while I wouldn’t personally condone abortion in my personal life except maybe in the above mentioned exceptions, I accept that it’s legal to abort small embryos. I’m quite hostile to the idea of aborting older embryos, though. It’s not a very important issue to me, but I’d oppose its legality.

    Entrance into human society begins personhood.

    My daughter entered human society when as a barely five-month-old embryo she started to react to my speech and songs by kicking and punching and being active afterwards. (My wife told me she was always more active after I talked to her for a while, and then slept through the night better, than if I didn’t do that.) Both me and my wife started bonding with her. How could she not have been a member of society?

    • Replies: @LondonBob
    I once read something on the Muslim position on abortion and it is permissible as long as it is done early, before 120 days from conception, after which the foetus is viewed as a living being. If it endangers the mother's life than it is permissible based on the lesser of two evils principle after that. Abortion is seen as an evil, but a necessary one. Actually thought that is a pretty sensible position and I believe one most would agree with.
  74. How many Christian voters are now cognizant of the fact that the Ted Cruz campaign deliberately mislead conservative voters into thinking Carson dropped out (before the polling)? Do most of the Christian voters who go for Carson or Cruz pay attention to stores that are not featured prominently on mainstream news?

  75. @Stephen R. Diamond

    No, but unless our demographic transformation is stopped forthwith, the abortion party will win every election, forever and ever and ever…
     
    Why can't antiabortionists (mind you, I'm certainly not one) attract Catholic Latinos, Islamic Arabs, and Hindu Indians? I've never understood this. It's mostly educated caucasians (like me) that favor abortion (or in my case, even early infanticide).

    White voters expect the government to align with their values. Blacks and immigrants vote for a government that aligns with their interests.

    This means whites vote on social issues while non-whites vote for programs that benefit them.

    Steve Sailer had a post touching on this.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    Donors care more about interests.
  76. @Stephen R. Diamond
    I guess one must sound crazy (or evil) to get much reaction these days. (Per Trump.)

    Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion. Entrance into human society begins personhood.

    Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion.

    You may characterize birth as being “arbitrary” to your heart’s content, but in the real world inhabited not by ultra-rational androids and/or people who suffer from Asperger’s Syndrome, people think there is actually something significant about the act of birth. It has an emotional impact on most humans, and indeed, on most other mammals. And so plenty of pro-Choice people, however foolish and misguided they may be, actually do draw a pretty significant moral distinction between an abortive procedure (one that usually takes place in the 1st, or occasionally the 2nd trimester, and almost never the 3rd), and just bludgeoning some infant to death. I’m sorry that this distinction puzzles you, but it doesn’t puzzle hardly anyone else, and you’re wasting our time with such distasteful glimpses into your apparently malformed psyche. I’m not trying to be cruel, or rude, but that’s just the way it is. If you have these sorts of thoughts, I’d advise keeping them to yourself. Ideally, I’d advise trying to dispel them, and coming to an understanding about why they are wrong.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    I think a fair number of cultures are okay with infanticide, which makes me think birth isn't such an absolutely clear dividing line for when it's okay to do away with an unwanted baby. It's easy to fool yourself into thinking that your culture's moral principles are the obviously right ones that everyone will naturally come to, but ancient Greek (and modern Afghan) sexual practices, plantation slavery, and burning witches at the stake are all pretty good indications that it's very possible for whole societies to come to radically different answers to basic moral questions than we do.
  77. @Stephen R. Diamond
    They know this? Seems like a rather abstract inference to me.

    It’s not. Not noticing demographic changes is a problem for myopic Westerners, not the people who stand to benefit from these changes. The La Raza folks crow about taking back your South West, there are plenty of videos of regular non-European migrants, but also religious authority figures openly acknowledging demographic displacement, they seem very comfortable with the idea of claiming areas where they are in a demographic majority or plurality as their own habitat where lawful institutions may not intrude etc etc. And a non-trivial minority of some of these peoples is willing to die to speed the process.

    This is a basic math that they recognize instinctively with their own eyes and then is confirmed by their elites.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
  78. @Steve Sailer
    Who is the rhythm guitarist in the E-Street Band who dresses like Mick Jones of the Clash: black beret, vaguely military/guerilla?

    Van Zandt also starred in Lilyhammer, a hilarious Netflix series about a US mobster who goes into hiding in Norway. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lilyhammer

  79. @5371
    [He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to “the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted’s were only about him and were more frequent.”]

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.

    That’s insulting, and from what I’ve seen untrue. “Twinkie” has never come across as a creep or an “operator.” There is also a difference between braggadocio and being truthful about one’s successes.

    What’s more interesting to me is that East Asian Americans are going to be largely turned off by Trump’s style while “people of color” are more appreciative of it.

    • Replies: @Twinkie

    What’s more interesting to me is that East Asian Americans are going to be largely turned off by Trump’s style while “people of color” are more appreciative of it.
     
    I am not sure about that. Some Asians seem enamored with the Il Duce-"I'll make trains run on time" routine of Trump. I think his books have done quite well in East Asia. There is a subset of Asians who fall easily for the "I'll teach you how to make million dollar real estate investments... for a low low price of $899 plus shipping and handling" ads.

    Trump probably does badly, though, with Christian Asians, as he did with Christian Iowans. They don't take kindly to bombastic people with two failed marriages who call someone else's wife/mother a bimbo in public and can't recite a single favorite Bible verse.
  80. @Pat Gilligan

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It’s not just that his locked up the “evangelicals” and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz’s magna cum laude and editor of law review weren’t just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.
     
    Ted Cruz, asshole.

    GQ reported that Cruz started a study group during his first year in Cambridge, but he announced that "he didn't want anybody from 'minor Ivies' like Penn or Brown." In an interview with the Boston Globe, another student recalled what happened when she agreed to carpool with Cruz: "We hadn't left Manhattan before he asked my IQ."

     

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you're a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust. Sorry Chief Rabbi Israel Zolli, but apparently you didn't witness what you witnessed and converted to Catholicism for no good reason, because some Jack Chick-esque fundamentalist preacher knows the truth.

    [Creepster]...Cruz made female students uncomfortable by frequently walking to their end of the floor in his freshman dorm, wearing only a paisley bathrobe. When he announced his bid for president of the school's debate society, the other members had a secret meeting to pick an anyone-but-Cruz candidate. The eventual winner later acknowledged that "my one qualification for the office was that I was not Ted...

    "I would rather have anybody else be the president of the United States," screenwriter Craig Mazin told the Daily Beast in 2013. "Anyone. I would rather pick somebody from the phone book." On Twitter, Mazin—who has called Cruz "a nightmare of a human being"—recalled that when he was a freshman sharing a dorm room with Cruz... Cruz, he notes, "was that widely loathed. It's his superpower." [Another Princeton roommate of Cruz's, Geoff Cohen, said:] "People might think Craig is exaggerating. He's not. I met Ted freshman week and loathed him within the hour."
    http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2016/01/ted-cruz-jerk-hated

     


    He was infamous for firing off mundane work e-mails in the middle of the night—it happened so often that some in the Bush campaign suspected him of writing them ahead of time and programming his computer to send while he was asleep. He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to "the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted's were only about him and were more frequent."
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    But I'm sure Ted Cruz will do well in Florida, an important battleground state the Republicans need to win. After all, he has Cuban roots. And I think the Cubans in Florida have nothing but love for what Castro and the revolution brought. They'll want to thank Ted's father for fighting to bring it about:

    He was born in Canada, in 1970, but his tale, as he likes to say, begins fourteen years earlier in a Cuban jail cell. His father, Rafael, had belonged to Castro’s rebel forces fighting to overthrow the Batista dictatorship, and on the night of Rafael’s seventeenth birthday in 1956, Batista’s goons caught up with him. "He got captured and he disappeared," Cruz told me one day over lunch at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Houston.
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    Evangelicalism is Christianity for dummies. I’ve never met a bright -or indeed honest and trustworthy -Evangelical in my life.
    Cruz comes across as a devious, ambitious and empty suit.
    At least Rubio is a more colorful rascal, the Flamingo Kid, as Sailed puts it. Agreed, they’re both scum, with Cruz probably a little bit smarter but not much more.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Evangelicalism is Christianity for dummies. I’ve never met a bright -or indeed honest and trustworthy -Evangelical in my life.
     
    Christianity, like any human endeavor, can be and is done badly, nor have evangelicals cornered the market on bad religion* (I'm a mainline Presbyterian, though Reformed/Orthodox-curious, and there is no shortage in the mainline either). I've known many evangelicals who are honest and trustworthy, and many bright people whose lives are devoted to the same principles as those evangelicals, even if that is not how they choose to identify themselves.

    Much of it depends on one's region of the country and what social circles one inhabits.

    * - Osteen-style religion is to Christianity like a Wellness Center is to a hospital. He's just missing the main point of what it's for; but both evangelicals and others have gone down that road.
  81. @EdwardM
    They have made a dent. Public opinion is around 50/50 against abortion, thanks in part of effective PR by anti-abortion activists who point out the worst of the abortion industry (e.g., Gosnell, Planned Parenthood). Majorities oppose the abortion-on-demand-in-all-circumstances that is a litmus test for the Democrat party. Some states have passed modest restrictions that have not been struck down by the courts. With another Supreme Court justice or two appointed by someone like President Cruz, it is not beyond the realm of possibility that Roe could be overturned,

    (For what it's worth, I am in what is apparently the small group of people who are not opposed to abortion morally, but think that Roe v. Wade was an outrageous decision. In America in the last half-century, it seems compulsory for most people, especially the left, to think that just because something is bad, it must be found unconstitutional or vice versa. Of course Justice Kennedy's "legal reasoning" in Obergefell was the most blatant example of this type of mentality, which Roe was able to mainstream.)

    Likewise, most other countries have more restrictive abortion policies than the U.S., so the usual keeping up with the Joneses arguments trotted out by the Progs on health care, etc… work against them on abortion.

    Abortion is sacred to American Progs because it provides them with a means to control black population without having to talk about black population. If the latter ever becomes less radioactive, then support for abortion per se will wane. Concern with white demographic decline already weighs against across the board support for the promotion of abortion in all cases.

  82. @BB753
    Evangelicalism is Christianity for dummies. I've never met a bright -or indeed honest and trustworthy -Evangelical in my life.
    Cruz comes across as a devious, ambitious and empty suit.
    At least Rubio is a more colorful rascal, the Flamingo Kid, as Sailed puts it. Agreed, they're both scum, with Cruz probably a little bit smarter but not much more.

    Evangelicalism is Christianity for dummies. I’ve never met a bright -or indeed honest and trustworthy -Evangelical in my life.

    Christianity, like any human endeavor, can be and is done badly, nor have evangelicals cornered the market on bad religion* (I’m a mainline Presbyterian, though Reformed/Orthodox-curious, and there is no shortage in the mainline either). I’ve known many evangelicals who are honest and trustworthy, and many bright people whose lives are devoted to the same principles as those evangelicals, even if that is not how they choose to identify themselves.

    Much of it depends on one’s region of the country and what social circles one inhabits.

    * – Osteen-style religion is to Christianity like a Wellness Center is to a hospital. He’s just missing the main point of what it’s for; but both evangelicals and others have gone down that road.

  83. @Hapalong Cassidy
    I've about had it with these so-called Evangelicals. Useful idiots is what they are to the establishment Republicans. As long as they throw them some red meat about abortion and gay marriage, they can carry on with their open borders, enrich-the-1 percent agenda.

    Politics is about coalition building. The Republican coalition includes people who care a lot about abortion or gay marriage. The thing I find interesting to watch is that those voters mostly don’t get anything for their support–abortion is still legal and gay marriage is recognized in all 50 states.

  84. @Jimi
    White voters expect the government to align with their values. Blacks and immigrants vote for a government that aligns with their interests.

    This means whites vote on social issues while non-whites vote for programs that benefit them.

    Steve Sailer had a post touching on this.

    Donors care more about interests.

  85. @Kevin O'Keeffe
    "Why would an antiabortionist think early infanticide more evil than abortion? Birth is an arbitrary criterion."

    You may characterize birth as being "arbitrary" to your heart's content, but in the real world inhabited not by ultra-rational androids and/or people who suffer from Asperger's Syndrome, people think there is actually something significant about the act of birth. It has an emotional impact on most humans, and indeed, on most other mammals. And so plenty of pro-Choice people, however foolish and misguided they may be, actually do draw a pretty significant moral distinction between an abortive procedure (one that usually takes place in the 1st, or occasionally the 2nd trimester, and almost never the 3rd), and just bludgeoning some infant to death. I'm sorry that this distinction puzzles you, but it doesn't puzzle hardly anyone else, and you're wasting our time with such distasteful glimpses into your apparently malformed psyche. I'm not trying to be cruel, or rude, but that's just the way it is. If you have these sorts of thoughts, I'd advise keeping them to yourself. Ideally, I'd advise trying to dispel them, and coming to an understanding about why they are wrong.

    I think a fair number of cultures are okay with infanticide, which makes me think birth isn’t such an absolutely clear dividing line for when it’s okay to do away with an unwanted baby. It’s easy to fool yourself into thinking that your culture’s moral principles are the obviously right ones that everyone will naturally come to, but ancient Greek (and modern Afghan) sexual practices, plantation slavery, and burning witches at the stake are all pretty good indications that it’s very possible for whole societies to come to radically different answers to basic moral questions than we do.

  86. @reiner Tor
    I am not exactly anti-abortion. I do, however, have a baby girl, and I don't think anybody - myself included - has a right to murder her. I think as a parent it's my obligation to provide for her.

    Birth is an arbitrary criterion.
     
    It is. Five-month-old embryos routinely punch and kick and react to their parents talking or singing to them. I don't think anyone has a right to murder them. But I do recognize that we have to introduce arbitrary criteria, or else we'd end up with a right to murder adults. Most people who think however small embryos or even zygotes are fully formed human beings (in a sense they are, we know their genes determine so much) also instinctively recognize that abortion is not totally like after-birth murder, so for example they won't propose exactly the same punishment for it as for murdering an adult. They also often recognize special cases (serious genetic or other developmental disorders or embryos conceived as a result of rape) where abortion could nevertheless be legal (though not to be encouraged even in these cases).

    I personally don't care much for zygotes and while I wouldn't personally condone abortion in my personal life except maybe in the above mentioned exceptions, I accept that it's legal to abort small embryos. I'm quite hostile to the idea of aborting older embryos, though. It's not a very important issue to me, but I'd oppose its legality.

    Entrance into human society begins personhood.
     
    My daughter entered human society when as a barely five-month-old embryo she started to react to my speech and songs by kicking and punching and being active afterwards. (My wife told me she was always more active after I talked to her for a while, and then slept through the night better, than if I didn't do that.) Both me and my wife started bonding with her. How could she not have been a member of society?

    I once read something on the Muslim position on abortion and it is permissible as long as it is done early, before 120 days from conception, after which the foetus is viewed as a living being. If it endangers the mother’s life than it is permissible based on the lesser of two evils principle after that. Abortion is seen as an evil, but a necessary one. Actually thought that is a pretty sensible position and I believe one most would agree with.

  87. OT, but the New England Confectionery Company (NECCO) founded in 1901, famous for their NECCO wafers and Valentine Hearts candy, has a new advertisement for their Valentine’s push:

    http://www.towleroad.com/2016/01/watch-necco-valentines-day-ad-features-gay-dallas-sweethearts-55-years/

  88. @5371
    [He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to “the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted’s were only about him and were more frequent.”]

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.

    Twink got a low dose of humility. So what. What the f* have you done for us?

  89. @officious intermeddler

    Winning requires coalition building.
     
    We hear this all the time. What is it, exactly, that we are supposed to offer to the mass of immigrants to tempt them to join our coalition? The Democrats give them free money; special affirmative-action privileges; unlimited further immigration of their families, friends and fellow countrymen; and the destruction of all of the parts that they don't like of the historic American nation. Should we offer them even more?

    We hear this all the time. What is it, exactly, that we are supposed to offer to the mass of immigrants to tempt them to join our coalition?

    You might try some reading comprehension. The potential coalition partners under consideration here are white evangelicals.

  90. @Bill

    What many rabid Trumpkins don’t seem to get is that politics is a team sport. Winning requires coalition building.
     
    For pity's sake. SoCons have been in this coalition for fifty years. This coalition, over its run, has delivered victory after victory after victory for the smibertarians and money men. It has delivered defeat after defeat after defeat to the SoCons.

    Throwing tantrums and wishing ill upon one’s possible (and necessary) allies because they do not agree with you is a sure path to defeat.
     
    No, a sure path to defeat is getting into bed with people who hate you and then staying there even after they beat the crap out of you every night for fifty years. That's a sure path to defeat. But, but, but once every four years they whisper nice things in my ear!

    You seriously think it is more in our interest to ally with Bryan Caplan and Sheldon Adelson than with the tatooed bikers mentioned in the story? Are you high?

    You seriously think it is more in our interest to ally with Bryan Caplan and Sheldon Adelson than with the tatooed bikers mentioned in the story? Are you high?

    Bryan Caplan and Sheldon Adelson are evangelicals?

    And, no, I have never done any illegal controlled substances. Ever. Not even a whiff of cannabis in college. Made life much easier later with background checks.

  91. @Pat Gilligan

    And Cruz showed that he can organize. It’s not just that his locked up the “evangelicals” and turned them out. He had a highly organized and efficient team on the ground with excellent data analytics. And on top of all that, he WORKED. He and his wife personally called people who needed to be persuaded back to his cause. He showed that he wanted to win, could win, and did win. Cruz’s magna cum laude and editor of law review weren’t just affirmative action honorifics. He is definitely brains + hard work.
     
    Ted Cruz, asshole.

    GQ reported that Cruz started a study group during his first year in Cambridge, but he announced that "he didn't want anybody from 'minor Ivies' like Penn or Brown." In an interview with the Boston Globe, another student recalled what happened when she agreed to carpool with Cruz: "We hadn't left Manhattan before he asked my IQ."

     

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you're a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust. Sorry Chief Rabbi Israel Zolli, but apparently you didn't witness what you witnessed and converted to Catholicism for no good reason, because some Jack Chick-esque fundamentalist preacher knows the truth.

    [Creepster]...Cruz made female students uncomfortable by frequently walking to their end of the floor in his freshman dorm, wearing only a paisley bathrobe. When he announced his bid for president of the school's debate society, the other members had a secret meeting to pick an anyone-but-Cruz candidate. The eventual winner later acknowledged that "my one qualification for the office was that I was not Ted...

    "I would rather have anybody else be the president of the United States," screenwriter Craig Mazin told the Daily Beast in 2013. "Anyone. I would rather pick somebody from the phone book." On Twitter, Mazin—who has called Cruz "a nightmare of a human being"—recalled that when he was a freshman sharing a dorm room with Cruz... Cruz, he notes, "was that widely loathed. It's his superpower." [Another Princeton roommate of Cruz's, Geoff Cohen, said:] "People might think Craig is exaggerating. He's not. I met Ted freshman week and loathed him within the hour."
    http://m.motherjones.com/politics/2016/01/ted-cruz-jerk-hated

     


    He was infamous for firing off mundane work e-mails in the middle of the night—it happened so often that some in the Bush campaign suspected him of writing them ahead of time and programming his computer to send while he was asleep. He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to "the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted's were only about him and were more frequent."
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    But I'm sure Ted Cruz will do well in Florida, an important battleground state the Republicans need to win. After all, he has Cuban roots. And I think the Cubans in Florida have nothing but love for what Castro and the revolution brought. They'll want to thank Ted's father for fighting to bring it about:

    He was born in Canada, in 1970, but his tale, as he likes to say, begins fourteen years earlier in a Cuban jail cell. His father, Rafael, had belonged to Castro’s rebel forces fighting to overthrow the Batista dictatorship, and on the night of Rafael’s seventeenth birthday in 1956, Batista’s goons caught up with him. "He got captured and he disappeared," Cruz told me one day over lunch at a Tex-Mex restaurant in Houston.
    http://www.gq.com/story/ted-cruz-republican-senator-october-2013?currentPage=5#note

     

    Did you go to an non-HYP Ivy, Twinkie? Even for just part of your education? If so, Cruz will view you as inferior. No doubt he already thinks you’re a damnable papist in need of Christ. His father, Rev. Rafael Cruz, says the Catholic Church did nothing during the Holocaust.

    First of all, let me just preface this by saying that I am still undecided between Trump and Cruz. And I have to say that what I have seen of Trump’s actual political achievement is unimpressive to say the least.

    As for what Cruz said in his early 20′s, really? I am pretty sure I said some asinine things when I thought I was bright young thing in grad school. A lot of smart people have. It’s a combination of youthful inexperience, arrogance, insecurity, and so forth. That is a sad noose to hang on a grown man running for the presidency decades later.

    As for Rev. Cruz, he appears to be a pretty principled guy. Since I consider him a heretic who is grossly in error in matters of Christian dogma, I guess we can call it even. And you know what, Mel Gibson’s father used to say nasty things about “the current occupant of St. Peter’s seat” and other crazy stuff, but I still think Gibson is a gifted director and actor, and patronize his products.

    For that matter, I consider Mormons to be a bunch of insane (but very nice) cultists, but I love them as political allies. One could hardly do better with others as neighbors.

    By the way, I do think that Cruz does come off as not particularly likeable. He doesn’t have that gift (which Rubio does in spades – too bad he doesn’t appear to be principled). But anybody who opposes the ethanol subsidy in Iowa and wins the caucus there anyway has my political respect.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  92. @Hapalong Cassidy
    It's called "picking your battles". Something the Evangelicals have never understood. They can't grasp that overturning Roe v. Wade is a pipe dream. Those establishment candidates do, however, grasp this. Mainstream Republicans have been railing against abortion for decades, yet have made nary a dent. And they are fine with that. It's a pretty good setup for them. A crowd-pleasing issue which they know they'll never have to act upon, and which their useful idiot constituency will never call them out on.

    They can’t grasp that overturning Roe v. Wade is a pipe dream.

    Well, we’ll see what happens when the Supreme Court is reliably majority strictly constructionist/constitutionalist. Even if one supports abortion rights, Roe v. Wade was a terrible, unconstitutional decision from a legal structural point of view.

    Mainstream Republicans have been railing against abortion for decades, yet have made nary a dent.

    On the contrary, the public support for abortion has fallen greatly over the decades (especially among married women). The pro-life movement has learned a great deal from the pro-Second Amendment movement, and has begun to follow an effective two track strategy: 1) publicize particularly heinous abuses of abortion and 2) pursue incremental legal steps (e.g. holding abortion clinics to the same medical quality standards as hospitals, etc.).

    The war ain’t over yet.

  93. @5371
    [He was also known for dispatching regular updates on his accomplishments that one recipient likened to “the cards people send about their families at Christmas, except Ted’s were only about him and were more frequent.”]

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.

    It is grossly insulting to be likened to a member of the reptilian class that inhabits the ranks of professional politicians.

    You have no idea about Cruz’s soul or mine. Only God knows.

    To me, Cruz regrettably gives off that used car salesman vibe.

    No one who knows me has ever likened me to such a character. On the contrary, I’ve been told I am too blunt, and my mother-in-law has been nagging me for a couple of decades that I am too honorable to get ahead in life (she thinks I need to be more “practical”).

    Though I am cocky and have been so most of my life, that arrogance is greatly tempered by both my Christian faith and by the painful knowledge that better men than I gave their lives so I could breathe today and enjoy my family and friends.

    In any case, for me it comes down to Trump or Cruz. Trump has talked a lot and revealed himself to be quite vulgar, but so far has displayed no political acumen or result. Cruz, despite that used car salesmen vibe, has shown that he can organize well, work hard, and win. And he has shown some principled backbone in the Senate against the Republican establishment, so I am beginning to lean toward Cruz (even though the chance of him winning in NH and SC is low, I think).

    • Replies: @iffen
    I don't think he was calling you a reptilian politician. I think he was restricting himself to the passage that he quoted in making the comparison between you and Cruz.
    , @AP
    Not that he has a chance, but what do you think of Kasich?
  94. @PB and J
    That's insulting, and from what I've seen untrue. "Twinkie" has never come across as a creep or an "operator." There is also a difference between braggadocio and being truthful about one's successes.

    What's more interesting to me is that East Asian Americans are going to be largely turned off by Trump's style while "people of color" are more appreciative of it.

    What’s more interesting to me is that East Asian Americans are going to be largely turned off by Trump’s style while “people of color” are more appreciative of it.

    I am not sure about that. Some Asians seem enamored with the Il Duce-”I’ll make trains run on time” routine of Trump. I think his books have done quite well in East Asia. There is a subset of Asians who fall easily for the “I’ll teach you how to make million dollar real estate investments… for a low low price of $899 plus shipping and handling” ads.

    Trump probably does badly, though, with Christian Asians, as he did with Christian Iowans. They don’t take kindly to bombastic people with two failed marriages who call someone else’s wife/mother a bimbo in public and can’t recite a single favorite Bible verse.

  95. @Twinkie

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.
     
    It is grossly insulting to be likened to a member of the reptilian class that inhabits the ranks of professional politicians.

    You have no idea about Cruz's soul or mine. Only God knows.

    To me, Cruz regrettably gives off that used car salesman vibe.

    No one who knows me has ever likened me to such a character. On the contrary, I've been told I am too blunt, and my mother-in-law has been nagging me for a couple of decades that I am too honorable to get ahead in life (she thinks I need to be more "practical").

    Though I am cocky and have been so most of my life, that arrogance is greatly tempered by both my Christian faith and by the painful knowledge that better men than I gave their lives so I could breathe today and enjoy my family and friends.

    In any case, for me it comes down to Trump or Cruz. Trump has talked a lot and revealed himself to be quite vulgar, but so far has displayed no political acumen or result. Cruz, despite that used car salesmen vibe, has shown that he can organize well, work hard, and win. And he has shown some principled backbone in the Senate against the Republican establishment, so I am beginning to lean toward Cruz (even though the chance of him winning in NH and SC is low, I think).

    I don’t think he was calling you a reptilian politician. I think he was restricting himself to the passage that he quoted in making the comparison between you and Cruz.

  96. @Twinkie

    Twinkie recognises a kindred soul.
     
    It is grossly insulting to be likened to a member of the reptilian class that inhabits the ranks of professional politicians.

    You have no idea about Cruz's soul or mine. Only God knows.

    To me, Cruz regrettably gives off that used car salesman vibe.

    No one who knows me has ever likened me to such a character. On the contrary, I've been told I am too blunt, and my mother-in-law has been nagging me for a couple of decades that I am too honorable to get ahead in life (she thinks I need to be more "practical").

    Though I am cocky and have been so most of my life, that arrogance is greatly tempered by both my Christian faith and by the painful knowledge that better men than I gave their lives so I could breathe today and enjoy my family and friends.

    In any case, for me it comes down to Trump or Cruz. Trump has talked a lot and revealed himself to be quite vulgar, but so far has displayed no political acumen or result. Cruz, despite that used car salesmen vibe, has shown that he can organize well, work hard, and win. And he has shown some principled backbone in the Senate against the Republican establishment, so I am beginning to lean toward Cruz (even though the chance of him winning in NH and SC is low, I think).

    Not that he has a chance, but what do you think of Kasich?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Kasich got reelected governor here by 31%.

    He got burned early in his first term trying to pull a Scott Walker on gov. unions and getting blown out by big money from out of state (there was a van with Georgia license plates full of black guys doing push polling against it in my neighborhood). After that, he was pretty much a status quotarian who made sure not to say a discouraging word about anyone.

    Not unlike Swartzeneggar's experience in Cali.
    , @Twinkie

    Not that he has a chance, but what do you think of Kasich?
     
    He seems like a nice enough man, but doesn't appear to have a tough spine in him. Would it be unfair to characterize him as Mitt Romney without any money?
  97. @AP
    Not that he has a chance, but what do you think of Kasich?

    Kasich got reelected governor here by 31%.

    He got burned early in his first term trying to pull a Scott Walker on gov. unions and getting blown out by big money from out of state (there was a van with Georgia license plates full of black guys doing push polling against it in my neighborhood). After that, he was pretty much a status quotarian who made sure not to say a discouraging word about anyone.

    Not unlike Swartzeneggar’s experience in Cali.

  98. @AP
    Not that he has a chance, but what do you think of Kasich?

    Not that he has a chance, but what do you think of Kasich?

    He seems like a nice enough man, but doesn’t appear to have a tough spine in him. Would it be unfair to characterize him as Mitt Romney without any money?

    • Replies: @AP
    Kasich governed a more conservative state, was better at it than Romney was at governing MA, and was more popular in his state than Romney was in MA (Kasich was re-elected in a landslide). And Kasich's state is the critical swing state of Ohio.

    You are correct in that he doesn't seem to be very tough, however.
  99. @Twinkie

    Not that he has a chance, but what do you think of Kasich?
     
    He seems like a nice enough man, but doesn't appear to have a tough spine in him. Would it be unfair to characterize him as Mitt Romney without any money?

    Kasich governed a more conservative state, was better at it than Romney was at governing MA, and was more popular in his state than Romney was in MA (Kasich was re-elected in a landslide). And Kasich’s state is the critical swing state of Ohio.

    You are correct in that he doesn’t seem to be very tough, however.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The sources of America’s immigration problems—and a possible solution
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Hundreds of POWs may have been left to die in Vietnam, abandoned by their government—and our media.