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  1. Either the GOP “Conservatism, Inc.” of Paul Ryan and the Deep State form a millstone round President Trump’s neck, or he never intended to keep his superb “America First!” campaign promises. I can’t think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn’t acted to fulfill them.

    Existing law gives the president the absolute power to limit immigration in any way and for any reason he finds fit to limit it, yet President Trump has not put up a fight and has instead bowed submissively to traitorous $ellout E$tabli$hment judges’ threadbare rulings against his immigration-limiting executive orders. Same goes for Build The Wall – he has the power, yet he’s not applying it.

    Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon7
    I'm similarly frustrated, but they have to play out the hand they've been dealt. Let AG Sessions work it through the courts. Maybe one or more of these leftist judges can be brought up for impeachment by the Senate, once it is clear that their political leanings have overcome their obligation to rule according to the law and established precedent.

    Donald Trump is used to dealing with government bureaucrats and obstructive efforts of all kinds; give him a chance to work.

    The president's policies have been more successful than we know about. You should stop listening to the mainstream media, you (and most Americans) are not permitted a glimpse of the effects of his policies. For example, just this morning there was reported a near-riot in the Texas legislature as protesters (many of whom were in the country illegally, I'm sure) faced ICE authorities. The issue was over the Texas effort to ban sanctuary cities.
    , @Jack Hanson
    Except, unless you've been under a rock, it doesn't work this way.

    The first thing that happens is the ACLU finds a Ninth Circus Mandarin to invent law, and then it goes from there. As keeps happening over and over again.

    I dont blame this administration for wanting to strike when the fire is hot.
    , @Olorin

    I can’t think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises,
     
    Which promises hasn't he "fulfilled" in these first 17 weeks of his administration?

    Please be more precise in your thinking by listing, say, ten of the promises.

    Also please summarize work plans for fulfilling them in your estimation. (Steps to be taken, timelines, parties involved, budgets required, projected outcomes and assessment benchmarks, follow-up methodology to remedy shortfalls.)

    17 weeks is about enough time to turn a patch of lawn into fenced garden, prepare it, and get some tomatoes. If the season and all involved parties cooperates.

    Seriously--what are you expecting? Everything all at once immediately? I can't reach across to how you are thinking. It seems like the kind of magical thinking a toddler or Evergreen State College student would use.

    , @Luke Lea
    "I can’t think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn’t acted to fulfill them."

    The only reason I can think of is that he is saving them for the run-up to the midterm elections in order to force compliance from recalcitrant Congressmen.
    , @MBlanc46
    That pretty well sums it up. He's done almost nothing of what he said he would do. I didn't expect much, but I did anticipate at least an attempt. Does he think we're all nitwits?
    , @davidnownthen
    Could be Trump is letting the Libertarian/Ayn Rand Virtue of Selfishness Paul Ryan shoot themselves...next election, maybe we can get rid of Paul Ryan and Lindsay Graham and John McCain...these folks are just as much war-mongering globalists as the corporate Democrats like Hillary, Bill and Obama.
    , @gda
    "Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them."

    We know that the inability to delay gratification is associated with lower IQ. We know that Rome wasn't built in a day.

    At least, some of us know.
    , @SFG
    No politician is going to give you everything you want. We have leverage over Trump, we would have none over Hillary--he needs our votes, she doesn't. Keep up the pressure on your representative and senator, and have a few kids if you're at the right stage of life.
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  2. First off, it might behoove some of our commenters here to one day realize, though this can often take extra brainpower, that, though we will criticize President Trump for breaking major promises on domestic and foreign policy, we still want him to succeed because that’s good for our country.

    Some of Trump’s talk about splitting the NATO bill, not being too keen on Article 5 (see Buchanan’s new column) and especially his reluctance to sign up for more of the Global Climate Disruption(TM) bull is heartening. His continuing of the warfare state is not.

    However, so far Trump has let patriotic Americans down with his betrayal of our hopes for him on the question of US National sovereignty – the southern border and immigration. John Derbyshire and plenty of commenters here on unz have laid out the details. Understand that this is an Existential problem. What does it matter if we somehow avoid the financial crash coming (spoiler alert, we can’t) or revamp our foreign policy for the better, or “grow jobs” if there is no American country here anymore?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Lmbo, look at all these words to tell us how upset you are at getting called out for your endless doom masturbation.
    , @Peter Akuleyev

    Some of Trump’s talk about splitting the NATO bill...is heartening.
     
    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren't paying for Germany's military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more. And to what end? If Russia is not the enemy what exactly do the Germans need to spend billions of euros on? A pan-EU Coast Guard and border patrol to stop refugees would be a very good investment, but that is not what Trump is talking about. Sure, the US may be bankrupting itself spending billions on pointless wars in Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq, while also trying to get involved in North Korea, but most NATO members want to stay out of those flytraps and I don't blame them.
  3. I guess I just don’t know how to play 4D chess – because what we get isn’t what we were told.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I guess I just don’t know how to play 4D chess – because what we get isn’t what we were told.
     
    Nothing personal towards Mister M, it's just that he wrote a good example of why I won't be perusing this thread any further. Because defeatism is boring. Trump hasn't fundamentally transformed Western civilization in the first four months of his Presidency, so I guess he's just a cuck. I swear, it's like dealing with children.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    I guess I just don’t know how to play 4D chess – because what we get isn’t what we were told.
     
    Imagine 4D strip chess.
  4. On immigration, if not for Sessions we would have gone backwards. Is it possibly the effect of Kushner? Perhaps if he’s gone Bannon can turn things around.

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  5. Read More
  6. Trump is better than the alternative. So far he is performing below my hopes but above my expectations which were pretty low. I think so far he is better than the last three presidents, which is a low bar – but probably a reasonable bar for expectations given that the alternatives were probably Hillary, Jeb or Marco. I expect a bit better than those three, Obama, GWB and Bill. But not much.

    I keep on getting GOP funding emails from the Trump team. “Drain the swamp!” They will not get so much as a dime from me until the wall is well under construction, and I don’t care if Mexico pays for it or not.

    It will be interesting to see how Trump deals with Kushner. During the campaign he was not afraid to hire people and not afraid to fire people. Of course, those people he fired weren’t relatives.

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    • Replies: @res

    It will be interesting to see how Trump deals with Kushner. During the campaign he was not afraid to hire people and not afraid to fire people. Of course, those people he fired weren’t relatives.
     
    Does anyone know how Trump dealt with family (or friends) during his business life? Did he keep them at arms length? Give them sinecures but no power? Give them power but hold them accountable (how)? Just let them run riot? Or something else?
    , @Kyle a
    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.
  7. Looking at it as an ousider from the other side of the Atlantic – from the UK and South Africa – the Trump Russia noise became boring months back and I no longer follow it or know what it’s all about.

    I never thought anything could exceed the Bush Derangement Syndrome we saw from the US and overseas commentariat and SJWs during Bush 43s presidential tenure; but with Trump it’s on a different level. His presidency seems under siege and there is constant talk of impeachment – for what, I don’t know.

    It doesn’t look like you guys are going to get the Mexican wall and it seems beyond the ken of America to come up with a functioning, first world, affordable, universal healthcare system that delivers outcomes like France or Singapore’s or even the vastly over-rated centralised inefficient and patchy post-code lottery prone UK NHS’s. From the outside it would seem straightforward enough to cookie-cut a system that works well. Perhaps the vested interests in the US medical industry and their proxies are too entrenched.

    Other than that, looking at the ripples Trump creates, he seems to be reasonably effective and personally I find him far more congenial to my overall countenance than I did Obama. I suspect he is in danger of racking up a few decent foreign policy successes. I see his approach to foreign policy as certainly the best since Nixon and maybe in my and maybe beyond.

    I do follow his Tweets which can be fun.

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  8. We got Gorsuch instead of Garland and that means that gun rights will still exist in America. Some illegals seem to be being deported. Those are two good things.

    Still better than Hillary or Jeb!

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Enforcement of current immigration laws and deportations of illegals seem to be increasing, but, on the flip side, we're also continuing to take in refugees and DACA is continuing.

    I wonder if Trump is conflicted here, because he really thinks he can win a majority of NAMS in 2020.
  9. This week is Kushner’s turn to be on the hot seat. “Scrutiny Turns to Why Kushner Met With an Ally of Putin” is today’s breathless NYT headline. No one has accused Kushner of actually doing anything illegal ( but if he talks to enough Federal agents maybe he will make an inconsistent statement and they can get him for that). There is clearly a campaign to stir up fake scandals on a daily basis to prevent Trump from getting anything done. Even if you don’t like Kushner this is not good news. Ultimately the fake Russia scandals will run out of steam because there is nothing behind them but the Democrats are hoping that they can stretch this out at least until the midterm elections.

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    • Agree: Travis
    • Replies: @Anon7
    I wonder if the baseless attacks on her husband will peel Ivanka Trump away from her Democrat political friends. That could be useful, given that President Trump seems set on having her around the White House.
    , @Anonymous
    I don't think there is any turning around the extreme damage done by the foaming at the mouth Russophobia. It's shocking how out of hand it got so quickly. Russia's resistance to the oligarchs and global cabal started it and their intervention in Syria sent it through the roof. Now the hysteria is so toxic and pervasive it seems beyond repair. Then we had this Russophobia moved into American politics and it's way beyond McCarthyism. McCarthyism on bath salts. The left, the globalists, the neocons, some Stangelovian generals, really do seem to want some confrontation with Russia. In the opinion of retired and highly-respected for military analysts, any conflict with Russia ends with American cities vaporized.
  10. President Trump has been highly disappointing on matters related to immigration.

    President Trump has signalled that he wants to continue REFUGEE OVERLOAD.

    President Trump has not forcefully halted Obama’s administrative amnesty for illegal alien invaders.

    President Trump has not followed Pat Buchanan’s call for a complete immigration moratorium.

    President Trump is not stopping the visa system that floods the United States with foreigners.

    President Trump is turning his back on his supporters and he is now snuggling up to the open borders mass immigration faction of the Republican Party.

    President Trump has not fought hard enough to build the wall on the border between the United States and Mexico. President Trump has not started mass deportations of illegal alien invaders.

    President Trump should bring Ann Corcoran, Ann Coulter, Peter Brimelow, Steve Sailer and Brenda Walker into his administration to run immigration policy. President Trump needs to get back to base, and he needs to do it immediately.

    Read More
    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    I'm with you, it's what needs to be done. I've been saying "root and branch" since Nov 9.

    President Trump tried to make nice and meet the Establishment halfway, and they are still trying to bury him.

    Bannon is still by his side, I'm sure Trump is getting advice akin to what you've posted here. But if he were start the "root and branch" process and actually drain ALL the swamps consequences would never be the same.

    If I had my finger on a metaphorical button labelled "Revolution" like the President does right now I might be hesitant too. I've said it before:

    Zugzwang.
    , @Stephen R. Diamond
    What about Michael Savage? ;)
  11. @Jack D
    This week is Kushner's turn to be on the hot seat. "Scrutiny Turns to Why Kushner Met With an Ally of Putin" is today's breathless NYT headline. No one has accused Kushner of actually doing anything illegal ( but if he talks to enough Federal agents maybe he will make an inconsistent statement and they can get him for that). There is clearly a campaign to stir up fake scandals on a daily basis to prevent Trump from getting anything done. Even if you don't like Kushner this is not good news. Ultimately the fake Russia scandals will run out of steam because there is nothing behind them but the Democrats are hoping that they can stretch this out at least until the midterm elections.

    I wonder if the baseless attacks on her husband will peel Ivanka Trump away from her Democrat political friends. That could be useful, given that President Trump seems set on having her around the White House.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dr kill
    I was thinking this myself. Even a seasoned political hack would be pissed at this shit.
  12. The great thing is that it’s not the Hillary Clinton administration. Hell, in four months she’d have started two wars.

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  13. EXCELLENT:

    - Genuine reinvigoration of ICE and real enforcement of immigration laws, up to and including deporting illegals in the face of “but he got kids!” TV rhetoric.

    - Appointment of Gorsuch to Supreme Court

    - Appointment of Sessions as AG.

    DISAPPOINTING, BUT NOT SURPRISING:

    - Budget plans that are basically a sop to the billionaire class.

    - Slight waffling on the border wall (or at least not making it a priority on which the Administration is willing to spend political capital).

    - A general lack of cohesion and message discipline.

    LEGITIMATELY SURPRISING:

    - I don’t get the big push to repeal Obamacare. When they had the first House vote and it failed, that was the perfect opportunity to say “we tried, the Democrats and fake-conservatives in Congress wouldn’t play ball.” And then move in to something else.

    Obamacare is imploding. Massive premium increases, people who haven’t bought insurance starting to get hit with heavy fines. It’s the perfect thing to hang around the neck of the Democrats – it’s CALLED “Obamacare” and not a single Republican voted for it. Trump-care could have served as the “we tried to change it, but Congress stopped us” answer to health-care-based anger for the next decade.

    Instead, we’re now wading BACK into a repeat fight with a bill that pisses everyone off, will give the media a chance to run endless “lil’ Bokeesha had insurance under Obamacare, now Trump wants to take it away!” stories, and that STILL won’t save any money. Stupid hill to die on, in my opinion.

    I have other thoughts but I’m sure they largely mirror those of other people on this thread, so I’ll hang up and listen.

    Read More
  14. @Auntie Analogue
    Either the GOP "Conservatism, Inc." of Paul Ryan and the Deep State form a millstone round President Trump's neck, or he never intended to keep his superb "America First!" campaign promises. I can't think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn't acted to fulfill them.

    Existing law gives the president the absolute power to limit immigration in any way and for any reason he finds fit to limit it, yet President Trump has not put up a fight and has instead bowed submissively to traitorous $ellout E$tabli$hment judges' threadbare rulings against his immigration-limiting executive orders. Same goes for Build The Wall - he has the power, yet he's not applying it.

    Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them.

    I’m similarly frustrated, but they have to play out the hand they’ve been dealt. Let AG Sessions work it through the courts. Maybe one or more of these leftist judges can be brought up for impeachment by the Senate, once it is clear that their political leanings have overcome their obligation to rule according to the law and established precedent.

    Donald Trump is used to dealing with government bureaucrats and obstructive efforts of all kinds; give him a chance to work.

    The president’s policies have been more successful than we know about. You should stop listening to the mainstream media, you (and most Americans) are not permitted a glimpse of the effects of his policies. For example, just this morning there was reported a near-riot in the Texas legislature as protesters (many of whom were in the country illegally, I’m sure) faced ICE authorities. The issue was over the Texas effort to ban sanctuary cities.

    Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    It's important to note that you don't have to follow a Bill Mitchell-type cheerleader to not become utterly "blackpilled" about Trump. An objective reading of the day-to-day thoughts of a Mark Krikorian or a Mickey Kaus, who are by no means blindly positive about Trump, will show that the administration's record on immigration is mixed, but is overall continually changing things for the better. If they're weak on H2B, they're stronger on H1B. Maybe these refugee caps have been lifted, but let's see how many refugees are actually processed. And now the White House is undergoing some sort of shakeup, with rumors of Lewandowsky and Bossie making a comeback, so we might see a renewed focus on the issues. I mean really, ask yourself where the US was a year ago and where it is now. This should be a no-brainer.
    , @Kevin C.

    Maybe one or more of these leftist judges can be brought up for impeachment by the Senate
     
    As if. A short read on the history of impeachment investigations of federal judges shows how rare actually removing one is:
    "There have been numerous attempts to impeach federal judges in the United States; a few have been successful in either forcing resignation or removing the judge. As of November 2003 there have been sixty-one federal judges or Supreme Court Justices investigated for impeachment."
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    For example, just this morning there was reported a near-riot in the Texas legislature as protesters (many of whom were in the country illegally, I’m sure) faced ICE authorities. The issue was over the Texas effort to ban sanctuary cities.
     
    I read about this on ZeroHedge, though the story had 2 slightly conflicting stories in one article on who threatened who personally and whether there was a real fist-fight.

    What I wanted to say was that this is confusion of cause with effect, Mr. 7. Trump got elected BECAUSE the voters had had enough of the politicians letting our country get invaded. The CC-license Texan (both names sounded Mexican, so the "good guy") has got constituents who have enough of it too, and his calling ICE on the blatantly-illegal aliens protesting outside was a nice move and happened BECAUSE people are getting seriously pissed.

    We need more of that, but Trump didn't make that happen. We need to make this stuff happen, if he will not lead, except as the lead twitterer.
  15. Impossible to overstate how good this foreign trip went for Trump. Not necessarily because of anything he did, but because of the appalling and ridiculous media coverage of every real or imagined gaffe. They discredit themselves more and more with each hand holding story. My God, they’re so vapid that they’re STILL writing misty opeds about the Macron handshake. I think our man TRUMP is turning the corner.

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  16. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Jack D
    This week is Kushner's turn to be on the hot seat. "Scrutiny Turns to Why Kushner Met With an Ally of Putin" is today's breathless NYT headline. No one has accused Kushner of actually doing anything illegal ( but if he talks to enough Federal agents maybe he will make an inconsistent statement and they can get him for that). There is clearly a campaign to stir up fake scandals on a daily basis to prevent Trump from getting anything done. Even if you don't like Kushner this is not good news. Ultimately the fake Russia scandals will run out of steam because there is nothing behind them but the Democrats are hoping that they can stretch this out at least until the midterm elections.

    I don’t think there is any turning around the extreme damage done by the foaming at the mouth Russophobia. It’s shocking how out of hand it got so quickly. Russia’s resistance to the oligarchs and global cabal started it and their intervention in Syria sent it through the roof. Now the hysteria is so toxic and pervasive it seems beyond repair. Then we had this Russophobia moved into American politics and it’s way beyond McCarthyism. McCarthyism on bath salts. The left, the globalists, the neocons, some Stangelovian generals, really do seem to want some confrontation with Russia. In the opinion of retired and highly-respected for military analysts, any conflict with Russia ends with American cities vaporized.

    Read More
    • Agree: Seamus Padraig
    • Replies: @Jack D
    I really don't see nuclear war as the endpoint of this game. Of course any time you play with fire you're at risk of it spreading out of control, but the main reason to stir up trouble with Russia seems to be for domestic political reasons (to avoid forcing the Democrat base to deal with their anti-white male belief system, which they would really prefer to keep believing in - change is hard) so I think there's a limit to how hard the Democrat leadership and Democrat controlled press is willing to press the issue. Right now dissing Russia and weakening Trump is a cheap twofer - what's the downside? (Also a hilarious one given that the left covered for the Russians, in their guise as "Soviets"for decades). If it required Washington, NY and LA to be vaporized, that's quite another matter. If you are the editor of the NYT or WashPo, having your city vaporized is very bad for the subscription numbers, which are falling badly as it is. Your printing plant might be in the blast zone and insurance doesn't cover nuclear war.

    Putin is obviously not anxious to have Moscow and St. Petersburg vaporized either. Russia also realizes that it is in no position to restore itself as an equal great power alongside the US and that is not really Putin's goal (maybe his dream or fantasy but Putin is a realist and knows what is achievable). This is why Putin confines himself to taking little bites here and there where he can get away with it and spending (relative to the US) paltry sums on hacking, disinformation, influencing foreign elections, etc. Of course the US does exactly the same thing (on steroids - in fact half of what Putin does he does in order to insure that he doesn't end up being Khaddafied), but when we do it, it's in the service of the Goddess of Democracy so it's OK.

    Ironically, by attempting to create a crisis of legitimacy for Trump, the Democrats are making it MORE likely that the administration will be so weakened and distracted that Putin will be able to take back the Baltics or something like that while we are preoccupied with impeachment (see Vietnam). But of course they actually don't give a shit about such faraway places of which we know nothing - Russia is just a stick to beat Trump with.
    , @bored identity
    One part of Echo-Chambering Firsters can not forgive losing WW LGB..., and not being able to start sequeling WWT in Putin's Dominion.

    The others can not forgive Putin for preventing them from taking a full control over Ukraine; The Other Ours Old Country incarnated through a pseudo-historical Khazarian Realm.

    The third group consists of post cold-war strangelovers and M.I. Complex profiteers.

    The Eye of Sauron oversees all three of them.

    Any normal US patriotic, a real-politics driven analyst could tell you that Trump-Putin historical agreement would lead to permanent half-century long global stabilization.
    , @Anonymous
    HBD awareness alert:

    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/james-clapper-trump-russia-ties-my-dashboard-warning-light-was-n765601

    [Clapper:] "... and just the historical practices of the Russians, who typically, almost genetically driven to co-opt, penetrate, gain favor, whatever, which is a typical Russian technique. So we were concerned."

     

    Imagine him saying this about any other group. That's how you know it's bad.
  17. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Biggest event of 2016 was not the election of Trump. It was the wholesale rejection of our entire establishment , including both parties, the ruling class, the media, the think tanks – everyone.

    Biggest event of the last century in America. The implications will be worked out for decades to come.

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  18. It’s striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he’s doing as president. He’s got a lot of places where he’s contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he’s right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn’t and probably can’t. The guy’s 70 years old, he’s probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn’t well-prepared for the job. He doesn’t know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn’t have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative–Megan isn’t a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she’s hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn’t just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he’s a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they’ll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan’s deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he’ll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn’t just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up “Rains of Castermere” and plunge a dagger into his back while saying “The Bushes send their regards.” When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

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    • Replies: @27 year old
    At the end of the day her article is still "sources say".

    And also at the end of the day, don't forget, this was the flight 93 election -- we knew we were doomed either way.
    , @Arclight
    Totally agree. I wasn't expecting greatness from him and even with his flaws it's good to have blocked Clinton... But I was hoping he would be better than he has been and I am starting to feel that his entire presidency will be like the last few months. If that is the case, I think a lot of conservative voters stay home in 2020.
    , @RW
    It was stupid to fire Comey. The investigation kept the Democrats busy and eventually would have made them look foolish when Comey finally found... nothing. But now Trump's got to deal with a special counsel accountable to no one who can carry on the investigation into the next election if he wants. Trump is not smart enough to move into the White House politics at 70. He's an egomaniac with a focus problem.
    , @Laugh Track

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative–Megan isn’t a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.)
     
    If not the green eyeshadow wing.
    I dunno. I found her op-ed sort of interesting, but awfully muddled. I mean:

    So what conservatives here know is that the freakout in Washington, which looks from afar like a battle between Trump and “the establishment,” is actually one side screaming in amazement as the other side turn their weapons on each other.
    Of course, that’s not the only reason that Washington conservatives are screaming.
     
    So who are the sides and who is doing the screaming? I guess you have to be an Insider to understand these oblique references.
    , @Federalist
    I don't care what whiny bitch so-called "conservatives" tell Megan McCardle. They had their chances. McCain and Romney lost. Then their anointed candidate, Jeb, was a total failure. His replacement, Rubio, was destroyed in his home state's primary.

    During the Obama presidency, Republican majorities in the House and Senate were absolutely worthless. Obama did whatever the hell he wanted.

    Thanks to Trump, the Republicans/"conservatives" got the Supreme Court Justice that they wanted. Would they have liked Hillary to have made the appointment of Scalia's replacement? The Republican establishment should worship Trump for this alone. And let's not forget, Ginsburg is really old.

    Now, the National Review "conservatives" fight Trump every step of the way. I don't have any problem when people here criticize Trump but the so-called conservatives had their chances. They've been totally worthless and are a bunch of ingrates.
    , @Desiderius

    She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.
     
    No, that wing doesn't live in DC.

    She's the best of a bad lot, but it's still bad.
    , @Prof. Woland
    Had Bernie Sanders been elected President, something which was quite plausible, he would be having a similar set of issues to what President Trump is going through albeit coming from a different angle. Both Trump and Sanders were insurgents so they had very shallow pools to recruit and staff their administrations from. Sanders, like Trump, would have had to hire from within his political party (Democrats) people who did not like him or support him and even oppose him openly. The press would have liked him only as long as he went along with their agenda so he would never had had a moment of peace unless he bent his administration to their will.
    , @J1234
    Good comment. I think that if Trump can't start making good on his more prominent campaign promises by late fall, he might as well not even run for reelection. And he may not even want to be reelected, if I read him right. A few days before the election, when the polls looked dismal, Trump said, "If I don't win, it'll have been an enormous waste of time and money." There's a real pessimistic side to him.

    Certainly he realizes that "Trump the TV Star" or "Trump the Longtime Public Figure" mean absolutely nothing to his supporters, while "Trump the Political Iconoclast" means everything. He has to know that it's far too late for appealing to, or acquiescing to, his opponents. But he seems to do just that on occasion.

    Still, the press acts like everything he does is a major mistake; on the order of having his aides say he gave no classified info to the Russians, then say the following day that he can give classified info to the Russians if he wants. Or failing on health care. The press is very effective at this type of propaganda, as evidence and hyperbole start to get blurred. And it's hard for even Trump supporters to be immune to it.

    But his campaign went in and out of stride. His administration will hit a stride at some point in the future. He'll have to realize, however, that that will only happen when he makes good on campaign promises.


    The guy’s 70 years old, he’s probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.
     
    Wow, remember when they made a huge deal about about Reagan being 70? One tends to think that times have changed, but then you remember that Bernie Sanders is 75. That pretty much explains it.
  19. First thing Trump supporters should do is cease and desist from this Jihad they have been waging against the Kushners. It serves no apparent purpose, it is based on mere hearsay about their influence . Whoever in this moment pursues this misguided effort is in the Orwellian sense(*) objectively doing the bidding of the Deep State and other Trump’s enemies. Firing Mike Flynn was a mistake, firing Kushner would be an absolute calamity! It’s General Order 270 Time: Not One Step Back!

    Second, bitching about how “nothing is getting done” is also not an argument, helpful or even correct. It grossly underestimates the power and influence of Trump’s enemies and their will to thwart him. It is also a self-fullfilling prophecy of sort since it is not possible for Trump to get anything done if his supporters are wusses who abandon posts at the first sign of trouble.

    (*) referring to this quote: http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/20274-pacifism-is-objectively-pro-fascist-this-is-elementary-common-sense-if

    Read More
    • Replies: @John Gruskos
    DACA and DAPA unrevoked, HB-2 visas increased, refugees increased, no attempt to secure adequate funding for the wall, Syria bombed twice, increased support for Saudi Arabia's war in Yemen, continued support for the cultural Marxist assault on Hungary - Trump, under the influence of Kushner, is objectively worse than Obama on both immigration and foreign policy.

    Even the "Muslim ban" is flawed. Blocking Iranian tourists antagonizes Iran and decreases the profits of the tourist industry, without decreasing immigration or diminishing the terrorist threat.

    Trump would have my fanatical support if he stayed true to the nationalist agenda he campaigned on, but if he amplifies invade-the-world/invite-the-world to humor his family, he will have my fanatical opposition.

    Like a Secretary of Defense once said, "No better friend, no worse enemy".
  20. OT – are there any black or minority readers who can read this Guardian piece and tell us what it says?

    “Why I’m no longer talking to white people about race”

    (they also have a piece on “who’s more dangerous – Russia or ISIS”).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Writer reposts 2014 drivel in 2017 again. White privilege, "positive discrimination" is good, yadda yadda. Structural racism yadda yadda.

    The Guardian confirmed as liberal assh*le once again.
    , @jim jones
    I doubt that you could find any White people willing to talk to Blacks on any subject, we know that the conversation would soon turn into a series of complaints.
    , @Ghost of Bull Moose
    “Why I’m no longer talking to white people about race”

    She said, in her piece for the Guardian about race.

    Promises, promises...
  21. The media has been so relentless in pushing Russian conspiracy stories, they often contradict each other and are based on unnamed sources, usually later proven to be mostly false reports.

    If Trump had conspired with Russia, why were the Russians requesting to establish a back channel for Trump dealings with the Kremlin 4 weeks after he won the election ? If there had been collusion between the Trump Campaign and the Russians why would it have been necessary to set up a back channel in December ?

    The media implies that setting up communications with Russia is somehow a crime or indicates collusion. But it is not a crime and seems to indicate there was little communication with the Russians prior to Trump’s victory.

    The constant leaks are the true crimes…and indicates that the Obama administration was bugging Trumps campaign and has used these recordings to damage the President politically. There is a real scandal here, but the media refuses to cover it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Someone might amuse themselves by breathlessly running last week's debunked fake news leaks this week.

    "BREAKING NEWS: CNN reports that sources say Trump ordered Russian prostitutes to urinate on Obama!" and so on.
    , @Pericles
    And furthermore, it does seem likely that the Obama administration illegally abused surveillance information on a scale that makes Nixon seem quaint. But Susan Rice dropped out of sight so very quickly once that became clear that it almost seems like a dream.
  22. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    At the end of the day her article is still “sources say”.

    And also at the end of the day, don’t forget, this was the flight 93 election — we knew we were doomed either way.

    Read More
  23. A president can’t get much done without some support in Congress and inside government offices. Don’t make the mistake of thinking that this president has support just because the Republican party has majorities in both houses. He doesn’t.

    Remember: He won the nomination against the wishes of those in power in “his/our” party. They would be almost as happy as the Left to see him fail or go.

    He needs to somehow help, where he can, to get Trumpists elected to Congress in 2018. (And Trumpists need to step up and run for Republican nominations for those upcoming congressional races.) He also needs to remind himself every day that his enemies wear both letters, D and R.

    With or without party elite support, President Trump needs to get

    back to the basics

    of why we voted for him, in order of importance:

    [MORE]

    1) Immigration: For we his supporters — we who are more numerous than media and social norms will allow to be heard — for us the past half-century has been a disaster. For President Donald J. Trump to truly accomplish what he has been chosen by history to do, he must reverse the demographic trends that have been changing the United States since The Immigration Act of 1965.

    Trump needs to realize that his people and his nation are engaged in an existential struggle to assert the same right to existence that pretty much every other nation of people on Earth takes for granted: namely, the right to be who we are, without shame or doubt, distinct from others.

    If he and we do not assert this right, we will suffer the same fate as a herd of sheep in a world of wolves, for every other people are doing what is best for their posterity. Only our kind holds onto relativistic illustions.

    2) Trade, or as I like to call it, Imports = Cheap Foreign Labor: Trump is now president because he won votes from Americans in places like Michigan, where good jobs were exported to foreign countries. Part of Donald Trump’s support comes from the victims of over-importation of foreign goods. He knows this. This was the part of his campaign strategy that everyone else overlooked. Well, Donald, you need to focus on those good, American workers who put you in the White House. You need to hang tough on imports. If you can do this, those folks will vote for you again in 2020.

    3) Foreign entanglements: Here is a conundrum. So far, we Trump voters kind of like Donald’s give ‘em hell attitude and realpolitik, but we see him continuing America’s expensive “Invade the World” strategy. He needs to show us that defending the likes of South Korea and Israel is really in our national interest. Otherwise, he needs to show us that he is just working with this existing order in the most advantageous way possible.

    4) PC culture and the Racist Campaign Against White Americans: Trump needs to continue to insert tweets and other things often enough to let us know he still cares about his own kind. This includes continued support for cops, border patrol, etc. Keep being Donald Trump. Don’t listen to those who would tell you to stop. Be yourself. You won, remember?

    You will notice there is no mention of “Russiagate” and investigations here. This is because they don’t matter, and because they will continue no matter what he does. He will have to live with this, and it is coming from people in both parties. It runs deep, and he has the fighting spirit to shove it right back at those pepetrating it. Might I recomment getting tough and using his powers to prosecute them, their leakers, and putting a few people in jail?

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  24. Apparently Trump’s poll numbers have improved after his first world trip, something I find remarkable since from the European perspective it seems to have been a complete and unprecedented disaster. To his credit Trump is certainly “putting America first”. Whether it is really in America’s long term interest to buddy up to Saudi Arabia and alienate the Europeans is a different question. The funny thing is that Trump is actually executing the pivot towards Asia that the Obama team kept talking about but couldn’t really pull off.

    Trump’s foreign policy moves make no sense if he were really a “white nationalist” but make a lot of sense if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    1. China is clearly the next world power.
    2. Europe is in terminal decline, and the EU is doomed to failure
    3. Russia will remain a strong regional player but has no hope of regaining superpower status and becoming an equal player with China and the US.
    4. China’s Achilles heel is energy. Controlling energy resources will keep the US dominant for the foreseeable future.

    If you accept those premises than Trump’s seemingly crazy actions all makes sense. It makes sense to cozy up to Saudi Arabia and Russia in order to keep them out of Chinese orbit. It also makes sense to cut Europe loose in order to strengthen ties with Russia.. If you need Erdogan to help keep order in the Middle East and watch Saudi Arabia’s flank, then you make friends with Erdogan and let him continue to blackmail Europeans with refugees and to fund Islamic cells throughout Germany.

    This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along, which is probably why the military seems to be solidly behind him. If true then Trump is going to disappoint idealists – both leftists who want the US to stand for human rights and “progressive” values, as well as white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for “traditional” values.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    I concur. Trump is a "great power conservative."
    , @27 year old
    >if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    >This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along

    >If true then Trump is going to disappoint... ...white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for “traditional” values.

    WN doesn't care about standing up for traditional values via foreign policy. WN cares about WN -- is it good for Whites.

    On paper you want your country to have a cynical realist FP so that your country can avoid getting dominated other countries therefore allowing a decent life for your citizens. But our rulers don't care about a decent life for us... What's the difference between getting screwed over by DC/Manhattan and screwed over by Beijing/Shanghai?

    As a regular working goy, why do I care whether America is a great power? Might I be better off if America was not a great power?
    , @John Gruskos
    The best way for America to balance the rise of China is to maintain our friendship with Europe, add Russia to the club, and strengthen both our own nation and our allies by promoting national conservatism (immigration restriction, social conservatism, distributist economics, and a non-interventionist foreign policy).

    Trying to control China by allying with Saudi Arabia to establish an energy stranglehold is an insanely bad strategy, and it isn't what our politicians have in mind.

    They are actually implementing an even worse foreign policy. They are cozying up to Saudi Arabia because Saudi Arabia is Israel's ally against Iran, and the Israel lobby is, unfortunately, all-powerful in American politics.
    , @MBlanc46
    Interesting analysis. It puts the cosying up with the Saudis in a different light. But Trump is also making nice with the Chinese. How does that fit in with your take.
  25. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    Totally agree. I wasn’t expecting greatness from him and even with his flaws it’s good to have blocked Clinton… But I was hoping he would be better than he has been and I am starting to feel that his entire presidency will be like the last few months. If that is the case, I think a lot of conservative voters stay home in 2020.

    Read More
  26. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    It was stupid to fire Comey. The investigation kept the Democrats busy and eventually would have made them look foolish when Comey finally found… nothing. But now Trump’s got to deal with a special counsel accountable to no one who can carry on the investigation into the next election if he wants. Trump is not smart enough to move into the White House politics at 70. He’s an egomaniac with a focus problem.

    Read More
    • Agree: Stephen R. Diamond
    • Replies: @Travis
    firing Comey was the right thing to do...but Trump was a fool for granting an interview with Lester Holt and contradicting the reasons given for the firing. Trump can't help himself, had to state that he would have fired Comey regardless of the Deputy Rosenstein's report.
  27. Trump is moving slowly on immigration after the obstacles he encountered in the courts. But he might still get there.

    Read More
  28. I think it’s becoming clear that Trump is not the great managerial force he claimed to be during the campaign. The perceived chaos in the WH scares traditional GOPers who are always on edge with the media. It causes them to retreat even more.

    Trump needs to allow skilled advisors to take greater reins in his administration. That would mean jettisoning his son-in-law and allowing Bannon to reassert control. The Sessions/Miller/Bannon wing have been consistent and have delivered results. Their one perceived misstep, the travel ban, really wasn’t one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @IHTG
    I think losing Kushner at this point would be a net negative. He's the middleman between the president and the Goldman crowd (Cohn etc), who aren't going anywhere. Would you rather they be completely unleashed?

    If what the media says is true, his domestic political instincts aren't the greatest, but he seems to have lots of energy for foreign policy initiatives, which could be a valuable thing. Just like his father-in-law, he'll improve with experience.

    , @Random Dude on the Internet
    It's always important to note that neither Kushner or Ivanka are Republicans: they are Liberal Democrats. They also have no idea what Trump's base (especially the newcomers in the rust belt and upper midwest) wants. This is very much a problem with politics: a bunch of ivy league graduates trying to figure out what a random Trump voter in Wisconsin (who voted Democrat all his life up until 2016) wants. Bannon is much more in tune with this. Donald is listening to his daughter and son-in-law at his own peril.
  29. @Anonymous Nephew
    OT - are there any black or minority readers who can read this Guardian piece and tell us what it says?

    "Why I'm no longer talking to white people about race"

    (they also have a piece on "who's more dangerous - Russia or ISIS").

    Writer reposts 2014 drivel in 2017 again. White privilege, “positive discrimination” is good, yadda yadda. Structural racism yadda yadda.

    The Guardian confirmed as liberal assh*le once again.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    No, the Guardian is an arseh*le, not an assh*le.
    , @Jmaie
    Typical NAM whining, "I demanded that white people accept my worldview, they weren't buying and now I am shaming them." Good luck with that.

    He might get responses more to his liking if "white privilege" was used as a discussion point rather than as a cudgel.
  30. @Anon7
    I'm similarly frustrated, but they have to play out the hand they've been dealt. Let AG Sessions work it through the courts. Maybe one or more of these leftist judges can be brought up for impeachment by the Senate, once it is clear that their political leanings have overcome their obligation to rule according to the law and established precedent.

    Donald Trump is used to dealing with government bureaucrats and obstructive efforts of all kinds; give him a chance to work.

    The president's policies have been more successful than we know about. You should stop listening to the mainstream media, you (and most Americans) are not permitted a glimpse of the effects of his policies. For example, just this morning there was reported a near-riot in the Texas legislature as protesters (many of whom were in the country illegally, I'm sure) faced ICE authorities. The issue was over the Texas effort to ban sanctuary cities.

    It’s important to note that you don’t have to follow a Bill Mitchell-type cheerleader to not become utterly “blackpilled” about Trump. An objective reading of the day-to-day thoughts of a Mark Krikorian or a Mickey Kaus, who are by no means blindly positive about Trump, will show that the administration’s record on immigration is mixed, but is overall continually changing things for the better. If they’re weak on H2B, they’re stronger on H1B. Maybe these refugee caps have been lifted, but let’s see how many refugees are actually processed. And now the White House is undergoing some sort of shakeup, with rumors of Lewandowsky and Bossie making a comeback, so we might see a renewed focus on the issues. I mean really, ask yourself where the US was a year ago and where it is now. This should be a no-brainer.

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  31. @Parsifal
    First thing Trump supporters should do is cease and desist from this Jihad they have been waging against the Kushners. It serves no apparent purpose, it is based on mere hearsay about their influence . Whoever in this moment pursues this misguided effort is in the Orwellian sense(*) objectively doing the bidding of the Deep State and other Trump's enemies. Firing Mike Flynn was a mistake, firing Kushner would be an absolute calamity! It's General Order 270 Time: Not One Step Back!

    Second, bitching about how "nothing is getting done" is also not an argument, helpful or even correct. It grossly underestimates the power and influence of Trump's enemies and their will to thwart him. It is also a self-fullfilling prophecy of sort since it is not possible for Trump to get anything done if his supporters are wusses who abandon posts at the first sign of trouble.

    (*) referring to this quote: http://www.goodreads.com/quotes/20274-pacifism-is-objectively-pro-fascist-this-is-elementary-common-sense-if

    DACA and DAPA unrevoked, HB-2 visas increased, refugees increased, no attempt to secure adequate funding for the wall, Syria bombed twice, increased support for Saudi Arabia’s war in Yemen, continued support for the cultural Marxist assault on Hungary – Trump, under the influence of Kushner, is objectively worse than Obama on both immigration and foreign policy.

    Even the “Muslim ban” is flawed. Blocking Iranian tourists antagonizes Iran and decreases the profits of the tourist industry, without decreasing immigration or diminishing the terrorist threat.

    Trump would have my fanatical support if he stayed true to the nationalist agenda he campaigned on, but if he amplifies invade-the-world/invite-the-world to humor his family, he will have my fanatical opposition.

    Like a Secretary of Defense once said, “No better friend, no worse enemy”.

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  32. @Ed
    I think it's becoming clear that Trump is not the great managerial force he claimed to be during the campaign. The perceived chaos in the WH scares traditional GOPers who are always on edge with the media. It causes them to retreat even more.

    Trump needs to allow skilled advisors to take greater reins in his administration. That would mean jettisoning his son-in-law and allowing Bannon to reassert control. The Sessions/Miller/Bannon wing have been consistent and have delivered results. Their one perceived misstep, the travel ban, really wasn't one.

    I think losing Kushner at this point would be a net negative. He’s the middleman between the president and the Goldman crowd (Cohn etc), who aren’t going anywhere. Would you rather they be completely unleashed?

    If what the media says is true, his domestic political instincts aren’t the greatest, but he seems to have lots of energy for foreign policy initiatives, which could be a valuable thing. Just like his father-in-law, he’ll improve with experience.

    Read More
  33. @Travis
    The media has been so relentless in pushing Russian conspiracy stories, they often contradict each other and are based on unnamed sources, usually later proven to be mostly false reports.

    If Trump had conspired with Russia, why were the Russians requesting to establish a back channel for Trump dealings with the Kremlin 4 weeks after he won the election ? If there had been collusion between the Trump Campaign and the Russians why would it have been necessary to set up a back channel in December ?

    The media implies that setting up communications with Russia is somehow a crime or indicates collusion. But it is not a crime and seems to indicate there was little communication with the Russians prior to Trump's victory.

    The constant leaks are the true crimes...and indicates that the Obama administration was bugging Trumps campaign and has used these recordings to damage the President politically. There is a real scandal here, but the media refuses to cover it.

    Someone might amuse themselves by breathlessly running last week’s debunked fake news leaks this week.

    “BREAKING NEWS: CNN reports that sources say Trump ordered Russian prostitutes to urinate on Obama!” and so on.

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  34. I’ll give him a full term before I judge his efforts on immigration. The corporate opponents have dug in; the D’s can’t live without demographically replacing white guys and the R’s are bought off to help them. The Wall and Deportation are key but are HUUUUGE things to accomplish these days. Eisenhower never had half the country and 90% of the Deep State in open hatred and revolt against the American people.

    Right now the Deep State is readying it’s packages against Gorsuch, Roberts, and Kennedy to use to push the Supreme Court to rule that, somehow, the president doesn’t have power to ban people from the country. Whether that ruling happens, and what Trump does about it, is key. Look for Trump to keep dropping more Andrew Jackson-type hints to test the waters at defying the Supreme Court.

    Marbury v. Madison is the worst decision in U.S. history.

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    • Replies: @Federalist
    I think that Trump does need to let Supreme Court justices know (through back channels) that he is willing to defy them on travel bans if they rule against him. The Supreme Court is, of course, enormously powerful. But its power rests on all other political actors toeing the line.

    Justices that vehemently disagree with one another on just about everything else still very much agree on maintaining the court's power. It's hard to imagine any other recent president or person who is or was likely to be president defying the Supreme Court. Is Trump crazy enough to do it? If I were on the Supreme Court, I would be worried. Trump will be around a few or several more years at most. Supreme Court justices serve for life.

    I don't think that this is the hill to die on for the justices. Every decision is politicized but even judges and justices who will rule or have ruled against Trump know that he is clearly entitled to the ban from an objective standpoint.
  35. No surge in Afghanistan yet. Yeah, that’s something.

    No word on the wall, or more importantly universal e-verify.

    Syria, whatever.

    Somalia appears no worse.

    Libya, seems to be left up to Europe

    So far no new wars.

    Latest TSA iniciative, everything will be checked. Outside the US there is resistance to this.

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    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Wall is moving forwards as best it can.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/byron-york-while-other-controversies-rage-work-on-border-wall-moves-forward/article/2624408?platform=hootsuite

    Very happy with Trump, things don't change over night but movement is in the right direction.
  36. @Daniel Chieh
    Writer reposts 2014 drivel in 2017 again. White privilege, "positive discrimination" is good, yadda yadda. Structural racism yadda yadda.

    The Guardian confirmed as liberal assh*le once again.

    No, the Guardian is an arseh*le, not an assh*le.

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  37. Trump’s much ballyhooed increase in the Veterans Administration budget is nothing but smoke and mirrors. The so-called increase is to expand the Choice program for veteran medical care. This program funnels money to private health insurance companies and is funded by cutting elderly veterans combat related disability pensions.

    Fuck that. It is just a final kick in the teeth to Vietnam veterans from a draft age President who never served.

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  38. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative–Megan isn’t a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.)

    If not the green eyeshadow wing.
    I dunno. I found her op-ed sort of interesting, but awfully muddled. I mean:

    So what conservatives here know is that the freakout in Washington, which looks from afar like a battle between Trump and “the establishment,” is actually one side screaming in amazement as the other side turn their weapons on each other.
    Of course, that’s not the only reason that Washington conservatives are screaming.

    So who are the sides and who is doing the screaming? I guess you have to be an Insider to understand these oblique references.

    Read More
  39. @Travis
    The media has been so relentless in pushing Russian conspiracy stories, they often contradict each other and are based on unnamed sources, usually later proven to be mostly false reports.

    If Trump had conspired with Russia, why were the Russians requesting to establish a back channel for Trump dealings with the Kremlin 4 weeks after he won the election ? If there had been collusion between the Trump Campaign and the Russians why would it have been necessary to set up a back channel in December ?

    The media implies that setting up communications with Russia is somehow a crime or indicates collusion. But it is not a crime and seems to indicate there was little communication with the Russians prior to Trump's victory.

    The constant leaks are the true crimes...and indicates that the Obama administration was bugging Trumps campaign and has used these recordings to damage the President politically. There is a real scandal here, but the media refuses to cover it.

    And furthermore, it does seem likely that the Obama administration illegally abused surveillance information on a scale that makes Nixon seem quaint. But Susan Rice dropped out of sight so very quickly once that became clear that it almost seems like a dream.

    Read More
  40. Yeah, the problem with Trump is Trump, which induces another problem being America’s opinion of Trump, specifically Trump supporters’ view of Trump.

    For a small but important minority of Trump supporters (including 40-80% of the commentariat here as a guess), attacks on Trump or other Trump setbacks are taken as adverse developments against them personally.

    For other Republicans or Trump voters, they’re not. And both groups are wrong.

    The McArdle article is a great cite btw. It’s one of a few things that has changed my mind regarding Trump over the last week or so. The more rabid Trump supporters want to think that Democrats, Deep Staters and liberals in the media are forming vortex of innuendo and bullshtt to incapacitate Trump.

    But somehow if we all stick together and rally around Trump we can ride it out. It’s bullshtt though. The McArdle piece and a couple others have shown that whoever your guy is inside the Administration, it might be Sessions, Miller, Bannon, Kellyanne Conway or Reince Priebus (even Kushner or Mrs Kushner if you swing that way), they _all_ have the New York Times on speed dial and spend at least two hours out of their day spilling their guts about how the boss is a retard.

    The reality is that nobody anywhere has suffered any kind of career, or legal, or social adverse consequences for “resisting” Trump and the reason for that is that Trump has constituted himself as an island without any kind of meaningful roots in American governance.

    Read More
  41. @Peter Akuleyev
    Apparently Trump's poll numbers have improved after his first world trip, something I find remarkable since from the European perspective it seems to have been a complete and unprecedented disaster. To his credit Trump is certainly "putting America first". Whether it is really in America's long term interest to buddy up to Saudi Arabia and alienate the Europeans is a different question. The funny thing is that Trump is actually executing the pivot towards Asia that the Obama team kept talking about but couldn't really pull off.

    Trump's foreign policy moves make no sense if he were really a "white nationalist" but make a lot of sense if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    1. China is clearly the next world power.
    2. Europe is in terminal decline, and the EU is doomed to failure
    3. Russia will remain a strong regional player but has no hope of regaining superpower status and becoming an equal player with China and the US.
    4. China's Achilles heel is energy. Controlling energy resources will keep the US dominant for the foreseeable future.

    If you accept those premises than Trump's seemingly crazy actions all makes sense. It makes sense to cozy up to Saudi Arabia and Russia in order to keep them out of Chinese orbit. It also makes sense to cut Europe loose in order to strengthen ties with Russia.. If you need Erdogan to help keep order in the Middle East and watch Saudi Arabia's flank, then you make friends with Erdogan and let him continue to blackmail Europeans with refugees and to fund Islamic cells throughout Germany.

    This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along, which is probably why the military seems to be solidly behind him. If true then Trump is going to disappoint idealists - both leftists who want the US to stand for human rights and "progressive" values, as well as white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for "traditional" values.

    I concur. Trump is a “great power conservative.”

    Read More
  42. @Peter Akuleyev
    Apparently Trump's poll numbers have improved after his first world trip, something I find remarkable since from the European perspective it seems to have been a complete and unprecedented disaster. To his credit Trump is certainly "putting America first". Whether it is really in America's long term interest to buddy up to Saudi Arabia and alienate the Europeans is a different question. The funny thing is that Trump is actually executing the pivot towards Asia that the Obama team kept talking about but couldn't really pull off.

    Trump's foreign policy moves make no sense if he were really a "white nationalist" but make a lot of sense if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    1. China is clearly the next world power.
    2. Europe is in terminal decline, and the EU is doomed to failure
    3. Russia will remain a strong regional player but has no hope of regaining superpower status and becoming an equal player with China and the US.
    4. China's Achilles heel is energy. Controlling energy resources will keep the US dominant for the foreseeable future.

    If you accept those premises than Trump's seemingly crazy actions all makes sense. It makes sense to cozy up to Saudi Arabia and Russia in order to keep them out of Chinese orbit. It also makes sense to cut Europe loose in order to strengthen ties with Russia.. If you need Erdogan to help keep order in the Middle East and watch Saudi Arabia's flank, then you make friends with Erdogan and let him continue to blackmail Europeans with refugees and to fund Islamic cells throughout Germany.

    This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along, which is probably why the military seems to be solidly behind him. If true then Trump is going to disappoint idealists - both leftists who want the US to stand for human rights and "progressive" values, as well as white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for "traditional" values.

    >if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    >This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along

    >If true then Trump is going to disappoint… …white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for “traditional” values.

    WN doesn’t care about standing up for traditional values via foreign policy. WN cares about WN — is it good for Whites.

    On paper you want your country to have a cynical realist FP so that your country can avoid getting dominated other countries therefore allowing a decent life for your citizens. But our rulers don’t care about a decent life for us… What’s the difference between getting screwed over by DC/Manhattan and screwed over by Beijing/Shanghai?

    As a regular working goy, why do I care whether America is a great power? Might I be better off if America was not a great power?

    Read More
    • Agree: James Richard
    • Disagree: rw95
    • Replies: @Anonym
    As a regular working goy, why do I care whether America is a great power? Might I be better off if America was not a great power?

    In previous years, the American standard of living was better than anywhere I could think of. Now it's more like a typical white country. I think the petrodollar had a lot to do with it. The US wouldn't have been able to print money that other countries had to work for in order to buy oil in USD if the US hadn't been a great enough power to topple regimes who so much as hinted at using another currency to sell the world's lifeblood, and been great enough to prevent competitor regimes from muscling in. That's a benefit.

    Being a minor power sucks ass. Ask the Tibetans about whether they would prefer being the hammer or the nail.

    https://g.co/kgs/fz5DUc
  43. @Auntie Analogue
    Either the GOP "Conservatism, Inc." of Paul Ryan and the Deep State form a millstone round President Trump's neck, or he never intended to keep his superb "America First!" campaign promises. I can't think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn't acted to fulfill them.

    Existing law gives the president the absolute power to limit immigration in any way and for any reason he finds fit to limit it, yet President Trump has not put up a fight and has instead bowed submissively to traitorous $ellout E$tabli$hment judges' threadbare rulings against his immigration-limiting executive orders. Same goes for Build The Wall - he has the power, yet he's not applying it.

    Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them.

    Except, unless you’ve been under a rock, it doesn’t work this way.

    The first thing that happens is the ACLU finds a Ninth Circus Mandarin to invent law, and then it goes from there. As keeps happening over and over again.

    I dont blame this administration for wanting to strike when the fire is hot.

    Read More
  44. @Achmed E. Newman
    First off, it might behoove some of our commenters here to one day realize, though this can often take extra brainpower, that, though we will criticize President Trump for breaking major promises on domestic and foreign policy, we still want him to succeed because that's good for our country.

    Some of Trump's talk about splitting the NATO bill, not being too keen on Article 5 (see Buchanan's new column) and especially his reluctance to sign up for more of the Global Climate Disruption(TM) bull is heartening. His continuing of the warfare state is not.

    However, so far Trump has let patriotic Americans down with his betrayal of our hopes for him on the question of US National sovereignty - the southern border and immigration. John Derbyshire and plenty of commenters here on unz have laid out the details. Understand that this is an Existential problem. What does it matter if we somehow avoid the financial crash coming (spoiler alert, we can't) or revamp our foreign policy for the better, or "grow jobs" if there is no American country here anymore?

    Lmbo, look at all these words to tell us how upset you are at getting called out for your endless doom masturbation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    I still can't tell if this whole schtick of yours is just "Internet Tough-Guy"-ism, or more "agent provocateur".
    , @Autochthon
    I say again, Audie Murphy: just what in the Hell have you been up to that you are so damned superior?

    Take your time; we'll wait.
    , @gda
    Of course, they said that about Churchill too.

    And look how that turned out.
  45. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    I don’t care what whiny bitch so-called “conservatives” tell Megan McCardle. They had their chances. McCain and Romney lost. Then their anointed candidate, Jeb, was a total failure. His replacement, Rubio, was destroyed in his home state’s primary.

    During the Obama presidency, Republican majorities in the House and Senate were absolutely worthless. Obama did whatever the hell he wanted.

    Thanks to Trump, the Republicans/”conservatives” got the Supreme Court Justice that they wanted. Would they have liked Hillary to have made the appointment of Scalia’s replacement? The Republican establishment should worship Trump for this alone. And let’s not forget, Ginsburg is really old.

    Now, the National Review “conservatives” fight Trump every step of the way. I don’t have any problem when people here criticize Trump but the so-called conservatives had their chances. They’ve been totally worthless and are a bunch of ingrates.

    Read More
  46. Is this the thread where we claim Trump is gonna pass an amnesty, not build the wall, and fire Bannon part XVII and whine about how put upon we are?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Federalist
    I thought that was every thread.
    , @mobi

    Is this the thread where we claim Trump is gonna pass an amnesty, not build the wall, and fire Bannon part XVII and whine about how put upon we are?
     
    Your points are usually well-taken, but you'd be more effective if you calmed down.
  47. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.

    No, that wing doesn’t live in DC.

    She’s the best of a bad lot, but it’s still bad.

    Read More
  48. Trump had a successful trip to Europe, thus the media starts another fake news story about Russia…There is no reason Kushner should not discussed creating back channels to communicate with Russia…but it appears it was the Russians who requested this logical step. Knowing the deep state was in control of the current lines of communication.

    Read More
  49. @Peter Akuleyev
    Apparently Trump's poll numbers have improved after his first world trip, something I find remarkable since from the European perspective it seems to have been a complete and unprecedented disaster. To his credit Trump is certainly "putting America first". Whether it is really in America's long term interest to buddy up to Saudi Arabia and alienate the Europeans is a different question. The funny thing is that Trump is actually executing the pivot towards Asia that the Obama team kept talking about but couldn't really pull off.

    Trump's foreign policy moves make no sense if he were really a "white nationalist" but make a lot of sense if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    1. China is clearly the next world power.
    2. Europe is in terminal decline, and the EU is doomed to failure
    3. Russia will remain a strong regional player but has no hope of regaining superpower status and becoming an equal player with China and the US.
    4. China's Achilles heel is energy. Controlling energy resources will keep the US dominant for the foreseeable future.

    If you accept those premises than Trump's seemingly crazy actions all makes sense. It makes sense to cozy up to Saudi Arabia and Russia in order to keep them out of Chinese orbit. It also makes sense to cut Europe loose in order to strengthen ties with Russia.. If you need Erdogan to help keep order in the Middle East and watch Saudi Arabia's flank, then you make friends with Erdogan and let him continue to blackmail Europeans with refugees and to fund Islamic cells throughout Germany.

    This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along, which is probably why the military seems to be solidly behind him. If true then Trump is going to disappoint idealists - both leftists who want the US to stand for human rights and "progressive" values, as well as white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for "traditional" values.

    The best way for America to balance the rise of China is to maintain our friendship with Europe, add Russia to the club, and strengthen both our own nation and our allies by promoting national conservatism (immigration restriction, social conservatism, distributist economics, and a non-interventionist foreign policy).

    Trying to control China by allying with Saudi Arabia to establish an energy stranglehold is an insanely bad strategy, and it isn’t what our politicians have in mind.

    They are actually implementing an even worse foreign policy. They are cozying up to Saudi Arabia because Saudi Arabia is Israel’s ally against Iran, and the Israel lobby is, unfortunately, all-powerful in American politics.

    Read More
  50. I’m giving Trump the benefit of the doubt and two more years to implement his policies. I’m withholding any judgment until then.
    C’mon, give Trump a break! He’s got the whole establishment, his own party, the Media, the Permanent Government (the civil service), and the Deep State part thereof against him.
    Hell, even his son-in-law is busy working against his administration, and Trump can’t or won’t see it because he’s blinded by his little Princess Ivanka!
    Who can he trust? It must feel lonely in the White House.
    Two years.. Then gloves are off!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Travis
    I agree, Trump has been in office just 5 months, his cabinet and much of his administration was not in place for another month. Dana Boente the acting deputy attorney general until May was an Obama appointee. Congress has obstructed Trump at every turn, and will continue to obstruct the Trump agenda. The Deep State will never stop its coup attempts against the Trump administration.

    Trump has little to defend himself with at the elite level -- not only would those intel and military brass undermine him, so would "his own" party's leaders in Congress, who are part of the Establishment. Nor does he have much weaponry to go on the offense with at the elite level.

    So Trump must resort to what his only strength has been all along -- his popular appeal to the lowly and middle layers of American society. His populist and nationalist message speaks most to their concerns, and his no-BS charisma and tone resonate the most with them.

    He needs to reverse the Obama executive order which gave us Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Or use it as a bargaining tool to craft a new immigration bill which builds a wall and eliminates the Diversity Lottery. The diversity Lottery brings in mostly Muslims, Asians and Africans. Ending the Diversity lottery would be better than his 90 day muslim ban, and more Muslims from entering America than the bans on muslims from the 6 nations he targeted.
    , @Stephen R. Diamond
    So, you're saying you refuse to draw any conclusions from his appointments to his inner circle?
  51. Trump’s foreign and domestic policy lacks strategic coherence because Gregory R. Copley is not advising him. With Copley’s advice the Trump administration would be successful, without his advice they will make mistake after mistake.

    Read More
  52. @Anonym
    Trump is better than the alternative. So far he is performing below my hopes but above my expectations which were pretty low. I think so far he is better than the last three presidents, which is a low bar - but probably a reasonable bar for expectations given that the alternatives were probably Hillary, Jeb or Marco. I expect a bit better than those three, Obama, GWB and Bill. But not much.

    I keep on getting GOP funding emails from the Trump team. "Drain the swamp!" They will not get so much as a dime from me until the wall is well under construction, and I don't care if Mexico pays for it or not.

    It will be interesting to see how Trump deals with Kushner. During the campaign he was not afraid to hire people and not afraid to fire people. Of course, those people he fired weren't relatives.

    It will be interesting to see how Trump deals with Kushner. During the campaign he was not afraid to hire people and not afraid to fire people. Of course, those people he fired weren’t relatives.

    Does anyone know how Trump dealt with family (or friends) during his business life? Did he keep them at arms length? Give them sinecures but no power? Give them power but hold them accountable (how)? Just let them run riot? Or something else?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Flip
    I seem to recall reading that he cut off his alcoholic brother's kids after they challenged his father's will.
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    My impression is that for years Trump has relied on his close family - his sons and Ivanka and Kushner - to run the business with him. He seems to be a low trust individual, but also I think he sees the Trump name as a family institution to be preserved across generations.
  53. Plus side:

    Steve Bannon is still there. The rumor has it that Steve Bannon recently is winning battles for the attention of Trump’s ear with Kushner.

    Sessions 50/50 (with the exception of recusing himself and appointing Mueller)

    Firing James Comey

    Forcing Israel to bust their serial antisemitic hoax crime false-flag operator

    Supreme court

    Minus side:

    Ivanka and Kushner in WH

    Sessions 50/50 (because of recusing himself and appointing Mueller)

    Immigration, visas, refugees, fence

    Health care,

    Internet – neutrality issue

    Bombig Syria

    Weapons to Saudi Arabia

    All the war talks about Iran and N. Korea

    NATO build up

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    11 Charles Pewitt > {bring iSteve into the White House}

    bad match. iSteve isn't even made of stern enough stuff to get out of California.

    iSteve belongs in a job like News Director of the VOA. He could do that from his house. I estimate that iSteve is financially trapped in his house.
    , @Karl
    54 utu > Forcing Israel to bust their serial antisemitic hoax crime false-flag operator



    i thought all these things were Mossad-false-flag?

    Not a kid who couldn't pass the (fairly lose) psychiatric standards to get drafted into the IDF, and who was taking payments from Washington.
  54. @Anonymous Nephew
    OT - are there any black or minority readers who can read this Guardian piece and tell us what it says?

    "Why I'm no longer talking to white people about race"

    (they also have a piece on "who's more dangerous - Russia or ISIS").

    I doubt that you could find any White people willing to talk to Blacks on any subject, we know that the conversation would soon turn into a series of complaints.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    You appear to have mistyped. It's the blacks who always have a litany of complaints.
  55. I hear some people say Trump hasn’t achieved anything but after his trip it’s safe to say he has achieved something. He’s strained relations with Germany.

    I know some people will rant about Merkel but her main opponent was also publicly outraged over how Trump treated Merkel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matra
    He’s strained relations with Germany.

    Good. It's a start. Given Germany's behaviour on virtually every issue this decade I'd be far more concerned if Germany and Trump were on the same side. EU/Germany arrogance is Europe's biggest problem right now, not Trump, Erdogan or Russia.
    , @Vinteuil
    The more Trump "strains relations" with Germany, the better.

    I mean, what are they gonna do? Close our German bases and send our troops home?

    Please let it be so!
    , @neutral

    her main opponent
     
    They have absolutely identical views when it comes to immigration, Trump, Russia, race, Islam, open borders, etc. To be an opponent one has to actually oppose something that is meaningful, arguing if some obscure tax should be increased 0.1% or 0.2% is not meaningful.

    I am not sure you thought out your argument here, if left winger Merkel is my enemy then so would an even more left wing politician be my enemy, saying both of them being outraged by Trump indicates that he is certainly doing something right with regards to Germany.

  56. I don’t think we have any idea what’s going on. The media hates Trump and will not honestly report news about his administration. Instead, they report stories that they manufacture in order to confuse and distract us. I don’t think we have anything to fuel meaningful speculation; we’re wondering if Brad stills loves Jen or Angelina at this point.

    Read More
  57. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    Had Bernie Sanders been elected President, something which was quite plausible, he would be having a similar set of issues to what President Trump is going through albeit coming from a different angle. Both Trump and Sanders were insurgents so they had very shallow pools to recruit and staff their administrations from. Sanders, like Trump, would have had to hire from within his political party (Democrats) people who did not like him or support him and even oppose him openly. The press would have liked him only as long as he went along with their agenda so he would never had had a moment of peace unless he bent his administration to their will.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    Sanders couldn't even bend two black lesbians to his will in the struggle over a microphone.
  58. @res

    It will be interesting to see how Trump deals with Kushner. During the campaign he was not afraid to hire people and not afraid to fire people. Of course, those people he fired weren’t relatives.
     
    Does anyone know how Trump dealt with family (or friends) during his business life? Did he keep them at arms length? Give them sinecures but no power? Give them power but hold them accountable (how)? Just let them run riot? Or something else?

    I seem to recall reading that he cut off his alcoholic brother’s kids after they challenged his father’s will.

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    • Replies: @res
    Thanks. Sounds like this: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3382756/Donald-Trump-cut-medical-treatment-nephew-s-sick-baby.html
    Surprised I missed this during the pre-election Trump hate-fest.
  59. @Achmed E. Newman
    First off, it might behoove some of our commenters here to one day realize, though this can often take extra brainpower, that, though we will criticize President Trump for breaking major promises on domestic and foreign policy, we still want him to succeed because that's good for our country.

    Some of Trump's talk about splitting the NATO bill, not being too keen on Article 5 (see Buchanan's new column) and especially his reluctance to sign up for more of the Global Climate Disruption(TM) bull is heartening. His continuing of the warfare state is not.

    However, so far Trump has let patriotic Americans down with his betrayal of our hopes for him on the question of US National sovereignty - the southern border and immigration. John Derbyshire and plenty of commenters here on unz have laid out the details. Understand that this is an Existential problem. What does it matter if we somehow avoid the financial crash coming (spoiler alert, we can't) or revamp our foreign policy for the better, or "grow jobs" if there is no American country here anymore?

    Some of Trump’s talk about splitting the NATO bill…is heartening.

    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren’t paying for Germany’s military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more. And to what end? If Russia is not the enemy what exactly do the Germans need to spend billions of euros on? A pan-EU Coast Guard and border patrol to stop refugees would be a very good investment, but that is not what Trump is talking about. Sure, the US may be bankrupting itself spending billions on pointless wars in Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq, while also trying to get involved in North Korea, but most NATO members want to stay out of those flytraps and I don’t blame them.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    IF Russia is not the enemy...

    Ay, there's the rub. Russia is not exactly an enemy but they're not allies either. Putin seems very determined to pursue Russian interests wherever the opportunity presents itself. He sees himself as tasked by destiny to maximize the power and interests of the Russian people (and especially that of his friends and family). Only in the modern world does this seem strange - for most of history this is how all rulers operated.

    He also sees Eastern Europe and the 'stans (and even part of the Arab world) as part of Russia's natural sphere of influence - he takes the Soviet Union's pre-1989 position as optimal. He knows that he's not likely to get back to that high water mark but he'd like to get back as much as possible. He's also very unhappy with the idea that NATO is right on his borders - he (probably rightly) sees that as a violation of the deal that was made to end the Cold War. And he has taken concrete action to modernize Russian forces, restored air patrols, etc. to show that it's not just a dream.

    Given all of that, someone has to present a credible defense to Russian power - nature abhors a vacuum. Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to "invade" Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that's awfully tempting. You would have to be a saint to withstand that kind of temptation and Putin is not a saint. As Trump has said, it's not fair for the US to keep paying for Europe's defense 70 years after the end of WWII.
    , @anonymous

    That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren’t paying for Germany’s military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more.
     
    That is correct in a technical sense. However, because of our huge presence in Europe the Germans and others have very much diminished forces than what they would probably have absent the US presence. For example, check out the wiki page for the current German Air Force. They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany's size. The USMC alone has more front line fighters than that.

    Of course that is really a feature, not a bug, about the post-war American presence in Europe and why it continues post-Soviet collapse. Those in charge dread European nations getting into an arms race with one another. So having a huge American presence keeps that in check.

    My guess is if the Europeans ever asked us to leave and started to build up their individual armed forces to the levels of the Israelis, our political class would hyperventilate. Though they complain about the excessive costs of "defending" Europe, the alternative of a highly armed mishmash of European armed forces would be far worse for them.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption.
     
    Hey, talk is better than nothing. I don't want to be accused by Mr. Hanson of being a Debbie Downer or whatever the latest, oh, "Doom Masterbater". Haha, he is more original in his name-calling than the left - I'll give him that.

    Hey Hanson, I would give you the book you lent me on Nuclear Armageddon back, but the pages are all stuck together - sorry about that. I should have watched it on Kindle.
  60. @res

    It will be interesting to see how Trump deals with Kushner. During the campaign he was not afraid to hire people and not afraid to fire people. Of course, those people he fired weren’t relatives.
     
    Does anyone know how Trump dealt with family (or friends) during his business life? Did he keep them at arms length? Give them sinecures but no power? Give them power but hold them accountable (how)? Just let them run riot? Or something else?

    My impression is that for years Trump has relied on his close family – his sons and Ivanka and Kushner – to run the business with him. He seems to be a low trust individual, but also I think he sees the Trump name as a family institution to be preserved across generations.

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    • Replies: @Dahlia
    My impression is that for years Trump has relied on his close family – his sons and Ivanka and Kushner – to run the business with him. He seems to be a low trust individual

    Trump would be FAR easier for people to understand, and just plain have an intuitive grasp of, if he was Donald MacLeod.

    His Scottish sensibility leaps out at me at all times; no surprise he wanted his clan in the White House with him.

    Agnostic has good posts at his place about Kushner: his lack of power and the mildly successful psyops campaign waged against altright/paleocons that Jared is not Our Guy, a globalist even.
    http://akinokure.blogspot.com/2017/05/intuition-if-kushners-out-good-or-bad.html?m=1

  61. I am one of the many people who voted for Trump because I have given up completely on the USA’s current political establishment: Republican and Democrat establishment politicians; the cohorts of staffers, bureaucrats, lobbyists, foundations, professional “experts”, etc., who support them; the fake news MSM who give these people cover and propaganda support; the Zionist establishment which apparently sets this country’s foreign policy and subsumes its interests to those of Israel; the whole stinking mess.

    We saw Trump as our last hope of destroying these parasites and liberating our country. The establishment is terrified he might take steps in that direction. They will do anything necessary to stop that from happening.

    Unless Trump was a total hypocrite during his campaign he needs to realize that regaining the support of his base is his only hope of surviving let alone accomplishing anything useful. Instead, up to now, he has surrounded himself with establishment figures like Priebus and has attempted to ingratiate himself with other establishment figures like the GOP Congressional leadership. These people will only sabotage Trump’s reform efforts. Trump’s attempts to placte the establishment only alienate his base of popular support.

    Trump and his followers need to recognize that his campaign and election were a tocsin declaring war on the establishment and a clarion call for revolutionary reform. Things will never be the same in this country. Trump can support his base as they have supported him and go down as one of the great figures in US history. Or he can desert his base and become a pathetic footnote. Either way, the establishment now has a large and permanent opposition that will continue to center around the people who gave Trump their sup[port. This will not go away although it remains to be seen when and how it will find new leaders should Trump fail.

    I agree with Buzz Mohawk. Trump needs to focus on the issues and proposed policies that got him elected. Among these are: (1) implementing real reform of immigration and naturalization, (2) creating bilateral trade agreements that are favorable to the USA’s domestic economy to replace harmful multilateral agreements like NAFTA and the TPP, (3) escaping outdated foreign entanglements like NATO and SEATO and the pernicious influence of the Israel lobby, (4) relatedly, establishing reasonable spheres of influence with other countries, the USA’s is the Americas not the Near East, Europe, or the South China Sea, (5) breaking the grip of the establishment on the federal government, (6) championing the interests of White, Christian, native-born Americans.

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    • Replies: @dr kill
    There is a single issue. The modern GOP must die. Trump was the only weapon at hand to murder the GOP. Everyone understands what a Trump vote meant. Thus the squealing in comfortable corners of the land.

    I am patiently waiting for him to figure it out and eff them all up.
  62. @Flip
    We got Gorsuch instead of Garland and that means that gun rights will still exist in America. Some illegals seem to be being deported. Those are two good things.

    Still better than Hillary or Jeb!

    Enforcement of current immigration laws and deportations of illegals seem to be increasing, but, on the flip side, we’re also continuing to take in refugees and DACA is continuing.

    I wonder if Trump is conflicted here, because he really thinks he can win a majority of NAMS in 2020.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    Enforcement of current immigration laws and deportations of illegals seem to be increasing, but, on the flip side, we’re also continuing to take in refugees and DACA is continuing.
     
    I believe that Sessions is driving the changes that are beginning to take life in the form of policy memos, group emails, and so forth. These are messages from real people with actual authority telling other people—their underlings—specifically what to do, as opposed to campaign promises and other hot air.

    As anyone with any kind of experience working in a large organization or bureaucratic setting will tell you, these sort of changes to procedure are excruciatingly slow to implement: people passively resist, are too ignorant or lazy to change, local authorities meaninglessly oppose the changes, etc. The good news is that once they are in place, they'll take equally long for the other side to change back.

    Re: DACA, I assume Trump is waiting to move until he's established momentum in the Supreme Court with a definitive decision in favor of immigration restriction. If the travel ban is shown to be constitutional, then it would be a more favorable climate for revoking DACA.

  63. @Anonymous
    I don't think there is any turning around the extreme damage done by the foaming at the mouth Russophobia. It's shocking how out of hand it got so quickly. Russia's resistance to the oligarchs and global cabal started it and their intervention in Syria sent it through the roof. Now the hysteria is so toxic and pervasive it seems beyond repair. Then we had this Russophobia moved into American politics and it's way beyond McCarthyism. McCarthyism on bath salts. The left, the globalists, the neocons, some Stangelovian generals, really do seem to want some confrontation with Russia. In the opinion of retired and highly-respected for military analysts, any conflict with Russia ends with American cities vaporized.

    I really don’t see nuclear war as the endpoint of this game. Of course any time you play with fire you’re at risk of it spreading out of control, but the main reason to stir up trouble with Russia seems to be for domestic political reasons (to avoid forcing the Democrat base to deal with their anti-white male belief system, which they would really prefer to keep believing in – change is hard) so I think there’s a limit to how hard the Democrat leadership and Democrat controlled press is willing to press the issue. Right now dissing Russia and weakening Trump is a cheap twofer – what’s the downside? (Also a hilarious one given that the left covered for the Russians, in their guise as “Soviets”for decades). If it required Washington, NY and LA to be vaporized, that’s quite another matter. If you are the editor of the NYT or WashPo, having your city vaporized is very bad for the subscription numbers, which are falling badly as it is. Your printing plant might be in the blast zone and insurance doesn’t cover nuclear war.

    Putin is obviously not anxious to have Moscow and St. Petersburg vaporized either. Russia also realizes that it is in no position to restore itself as an equal great power alongside the US and that is not really Putin’s goal (maybe his dream or fantasy but Putin is a realist and knows what is achievable). This is why Putin confines himself to taking little bites here and there where he can get away with it and spending (relative to the US) paltry sums on hacking, disinformation, influencing foreign elections, etc. Of course the US does exactly the same thing (on steroids – in fact half of what Putin does he does in order to insure that he doesn’t end up being Khaddafied), but when we do it, it’s in the service of the Goddess of Democracy so it’s OK.

    Ironically, by attempting to create a crisis of legitimacy for Trump, the Democrats are making it MORE likely that the administration will be so weakened and distracted that Putin will be able to take back the Baltics or something like that while we are preoccupied with impeachment (see Vietnam). But of course they actually don’t give a shit about such faraway places of which we know nothing – Russia is just a stick to beat Trump with.

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    • Replies: @Dissident

    Right now dissing Russia and weakening Trump is a cheap twofer – what’s the downside? (Also a hilarious one given that the left covered for the Russians, in their guise as “Soviets”for decades).
     
    Indeed, these are the same people who blamed the Right for the Cold War and argued for a live and let live policy toward the Soviets. (And, in many cases, were apologists for --if not outright supporters of-- Stalin.) Now that Russia is led by an unapologetic White, Christian, nationalist and traditionalist, they're ready to start a new Cold War, perhaps even going as far as recklessly and needlessly taking us to the brink of a nuclear showdown.

    On Russia, Democrats are the new John Birchers. The hypocrisy is rather striking -- but hardly surprising. After all, we're talking about people who by all indications see no contradiction between their behavior when it came to individuals such as Al Sharpton and Louis Farrakhan and their deep and extensive ties to the Democrats (including Barack Obama and Bill de Blasio, both of whom repeatedly honored Sharpton as an official guest), on the one hand, and that when it comes to President Trump and his supporters, on the other.

    As far as I can see, Russia is only a threat to us to the extent that we meddle into their affairs and needlessly and stupidly provoke them.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Great comment, Jack, and also the reply by Dissident! I would like to add that I think what Putin wants out of the US, and was hopeful about Trump about, was for us via NATO to just QUIT! BOXING! THEM! IN!. Having these Baltic countries part of NATO and continually expanding (which started with GHW Bush) it right up to the Russian border in other areas is something anyone would be angry about.

    Imagine it the other way around. "WARSAW pact invites Mexico and Canada into the fold - story at 11"

    But of course they actually don’t give a shit about such faraway places of which we know nothing – Russia is just a stick to beat Trump with.
     
    Absolutely!
  64. Charles Krauthammer planted a new meme of Russian influence on Trump. This time it is that Russian must not like Kushner and his influence in Trump administration. Read it as: Kushner is good and Trump will be even worse w/o Kushner because that what Russians want. If Kushner is forced to resign it will mean that Russians have won (again).

    Kushner Ties: ‘I Don’t Trust This Story’ — ‘The Russians Are Leaking It Clearly’

    http://www.breitbart.com/video/2017/05/30/krauthammer-on-russia-kushner-ties-i-dont-trust-this-story-the-russians-are-leaking-it-clearly/

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    • Replies: @Pericles
    Gosh, I wonder why (((Krauthammer))) would defend (((Kushner)))?
  65. I think Trump hasn’t yet figured out a way to fight the judiciary. He’s probably not bothering with things he knows that will get blocked until he has a strategy. Or maybe sees how the Supreme Court plays out.

    There’s not much point in starting to build a wall if it’s immediately blocked by a random judge. And I don’t think impeaching judges is going to fly just yet.

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    • Agree: Kevin C.
    • Replies: @Sammler
    The creation of Trump-specific law by court rulings looks like an impeachable offense to me. But I don't think Congress has the fortitude to see it done. Also, any movement towards impeachment before a Supreme Court ruling would be incredibly stupid.

    I think the SC respects law enough to overturn the circuits. Maybe I am wrong.
  66. Trump needs to firmly internalize the fact that the MSM will screech every day of his administration about something or other.

    The MSM will screech on the beaches, they will screech on the landing grounds, they will screech in the fields and in the streets, they will screech in the hills; they will never surrender.

    Once he admits this to himself, he can stop trying to make them like him.

    Most importantly, when he is planning something, the strategy discussion will be “what do we do when they screech about this,” rather than “how can we play this so the media won’t screech about it?”

    Yes, there are a few things the MSM won’t screech about, but if they don’t screech about Trump-move A, they will find an imaginary flea of an issue to screech about instead.

    I recommend Trump specifically start referring to MSM reactions as “screeching”. It’s a pithy Trump-style label.

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  67. @Peter Akuleyev

    Some of Trump’s talk about splitting the NATO bill...is heartening.
     
    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren't paying for Germany's military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more. And to what end? If Russia is not the enemy what exactly do the Germans need to spend billions of euros on? A pan-EU Coast Guard and border patrol to stop refugees would be a very good investment, but that is not what Trump is talking about. Sure, the US may be bankrupting itself spending billions on pointless wars in Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq, while also trying to get involved in North Korea, but most NATO members want to stay out of those flytraps and I don't blame them.

    IF Russia is not the enemy…

    Ay, there’s the rub. Russia is not exactly an enemy but they’re not allies either. Putin seems very determined to pursue Russian interests wherever the opportunity presents itself. He sees himself as tasked by destiny to maximize the power and interests of the Russian people (and especially that of his friends and family). Only in the modern world does this seem strange – for most of history this is how all rulers operated.

    He also sees Eastern Europe and the ‘stans (and even part of the Arab world) as part of Russia’s natural sphere of influence – he takes the Soviet Union’s pre-1989 position as optimal. He knows that he’s not likely to get back to that high water mark but he’d like to get back as much as possible. He’s also very unhappy with the idea that NATO is right on his borders – he (probably rightly) sees that as a violation of the deal that was made to end the Cold War. And he has taken concrete action to modernize Russian forces, restored air patrols, etc. to show that it’s not just a dream.

    Given all of that, someone has to present a credible defense to Russian power – nature abhors a vacuum. Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to “invade” Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that’s awfully tempting. You would have to be a saint to withstand that kind of temptation and Putin is not a saint. As Trump has said, it’s not fair for the US to keep paying for Europe’s defense 70 years after the end of WWII.

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    • Disagree: for-the-record
    • Replies: @peterike

    Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to “invade” Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that’s awfully tempting.

     

    Trump should tell Putin, go ahead and invade Germany. We won't do a thing to stop you. Save them from themselves.
    , @for-the-record
    he takes the Soviet Union’s pre-1989 position as optimal. He knows that he’s not likely to get back to that high water mark but he’d like to get back as much as possible.

    I don't think Putin has any aggressive interest or intent, other than protecting Russian interests in the "near abroad", which certainly does not include invading Poland or Germany (let alone the "Stans"). As for the Baltics, they would be wise not to provoke Russia (as per Saakaskvili in Georgia, who was exceptionally stupid, but then again he had McCain egging him on).

  68. Trump is going slowly from being the hunted to being the hunter. I think we will look back at the Comey firing as the beginning of the end of the soft coup. Both Brennan and Clapper have washed their hands. The Democrats are still throwing rocks but are rhetorically backing away from impeachment knowing that is a loser. Pretty soon we will see the very public frog marching of culprits, both in the government and the press, who were smoked out by a combination of Trump Trolling and counter espionage. There is still danger to Trump because of the uncontrollably of the Special Counsel but it is now a problem for Democrats tied to the past administration as well, probably even more so. Susan Rice, Loretta Lynch, Hillary Clinton, and the rest might finally get their rewards, not to mention their boss who so skillfully insulated himself by using them as foils.

    The Russians were a good straw man but by throwing false allegations as a way of smearing Trump means that the Democrats have done their worst and they will be no further real harm other than General Flynn’s scalp. In the big picture, he is quite expendable. In fact, by inadvertently stumbling into the minefield first, Flynn probably saved a lot more casualties within the Trump administration.

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    • Disagree: Kevin C.
    • Replies: @utu
    Trump is going slowly from being the hunted to being the hunter. I think we will look back at the Comey firing as the beginning of the end of the soft coup.

    Jerry Pournelle tries to spin the firing of Comey exactly this way. I wish it was true...
    https://www.jerrypournelle.com/chaosmanor/recovery-opinionanalysis-on-comey-and-draining-the-swamp-a-note-on-education/
    , @Random Dude on the Internet
    Democrats were never going to seriously pursue those matters anyway. Everything they've done is an attempt to raise their base's flagging enthusiasm. It hasn't worked because the Democrats are utterly incapable of developing a strategy that isn't just foaming at the mouth outrage. It's a political loser and having failing to win a single special election (think of what Scott Brown was able to do in 2010), it's clear that the DNC needs to go back to the drawing board to think of something other than trying to force a Trump = Russia meme into reality. I doubt they will have a coherent strategy for 2020. In hindsight it was an utter mistake for Flynn to step down.
  69. @Daniel Chieh
    Writer reposts 2014 drivel in 2017 again. White privilege, "positive discrimination" is good, yadda yadda. Structural racism yadda yadda.

    The Guardian confirmed as liberal assh*le once again.

    Typical NAM whining, “I demanded that white people accept my worldview, they weren’t buying and now I am shaming them.” Good luck with that.

    He might get responses more to his liking if “white privilege” was used as a discussion point rather than as a cudgel.

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  70. The next person what says “But he’s still better than Hillary!” needs to get a knuckle sandwich. Being better than Hillary is not going to help the country. Being one whit below his campaign promises is not going to help the country. In order to help the country, Trump needs to fulfill every jot and tittle of his campaign promises and more. In fact, he didn’t promise nearly enough, and what he’s actually doing is not only nowhere close to enough, it’s patently detrimental.

    Not one single person who believed in the Trump campaign should be satisfied with his performance. You ought to be infuriated. You ought to be leading the charge to remove him from office. Why? Because he stole our last chance. We had one, final opportunity to change the system from within. We organized, we networked, we campaigned, we gave money, we voted—I know I and many of you as well did literally everything we could to drag Trump over goal line because we understood what was at stake in this election. And against all odds, we did it. We actually won. It never ceases to fill my heart with pride and hope when I think about what we accomplished on November 8th. On that fine day, the Nationalists actually defeated the Deep State and the Globalist cabal. Did you have tears in your eyes at 2 AM when President Elect Trump appeared on television? I know I did. I still do.

    [MORE]
    But then our candidate cucked out on us. It was not even 24 hours before he said that he “did not want to hurt” Hillary Clinton and was therefore backing off his promise to investigate her. This is literally unsupportable. Anyone with an accurate sense of law and justice knows that it would not be at all hyperbolic to say that Hillary Clinton’s head belongs on a pike in front of the White House. The state has not only the right but the duty to prosecute crimes such as hers, especially when the head of that state wishes to be known as the “law and order president.” To simply let her off the hook is not magnanimity but dereliction of duty, and this cannot be tolerated. But in the afterglow of the election, we were all too willing to interpret Trump using the hermeneutic of 4D chess. “He just needs to play it safe until he consolidates his power,” we thought. “Then he’ll throw the book at her.”

    Sadly, that situation has still not been remedied, and it was only the first in a long line of Trumpian cuck-outs. I won’t belabor the point by going through the whole litany, but suffice it to say that the hermeneutic of 4D chess died an ignoble death the moment the 59 cruise missiles flew at Syria. That was a crushing blow to all hope that Trump would be a sane, nationalist leader. It was also outrageous, incompetent, criminal, and deeply immoral. Now add to that the hundred-billion dollar arms deal with the despicable House of Saud. Add to that the fact that not one, not two, but three carrier groups (a significant fraction of the entire US Navy) have been sent to menace North Korea, who simply laughs it off. I am imagining at this moment a parody of the old “this is your brain in drugs” public service announcements. It begins with an aerial shot of the Pentagon and the voice-over saying, “This is fecklessness and corruption.” Then it cuts to a video of Trump swinging swords with Saudis and the voice-over saying, “This is fecklessness and corruption on steroids.”

    Our situation, at the moment, is dire. If we are to have any hope of salvaging the opportunity afforded by the Trump presidency, the effort cannot be left up to Trump. It is in ourselves, the captains of the True Right, whom we must repose confidence. We won the previous battle and we can win this one as well.

    One is not thinking politically unless he has a clearly definable goal and the reasonable means of attaining it. The goal must be to take over the Trump presidency. Not to “support the president,” but to make Trump our bitch and force him to do what we elected him for. The means of attaining it is for the “Deplorables” (God I hate that word) to rise up with one voice and let Trump know that he’s on notice. The expression of that voice must be a primary challenger who will run against Trump from the Right, and congressional and local candidates who will run on the Trump platform but actually mean it. Their message should be very simple: “I mean what Trump says. I believe in it, but I was let down. He isn’t doing it, I will.”

    We’ve already seen that this approach would work. It is the only thing that will work; it is the right thing to do; and it’s our next, best hope.

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    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @IHTG

    Not one single person who believed in the Trump campaign should be satisfied with his performance. You ought to be infuriated. You ought to be leading the charge to remove him from office.
     
    Good luck with that. Why not try to seek practical solutions instead?
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Unfortunately, I think you overestimate the number of Nationalists that actually were in the country; a significant portion of Trump's support was rural people - some which I'm familiar with, who really have far from Nationalist leanings. Indeed, wildly enough, I knew at least two who were effectively pro-China which seemed pretty insane all things considered. But Chinese companies happened to be giving them jobs, and they needed it. They just wanted to work. The previous sentence cannot be emphasized enough.

    And that's what I feel like a lot of Trump's support boiled down to. There's some level of poverty and despair in a lot of the US that we are isolated from, and there are people who'd be willing to support nearly anything if they can just lead a normal life, and the answer doesn't involve "abandon everything, go move to a big city where you can't afford to even get settled in."

    , @Sammler
    Yeah, because if we help remove him, his replacement is bound to be an improvement.
  71. OT

    Looks like we wuzn’t kangs after all.

    https://www.nature.com/news/mummy-dna-unravels-ancient-egyptians-ancestry-1.22069

    “Both types of genomic material showed that ancient Egyptians shared little DNA with modern sub-Saharan Africans. Instead, their closest relatives were people living during the Neolithic and Bronze ages in an area known as the Levant. Strikingly, the mummies were more closely related to ancient Europeans and Anatolians than to modern Egyptians.”

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I was reading Gravey's Ghosts and the black writer noted: "Why does it even matter if we built pyramids or not? Isn't it more important that we can't seem to build modern engines? What we may or may not have built in 4000 BC is not something to obsess over."

    Its true. Its remarkable how something so obvious is missed in the entire Kangz obsession.
  72. Reading the responses, I’m reminded of going to ball games with one friend. The Sox give up a couple runs in the first and he wants to leave because the game is over. It’s even worse in football, which tends to be more back and forth. It’s as if he lacks the capacity to see beyond the moment. His current emotional state is all consuming.

    Trump has been in office four months. He’s stepped on his own dick a few times and he has a lot to learn about dealing with his own party, but he has done some good things too. He got better as a candidate in the primaries and he got better in the general as a candidate. He’ll get better at this too. He’s too competitive not to.

    It’s important to keep in mind that Trump was always going to be more wrecker than fixer. We need a wrecker right now more than some guy with a head full of Utopian dreams. That means it will be ugly and messy at times, but that’s part of the deal in the demolition phase. On occasion, he’ll bust up the wrong things and you just have to live with it.

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    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Polynikes
    Agreed. Lots of overreaction to 4 months even though he's made strides, if not sometimes errantly, towards many of his major policy promises.

    Give me another 20 months at least, before we start freaking out.
  73. @Jack D
    IF Russia is not the enemy...

    Ay, there's the rub. Russia is not exactly an enemy but they're not allies either. Putin seems very determined to pursue Russian interests wherever the opportunity presents itself. He sees himself as tasked by destiny to maximize the power and interests of the Russian people (and especially that of his friends and family). Only in the modern world does this seem strange - for most of history this is how all rulers operated.

    He also sees Eastern Europe and the 'stans (and even part of the Arab world) as part of Russia's natural sphere of influence - he takes the Soviet Union's pre-1989 position as optimal. He knows that he's not likely to get back to that high water mark but he'd like to get back as much as possible. He's also very unhappy with the idea that NATO is right on his borders - he (probably rightly) sees that as a violation of the deal that was made to end the Cold War. And he has taken concrete action to modernize Russian forces, restored air patrols, etc. to show that it's not just a dream.

    Given all of that, someone has to present a credible defense to Russian power - nature abhors a vacuum. Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to "invade" Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that's awfully tempting. You would have to be a saint to withstand that kind of temptation and Putin is not a saint. As Trump has said, it's not fair for the US to keep paying for Europe's defense 70 years after the end of WWII.

    Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to “invade” Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that’s awfully tempting.

    Trump should tell Putin, go ahead and invade Germany. We won’t do a thing to stop you. Save them from themselves.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Agreed, and I would be perfectly delighted were they to keep going until they reached the English Channel.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    In one of his columns John Derbyshire wondered if Russian occupation of Western Europe would be worse than what the leadership is doing to them now via the mass importation of Arabs and sub-Saharan Africans. My mother-in-law lived during the German occupation of France and says that they were less intrusive than the Muslims are now.
  74. @Mister M
    I guess I just don't know how to play 4D chess - because what we get isn't what we were told.

    I guess I just don’t know how to play 4D chess – because what we get isn’t what we were told.

    Nothing personal towards Mister M, it’s just that he wrote a good example of why I won’t be perusing this thread any further. Because defeatism is boring. Trump hasn’t fundamentally transformed Western civilization in the first four months of his Presidency, so I guess he’s just a cuck. I swear, it’s like dealing with children.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    No kidding. Stoic ain't a word associated with this place.
  75. @Anonymous Nephew
    OT


    Looks like we wuzn't kangs after all.

    https://www.nature.com/news/mummy-dna-unravels-ancient-egyptians-ancestry-1.22069

    "Both types of genomic material showed that ancient Egyptians shared little DNA with modern sub-Saharan Africans. Instead, their closest relatives were people living during the Neolithic and Bronze ages in an area known as the Levant. Strikingly, the mummies were more closely related to ancient Europeans and Anatolians than to modern Egyptians."

    I was reading Gravey’s Ghosts and the black writer noted: “Why does it even matter if we built pyramids or not? Isn’t it more important that we can’t seem to build modern engines? What we may or may not have built in 4000 BC is not something to obsess over.”

    Its true. Its remarkable how something so obvious is missed in the entire Kangz obsession.

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    • Replies: @res
    I assume you made a small typo and meant: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/
    That site looks interesting. A black point of view from a writer(s?) who led off the most recent post with "A tale of narrative collapse within a single article."
    Sounds worth checking out. Thanks!

    I looked through a few posts. Is this a black counterpart to iSteve? For example: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/2017/05/a-lesson-in-hbd.html

    Here is the pyramids post: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/2017/03/and-yall-are-still-talking-about.html

    An interview with the author: http://www.amerika.org/politics/interview-with-sondjata-of-garveys-ghost-blog/
  76. @Jack D
    I really don't see nuclear war as the endpoint of this game. Of course any time you play with fire you're at risk of it spreading out of control, but the main reason to stir up trouble with Russia seems to be for domestic political reasons (to avoid forcing the Democrat base to deal with their anti-white male belief system, which they would really prefer to keep believing in - change is hard) so I think there's a limit to how hard the Democrat leadership and Democrat controlled press is willing to press the issue. Right now dissing Russia and weakening Trump is a cheap twofer - what's the downside? (Also a hilarious one given that the left covered for the Russians, in their guise as "Soviets"for decades). If it required Washington, NY and LA to be vaporized, that's quite another matter. If you are the editor of the NYT or WashPo, having your city vaporized is very bad for the subscription numbers, which are falling badly as it is. Your printing plant might be in the blast zone and insurance doesn't cover nuclear war.

    Putin is obviously not anxious to have Moscow and St. Petersburg vaporized either. Russia also realizes that it is in no position to restore itself as an equal great power alongside the US and that is not really Putin's goal (maybe his dream or fantasy but Putin is a realist and knows what is achievable). This is why Putin confines himself to taking little bites here and there where he can get away with it and spending (relative to the US) paltry sums on hacking, disinformation, influencing foreign elections, etc. Of course the US does exactly the same thing (on steroids - in fact half of what Putin does he does in order to insure that he doesn't end up being Khaddafied), but when we do it, it's in the service of the Goddess of Democracy so it's OK.

    Ironically, by attempting to create a crisis of legitimacy for Trump, the Democrats are making it MORE likely that the administration will be so weakened and distracted that Putin will be able to take back the Baltics or something like that while we are preoccupied with impeachment (see Vietnam). But of course they actually don't give a shit about such faraway places of which we know nothing - Russia is just a stick to beat Trump with.

    Right now dissing Russia and weakening Trump is a cheap twofer – what’s the downside? (Also a hilarious one given that the left covered for the Russians, in their guise as “Soviets”for decades).

    Indeed, these are the same people who blamed the Right for the Cold War and argued for a live and let live policy toward the Soviets. (And, in many cases, were apologists for –if not outright supporters of– Stalin.) Now that Russia is led by an unapologetic White, Christian, nationalist and traditionalist, they’re ready to start a new Cold War, perhaps even going as far as recklessly and needlessly taking us to the brink of a nuclear showdown.

    On Russia, Democrats are the new John Birchers. The hypocrisy is rather striking — but hardly surprising. After all, we’re talking about people who by all indications see no contradiction between their behavior when it came to individuals such as Al Sharpton and Louis Farrakhan and their deep and extensive ties to the Democrats (including Barack Obama and Bill de Blasio, both of whom repeatedly honored Sharpton as an official guest), on the one hand, and that when it comes to President Trump and his supporters, on the other.

    As far as I can see, Russia is only a threat to us to the extent that we meddle into their affairs and needlessly and stupidly provoke them.

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  77. @Auntie Analogue
    Either the GOP "Conservatism, Inc." of Paul Ryan and the Deep State form a millstone round President Trump's neck, or he never intended to keep his superb "America First!" campaign promises. I can't think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn't acted to fulfill them.

    Existing law gives the president the absolute power to limit immigration in any way and for any reason he finds fit to limit it, yet President Trump has not put up a fight and has instead bowed submissively to traitorous $ellout E$tabli$hment judges' threadbare rulings against his immigration-limiting executive orders. Same goes for Build The Wall - he has the power, yet he's not applying it.

    Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them.

    I can’t think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises,

    Which promises hasn’t he “fulfilled” in these first 17 weeks of his administration?

    Please be more precise in your thinking by listing, say, ten of the promises.

    Also please summarize work plans for fulfilling them in your estimation. (Steps to be taken, timelines, parties involved, budgets required, projected outcomes and assessment benchmarks, follow-up methodology to remedy shortfalls.)

    17 weeks is about enough time to turn a patch of lawn into fenced garden, prepare it, and get some tomatoes. If the season and all involved parties cooperates.

    Seriously–what are you expecting? Everything all at once immediately? I can’t reach across to how you are thinking. It seems like the kind of magical thinking a toddler or Evergreen State College student would use.

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    • Agree: CK
    • Replies: @Stan Adams

    It seems like the kind of magical thinking a toddler or Evergreen State College student would use.
     
    Sir, I cannot abide this scurrilous slur against the brotherhood of two-year-olds.

    The average ESC student has an IQ on par with that of a developmentally-challenged garden slug.
  78. @Charles Pewitt
    President Trump has been highly disappointing on matters related to immigration.

    President Trump has signalled that he wants to continue REFUGEE OVERLOAD.

    President Trump has not forcefully halted Obama's administrative amnesty for illegal alien invaders.

    President Trump has not followed Pat Buchanan's call for a complete immigration moratorium.

    President Trump is not stopping the visa system that floods the United States with foreigners.

    President Trump is turning his back on his supporters and he is now snuggling up to the open borders mass immigration faction of the Republican Party.

    President Trump has not fought hard enough to build the wall on the border between the United States and Mexico. President Trump has not started mass deportations of illegal alien invaders.


    President Trump should bring Ann Corcoran, Ann Coulter, Peter Brimelow, Steve Sailer and Brenda Walker into his administration to run immigration policy. President Trump needs to get back to base, and he needs to do it immediately.

    I’m with you, it’s what needs to be done. I’ve been saying “root and branch” since Nov 9.

    President Trump tried to make nice and meet the Establishment halfway, and they are still trying to bury him.

    Bannon is still by his side, I’m sure Trump is getting advice akin to what you’ve posted here. But if he were start the “root and branch” process and actually drain ALL the swamps consequences would never be the same.

    If I had my finger on a metaphorical button labelled “Revolution” like the President does right now I might be hesitant too. I’ve said it before:

    Zugzwang.

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  79. I’ll Keep Saying This Because It’s True:

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions Is The Best Thing About President Trump. This is the best picture I have yet seen of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions is a Southern gentleman fighter; President Trump should listen to him on immigration:

    President Trump must make the immigration issue the issue that defines the difference between the Democrat Party and the Republican Party. President Trump must start a brawl with the GOP Cheap Labor Faction which pushes open borders mass immigration. President Trump will win that fight and he will gain support from independents and Democrats who mistrust the Chamber of Commerce-type Republicans who support open borders mass immigration.

    President Trump should ignore all the corporate media horseshit about Russia. The corporate media is just using the Russia crap to keep President Trump on defense. The corporate media is laying down a WW I-style artillery barrage on President Trump. President Trump must go on the offense and attack. The immigration issue is the one that will win for President Trump.

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    • Replies: @Olorin
    President Trump must make immigration the issue that defines the difference between the Boasian Establishment Party and the emergent Population Biology Woke Party.
    , @Anonymous

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions Is The Best Thing About President Trump. This is the best picture I have yet seen of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions is a Southern gentleman fighter
     
    We know from history that Southern gentlemen fighters don't win wars. Even though outmanned and outgunned they'd still rather have their men die dignified and in respectable formation. They're too dignified for Viet Cong tactics and kamikaze attacks on Union encampments which would have bled the North into acquiescing. But I guess for Southern gentlemen it is better to lose and be subjugated than be seen as undignified. Because you can even be a loser and get statue. For a while.*

    Robert E. Lee. An historical footnote in history. But a gentleman nonetheless.

    *Just some thoughts of a New England yankee who had at least one relative killed fighting for the Union.

    , @John Gruskos
    Trump just brought back wet-foot-dry-foot, and the trade embargo against Cuba:

    http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/wet-foot-dry-foot-trade-embargo/2017/05/29/id/792965/

    Who knew America First meant increasing illegal immigration, and decreasing American exports?
  80. OT:

    Japan urgently needs more immigration! I understand that there are Syrian and African doctors who are called for right away to save the dying island nation!

    https://www.rt.com/business/390180-japan-labor-shortage-economy/

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    • Replies: @rw95
    You know Japan is beginning to loosen its immigration laws, right?
    , @anonymous
    The good thing is that no sane politician in Japan (especially in regard to their own career) would risk promoting true open border policies for immigration, not only because of the current overcrowded condition of Japan, but the people there aren't keen on receiving many immigrants, even if they are from white nations.
    I saw once some old news about Shinzo Abe and many if not most politicians thinking twice about loosening citizenship and visas for foreigners risking loss of popularity among their voters. I don't think it would be different now.
    Besides, the opinion of japanese people about the ones who could attain citizenship and visas aren't so good, since the government were allowing more low-skilled people into the country than the high-skilled.
  81. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Peter Akuleyev

    Some of Trump’s talk about splitting the NATO bill...is heartening.
     
    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren't paying for Germany's military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more. And to what end? If Russia is not the enemy what exactly do the Germans need to spend billions of euros on? A pan-EU Coast Guard and border patrol to stop refugees would be a very good investment, but that is not what Trump is talking about. Sure, the US may be bankrupting itself spending billions on pointless wars in Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq, while also trying to get involved in North Korea, but most NATO members want to stay out of those flytraps and I don't blame them.

    That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren’t paying for Germany’s military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more.

    That is correct in a technical sense. However, because of our huge presence in Europe the Germans and others have very much diminished forces than what they would probably have absent the US presence. For example, check out the wiki page for the current German Air Force. They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany’s size. The USMC alone has more front line fighters than that.

    Of course that is really a feature, not a bug, about the post-war American presence in Europe and why it continues post-Soviet collapse. Those in charge dread European nations getting into an arms race with one another. So having a huge American presence keeps that in check.

    My guess is if the Europeans ever asked us to leave and started to build up their individual armed forces to the levels of the Israelis, our political class would hyperventilate. Though they complain about the excessive costs of “defending” Europe, the alternative of a highly armed mishmash of European armed forces would be far worse for them.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The Merkel hysteria could easily become the straw that blows up his Administration ... for precisely the reasons you describe.

    It's like Trump's big "oops" about Japan during spring 2016 - he suggested Japan have nuclear arms (or something equivalent). Totally oblivious to geopolitical reality that the Japan policy was carefully crafted and is Absolute Law and Never Ever Questioned. That was the red flag that Trump needed some educational intervention, pronto.

    Now the blunder is with Germany and he is IN office. And I suspect Merkel is floundering as "damsel in distress" role with some heavy backup chorus. The entire weight of the FP establishment will be singing 24/7 on this - and they may even invent a way to integrate it with the "Russian" narrative to boot.
    , @Fredrik
    This is exactly right.

    As a European I can safely say I'd like us to spend a lot more on the military but there are two problems.

    1. Just like Peter Akuleyev mentions this would only be needed if Russia is 'bad'. I tend to think they are or at least 'bad enough'. Others in Europe disagree. Most of us don't want to pay for wars far away either.
    2. You're absolutely right that the US has paid for military protection of Europe partly because they want to avoid an arms race. This is also part of the reason why many Europeans are against too much military spending because they're afraid it would signal something to their immediate neighbours. Of course paying for US military in Europe also enables USA to keep Europeans on its side. I don't really believe that the balance of that 'transaction' changed in January 2017.
    , @German_reader
    "They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany’s size."

    And most of them aren't even working, I seem to recall having read some time ago that Germany can't have more than a dozen (!) fighters in the air at any time.
    , @Autochthon
    That's all a bit apples and oranges: We've a GDP five times that of Germany, a GDPP thirty-four percent greater; The U.S.A. is almost thirty times as large as Germany; Germany is about eighty-five percent as large as California (a nation's area has enormous ramifications for the size of a military needed to defend it), Germany has about eighty million people, and the U.S.A. has many more than three hundred million.

    I could go on and on, but the horse is long dead.
  82. @Anonymous
    I don't think there is any turning around the extreme damage done by the foaming at the mouth Russophobia. It's shocking how out of hand it got so quickly. Russia's resistance to the oligarchs and global cabal started it and their intervention in Syria sent it through the roof. Now the hysteria is so toxic and pervasive it seems beyond repair. Then we had this Russophobia moved into American politics and it's way beyond McCarthyism. McCarthyism on bath salts. The left, the globalists, the neocons, some Stangelovian generals, really do seem to want some confrontation with Russia. In the opinion of retired and highly-respected for military analysts, any conflict with Russia ends with American cities vaporized.

    One part of Echo-Chambering Firsters can not forgive losing WW LGB…, and not being able to start sequeling WWT in Putin’s Dominion.

    The others can not forgive Putin for preventing them from taking a full control over Ukraine; The Other Ours Old Country incarnated through a pseudo-historical Khazarian Realm.

    The third group consists of post cold-war strangelovers and M.I. Complex profiteers.

    The Eye of Sauron oversees all three of them.

    Any normal US patriotic, a real-politics driven analyst could tell you that Trump-Putin historical agreement would lead to permanent half-century long global stabilization.

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  83. @Daniel Chieh
    I was reading Gravey's Ghosts and the black writer noted: "Why does it even matter if we built pyramids or not? Isn't it more important that we can't seem to build modern engines? What we may or may not have built in 4000 BC is not something to obsess over."

    Its true. Its remarkable how something so obvious is missed in the entire Kangz obsession.

    I assume you made a small typo and meant: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/
    That site looks interesting. A black point of view from a writer(s?) who led off the most recent post with “A tale of narrative collapse within a single article.”
    Sounds worth checking out. Thanks!

    I looked through a few posts. Is this a black counterpart to iSteve? For example: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/2017/05/a-lesson-in-hbd.html

    Here is the pyramids post: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/2017/03/and-yall-are-still-talking-about.html

    An interview with the author: http://www.amerika.org/politics/interview-with-sondjata-of-garveys-ghost-blog/

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  84. @Daniel Chieh
    OT:

    Japan urgently needs more immigration! I understand that there are Syrian and African doctors who are called for right away to save the dying island nation!

    https://www.rt.com/business/390180-japan-labor-shortage-economy/

    You know Japan is beginning to loosen its immigration laws, right?

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Yes. And I also know that they plan on limiting it pretty harshly, even so. Its unlikely that they will ever have a substantial population of NAMs, for starters.
  85. Gorsuch on the SCOTUS is a big positive. Maybe Trump will get the opportunity to fill another vacancy on the SCOTUS and put conservative justices in the majority instead of an on-again, off-again coalition with Kennedy.

    Also, from what I’ve heard, his picks for vacancies on appeals courts and district courts have been strong. This is a golden opportunity to tilt the federal bench back toward the right, away from the horrifying future depicted by International Refugee Assistance Project v. Trump.

    Judicial appointments have long-term consequences that subsequent administrations can’t undo overnight.

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  86. @Intelligent Dasein
    The next person what says "But he's still better than Hillary!" needs to get a knuckle sandwich. Being better than Hillary is not going to help the country. Being one whit below his campaign promises is not going to help the country. In order to help the country, Trump needs to fulfill every jot and tittle of his campaign promises and more. In fact, he didn't promise nearly enough, and what he's actually doing is not only nowhere close to enough, it's patently detrimental.

    Not one single person who believed in the Trump campaign should be satisfied with his performance. You ought to be infuriated. You ought to be leading the charge to remove him from office. Why? Because he stole our last chance. We had one, final opportunity to change the system from within. We organized, we networked, we campaigned, we gave money, we voted---I know I and many of you as well did literally everything we could to drag Trump over goal line because we understood what was at stake in this election. And against all odds, we did it. We actually won. It never ceases to fill my heart with pride and hope when I think about what we accomplished on November 8th. On that fine day, the Nationalists actually defeated the Deep State and the Globalist cabal. Did you have tears in your eyes at 2 AM when President Elect Trump appeared on television? I know I did. I still do.

    But then our candidate cucked out on us. It was not even 24 hours before he said that he "did not want to hurt" Hillary Clinton and was therefore backing off his promise to investigate her. This is literally unsupportable. Anyone with an accurate sense of law and justice knows that it would not be at all hyperbolic to say that Hillary Clinton's head belongs on a pike in front of the White House. The state has not only the right but the duty to prosecute crimes such as hers, especially when the head of that state wishes to be known as the "law and order president." To simply let her off the hook is not magnanimity but dereliction of duty, and this cannot be tolerated. But in the afterglow of the election, we were all too willing to interpret Trump using the hermeneutic of 4D chess. "He just needs to play it safe until he consolidates his power," we thought. "Then he'll throw the book at her."

    Sadly, that situation has still not been remedied, and it was only the first in a long line of Trumpian cuck-outs. I won't belabor the point by going through the whole litany, but suffice it to say that the hermeneutic of 4D chess died an ignoble death the moment the 59 cruise missiles flew at Syria. That was a crushing blow to all hope that Trump would be a sane, nationalist leader. It was also outrageous, incompetent, criminal, and deeply immoral. Now add to that the hundred-billion dollar arms deal with the despicable House of Saud. Add to that the fact that not one, not two, but three carrier groups (a significant fraction of the entire US Navy) have been sent to menace North Korea, who simply laughs it off. I am imagining at this moment a parody of the old "this is your brain in drugs" public service announcements. It begins with an aerial shot of the Pentagon and the voice-over saying, "This is fecklessness and corruption." Then it cuts to a video of Trump swinging swords with Saudis and the voice-over saying, "This is fecklessness and corruption on steroids."

    Our situation, at the moment, is dire. If we are to have any hope of salvaging the opportunity afforded by the Trump presidency, the effort cannot be left up to Trump. It is in ourselves, the captains of the True Right, whom we must repose confidence. We won the previous battle and we can win this one as well.

    One is not thinking politically unless he has a clearly definable goal and the reasonable means of attaining it. The goal must be to take over the Trump presidency. Not to "support the president," but to make Trump our bitch and force him to do what we elected him for. The means of attaining it is for the "Deplorables" (God I hate that word) to rise up with one voice and let Trump know that he's on notice. The expression of that voice must be a primary challenger who will run against Trump from the Right, and congressional and local candidates who will run on the Trump platform but actually mean it. Their message should be very simple: "I mean what Trump says. I believe in it, but I was let down. He isn't doing it, I will."

    We've already seen that this approach would work. It is the only thing that will work; it is the right thing to do; and it's our next, best hope.

    Not one single person who believed in the Trump campaign should be satisfied with his performance. You ought to be infuriated. You ought to be leading the charge to remove him from office.

    Good luck with that. Why not try to seek practical solutions instead?

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  87. OT: The New Yorker chimes in on the opioid epidemic. Haven’t read it yet, but Ctrl F + Immi comes up blank. What a surprise.

    http://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2017/06/05/the-addicts-next-door

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  88. Trump’s foreign policy moves make no sense if he were really a “white nationalist” but make a lot of sense if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    1. China is clearly the next world power.
    2. Europe is in terminal decline, and the EU is doomed to failure
    3. Russia will remain a strong regional player but has no hope of regaining superpower status and becoming an equal player with China and the US.
    4. China’s Achilles heel is energy. Controlling energy resources will keep the US dominant for the foreseeable future.

    If you accept those premises than Trump’s seemingly crazy actions all makes sense. It makes sense to cozy up to Saudi Arabia and Russia in order to keep them out of Chinese orbit. It also makes sense to cut Europe loose in order to strengthen ties with Russia.. If you need Erdogan to help keep order in the Middle East and watch Saudi Arabia’s flank, then you make friends with Erdogan and let him continue to blackmail Europeans with refugees and to fund Islamic cells throughout Germany.

    This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along, which is probably why the military seems to be solidly behind him. If true then Trump is going to disappoint idealists – both leftists who want the US to stand for human rights and “progressive” values, as well as white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for “traditional” values.

    You skipped the part where you explain, even in passing, how none of this would make sense if Trump were really a White Nationalist, why all of this will disappoint White Nationalists, what any of this has to do with traditional values, etc.

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  89. OT OT OT
    The surprising ancestry of ancient Egyptians: First ever genome study of mummies reveals they were more Turkish and European than African
    Researchers performed a detailed analysis of the DNA of ancient mummies
    They found that ancient Egyptians were closely related to European populations
    Traditional communities in the Levant and Neolithic Europe were close relatives
    Study found that modern Egyptians share more ancestry with Sub-Saharan Africans than ancient Egyptians did
    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4555292/Study-mummies-reveals-Turkish-European.html#ixzz4iaVyiaTq

    (Wuz not Wuz Kangz etc etc)

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    • Replies: @Clark Westwood

    First ever genome study of mummies reveals they were more Turkish and European than African
     
    Very interesting. Thanks for the pointer.
  90. Integrate Russia into the West, which Reagan and Thatcher wanted. Most of Russia’s supposedly aggressive actions (acquiring Crimea, for example) have been reactive to U.S./neocon provocations. Russia should be brought into NATO.

    Iran connects north to south, east to west. Integrate Iran into Western civilization. This would marginalize the clerical regime. A friendlier, more stable Iran is desirable, We need to have a balanced relationship with Saudi Arabia and Iran as we did pre-1979.

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  91. @Jack D
    IF Russia is not the enemy...

    Ay, there's the rub. Russia is not exactly an enemy but they're not allies either. Putin seems very determined to pursue Russian interests wherever the opportunity presents itself. He sees himself as tasked by destiny to maximize the power and interests of the Russian people (and especially that of his friends and family). Only in the modern world does this seem strange - for most of history this is how all rulers operated.

    He also sees Eastern Europe and the 'stans (and even part of the Arab world) as part of Russia's natural sphere of influence - he takes the Soviet Union's pre-1989 position as optimal. He knows that he's not likely to get back to that high water mark but he'd like to get back as much as possible. He's also very unhappy with the idea that NATO is right on his borders - he (probably rightly) sees that as a violation of the deal that was made to end the Cold War. And he has taken concrete action to modernize Russian forces, restored air patrols, etc. to show that it's not just a dream.

    Given all of that, someone has to present a credible defense to Russian power - nature abhors a vacuum. Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to "invade" Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that's awfully tempting. You would have to be a saint to withstand that kind of temptation and Putin is not a saint. As Trump has said, it's not fair for the US to keep paying for Europe's defense 70 years after the end of WWII.

    he takes the Soviet Union’s pre-1989 position as optimal. He knows that he’s not likely to get back to that high water mark but he’d like to get back as much as possible.

    I don’t think Putin has any aggressive interest or intent, other than protecting Russian interests in the “near abroad”, which certainly does not include invading Poland or Germany (let alone the “Stans”). As for the Baltics, they would be wise not to provoke Russia (as per Saakaskvili in Georgia, who was exceptionally stupid, but then again he had McCain egging him on).

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  92. bored identity is not buying a ticket, because every MSM Toilet Bowl in the World would scrren live this muzzie-washing performance:

    “One Love Manchester” is set for June 4 at….. the Emirates Old Trafford cricket(LOL) grounds in Manchester.

    This Grandeous Twat Hates America,but Likes Money….Your Money:

    . “Our response to this violence must be to come closer together, to help each other, to love more, to sing louder and live more kindly and generously than we did before.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2017/05/30/ariana-grande-manchester-benefit-concert-to-feature-katy-perry-coldplay-miley-cyrus/

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    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    To be fair, the money's all going to the victims AFAIK. There are still 17 people in intensive care and another 50-odd in hospital.

    I'm sure there'll be a lot of crap talked about The Religion Of Peace and What Unites Us Is Greater Than What Divides Us, and it'll end with the mass singing of "Don't Look Back In Anger", but what else can one expect?
  93. @Intelligent Dasein
    The next person what says "But he's still better than Hillary!" needs to get a knuckle sandwich. Being better than Hillary is not going to help the country. Being one whit below his campaign promises is not going to help the country. In order to help the country, Trump needs to fulfill every jot and tittle of his campaign promises and more. In fact, he didn't promise nearly enough, and what he's actually doing is not only nowhere close to enough, it's patently detrimental.

    Not one single person who believed in the Trump campaign should be satisfied with his performance. You ought to be infuriated. You ought to be leading the charge to remove him from office. Why? Because he stole our last chance. We had one, final opportunity to change the system from within. We organized, we networked, we campaigned, we gave money, we voted---I know I and many of you as well did literally everything we could to drag Trump over goal line because we understood what was at stake in this election. And against all odds, we did it. We actually won. It never ceases to fill my heart with pride and hope when I think about what we accomplished on November 8th. On that fine day, the Nationalists actually defeated the Deep State and the Globalist cabal. Did you have tears in your eyes at 2 AM when President Elect Trump appeared on television? I know I did. I still do.

    But then our candidate cucked out on us. It was not even 24 hours before he said that he "did not want to hurt" Hillary Clinton and was therefore backing off his promise to investigate her. This is literally unsupportable. Anyone with an accurate sense of law and justice knows that it would not be at all hyperbolic to say that Hillary Clinton's head belongs on a pike in front of the White House. The state has not only the right but the duty to prosecute crimes such as hers, especially when the head of that state wishes to be known as the "law and order president." To simply let her off the hook is not magnanimity but dereliction of duty, and this cannot be tolerated. But in the afterglow of the election, we were all too willing to interpret Trump using the hermeneutic of 4D chess. "He just needs to play it safe until he consolidates his power," we thought. "Then he'll throw the book at her."

    Sadly, that situation has still not been remedied, and it was only the first in a long line of Trumpian cuck-outs. I won't belabor the point by going through the whole litany, but suffice it to say that the hermeneutic of 4D chess died an ignoble death the moment the 59 cruise missiles flew at Syria. That was a crushing blow to all hope that Trump would be a sane, nationalist leader. It was also outrageous, incompetent, criminal, and deeply immoral. Now add to that the hundred-billion dollar arms deal with the despicable House of Saud. Add to that the fact that not one, not two, but three carrier groups (a significant fraction of the entire US Navy) have been sent to menace North Korea, who simply laughs it off. I am imagining at this moment a parody of the old "this is your brain in drugs" public service announcements. It begins with an aerial shot of the Pentagon and the voice-over saying, "This is fecklessness and corruption." Then it cuts to a video of Trump swinging swords with Saudis and the voice-over saying, "This is fecklessness and corruption on steroids."

    Our situation, at the moment, is dire. If we are to have any hope of salvaging the opportunity afforded by the Trump presidency, the effort cannot be left up to Trump. It is in ourselves, the captains of the True Right, whom we must repose confidence. We won the previous battle and we can win this one as well.

    One is not thinking politically unless he has a clearly definable goal and the reasonable means of attaining it. The goal must be to take over the Trump presidency. Not to "support the president," but to make Trump our bitch and force him to do what we elected him for. The means of attaining it is for the "Deplorables" (God I hate that word) to rise up with one voice and let Trump know that he's on notice. The expression of that voice must be a primary challenger who will run against Trump from the Right, and congressional and local candidates who will run on the Trump platform but actually mean it. Their message should be very simple: "I mean what Trump says. I believe in it, but I was let down. He isn't doing it, I will."

    We've already seen that this approach would work. It is the only thing that will work; it is the right thing to do; and it's our next, best hope.

    Unfortunately, I think you overestimate the number of Nationalists that actually were in the country; a significant portion of Trump’s support was rural people – some which I’m familiar with, who really have far from Nationalist leanings. Indeed, wildly enough, I knew at least two who were effectively pro-China which seemed pretty insane all things considered. But Chinese companies happened to be giving them jobs, and they needed it. They just wanted to work. The previous sentence cannot be emphasized enough.

    And that’s what I feel like a lot of Trump’s support boiled down to. There’s some level of poverty and despair in a lot of the US that we are isolated from, and there are people who’d be willing to support nearly anything if they can just lead a normal life, and the answer doesn’t involve “abandon everything, go move to a big city where you can’t afford to even get settled in.”

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  94. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Pence could have pulled off this visit (including setting the stage for parting ways over Paris Agreement) without rattling America’s second most important “special relationship” with Europe. The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don’t kill each other. They both depend on and resent us, and it’s worked pretty well. It’s a matter of existential survival – a complex geopolitical balance that Trump may or may not be aware of. If not, he simply will not be allowed to proceed. Merkel is expressing Middle European distress and confusion on the world stage and may be echoed by the entire CFR/ think tank complex in short order. Maybe she pictured Obama in the beer hall audience.

    What if it all boils down to a personality flaw? … not admitting he doesn’t have enough knowledge. It’s hardly a deal breaker- with one or two advisers next to him, NONE of his troubles need to have happened. Including simply keeping his mouth shut. His political neophyte phase has to be brought to a close if he is to have any future in office. Bannon surely has a handful.

    Someone like Gingrich (there have been numerous weighty people along the way), sitting in Jared’s seat could advise him in private if need be, even after everyone leaves the room. Someone who knows everything or who can make a call to someone else who does. Apparently no one can be candid with him, or even suggest such a thing! His family in the inner sanctum is one big fat lost opportunity cost, and possibly even a sabotage vector, if the NeoCons need to twist the knife.

    Hopefully he exposes as much rot as possible – there was no one else willing and able to do this. If they take him down, the Clinton Cabal needs to come along too.

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    • Replies: @IHTG

    The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don’t kill each other.
     
    LMAO, these pussies aren't going to kill anybody.
    , @Opinionator
    The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don’t kill each other. They both depend on and resent us, and it’s worked pretty well. It’s a matter of existential survival.

    It hasn't worked out well, actually. All these countries are on an accelerating path to destruction.
    , @Dahlia
    They both depend on and resent us, and it’s worked pretty well. It’s a matter of existential survival

    I see a Western Europe facing an existential crisis of its own making due to a liberalism that looks somewhat like a rebellious adolescent's. Merkel's Boner. England with its blind eye to decades-long sex slavery of its working class preteen girls...

    Many have speculated whether Western Europe's immaturity -if that's what it is, perhaps it's just decadence- owes much to depending so much on the US for defense.

    Steve often points out what he calls the World's Most Important Graph, African population projections and.... Well, Europe cannot continue to behave as she has been and survive. Will paying for her own defense alter her thinking? Her trajectory? I don't know, but it's possible. There is *no* hope for her on the road she's on now. None.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    The US keeps enough reign on Europe…
     
    Typo or pun?

    Or this?
  95. @rw95
    You know Japan is beginning to loosen its immigration laws, right?

    Yes. And I also know that they plan on limiting it pretty harshly, even so. Its unlikely that they will ever have a substantial population of NAMs, for starters.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Yes. And I also know that they plan on limiting it pretty harshly, even so. Its unlikely that they will ever have a substantial population of NAMs, for starters.
     
    Yeah, I'd don't consider a few Koreans or Chinese or even some Southeast Asians to be much of a problem for Japan. In short order Japan will get to see what third-world immigration brings when it watches developments in Europe. Western Europe will be a dysfunctional apocalyptic clusterfuck pretty soon, even more fucked up and violent than the native lands of these disparate third-worlders. In their native lands everyone knew everyone else's mindset and background so the dominant population took preemptive action or necessary punitive action to put the kibosh on threats to their way of life. Western European countries don't have the time to get up to speed and truly know an alien culture, let alone many alien cultures outside of their native lands and reacting within a cauldron of other hostile third-world cultures outside of their native lands.
    , @rw95
    We'll see.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    In the past, Japan was pretty strict about sending even ethnic Japanese from Brazil home when their jobs in Japan ended. IIRC, they gave them money to leave.
  96. @Charles Pewitt
    I'll Keep Saying This Because It's True:

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions Is The Best Thing About President Trump. This is the best picture I have yet seen of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions is a Southern gentleman fighter; President Trump should listen to him on immigration:

    https://twitter.com/fenolj/status/818610595687792640

    President Trump must make the immigration issue the issue that defines the difference between the Democrat Party and the Republican Party. President Trump must start a brawl with the GOP Cheap Labor Faction which pushes open borders mass immigration. President Trump will win that fight and he will gain support from independents and Democrats who mistrust the Chamber of Commerce-type Republicans who support open borders mass immigration.

    President Trump should ignore all the corporate media horseshit about Russia. The corporate media is just using the Russia crap to keep President Trump on defense. The corporate media is laying down a WW I-style artillery barrage on President Trump. President Trump must go on the offense and attack. The immigration issue is the one that will win for President Trump.

    President Trump must make immigration the issue that defines the difference between the Boasian Establishment Party and the emergent Population Biology Woke Party.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Southerners already are in the Population Biology Woke Party. The Whites in the rest of the nation are too, or they are close to being so. Hillary Clinton moved to the mostly White town of Chappaqua, New York because she is a member of the Population Biology Woke Party. That is why she comes off as such a phony. Blacks know she's a bullshit artist, despite all her praise for the Black Lives Matter mob.

    Kevin MacDonald has nailed those bastards in the Boasian Establishment Party. They don't believe any of their own nonsense either; they just say it to attack European Christian Americans.
    , @rw95
    The phrase "Woke" needs to die, IMMEDIATELY.
  97. The stuff I find most disturbing is the Haiti status thing, DACA. All he had to do was not screw us.

    WN doesn’t care about standing up for traditional values via foreign policy. WN cares about WN — is it good for Whites.

    And that only in a non-tendentious way. E.g., no, what’s good for white leftists isn’t what’s good for Whites. More accurately, WNs care about what’s good for WNs, constituent demographics. Whites would be far better off if we woke up tomorrow to find that millions of a certain type of white were no longer on the planet.

    Charles Krauthammer planted a new meme of Russian influence on Trump. This time it is that Russian must not like Kushner and his influence in Trump administration. Read it as: Kushner is good and Trump will be even worse w/o Kushner because that what Russians want. If Kushner is forced to resign it will mean that Russians have won (again).

    Kushner Ties: ‘I Don’t Trust This Story’ — ‘The Russians Are Leaking It Clearly’

    That is a long way to go to spin a (((Narrative))).

    He’s also very unhappy with the idea that NATO is right on his borders – he (probably rightly) sees that as a violation of the deal that was made to end the Cold War. And he has taken concrete action to modernize Russian forces, restored air patrols, etc. to show that it’s not just a dream.

    I’m generally pro-Russian, at least, on the current scale (not difficult), though not as pro-Russian as I used to be (pro-Russians disabused me of that, with their serial bull****. But I don’t have much sympathy for Russians’ whining about NATO expansion. Russia turned much of Europe into a jail for the better part of a century. F*** them, on this score.

    Yes, the US/western European influence is vile (nation-wrecking), but that’s a whole other matter (it’s not as if the Russians care about any of that anyway).

    If I had my finger on a metaphorical button labelled “Revolution” like the President does right now I might be hesitant too.

    I might suffer from analysis paralysis, but no, I wouldn’t hesitate at the idea of Revolution, at all. I’d relish it. I’d be doing everything I could to clean house in the national security apparatus, for starters (though I admit I can think of a lot of reasons that it might not appear so to an outsider); fire everyone who doesn’t seem reliable, from the top down.

    Charles Pewitt says:
    May 30, 2017 at 5:44 pm GMT • 200 Words

    Agreed.

    You know Japan is beginning to loosen its immigration laws, right?

    Magic 8 Ball says the immigrants will look a lot like the Japanese.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    (((Stephen F. Cohen))) is worth a read on Russia. Trump ought to offer him a high-level job in the State Department or in national security.
    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/869624247399833600
  98. @Flip
    I seem to recall reading that he cut off his alcoholic brother's kids after they challenged his father's will.

    Thanks. Sounds like this: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3382756/Donald-Trump-cut-medical-treatment-nephew-s-sick-baby.html
    Surprised I missed this during the pre-election Trump hate-fest.

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  99. @Anon7
    I wonder if the baseless attacks on her husband will peel Ivanka Trump away from her Democrat political friends. That could be useful, given that President Trump seems set on having her around the White House.

    I was thinking this myself. Even a seasoned political hack would be pissed at this shit.

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  100. @Auntie Analogue
    Either the GOP "Conservatism, Inc." of Paul Ryan and the Deep State form a millstone round President Trump's neck, or he never intended to keep his superb "America First!" campaign promises. I can't think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn't acted to fulfill them.

    Existing law gives the president the absolute power to limit immigration in any way and for any reason he finds fit to limit it, yet President Trump has not put up a fight and has instead bowed submissively to traitorous $ellout E$tabli$hment judges' threadbare rulings against his immigration-limiting executive orders. Same goes for Build The Wall - he has the power, yet he's not applying it.

    Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them.

    “I can’t think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn’t acted to fulfill them.”

    The only reason I can think of is that he is saving them for the run-up to the midterm elections in order to force compliance from recalcitrant Congressmen.

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  101. @Federalist
    I don't care what whiny bitch so-called "conservatives" tell Megan McCardle. They had their chances. McCain and Romney lost. Then their anointed candidate, Jeb, was a total failure. His replacement, Rubio, was destroyed in his home state's primary.

    During the Obama presidency, Republican majorities in the House and Senate were absolutely worthless. Obama did whatever the hell he wanted.

    Thanks to Trump, the Republicans/"conservatives" got the Supreme Court Justice that they wanted. Would they have liked Hillary to have made the appointment of Scalia's replacement? The Republican establishment should worship Trump for this alone. And let's not forget, Ginsburg is really old.

    Now, the National Review "conservatives" fight Trump every step of the way. I don't have any problem when people here criticize Trump but the so-called conservatives had their chances. They've been totally worthless and are a bunch of ingrates.

    Yes.

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  102. @Jus' Sayin'...
    I am one of the many people who voted for Trump because I have given up completely on the USA's current political establishment: Republican and Democrat establishment politicians; the cohorts of staffers, bureaucrats, lobbyists, foundations, professional "experts", etc., who support them; the fake news MSM who give these people cover and propaganda support; the Zionist establishment which apparently sets this country's foreign policy and subsumes its interests to those of Israel; the whole stinking mess.

    We saw Trump as our last hope of destroying these parasites and liberating our country. The establishment is terrified he might take steps in that direction. They will do anything necessary to stop that from happening.

    Unless Trump was a total hypocrite during his campaign he needs to realize that regaining the support of his base is his only hope of surviving let alone accomplishing anything useful. Instead, up to now, he has surrounded himself with establishment figures like Priebus and has attempted to ingratiate himself with other establishment figures like the GOP Congressional leadership. These people will only sabotage Trump's reform efforts. Trump's attempts to placte the establishment only alienate his base of popular support.

    Trump and his followers need to recognize that his campaign and election were a tocsin declaring war on the establishment and a clarion call for revolutionary reform. Things will never be the same in this country. Trump can support his base as they have supported him and go down as one of the great figures in US history. Or he can desert his base and become a pathetic footnote. Either way, the establishment now has a large and permanent opposition that will continue to center around the people who gave Trump their sup[port. This will not go away although it remains to be seen when and how it will find new leaders should Trump fail.

    I agree with Buzz Mohawk. Trump needs to focus on the issues and proposed policies that got him elected. Among these are: (1) implementing real reform of immigration and naturalization, (2) creating bilateral trade agreements that are favorable to the USA's domestic economy to replace harmful multilateral agreements like NAFTA and the TPP, (3) escaping outdated foreign entanglements like NATO and SEATO and the pernicious influence of the Israel lobby, (4) relatedly, establishing reasonable spheres of influence with other countries, the USA's is the Americas not the Near East, Europe, or the South China Sea, (5) breaking the grip of the establishment on the federal government, (6) championing the interests of White, Christian, native-born Americans.

    There is a single issue. The modern GOP must die. Trump was the only weapon at hand to murder the GOP. Everyone understands what a Trump vote meant. Thus the squealing in comfortable corners of the land.

    I am patiently waiting for him to figure it out and eff them all up.

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  103. I don’t take seriously any of the media’s gossip about The Real Housewives of Pennsylvania Avenue. What Bannon wants or Kushner wants or some other who-knows-who wants and who is slwwping with who[m!] is only known by literal insiders, of which I am not one.

    I also didn’t expect much from Trump. I just think rhat a Hillary win would have been grotesque beyond any definition of the word, every day for ever and ever.

    What DOES surprise me is how fully people like Ann Coulter came around to sticking for their principles rather than for “Trump!” as the lowbrow are doing and could always be expected to do.

    Again, I expected nothing from Trump aside for two things.

    1) This is neither good nor bad per se but I thought he would engage the populace as a whole and bwcome more popular among non-Republicans. I knew he would bring Ivanka into the family biz but I thought it would be offset by his becoming a generally loved emperor.

    2) I considered it a possibility that he might actually DO SOMETHING for America and Americans for at least a few months. I never figured he would build an actual wall but I thought he would at least build it in places instead of a completely needless and useless attempt at a ban from various random Muslim countries. Not that I thought he would do any of this out of the goodness of his heart or to keep any campaign promises but just because it might seem like the smart thing to do for a couple of months.

    Really though, what surprises me is that he is not done EITHER 1 or 2 but just floundered around like a retarded fish.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    What DOES surprise me is how fully people like Ann Coulter came around to sticking for their principles rather than for “Trump!” ...
     
    Moshe, Ann Coulter has really come around in 10 years or so. She used to be a typical neocon, as I recall. She is a real truth-seeker now, a libertarian/conservative, and has always been a great writer. No, it's not like I'm in love with her or anything.... no, .... I don't think so ... sigh ....
  104. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @anonymous

    That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren’t paying for Germany’s military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more.
     
    That is correct in a technical sense. However, because of our huge presence in Europe the Germans and others have very much diminished forces than what they would probably have absent the US presence. For example, check out the wiki page for the current German Air Force. They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany's size. The USMC alone has more front line fighters than that.

    Of course that is really a feature, not a bug, about the post-war American presence in Europe and why it continues post-Soviet collapse. Those in charge dread European nations getting into an arms race with one another. So having a huge American presence keeps that in check.

    My guess is if the Europeans ever asked us to leave and started to build up their individual armed forces to the levels of the Israelis, our political class would hyperventilate. Though they complain about the excessive costs of "defending" Europe, the alternative of a highly armed mishmash of European armed forces would be far worse for them.

    The Merkel hysteria could easily become the straw that blows up his Administration … for precisely the reasons you describe.

    It’s like Trump’s big “oops” about Japan during spring 2016 – he suggested Japan have nuclear arms (or something equivalent). Totally oblivious to geopolitical reality that the Japan policy was carefully crafted and is Absolute Law and Never Ever Questioned. That was the red flag that Trump needed some educational intervention, pronto.

    Now the blunder is with Germany and he is IN office. And I suspect Merkel is floundering as “damsel in distress” role with some heavy backup chorus. The entire weight of the FP establishment will be singing 24/7 on this – and they may even invent a way to integrate it with the “Russian” narrative to boot.

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  105. @Anonymous
    Pence could have pulled off this visit (including setting the stage for parting ways over Paris Agreement) without rattling America's second most important "special relationship" with Europe. The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don't kill each other. They both depend on and resent us, and it's worked pretty well. It's a matter of existential survival - a complex geopolitical balance that Trump may or may not be aware of. If not, he simply will not be allowed to proceed. Merkel is expressing Middle European distress and confusion on the world stage and may be echoed by the entire CFR/ think tank complex in short order. Maybe she pictured Obama in the beer hall audience.

    What if it all boils down to a personality flaw? ... not admitting he doesn't have enough knowledge. It's hardly a deal breaker- with one or two advisers next to him, NONE of his troubles need to have happened. Including simply keeping his mouth shut. His political neophyte phase has to be brought to a close if he is to have any future in office. Bannon surely has a handful.

    Someone like Gingrich (there have been numerous weighty people along the way), sitting in Jared's seat could advise him in private if need be, even after everyone leaves the room. Someone who knows everything or who can make a call to someone else who does. Apparently no one can be candid with him, or even suggest such a thing! His family in the inner sanctum is one big fat lost opportunity cost, and possibly even a sabotage vector, if the NeoCons need to twist the knife.

    Hopefully he exposes as much rot as possible - there was no one else willing and able to do this. If they take him down, the Clinton Cabal needs to come along too.

    The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don’t kill each other.

    LMAO, these pussies aren’t going to kill anybody.

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  106. @peterike

    Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to “invade” Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that’s awfully tempting.

     

    Trump should tell Putin, go ahead and invade Germany. We won't do a thing to stop you. Save them from themselves.

    Agreed, and I would be perfectly delighted were they to keep going until they reached the English Channel.

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  107. President Trump campaigned as the champion of WHITES WITHOUT COLLEGE DEGREES(WWCDs). President Trump owes his victory to WWCDs in the WOMP states — Wisconsin, Ohio, Michigan, Pennsylvania. President Trump’s strategy was to deny Hillary Clinton the WWCD vote in the WOMP states. That is why he won. Democrats know this.

    Joan C. Williams explicitly used the WWCD formulation in a NY Times opinion article where she gives advice on how to win back the WWCDs to the Democrats’ side. Her advice is laughable, but she is a law professor from California, so what would you expect.

    “Two changes are required for Democrats to diminish the 39-point margin by which whites without college degrees voted for Mr. Trump over Hillary Clinton.” — Joan C. Williams in New York Times — “the Dumb Politics Of Elite Condescension”

    The Dumb Politics of Elite Condescension https://nyti.ms/2r9HNoL

    Whites Without College Degrees want to see illegal alien invaders deported. WWCDs want a complete moratorium on all legal immigration. President Trump should strongly side with WWCDs, because they will strongly side with him if he does so.

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  108. Hey Steve! Are you going to ever tell us your thoughts? I have half a feeling that you’re working on your second book, and are mining your readership for research, or something.

    Trump got himself a little bit of breathing room with his “big trip” away from the terrible press around the Comey sacking, the appointment of Mueller as special counsel, and the mishandled meeting with the Russians. It’s hard to tell, however, how much of this reprieve was just because of fewer opportunities for either Trump himself to commit another gaffe, or maybe possibly one or several people on his staff less able to leak something to the press (it could be possible, if anyone in the White House had enough sense, that the trip provided an opportunity to identify leakers: see if a source drops off from anyone on the trip being less willing to chance things to overseas communications).

    (As far as the supposed falling out with Merkel, et al, on the trip, a couple things to keep in mind are (1) Merkel has an election to deal with this year, so some of what she says and does is for domestic consumption; and (2) Trump has been, in this and likely many other ways, accelerating trends that would have been coming anyway. 25 years after the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the U.S. has much less reason to be interested in NATO, given that the enemy it was established to face no longer exists and its successor is a paltry military threat to the rest of Europe, and the fact that the major European members of NATO show no interest in protecting themselves from the actual threat posed by mass Muslim and African immigration.)

    Now that Trump and his camp are back in Washington, and there’s talk of a “shake-up,” we will have to see what happens in the next couple of weeks. The big question mark with this presidency has always been Trump’s ability and character, and that was clear even as far back as the campaign, when he would regularly drag his campaign off into the weeds with one or another provocative public statement or controversy. It seems clear that he needs to change at least in some respect, even if to the minimal degree of appointing a few key core staffers whom he will listen to when they tell him “no” about something, whom he won’t publicly cut the legs out from under, who are able to do the heavy lifting he either can’t or won’t, and who want the job. The problem is still that probably anyone with the competence and ability to get this presidency (and this President) on a sounder footing who isn’t already working there probably already has a decent job, and probably isn’t interested in what has come to look like a toxic work environment under a toxic boss that is likely to leave their career and reputation damaged (and likely with both terrible hours and a government-level salary to boot, not to mention an ongoing Justice Department investigation that has everyone lawyering up). Somebody needs to be there to tell him to STFU, stop with the off-message tweeting, the weird and inappropriate statements to foreign dignitaries, etc. Hopefully, maybe, the special counsel investigation will have lawyers necessarily taking charge of the communications to some degree, so it might be a blessing in disguise.

    Politically, Trump is going to have to deliver something to his base, probably on immigration, this year, in order to avoid the Democrats taking over at least one house of Congress (which will kill any hope of legislating anything stone dead and will open up the floodgates of investigations). I can’t imagine how anyone who watches the immigration issue didn’t have steam coming out of their ears last week with the announcement of the increase in refugee admissions by the State Department this year. Nate Silver last week or so at Fivethirtyeight wrote up some poll findings that Trump’s base was softening, mostly by a shift of “enthusiastic support” towards “somewhat support,” and I have to see that as failures to deliver and stumbles on issues like immigration (which has been the core of Trump’s “enthusiastic support” from the beginning). If his base shrinks or loses interest significantly as the midterms approach and Republicans in Congress and establishment conservatism feel the leash slackening, Trump will have some major problems.

    Bottom line: still Flight 93, the cockpit was breached, but still not clear whether the guy in the seat can fly the plane.

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  109. @Dave Pinsen
    Enforcement of current immigration laws and deportations of illegals seem to be increasing, but, on the flip side, we're also continuing to take in refugees and DACA is continuing.

    I wonder if Trump is conflicted here, because he really thinks he can win a majority of NAMS in 2020.

    Enforcement of current immigration laws and deportations of illegals seem to be increasing, but, on the flip side, we’re also continuing to take in refugees and DACA is continuing.

    I believe that Sessions is driving the changes that are beginning to take life in the form of policy memos, group emails, and so forth. These are messages from real people with actual authority telling other people—their underlings—specifically what to do, as opposed to campaign promises and other hot air.

    As anyone with any kind of experience working in a large organization or bureaucratic setting will tell you, these sort of changes to procedure are excruciatingly slow to implement: people passively resist, are too ignorant or lazy to change, local authorities meaninglessly oppose the changes, etc. The good news is that once they are in place, they’ll take equally long for the other side to change back.

    Re: DACA, I assume Trump is waiting to move until he’s established momentum in the Supreme Court with a definitive decision in favor of immigration restriction. If the travel ban is shown to be constitutional, then it would be a more favorable climate for revoking DACA.

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.

    Re: DACA, I assume Trump is waiting to move until he’s established momentum in the Supreme Court with a definitive decision in favor of immigration restriction. If the travel ban is shown to be constitutional, then it would be a more favorable climate for revoking DACA.
     
    And if its not? If, even withe the Gorsuch appointment, SCOTUS sides with the lower courts in finding Trump's travel bans "unconstitutional", what then?
  110. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Charles Pewitt
    I'll Keep Saying This Because It's True:

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions Is The Best Thing About President Trump. This is the best picture I have yet seen of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions is a Southern gentleman fighter; President Trump should listen to him on immigration:

    https://twitter.com/fenolj/status/818610595687792640

    President Trump must make the immigration issue the issue that defines the difference between the Democrat Party and the Republican Party. President Trump must start a brawl with the GOP Cheap Labor Faction which pushes open borders mass immigration. President Trump will win that fight and he will gain support from independents and Democrats who mistrust the Chamber of Commerce-type Republicans who support open borders mass immigration.

    President Trump should ignore all the corporate media horseshit about Russia. The corporate media is just using the Russia crap to keep President Trump on defense. The corporate media is laying down a WW I-style artillery barrage on President Trump. President Trump must go on the offense and attack. The immigration issue is the one that will win for President Trump.

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions Is The Best Thing About President Trump. This is the best picture I have yet seen of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions is a Southern gentleman fighter

    We know from history that Southern gentlemen fighters don’t win wars. Even though outmanned and outgunned they’d still rather have their men die dignified and in respectable formation. They’re too dignified for Viet Cong tactics and kamikaze attacks on Union encampments which would have bled the North into acquiescing. But I guess for Southern gentlemen it is better to lose and be subjugated than be seen as undignified. Because you can even be a loser and get statue. For a while.*

    Robert E. Lee. An historical footnote in history. But a gentleman nonetheless.

    *Just some thoughts of a New England yankee who had at least one relative killed fighting for the Union.

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    • Replies: @Pericles
    Well, there were some

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Guerrilla_warfare_in_the_American_Civil_War
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nathan_Bedford_Forrest
  111. @Anonymous Nephew
    OT - are there any black or minority readers who can read this Guardian piece and tell us what it says?

    "Why I'm no longer talking to white people about race"

    (they also have a piece on "who's more dangerous - Russia or ISIS").

    “Why I’m no longer talking to white people about race”

    She said, in her piece for the Guardian about race.

    Promises, promises…

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  112. @anonymous

    That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren’t paying for Germany’s military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more.
     
    That is correct in a technical sense. However, because of our huge presence in Europe the Germans and others have very much diminished forces than what they would probably have absent the US presence. For example, check out the wiki page for the current German Air Force. They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany's size. The USMC alone has more front line fighters than that.

    Of course that is really a feature, not a bug, about the post-war American presence in Europe and why it continues post-Soviet collapse. Those in charge dread European nations getting into an arms race with one another. So having a huge American presence keeps that in check.

    My guess is if the Europeans ever asked us to leave and started to build up their individual armed forces to the levels of the Israelis, our political class would hyperventilate. Though they complain about the excessive costs of "defending" Europe, the alternative of a highly armed mishmash of European armed forces would be far worse for them.

    This is exactly right.

    As a European I can safely say I’d like us to spend a lot more on the military but there are two problems.

    1. Just like Peter Akuleyev mentions this would only be needed if Russia is ‘bad’. I tend to think they are or at least ‘bad enough’. Others in Europe disagree. Most of us don’t want to pay for wars far away either.
    2. You’re absolutely right that the US has paid for military protection of Europe partly because they want to avoid an arms race. This is also part of the reason why many Europeans are against too much military spending because they’re afraid it would signal something to their immediate neighbours. Of course paying for US military in Europe also enables USA to keep Europeans on its side. I don’t really believe that the balance of that ‘transaction’ changed in January 2017.

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  113. “Hispanic Caucus Calls on DHS to Remove Immigration Hardliner as Ombudsman”: http://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/hispanic-lawmakers-call-removal-official-anti-immigration-group-n764741

    WASHINGTON — The Congressional Hispanic Caucus is criticizing the appointment of a Citizenship and Immigration Services ombudsman who previously worked for a group that supports immigration restrictions as “offensive, insensitive and malicious”

    The caucus has called for the removal of Julie Kirchner, a former executive director of the Federation for American Immigration Reform. Lawmakers said she “made a career of attacking immigrant communities” during her time with FAIR.

    FAIR is staunchly opposed to illegal immigration and advocates restrictions on legal immigration.

    “I think it’s a huge mistake because it brings fear into the homes of many people who feel that are not going to be treated in a way that respect their constitutional rights,” Rep. Juan Vargas, D-California, told NBC News.

    Kirchner, a former Trump campaign immigration policy adviser, is one of several people who worked for groups that take a hardliner approach to immigration and have been tapped to fill senior positions in the administration.

    As Citizenship and Immigration Services ombudsman, her role now includes receiving thousands of requests for help with immigration-related matters every year and helping provide “an impartial and independent perspective.”

    Another hire of concern to immigration activists is Jon Feere, a former legal policy analyst at the Center for Immigration Studies, a conservative group that advocates for greater immigration restrictions. He was recently named a special adviser to Thomas D. Homan, acting director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.

    He previously served as an immigration policy adviser for the Trump campaign and transition teams.

    “It should come as no surprise to anyone that he would then staff key positions with people who also fit outside the mainstream or who advocate for views that are more consistent with his campaign rhetoric than some moderate version,” said John Hudak, a senior fellow at The Brookings Institution. “I think every president that has issue areas that are dear to them look for some of the most aggressive advocates to work on behalf of those issues.”

    When asked about the hires, a White House official told NBC News, “The President campaigned on increased border security and enforcement of our nation’s immigration laws and that’s exactly what the administration has been focused on.”

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    • Replies: @Buck Turgidson
    We need more not less immigration "hardliners."

    "Hardliner." That is another one of those cutesy derogatory scary terms the media uses to describe "those who wish to enforce the (immigration) laws."

    Maverick
    Controversial
    Outspoken
    Boatrocker (I made that up, haven't seen it in print)
    Hardliner
  114. @Olorin
    President Trump must make immigration the issue that defines the difference between the Boasian Establishment Party and the emergent Population Biology Woke Party.

    Southerners already are in the Population Biology Woke Party. The Whites in the rest of the nation are too, or they are close to being so. Hillary Clinton moved to the mostly White town of Chappaqua, New York because she is a member of the Population Biology Woke Party. That is why she comes off as such a phony. Blacks know she’s a bullshit artist, despite all her praise for the Black Lives Matter mob.

    Kevin MacDonald has nailed those bastards in the Boasian Establishment Party. They don’t believe any of their own nonsense either; they just say it to attack European Christian Americans.

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    • Replies: @rw95
    TOO peaked in web traffic... 3 years ago.

    http://www.rank2traffic.com/theoccidentalobserver.net
  115. @George
    No surge in Afghanistan yet. Yeah, that's something.

    No word on the wall, or more importantly universal e-verify.

    Syria, whatever.

    Somalia appears no worse.

    Libya, seems to be left up to Europe

    So far no new wars.

    Latest TSA iniciative, everything will be checked. Outside the US there is resistance to this.

    Wall is moving forwards as best it can.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/byron-york-while-other-controversies-rage-work-on-border-wall-moves-forward/article/2624408?platform=hootsuite

    Very happy with Trump, things don’t change over night but movement is in the right direction.

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  116. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Daniel Chieh
    Yes. And I also know that they plan on limiting it pretty harshly, even so. Its unlikely that they will ever have a substantial population of NAMs, for starters.

    Yes. And I also know that they plan on limiting it pretty harshly, even so. Its unlikely that they will ever have a substantial population of NAMs, for starters.

    Yeah, I’d don’t consider a few Koreans or Chinese or even some Southeast Asians to be much of a problem for Japan. In short order Japan will get to see what third-world immigration brings when it watches developments in Europe. Western Europe will be a dysfunctional apocalyptic clusterfuck pretty soon, even more fucked up and violent than the native lands of these disparate third-worlders. In their native lands everyone knew everyone else’s mindset and background so the dominant population took preemptive action or necessary punitive action to put the kibosh on threats to their way of life. Western European countries don’t have the time to get up to speed and truly know an alien culture, let alone many alien cultures outside of their native lands and reacting within a cauldron of other hostile third-world cultures outside of their native lands.

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  117. @bored identity
    bored identity is not buying a ticket, because every MSM Toilet Bowl in the World would scrren live this muzzie-washing performance:

    “One Love Manchester” is set for June 4 at..... the Emirates Old Trafford cricket(LOL) grounds in Manchester.

    This Grandeous Twat Hates America,but Likes Money....Your Money:

    . “Our response to this violence must be to come closer together, to help each other, to love more, to sing louder and live more kindly and generously than we did before.


    http://www.breitbart.com/big-hollywood/2017/05/30/ariana-grande-manchester-benefit-concert-to-feature-katy-perry-coldplay-miley-cyrus/

    To be fair, the money’s all going to the victims AFAIK. There are still 17 people in intensive care and another 50-odd in hospital.

    I’m sure there’ll be a lot of crap talked about The Religion Of Peace and What Unites Us Is Greater Than What Divides Us, and it’ll end with the mass singing of “Don’t Look Back In Anger”, but what else can one expect?

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    • Agree: Dave Pinsen
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    A Morrissey benefit concert would be interesting.
    , @bored identity



    "To be fair,....but what else can one expect?"

     

    O' Pluh-eez!


    1.) Less than 1% of Colonel Covfefe's Frozen Bounty would suffice to take care of all surviving victims.
    And, btw, Confiscating Rugheads' Assets is something that any responsible Western Government should does indiscriminately whenever any MENA originated mofo decides to manchesterize our way of living.

    So, this latest brainwashing exercise of Luv Trumps Hate is not about money.

    2.) Again, this bumbling Khabbalistwat had, on security cameras, during 4th of July weekend of 2015, expressed her Hate for America & Americans; being triggered over excessive availability of 50 shades of donuts, and to impress her Lateeeeno toyboy, or something:


    https://youtu.be/FtpjjQVlFgw


    If Grande only elaborated more on her patriotic feelings, she would be your next DNC convention guest speaker:



    "F*****g Americans...

    The Americans are responsible for all the wars in the world."

    Grande then asked the donut shop attendant, "Are you an American?"




    Why can't Sixty Million Americans ( aka Trump Voters ) make Ariana to get the gibson away from their lives ?


    To be fair,....but what else can one expect?

    Right?
  118. @Prof. Woland
    Trump is going slowly from being the hunted to being the hunter. I think we will look back at the Comey firing as the beginning of the end of the soft coup. Both Brennan and Clapper have washed their hands. The Democrats are still throwing rocks but are rhetorically backing away from impeachment knowing that is a loser. Pretty soon we will see the very public frog marching of culprits, both in the government and the press, who were smoked out by a combination of Trump Trolling and counter espionage. There is still danger to Trump because of the uncontrollably of the Special Counsel but it is now a problem for Democrats tied to the past administration as well, probably even more so. Susan Rice, Loretta Lynch, Hillary Clinton, and the rest might finally get their rewards, not to mention their boss who so skillfully insulated himself by using them as foils.

    The Russians were a good straw man but by throwing false allegations as a way of smearing Trump means that the Democrats have done their worst and they will be no further real harm other than General Flynn's scalp. In the big picture, he is quite expendable. In fact, by inadvertently stumbling into the minefield first, Flynn probably saved a lot more casualties within the Trump administration.

    Trump is going slowly from being the hunted to being the hunter. I think we will look back at the Comey firing as the beginning of the end of the soft coup.

    Jerry Pournelle tries to spin the firing of Comey exactly this way. I wish it was true…

    https://www.jerrypournelle.com/chaosmanor/recovery-opinionanalysis-on-comey-and-draining-the-swamp-a-note-on-education/

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  119. @BB753
    I'm giving Trump the benefit of the doubt and two more years to implement his policies. I'm withholding any judgment until then.
    C'mon, give Trump a break! He's got the whole establishment, his own party, the Media, the Permanent Government (the civil service), and the Deep State part thereof against him.
    Hell, even his son-in-law is busy working against his administration, and Trump can't or won't see it because he's blinded by his little Princess Ivanka!
    Who can he trust? It must feel lonely in the White House.
    Two years.. Then gloves are off!

    I agree, Trump has been in office just 5 months, his cabinet and much of his administration was not in place for another month. Dana Boente the acting deputy attorney general until May was an Obama appointee. Congress has obstructed Trump at every turn, and will continue to obstruct the Trump agenda. The Deep State will never stop its coup attempts against the Trump administration.

    Trump has little to defend himself with at the elite level — not only would those intel and military brass undermine him, so would “his own” party’s leaders in Congress, who are part of the Establishment. Nor does he have much weaponry to go on the offense with at the elite level.

    So Trump must resort to what his only strength has been all along — his popular appeal to the lowly and middle layers of American society. His populist and nationalist message speaks most to their concerns, and his no-BS charisma and tone resonate the most with them.

    He needs to reverse the Obama executive order which gave us Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Or use it as a bargaining tool to craft a new immigration bill which builds a wall and eliminates the Diversity Lottery. The diversity Lottery brings in mostly Muslims, Asians and Africans. Ending the Diversity lottery would be better than his 90 day muslim ban, and more Muslims from entering America than the bans on muslims from the 6 nations he targeted.

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  120. @Olorin
    President Trump must make immigration the issue that defines the difference between the Boasian Establishment Party and the emergent Population Biology Woke Party.

    The phrase “Woke” needs to die, IMMEDIATELY.

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.
    Word, not phrase; "phrase" requires multiple words, and "woke" is just one.
  121. @Daniel Chieh
    Yes. And I also know that they plan on limiting it pretty harshly, even so. Its unlikely that they will ever have a substantial population of NAMs, for starters.

    We’ll see.

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  122. @whorefinder
    I'll give him a full term before I judge his efforts on immigration. The corporate opponents have dug in; the D's can't live without demographically replacing white guys and the R's are bought off to help them. The Wall and Deportation are key but are HUUUUGE things to accomplish these days. Eisenhower never had half the country and 90% of the Deep State in open hatred and revolt against the American people.

    Right now the Deep State is readying it's packages against Gorsuch, Roberts, and Kennedy to use to push the Supreme Court to rule that, somehow, the president doesn't have power to ban people from the country. Whether that ruling happens, and what Trump does about it, is key. Look for Trump to keep dropping more Andrew Jackson-type hints to test the waters at defying the Supreme Court.

    Marbury v. Madison is the worst decision in U.S. history.

    I think that Trump does need to let Supreme Court justices know (through back channels) that he is willing to defy them on travel bans if they rule against him. The Supreme Court is, of course, enormously powerful. But its power rests on all other political actors toeing the line.

    Justices that vehemently disagree with one another on just about everything else still very much agree on maintaining the court’s power. It’s hard to imagine any other recent president or person who is or was likely to be president defying the Supreme Court. Is Trump crazy enough to do it? If I were on the Supreme Court, I would be worried. Trump will be around a few or several more years at most. Supreme Court justices serve for life.

    I don’t think that this is the hill to die on for the justices. Every decision is politicized but even judges and justices who will rule or have ruled against Trump know that he is clearly entitled to the ban from an objective standpoint.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Right now, Trump should rhetorically start laying the groundwork for not following the Supreme Court on immigration. Start dropping hints (as only he can) in speeches about "courts gone amuck" and "unelected judges usurping power" and how the Supreme Court "has had no constitutional basis to do some of the things it's done" (without being more specific).

    Then get a few legal experts out there to talk about how Marbury v. Madison's holding is nowhere in the constitution and how the Founders intended all three branches to be co-equals in defining what is constitutional---and the idea that the Supreme Court is the sole arbiter is a a Supreme Court-only invention.

    Do all this before the arguments are heard on his immigration bans, and let the chips fall where they may. Most of the country is in favor of the bans, and if the Supreme Court wants to lose face it will defy Trump and the country will support Trump defying them. Then the D's can try impeachment with the R's help, but the backlash will be so great at that point (with Trump leading it himself) that any politician voting for impeachment will be hung from the squares. And the military will prevent any arrest of Trump, if it comes to it.

    I defy the Left to try it.
  123. @peterike

    Russia is not eager to pay the price in treasure and blood that would be required to “invade” Germany , but if it could roll right back in unopposed and restore the 1989 border (because NATO broke its end of the deal) , that’s awfully tempting.

     

    Trump should tell Putin, go ahead and invade Germany. We won't do a thing to stop you. Save them from themselves.

    In one of his columns John Derbyshire wondered if Russian occupation of Western Europe would be worse than what the leadership is doing to them now via the mass importation of Arabs and sub-Saharan Africans. My mother-in-law lived during the German occupation of France and says that they were less intrusive than the Muslims are now.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Are we being punished by those who loved Communism because we killed off the Soviet Union?
    , @Corvinus
    "In one of his columns John Derbyshire wondered if Russian occupation of Western Europe would be worse than what the leadership is doing to them now via the mass importation of Arabs and sub-Saharan Africans."

    Jesus H. Christ, if Derbs was thinking out loud on this subject, he has a screw loose. Eastern Europeans were stripped of the political freedoms and economic self-determination by "Mother Russia" post-World War 2. Western Europe would have experienced a similar fate. The newly installed leaders would have made unilateral decisions without citizen input. However, when it comes to European leadership that has passed legislation to enable immigration from the Middle East and Africa, the people in charge have been granted the right to make decisions for the well-being of their nation. The citizens here have a say in matters. So should they find these policies to be other than beneficial, they have the liberty to seek redress of grievances. Under authoritarian rule by the Soviets, Western Europeans would have no such authority, and if they dared to question such decisions, they would be jackbooted into submission.

    "My mother-in-law lived during the German occupation of France and says that they were less intrusive than the Muslims are now."

    Probably because she was assisting the Germans in their cause. In order to suppress partisans and resistance fighters, the newly installed French regime cooperated closely with the Gestapo to round up them up. The German military was on constant watch to ensure that the French resistance movement would not gain momentum.
  124. @res
    I assume you made a small typo and meant: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/
    That site looks interesting. A black point of view from a writer(s?) who led off the most recent post with "A tale of narrative collapse within a single article."
    Sounds worth checking out. Thanks!

    I looked through a few posts. Is this a black counterpart to iSteve? For example: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/2017/05/a-lesson-in-hbd.html

    Here is the pyramids post: http://garveys-ghost.blogspot.com/2017/03/and-yall-are-still-talking-about.html

    An interview with the author: http://www.amerika.org/politics/interview-with-sondjata-of-garveys-ghost-blog/

    He is pretty worth reading.

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  125. Alt-rightists (like myself) need to keep calm and play the long game. The mainstream left can see how powerful our ideas are, and the wealth of evidence in our favour, and they are unrelenting and aggressive against alt-right ideas and anyone (like Trump) with any sign of alt-right sympathies or tendencies. They will go to enormous lengths to keep alt-right ideas from spreading. The mainstream media campaign against Trump is incredibly vicious and one-sided. We need to keep calm, keep united to the extent possible, and play the long game.

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  126. @Jack Hanson
    Is this the thread where we claim Trump is gonna pass an amnesty, not build the wall, and fire Bannon part XVII and whine about how put upon we are?

    I thought that was every thread.

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  127. @RW
    It was stupid to fire Comey. The investigation kept the Democrats busy and eventually would have made them look foolish when Comey finally found... nothing. But now Trump's got to deal with a special counsel accountable to no one who can carry on the investigation into the next election if he wants. Trump is not smart enough to move into the White House politics at 70. He's an egomaniac with a focus problem.

    firing Comey was the right thing to do…but Trump was a fool for granting an interview with Lester Holt and contradicting the reasons given for the firing. Trump can’t help himself, had to state that he would have fired Comey regardless of the Deputy Rosenstein’s report.

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  128. @Anon7
    I'm similarly frustrated, but they have to play out the hand they've been dealt. Let AG Sessions work it through the courts. Maybe one or more of these leftist judges can be brought up for impeachment by the Senate, once it is clear that their political leanings have overcome their obligation to rule according to the law and established precedent.

    Donald Trump is used to dealing with government bureaucrats and obstructive efforts of all kinds; give him a chance to work.

    The president's policies have been more successful than we know about. You should stop listening to the mainstream media, you (and most Americans) are not permitted a glimpse of the effects of his policies. For example, just this morning there was reported a near-riot in the Texas legislature as protesters (many of whom were in the country illegally, I'm sure) faced ICE authorities. The issue was over the Texas effort to ban sanctuary cities.

    Maybe one or more of these leftist judges can be brought up for impeachment by the Senate

    As if. A short read on the history of impeachment investigations of federal judges shows how rare actually removing one is:
    “There have been numerous attempts to impeach federal judges in the United States; a few have been successful in either forcing resignation or removing the judge. As of November 2003 there have been sixty-one federal judges or Supreme Court Justices investigated for impeachment.”

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  129. To commenters who say give Trump more time, I respond that there is generally only a limited amount of time during which a new administration, just like any new management, can move to implement changes. At a certain point, like it or not, you “own” the system and attempts to change it become much more difficult.

    Insofar as Trump is concerned, I’m reminded of Winston Churchill’s characterization of the World War II Anzio invasion: “I was hoping we’d throw a wildcat ashore; what we got was a beached whale.”

    He’s free to prove me wrong. But I’m not responding to fundraising appeals from Newt Gingrich, whose wife, I note, will be nursing at the federal teat as ambassador to the Vatican.

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  130. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Everyone remembers Trump’s campaign promise to massively deepen ties to Saudi Arabia, right?

    Yeah, we were all so worried about our relationship with the Saudi guys who have spread wahabbi Islam across the world by funding/building the radical mosques.

    The same guys who have been trying to strangle our magnificent fracking industry! They are Trump’s new best friends for life!

    Because then finally, after we arm Saudi Arabia to the teeth, we can have…

    THE NEOCON’S PRECIOUS WAR WITH IRAN.

    That’s what we all voted for! Remember?

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  131. @Anonymous
    Pence could have pulled off this visit (including setting the stage for parting ways over Paris Agreement) without rattling America's second most important "special relationship" with Europe. The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don't kill each other. They both depend on and resent us, and it's worked pretty well. It's a matter of existential survival - a complex geopolitical balance that Trump may or may not be aware of. If not, he simply will not be allowed to proceed. Merkel is expressing Middle European distress and confusion on the world stage and may be echoed by the entire CFR/ think tank complex in short order. Maybe she pictured Obama in the beer hall audience.

    What if it all boils down to a personality flaw? ... not admitting he doesn't have enough knowledge. It's hardly a deal breaker- with one or two advisers next to him, NONE of his troubles need to have happened. Including simply keeping his mouth shut. His political neophyte phase has to be brought to a close if he is to have any future in office. Bannon surely has a handful.

    Someone like Gingrich (there have been numerous weighty people along the way), sitting in Jared's seat could advise him in private if need be, even after everyone leaves the room. Someone who knows everything or who can make a call to someone else who does. Apparently no one can be candid with him, or even suggest such a thing! His family in the inner sanctum is one big fat lost opportunity cost, and possibly even a sabotage vector, if the NeoCons need to twist the knife.

    Hopefully he exposes as much rot as possible - there was no one else willing and able to do this. If they take him down, the Clinton Cabal needs to come along too.

    The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don’t kill each other. They both depend on and resent us, and it’s worked pretty well. It’s a matter of existential survival.

    It hasn’t worked out well, actually. All these countries are on an accelerating path to destruction.

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  132. @NOTA
    It's striking to me: Trump has turned out to be exactly what he looks like. He is a brilliant showman and self-promotor, but he has very little idea what he's doing as president. He's got a lot of places where he's contradicting the ruling class consensus, and often he's right that that consensus is nuts, but he has little to replace it with. His understanding of serious political and social issues is that of a smart guy who watches the TV news regularly, not that of someone who thinks and reads deeply about those issues. Maybe Bannon would fit that role, or Pat Buchannan, or Greg Cochran, or someone else, but Trump doesn't and probably can't. The guy's 70 years old, he's probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    The Trump administration is floundering, probably partly because of the opposition of the ruling class/deep state types, but at least as much because Trump isn't well-prepared for the job. He doesn't know the stuff he needs to know, and he doesn't have a trusted core of advisors around him to keep him pointed in the right direction. The constant leaks from inside his administration reflect that, as do the flailing on stuff like firing Comey, as does the awful PR of having Trump regularly contradict his own press secretary and his own cabinet appointees.

    This article from Megan McArdle is important and informative--Megan isn't a Trumpista, but neither is she a #resist type, nor even a Democrat. (She fits best on the green eyeshade wing of the Republican party.). What she's hearing from lifelong Republicans who voted for and supported Trump (perhaps in hold-your-nose mode) isn't just the liberal NYT / WP trying to screw Trump over because he's a Republican.

    If a reporter is hearing this stuff, congressional Republicans must be swamped with such stories, and they'll chose their strategies accordingly. Ryan's deep affection for Trump is exactly as sincere as it looks, and the very instant it appears to Ryan that turning on him is a good idea, he'll do so. And Trump has left behind a long list of batteeed, bruised, and thoroughly pissed-off ex-opponents (he didn't just beat them, he insulted them and their families, and humiliated them on TV) who *dream* of they day they can have the band strike up "Rains of Castermere" and plunge a dagger into his back while saying "The Bushes send their regards." When he no longer looks to be unbeatable, he will have a long line of people waiting for their turn to screw him over.

    Good comment. I think that if Trump can’t start making good on his more prominent campaign promises by late fall, he might as well not even run for reelection. And he may not even want to be reelected, if I read him right. A few days before the election, when the polls looked dismal, Trump said, “If I don’t win, it’ll have been an enormous waste of time and money.” There’s a real pessimistic side to him.

    Certainly he realizes that “Trump the TV Star” or “Trump the Longtime Public Figure” mean absolutely nothing to his supporters, while “Trump the Political Iconoclast” means everything. He has to know that it’s far too late for appealing to, or acquiescing to, his opponents. But he seems to do just that on occasion.

    Still, the press acts like everything he does is a major mistake; on the order of having his aides say he gave no classified info to the Russians, then say the following day that he can give classified info to the Russians if he wants. Or failing on health care. The press is very effective at this type of propaganda, as evidence and hyperbole start to get blurred. And it’s hard for even Trump supporters to be immune to it.

    But his campaign went in and out of stride. His administration will hit a stride at some point in the future. He’ll have to realize, however, that that will only happen when he makes good on campaign promises.

    The guy’s 70 years old, he’s probably shown us his nature pretty well by now.

    Wow, remember when they made a huge deal about about Reagan being 70? One tends to think that times have changed, but then you remember that Bernie Sanders is 75. That pretty much explains it.

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  133. @GSH
    I think Trump hasn't yet figured out a way to fight the judiciary. He's probably not bothering with things he knows that will get blocked until he has a strategy. Or maybe sees how the Supreme Court plays out.

    There's not much point in starting to build a wall if it's immediately blocked by a random judge. And I don't think impeaching judges is going to fly just yet.

    The creation of Trump-specific law by court rulings looks like an impeachable offense to me. But I don’t think Congress has the fortitude to see it done. Also, any movement towards impeachment before a Supreme Court ruling would be incredibly stupid.

    I think the SC respects law enough to overturn the circuits. Maybe I am wrong.

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  134. David Frum, in The Atlantic: “Since 1945, the supreme strategic goal in Europe of the USSR and then Russia was the severing of the US-German alliance. Trump delivered.”

    Trump is demanding that the Europeans pay for their own defense instead of the American taxpayer footing the bill. It is very like what Eisenhower and then JFK tried to do–the Russians hated it because it involved Germany was getting a finger on the Nato nuclear trigger.

    Germany is in the process of divesting itself of even civil nuclear installations, and has virtually disarmed , largely because it’s cocooned within a friendly alliance on all borders for the first time in its history.

    The accusation is that Trump and Putin have agendas that converge on US withdrawal from Europe. see

    Anne Applebaum: Trump arrived in Brussels and began to lecture America’s closest allies, accusing them of owing “massive amounts of money” to NATO and U.S. taxpayers. This made no sense: NATO is not a club like Mar-a-Lago with annual dues. But it was a clear sign, at last, of what many had suspected all along: Trump prefers the company of dictators who flatter him to democrats who treat him as an equal.

    So the US has to pay for the privilege of being in Europe, a bit like like Applebaum’s husband thought Britain had to continue paying British child benefit welfare to children in Poland (for the privilege of being shacked to the EU–lowest grown area on the planed) Well it didn’t!

    Trump is in line with Eisenhower and JFK’s policies of the US functioning as an offshore balance.. If the Russians are actually overjoyed it is only because they are too stupid to realise that to the extent that the US withdraws from Europe Germany will have to re-arm. Nuclear weapons will be necessary for the Mexican standoff under which conventional wars will be fought, so Germany will nuke up. It is their country and they should be the main ones to pay and die to defend it. A rearmed Germany could take Russia.

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  135. @Intelligent Dasein
    The next person what says "But he's still better than Hillary!" needs to get a knuckle sandwich. Being better than Hillary is not going to help the country. Being one whit below his campaign promises is not going to help the country. In order to help the country, Trump needs to fulfill every jot and tittle of his campaign promises and more. In fact, he didn't promise nearly enough, and what he's actually doing is not only nowhere close to enough, it's patently detrimental.

    Not one single person who believed in the Trump campaign should be satisfied with his performance. You ought to be infuriated. You ought to be leading the charge to remove him from office. Why? Because he stole our last chance. We had one, final opportunity to change the system from within. We organized, we networked, we campaigned, we gave money, we voted---I know I and many of you as well did literally everything we could to drag Trump over goal line because we understood what was at stake in this election. And against all odds, we did it. We actually won. It never ceases to fill my heart with pride and hope when I think about what we accomplished on November 8th. On that fine day, the Nationalists actually defeated the Deep State and the Globalist cabal. Did you have tears in your eyes at 2 AM when President Elect Trump appeared on television? I know I did. I still do.

    But then our candidate cucked out on us. It was not even 24 hours before he said that he "did not want to hurt" Hillary Clinton and was therefore backing off his promise to investigate her. This is literally unsupportable. Anyone with an accurate sense of law and justice knows that it would not be at all hyperbolic to say that Hillary Clinton's head belongs on a pike in front of the White House. The state has not only the right but the duty to prosecute crimes such as hers, especially when the head of that state wishes to be known as the "law and order president." To simply let her off the hook is not magnanimity but dereliction of duty, and this cannot be tolerated. But in the afterglow of the election, we were all too willing to interpret Trump using the hermeneutic of 4D chess. "He just needs to play it safe until he consolidates his power," we thought. "Then he'll throw the book at her."

    Sadly, that situation has still not been remedied, and it was only the first in a long line of Trumpian cuck-outs. I won't belabor the point by going through the whole litany, but suffice it to say that the hermeneutic of 4D chess died an ignoble death the moment the 59 cruise missiles flew at Syria. That was a crushing blow to all hope that Trump would be a sane, nationalist leader. It was also outrageous, incompetent, criminal, and deeply immoral. Now add to that the hundred-billion dollar arms deal with the despicable House of Saud. Add to that the fact that not one, not two, but three carrier groups (a significant fraction of the entire US Navy) have been sent to menace North Korea, who simply laughs it off. I am imagining at this moment a parody of the old "this is your brain in drugs" public service announcements. It begins with an aerial shot of the Pentagon and the voice-over saying, "This is fecklessness and corruption." Then it cuts to a video of Trump swinging swords with Saudis and the voice-over saying, "This is fecklessness and corruption on steroids."

    Our situation, at the moment, is dire. If we are to have any hope of salvaging the opportunity afforded by the Trump presidency, the effort cannot be left up to Trump. It is in ourselves, the captains of the True Right, whom we must repose confidence. We won the previous battle and we can win this one as well.

    One is not thinking politically unless he has a clearly definable goal and the reasonable means of attaining it. The goal must be to take over the Trump presidency. Not to "support the president," but to make Trump our bitch and force him to do what we elected him for. The means of attaining it is for the "Deplorables" (God I hate that word) to rise up with one voice and let Trump know that he's on notice. The expression of that voice must be a primary challenger who will run against Trump from the Right, and congressional and local candidates who will run on the Trump platform but actually mean it. Their message should be very simple: "I mean what Trump says. I believe in it, but I was let down. He isn't doing it, I will."

    We've already seen that this approach would work. It is the only thing that will work; it is the right thing to do; and it's our next, best hope.

    Yeah, because if we help remove him, his replacement is bound to be an improvement.

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  136. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Daniel Chieh
    OT:

    Japan urgently needs more immigration! I understand that there are Syrian and African doctors who are called for right away to save the dying island nation!

    https://www.rt.com/business/390180-japan-labor-shortage-economy/

    The good thing is that no sane politician in Japan (especially in regard to their own career) would risk promoting true open border policies for immigration, not only because of the current overcrowded condition of Japan, but the people there aren’t keen on receiving many immigrants, even if they are from white nations.
    I saw once some old news about Shinzo Abe and many if not most politicians thinking twice about loosening citizenship and visas for foreigners risking loss of popularity among their voters. I don’t think it would be different now.
    Besides, the opinion of japanese people about the ones who could attain citizenship and visas aren’t so good, since the government were allowing more low-skilled people into the country than the high-skilled.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    The good thing is that no sane politician in Japan (especially in regard to their own career) would risk promoting true open border policies for immigration, not only because of the current overcrowded condition of Japan, but the people there aren’t keen on receiving many immigrants, even if they are from white nations.

    The thing that gets me is that when one brings up reciprocity in open-bordersism, other people respond that people should come to the West because their countries are overcrowded. Ok. It's not an argument, but still:

    https://www.indexmundi.com/g/r.aspx?v=21000

    Why do these people support immigration into the Netherlands? Belgium? The UK? Belgium? Italy? They are not far from Japan, above or below. They are all above China.

    The trouble with being guilt-prone is that it is easy to be guilt-tripped, and as a people we are. On the other hand, it's part of the reason why our societies are better places to live.
  137. The hand-slaps, Montenegrin pushes and posturing aren’t all photoshop: Trump is out of his depth and the ceaseless onslaught of the MSM is taking it’s toll. Being an aging boomer, the MSM has lost a few teeth, including the incisors Trump punched out in the campaign, but they’re not toothless yet.

    There’s no reason to think Miller, or even Bannon, have the ideological depth many of us have, and really understand the acceleratory decline the historical American nation, and the entire West, has entered. Ideology was never enough motivation for them – they need to see this as a fight for life.

    I’m hopeful that Trump will soon understand that the goal could never be to simply become President and spit in the eyes of the sort of contemptible people, Bill Maher et al, who mocked Ann Coulter in June of 2015. There was never respect to be earned from those people, grudging or otherwise.

    Trump must come to understand that the goal was always to become a great president, with all the risk that entails. To achieve that, he needs to understand his worst enemies must be crushed. It is the only thing they will ever understand or respect, since crushing is what they wish to do to him.

    The ceaseless attack will get him there all the faster. If he can withstand it.

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  138. @Clyde
    OT OT OT
    The surprising ancestry of ancient Egyptians: First ever genome study of mummies reveals they were more Turkish and European than African
    Researchers performed a detailed analysis of the DNA of ancient mummies
    They found that ancient Egyptians were closely related to European populations
    Traditional communities in the Levant and Neolithic Europe were close relatives
    Study found that modern Egyptians share more ancestry with Sub-Saharan Africans than ancient Egyptians did
    Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/sciencetech/article-4555292/Study-mummies-reveals-Turkish-European.html#ixzz4iaVyiaTq

    (Wuz not Wuz Kangz etc etc)

    First ever genome study of mummies reveals they were more Turkish and European than African

    Very interesting. Thanks for the pointer.

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  139. The media and the deep state are spewing a continuous firehose of sh*t at our President.
    It’s impressive when he accomplishes anything under such a barrage.

    As Teddy Roosevelt said:
    “It is not the critic who counts; not the man who points out how the strong man stumbles, or where the doer of deeds could have done them better. The credit belongs to the man who is actually in the arena, whose face is marred by dust and sweat and blood; who strives valiantly; who errs, who comes short again and again, because there is no effort without error and shortcoming; but who does actually strive to do the deeds; who knows great enthusiasms, the great devotions; who spends himself in a worthy cause; who at the best knows in the end the triumph of high achievement, and who at the worst, if he fails, at least fails while daring greatly, so that his place shall never be with those cold and timid souls who neither know victory nor defeat. “

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  140. Prof. Woland just nailed it in my humble opinion . Trump is entering hunter modality and is on the offensive . Wonder if the good month / bad month thing is gonna continue . Let’s hope it never turns into a good year / bad year cycle though.

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  141. One more reminder of why we need Trump’s judicial appointees:

    Another federal circuit court has weighed in on whether transgender school students should be able to select which bathrooms to use and has ruled in the student’s favor.

    A three-judge panel of the 7th Circuit Court of Appeals today affirmed an injunction in place telling Kenosha Unified School District in Wisconsin that it can’t refuse to let Ashton Whitaker, 17, use the male facilities.

    http://reason.com/blog/2017/05/30/another-court-panel-allows-trans-teen-to

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  142. Also one thing about Trump is its taken him YEARS to accomplish what he has . Maybe he’s playing a longer game than people think or is just a slow moving train. When those locomotives start rolling watch out everyone .

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  143. I Think there is a little back stiffening in areas that still have a chance with Trump being in office. For example, the fun day they had yesterday in Austin. The Anglo legislator being assaulted on the floor by a Mexican( i can’t say Mex american, because his activities rule that out) legislator, for telling him he saw a self admitted illegal and he called ICE on him. If there were people fighting like that in the Cali Legislature before it tumbled off the cliff, do you think the ICE would have been a real threat under O, Clinton , or either Bush? Or that the legislator would have held his ground and told him he’d shoot him if he came after him as the Mex state rep claims?

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  144. OT: Shaun King is at it again, this time with an incident in Arcadia

    A CHILD WAS EXECUTED IN COLD BLOOD …

    On Friday May 26, 2017 fifteen-year-old Darius Smith was executed by an off duty law enforcement officer. He was shot twice in the legs before being shot three more times in the chest at close range. Multiple witnesses say his assailant dropped him with the shots to the legs and then stood over him and emptied three rounds into his chest. Two of his friends attempted to get out of harms way by running in different directions. The shooter took aim at them as well. He caught one with a shot to the buttocks and another shot to the hand. As the man approached, the child plead for his life. He begged the shooter not to shoot him any more. Instead the unidentified shooter pursued his friends, shooting multiple rounds at the boys as they ran for their lives.

    The two teenagers that survived the shooters array of bullets will be facing criminal charges for the murder of their friend. The man who killed one teen, wounded another and put a third in eminent fear for his life, faces no criminal liability whatsoever. This is the state of America concerning black lives and law enforcement.

    These three boys, two fifteen-year-olds and a fourteen year old, were headed to a nearby Friday market event; a common Friday night hang out for local teens. They were traveling by rail and got off at the appropriate stop. Their assailant got off at this stop as well. Its unclear how the four became involved in a dispute. The shooter claims the boys attacked him yielding a toy gun and demanding money. Its not uncommon for law enforcement to cry self-defense in order to justify an indefensible shooting. This tactic becomes even more convenient given our society’s rush to criminalize people of color. So these three boys, with no criminal records, suddenly decide to become armed robbers, in broad day light, at a popular Friday night rail stop and chose as their victim a man apparently carrying nothing at all of value. This is the only version of events being promoted in the media. The limited information the families have been able to receive from the two surviving boys (both in custody) assert that there was no robbery attempt. It seems clear there was some sort of dispute and that this dispute was ended when this law enforcement officer began shooting indiscriminately at defenseless children. The majority of the evidence available indicates that the officer shot a child to death in cold blood and attempted to kill the others as well. The boys and other independent witnesses confirm the apparent criminal intent of the custom agent. He sits at home, a free man. A fourteen year old child is being held in police custody at a local hospital. A fifteen-year-old is incarcerated in a juvenile facility. Darius Smith’s body is still the custody of the medical examiner. He’ll never go home again.

    https://www.facebook.com/shaunking/posts/1421811111191136

    This time it’s so obvious that not even the NYT, WaPo, Deray etc. fell for it.

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  145. Hey Bored Identity – Calm the F down . She’s just being a girl . The men who speak this way have no excuse however .

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  146. @Fredrik
    I hear some people say Trump hasn't achieved anything but after his trip it's safe to say he has achieved something. He's strained relations with Germany.

    I know some people will rant about Merkel but her main opponent was also publicly outraged over how Trump treated Merkel.

    He’s strained relations with Germany.

    Good. It’s a start. Given Germany’s behaviour on virtually every issue this decade I’d be far more concerned if Germany and Trump were on the same side. EU/Germany arrogance is Europe’s biggest problem right now, not Trump, Erdogan or Russia.

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  147. @Anonymous Nephew
    To be fair, the money's all going to the victims AFAIK. There are still 17 people in intensive care and another 50-odd in hospital.

    I'm sure there'll be a lot of crap talked about The Religion Of Peace and What Unites Us Is Greater Than What Divides Us, and it'll end with the mass singing of "Don't Look Back In Anger", but what else can one expect?

    A Morrissey benefit concert would be interesting.

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    • Replies: @bored identity
    ...that ticket bored identity would hook,line, and buy.
    , @bored identity
    ...that ticket bored identity would hook,line, and buy.
  148. @Charles Pewitt
    I'll Keep Saying This Because It's True:

    Attorney General Jeff Sessions Is The Best Thing About President Trump. This is the best picture I have yet seen of Attorney General Jeff Sessions. Sessions is a Southern gentleman fighter; President Trump should listen to him on immigration:

    https://twitter.com/fenolj/status/818610595687792640

    President Trump must make the immigration issue the issue that defines the difference between the Democrat Party and the Republican Party. President Trump must start a brawl with the GOP Cheap Labor Faction which pushes open borders mass immigration. President Trump will win that fight and he will gain support from independents and Democrats who mistrust the Chamber of Commerce-type Republicans who support open borders mass immigration.

    President Trump should ignore all the corporate media horseshit about Russia. The corporate media is just using the Russia crap to keep President Trump on defense. The corporate media is laying down a WW I-style artillery barrage on President Trump. President Trump must go on the offense and attack. The immigration issue is the one that will win for President Trump.

    Trump just brought back wet-foot-dry-foot, and the trade embargo against Cuba:

    http://www.newsmax.com/Newsfront/wet-foot-dry-foot-trade-embargo/2017/05/29/id/792965/

    Who knew America First meant increasing illegal immigration, and decreasing American exports?

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  149. @Auntie Analogue
    Either the GOP "Conservatism, Inc." of Paul Ryan and the Deep State form a millstone round President Trump's neck, or he never intended to keep his superb "America First!" campaign promises. I can't think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn't acted to fulfill them.

    Existing law gives the president the absolute power to limit immigration in any way and for any reason he finds fit to limit it, yet President Trump has not put up a fight and has instead bowed submissively to traitorous $ellout E$tabli$hment judges' threadbare rulings against his immigration-limiting executive orders. Same goes for Build The Wall - he has the power, yet he's not applying it.

    Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them.

    That pretty well sums it up. He’s done almost nothing of what he said he would do. I didn’t expect much, but I did anticipate at least an attempt. Does he think we’re all nitwits?

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  150. At this point, the best thing that Donald Trump could do for the Dissident Right is to be removed from office in a way that is widely seen as unjust.

    That could lead to some really interesting developments.

    Who is it who coined that phrase: “the worse, the better?”

    And did he by any chance have any connection with the guy who asked “who? whom?”

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.

    At this point, the best thing that Donald Trump could do for the Dissident Right is to be removed from office in a way that is widely seen as unjust.

    That could lead to some really interesting developments.
     
    Such as? I continually see these comments about how this or that event will "wake up" people, anger the people, increase disillusionment with "the system", et cetera. To which I can only say, "so what?" Anger can be a useful motivator… but only if it can be channeled to useful ends. But getting mad does one no good if all one can do is sit and stew impotently in one's anger, while the target of one's anger remains untouchable. It's like a scrawny kid at school who gets beaten up and his lunch money stolen daily by a bully who has him outmassed, out-muscled, and pretty much totally outclassed; it doesn't matter how angry he gets at the bully, no matter what he does the bully will still kick his a** every. single. time.

    And besides, given the Media's reach and influence, I'm sure that they can convince enough people that even the most blatantly unfair removal method is acceptable when used on Trump, and ensure that it is not "widely seen as unjust" outside our narrow minority here on the Right.
    , @NOTA
    I found that kind of rhetoric a lot more appealing when I was a single 20 year old man. Now I'm a middle-aged guy with a family, and the "burn this shit down" mentality makes me very uneasy. What are the odds that long-term dysfunction or civil unrest lead to anything good for us as a country? More likely we just get that high tech police state we've always wanted a decade or two early.
  151. Trump is a center-right president of an historically center-right nation.

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  152. @Auntie Analogue
    Either the GOP "Conservatism, Inc." of Paul Ryan and the Deep State form a millstone round President Trump's neck, or he never intended to keep his superb "America First!" campaign promises. I can't think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises, and it does none of us good to speculate about why he hasn't acted to fulfill them.

    Existing law gives the president the absolute power to limit immigration in any way and for any reason he finds fit to limit it, yet President Trump has not put up a fight and has instead bowed submissively to traitorous $ellout E$tabli$hment judges' threadbare rulings against his immigration-limiting executive orders. Same goes for Build The Wall - he has the power, yet he's not applying it.

    Those of us who voted for Trump voted for swift action on his campaign promises, but we have thus far gotten nothing but inaction on them.

    Could be Trump is letting the Libertarian/Ayn Rand Virtue of Selfishness Paul Ryan shoot themselves…next election, maybe we can get rid of Paul Ryan and Lindsay Graham and John McCain…these folks are just as much war-mongering globalists as the corporate Democrats like Hillary, Bill and Obama.

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  153. @Jack Hanson
    Lmbo, look at all these words to tell us how upset you are at getting called out for your endless doom masturbation.

    I still can’t tell if this whole schtick of yours is just “Internet Tough-Guy”-ism, or more “agent provocateur”.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    The feeling is mutual. I can't tell if you and the rest of the blackpill eeyore crowd are paid to push doom memes or if you really believe it.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Nobody pays for that crap. He must be an intern agent provocateur.
  154. @Fredrik
    I hear some people say Trump hasn't achieved anything but after his trip it's safe to say he has achieved something. He's strained relations with Germany.

    I know some people will rant about Merkel but her main opponent was also publicly outraged over how Trump treated Merkel.

    The more Trump “strains relations” with Germany, the better.

    I mean, what are they gonna do? Close our German bases and send our troops home?

    Please let it be so!

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    • Agree: MBlanc46
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The more Trump “strains relations” with Germany, the better.

    I mean, what are they gonna do? Close our German bases and send our troops home?
     
    When Germany declared war on us (before we did them), we could have laughed that clown off, and concentrated on the nation that attacked us. But, no, we had to play chicken with them.

    Bush II is criticized for spending 4,000 American lives to avenge 3,000 American lives, but that president spent 4,000,000 to avenge 2,000. Talk about double standards. But that was "the Good War".

    Just last week, an out-of-towner I was trapped with in an elevator went on about how could we possibly name an air terminal after Charles Lindbergh. "Read up on him! He was a Nazi! A Nazi!"

    The other terminal is named after Hubert Humphrey, who cost my family more lives than did Lindy. I think it should be renamed after Charles Sr.
  155. @Peter Akuleyev
    Apparently Trump's poll numbers have improved after his first world trip, something I find remarkable since from the European perspective it seems to have been a complete and unprecedented disaster. To his credit Trump is certainly "putting America first". Whether it is really in America's long term interest to buddy up to Saudi Arabia and alienate the Europeans is a different question. The funny thing is that Trump is actually executing the pivot towards Asia that the Obama team kept talking about but couldn't really pull off.

    Trump's foreign policy moves make no sense if he were really a "white nationalist" but make a lot of sense if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    1. China is clearly the next world power.
    2. Europe is in terminal decline, and the EU is doomed to failure
    3. Russia will remain a strong regional player but has no hope of regaining superpower status and becoming an equal player with China and the US.
    4. China's Achilles heel is energy. Controlling energy resources will keep the US dominant for the foreseeable future.

    If you accept those premises than Trump's seemingly crazy actions all makes sense. It makes sense to cozy up to Saudi Arabia and Russia in order to keep them out of Chinese orbit. It also makes sense to cut Europe loose in order to strengthen ties with Russia.. If you need Erdogan to help keep order in the Middle East and watch Saudi Arabia's flank, then you make friends with Erdogan and let him continue to blackmail Europeans with refugees and to fund Islamic cells throughout Germany.

    This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along, which is probably why the military seems to be solidly behind him. If true then Trump is going to disappoint idealists - both leftists who want the US to stand for human rights and "progressive" values, as well as white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for "traditional" values.

    Interesting analysis. It puts the cosying up with the Saudis in a different light. But Trump is also making nice with the Chinese. How does that fit in with your take.

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    • Replies: @englishmike
    Interesting analysis.

    I thought so too.

    But Trump is also making nice with the Chinese. How does that fit in with your take?

    It's not for me to reply on Mr Akuleyev's behalf, but I can think of two reasons for making nice with them.

    1. Trump's desire to resolve the problem of North Korea's belligerence does depend on encouraging the Chinese to take more responsibility for dealing with Kim. He was consistent on that point during the election campaign.

    2. Those "islands" China has constructed in the South China Sea were/are in danger of becoming a major source of conflict. With the Chinese, "megaphone diplomacy" is less likely to resolve that problem than "making nice", especially from someone who understands "the art of the deal".
  156. @anonymous

    That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren’t paying for Germany’s military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more.
     
    That is correct in a technical sense. However, because of our huge presence in Europe the Germans and others have very much diminished forces than what they would probably have absent the US presence. For example, check out the wiki page for the current German Air Force. They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany's size. The USMC alone has more front line fighters than that.

    Of course that is really a feature, not a bug, about the post-war American presence in Europe and why it continues post-Soviet collapse. Those in charge dread European nations getting into an arms race with one another. So having a huge American presence keeps that in check.

    My guess is if the Europeans ever asked us to leave and started to build up their individual armed forces to the levels of the Israelis, our political class would hyperventilate. Though they complain about the excessive costs of "defending" Europe, the alternative of a highly armed mishmash of European armed forces would be far worse for them.

    “They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany’s size.”

    And most of them aren’t even working, I seem to recall having read some time ago that Germany can’t have more than a dozen (!) fighters in the air at any time.

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  157. @Anonym
    Trump is better than the alternative. So far he is performing below my hopes but above my expectations which were pretty low. I think so far he is better than the last three presidents, which is a low bar - but probably a reasonable bar for expectations given that the alternatives were probably Hillary, Jeb or Marco. I expect a bit better than those three, Obama, GWB and Bill. But not much.

    I keep on getting GOP funding emails from the Trump team. "Drain the swamp!" They will not get so much as a dime from me until the wall is well under construction, and I don't care if Mexico pays for it or not.

    It will be interesting to see how Trump deals with Kushner. During the campaign he was not afraid to hire people and not afraid to fire people. Of course, those people he fired weren't relatives.

    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Williams

    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.
     
    A great deal of the third Godfather flick has to do with Michael's guilt about Fredo.
    , @Anonym
    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.

    For better or worse, Trump is not Michael Corleone.
  158. @Fredrik
    I hear some people say Trump hasn't achieved anything but after his trip it's safe to say he has achieved something. He's strained relations with Germany.

    I know some people will rant about Merkel but her main opponent was also publicly outraged over how Trump treated Merkel.

    her main opponent

    They have absolutely identical views when it comes to immigration, Trump, Russia, race, Islam, open borders, etc. To be an opponent one has to actually oppose something that is meaningful, arguing if some obscure tax should be increased 0.1% or 0.2% is not meaningful.

    I am not sure you thought out your argument here, if left winger Merkel is my enemy then so would an even more left wing politician be my enemy, saying both of them being outraged by Trump indicates that he is certainly doing something right with regards to Germany.

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  159. @Mister M
    I guess I just don't know how to play 4D chess - because what we get isn't what we were told.

    I guess I just don’t know how to play 4D chess – because what we get isn’t what we were told.

    Imagine 4D strip chess.

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  160. @anonymous

    That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren’t paying for Germany’s military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more.
     
    That is correct in a technical sense. However, because of our huge presence in Europe the Germans and others have very much diminished forces than what they would probably have absent the US presence. For example, check out the wiki page for the current German Air Force. They have about 125 Eurofighter Typhoons. This is pitifully small for a nation of Germany's size. The USMC alone has more front line fighters than that.

    Of course that is really a feature, not a bug, about the post-war American presence in Europe and why it continues post-Soviet collapse. Those in charge dread European nations getting into an arms race with one another. So having a huge American presence keeps that in check.

    My guess is if the Europeans ever asked us to leave and started to build up their individual armed forces to the levels of the Israelis, our political class would hyperventilate. Though they complain about the excessive costs of "defending" Europe, the alternative of a highly armed mishmash of European armed forces would be far worse for them.

    That’s all a bit apples and oranges: We’ve a GDP five times that of Germany, a GDPP thirty-four percent greater; The U.S.A. is almost thirty times as large as Germany; Germany is about eighty-five percent as large as California (a nation’s area has enormous ramifications for the size of a military needed to defend it), Germany has about eighty million people, and the U.S.A. has many more than three hundred million.

    I could go on and on, but the horse is long dead.

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    • Replies: @anonymous

    That’s all a bit apples and oranges: We’ve a GDP five times that of Germany, a GDPP thirty-four percent greater;
     
    Germany's air force is less impressive than the air arm of the US Marine Corps. Let that sink in. The world's 5th largest economy has an air force with less power than the USMC air component.

    Compare Germany's air force to that of Israel, a nation with a 10th of the population and GDP. Israel's Air Force is significantly more impressive especially in frontline fighters.

    As I wrote above the US actually prefers that Germany and the other Euro states refrain from any arms races. So Germany's current state of military force is a feature not a bug of big US defense spending.

    And I am not trying to pick on Germany. Just look at Canada and Mexico, two large geographical nations with big economies. Canada's air force is smaller than the USMC air component too.

    And Mexico? Mexico's air force is weaker than just one US Navy wing on ONE aircraft carrier. In fact, Mexico's frontline fighter fleet doesn't even compare to one US navy fighter squadron! The world's 10th largest economy has fewer fighters than one US Navy fighter squadron!

    They only get away with that because their neighbor has a enormous military who would never let an outsider endanger them.
  161. “Sheriffs are enthusiastic about enforcing U.S. immigration law. That makes a big difference.”: https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2017/05/30/sheriffs-are-enthusiastic-about-enforcing-u-s-immigration-law-that-makes-a-big-difference/

    The Trump administration has said that it will expand Immigration Authority Section 287(g) of the 2009 Immigration and Nationality Act, a voluntary federal program that deputizes local law enforcement officers to enforce federal immigration laws. The Obama administration curtailed this program (by reducing funding) in favor of Secure Communities, largely because 287(g) is very expensive. Secure Communities requires that law enforcement check the immigration status of anyone booked into jail through the federal fingerprint database.

    According to the news site FiveThirtyEight, since Trump’s inauguration immigrants in three major cities are reporting fewer crimes to police. Apparently they are afraid that their immigrant status will be checked, leading to deportation.

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    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    So immigrants are reporting fewer crimes? I'd much rather they commit fewer crimes.
  162. @jim jones
    I doubt that you could find any White people willing to talk to Blacks on any subject, we know that the conversation would soon turn into a series of complaints.

    You appear to have mistyped. It’s the blacks who always have a litany of complaints.

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  163. @Vinteuil
    The more Trump "strains relations" with Germany, the better.

    I mean, what are they gonna do? Close our German bases and send our troops home?

    Please let it be so!

    The more Trump “strains relations” with Germany, the better.

    I mean, what are they gonna do? Close our German bases and send our troops home?

    When Germany declared war on us (before we did them), we could have laughed that clown off, and concentrated on the nation that attacked us. But, no, we had to play chicken with them.

    Bush II is criticized for spending 4,000 American lives to avenge 3,000 American lives, but that president spent 4,000,000 to avenge 2,000. Talk about double standards. But that was “the Good War”.

    Just last week, an out-of-towner I was trapped with in an elevator went on about how could we possibly name an air terminal after Charles Lindbergh. “Read up on him! He was a Nazi! A Nazi!”

    The other terminal is named after Hubert Humphrey, who cost my family more lives than did Lindy. I think it should be renamed after Charles Sr.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    ... but that president spent 4,000,000 to avenge 2,000.
     
    I knew that figure was way off, but I wanted to check first. You're off by an order of magnitude - something like 410,000 deaths of Americans. It is still terrible, and I'm not arguing your point here.

    I think MSP will have to rename the main terminal to "Little Mogadishu" You can't even get a hamburger from anyone resembling an American.

    Oh, got any youtube links of that 4D strip-chess thing? A friend of mine wanted to take a look.

  164. I’m not seeing any progress at all on the things that were promised. The only benefit from Trump’s presidency is that Hillary didn’t get the spot.

    What was probably the last President ever chosen by the American people (rather than special interests in our political caste) seems to be a disaster.

    I think it’s time to give up on exerting political power, and seeking instead to ensure that our families and our interests are protected during the imminent collapse of the American system.

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  165. The Trump presidency started with a bang with all the EO’s regarding immigration enforcement and restriction on Muslims but is now little more than a glorified wimper. But Mr. art of the deal has cowardly ceded his executive authority on immigration and national security to the imperial judiciary and got steamrolled by Congress on building the border wall at least in the first round. He kept DACA in place after promising to rescind it and now stories are circulating that they will double refugee visas through FY17 (October 2017).

    And to top it off he’s now in the neoconservative orbit on foreign policy with his asinine missile strike on a Syrian airbase and the strong possibility of increased military operations with the aim of toppling the Assad regime. This isn’t what I or any Trump supporter voted for and if another election were held today I would probably stay home.

    So either Trump was playing us all along or being the shrewd businessman that he is saw the writing on the wall once he assumed office and elected to “play ball” with the deep state instead of fight them tooth and nail and give the government back to the people as he promised in his inauguration speech. If this is the case then he took the easy way out and is all hat and no cattle.

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  166. @Svigor
    The stuff I find most disturbing is the Haiti status thing, DACA. All he had to do was not screw us.

    WN doesn’t care about standing up for traditional values via foreign policy. WN cares about WN — is it good for Whites.
     
    And that only in a non-tendentious way. E.g., no, what's good for white leftists isn't what's good for Whites. More accurately, WNs care about what's good for WNs, constituent demographics. Whites would be far better off if we woke up tomorrow to find that millions of a certain type of white were no longer on the planet.

    Charles Krauthammer planted a new meme of Russian influence on Trump. This time it is that Russian must not like Kushner and his influence in Trump administration. Read it as: Kushner is good and Trump will be even worse w/o Kushner because that what Russians want. If Kushner is forced to resign it will mean that Russians have won (again).

    Kushner Ties: ‘I Don’t Trust This Story’ — ‘The Russians Are Leaking It Clearly’
     
    That is a long way to go to spin a (((Narrative))).

    He’s also very unhappy with the idea that NATO is right on his borders – he (probably rightly) sees that as a violation of the deal that was made to end the Cold War. And he has taken concrete action to modernize Russian forces, restored air patrols, etc. to show that it’s not just a dream.
     
    I'm generally pro-Russian, at least, on the current scale (not difficult), though not as pro-Russian as I used to be (pro-Russians disabused me of that, with their serial bull****. But I don't have much sympathy for Russians' whining about NATO expansion. Russia turned much of Europe into a jail for the better part of a century. F*** them, on this score.

    Yes, the US/western European influence is vile (nation-wrecking), but that's a whole other matter (it's not as if the Russians care about any of that anyway).

    If I had my finger on a metaphorical button labelled “Revolution” like the President does right now I might be hesitant too.
     
    I might suffer from analysis paralysis, but no, I wouldn't hesitate at the idea of Revolution, at all. I'd relish it. I'd be doing everything I could to clean house in the national security apparatus, for starters (though I admit I can think of a lot of reasons that it might not appear so to an outsider); fire everyone who doesn't seem reliable, from the top down.

    Charles Pewitt says:
    May 30, 2017 at 5:44 pm GMT • 200 Words
     
    Agreed.

    You know Japan is beginning to loosen its immigration laws, right?
     
    Magic 8 Ball says the immigrants will look a lot like the Japanese.

    (((Stephen F. Cohen))) is worth a read on Russia. Trump ought to offer him a high-level job in the State Department or in national security.

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    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Dave Pinsen:

    For those interested in hearing Stephen Cohen, he is usually interviewed weekly on the John Bachelor radio show. In New York City the show is on Tuesdays at 9 PM (WABC, 770 AM).

    He is also regularly published in The Nation magazine where his wife is the editor and chief financial donor.
  167. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    If your garden variety civil servant had pulled what H. Clinton pulled with those emails he/ she would have lost their job and pension and would be facing jail time, so I take satisfaction and solace in the knowledge that I voted for Trump for no other reason but to keep that woman out of the White House and thus upholding something vaguely resembling “rule of law” (however illusory). On the other hand (speaking of illusions) I never had any about Trump. And thus far I’m thinking that it was just as well that I didn’t.

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  168. @Daniel Chieh
    Yes. And I also know that they plan on limiting it pretty harshly, even so. Its unlikely that they will ever have a substantial population of NAMs, for starters.

    In the past, Japan was pretty strict about sending even ethnic Japanese from Brazil home when their jobs in Japan ended. IIRC, they gave them money to leave.

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  169. @Kevin C.
    I still can't tell if this whole schtick of yours is just "Internet Tough-Guy"-ism, or more "agent provocateur".

    The feeling is mutual. I can’t tell if you and the rest of the blackpill eeyore crowd are paid to push doom memes or if you really believe it.

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  170. @Jack Hanson
    Is this the thread where we claim Trump is gonna pass an amnesty, not build the wall, and fire Bannon part XVII and whine about how put upon we are?

    Is this the thread where we claim Trump is gonna pass an amnesty, not build the wall, and fire Bannon part XVII and whine about how put upon we are?

    Your points are usually well-taken, but you’d be more effective if you calmed down.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Your points are usually well-taken, but you’d be more effective if you calmed down.
     
    NO, he'd be more effective if he could learn the difference between criticism of and active resistance to*, the guy!

    * As in, per utu's minuses and Pewitt's post #11, we write what we know he is doing way wrong, but we are not actively resisting his presidency. He'd better shape the hell up soon.

    Oooohhh Bannon's back, Bannon's back. I like Bannon and I wish HE were the president. Yeah, well show me some immigration control and work on the southern border. Quit the middle east warmongering. Get something done, you ineffective, twittering dipshit, and we'll have respect for you again! Turn off your apps and lead already!

    Not you Hanson, President Trump.

    , @Jack Hanson
    Tell that to the people declaring we've been stabbed in the back every week.
  171. @Olorin

    I can’t think of another reason why President Trump has not moved immediately to fulfill his campaign promises,
     
    Which promises hasn't he "fulfilled" in these first 17 weeks of his administration?

    Please be more precise in your thinking by listing, say, ten of the promises.

    Also please summarize work plans for fulfilling them in your estimation. (Steps to be taken, timelines, parties involved, budgets required, projected outcomes and assessment benchmarks, follow-up methodology to remedy shortfalls.)

    17 weeks is about enough time to turn a patch of lawn into fenced garden, prepare it, and get some tomatoes. If the season and all involved parties cooperates.

    Seriously--what are you expecting? Everything all at once immediately? I can't reach across to how you are thinking. It seems like the kind of magical thinking a toddler or Evergreen State College student would use.

    It seems like the kind of magical thinking a toddler or Evergreen State College student would use.

    Sir, I cannot abide this scurrilous slur against the brotherhood of two-year-olds.

    The average ESC student has an IQ on par with that of a developmentally-challenged garden slug.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The average ESC student has an IQ on par with that of a developmentally-challenged garden slug
     
    Sure you're not confusing them with UC Santa Cruz?

    https://www.ucsc.edu/about/mascot.html
    , @Olorin
    Hey, Stan. Don't you cast aspersions on our Ariolimaxes.

    No really, banana slugs are cool. Composters extraordinaire. And quite interesting.

    Les Olorins had a pet 3" banana slug that lived under our porch. Green with black spots.

    We'd turn on the porch light at night and out it would come, then stretch upward on the porch floor boards like a puppy with its sensory and eye stalks extended, looking for its people.

    We'd feed it lettuce and geranium flower petals. It would eat and apparently got used to having little fingers pet its back. Then it would maunder off to its hammock belowdecks.

    Eventually it became an 8" banana slug with many scars on its back from mating battles. I left some pieces of wood in a corner of our front lot during one forest cleanup...and it adopted that as its hut. We now think of it as a sort of Resident Zen Slug.

    Ariolimax mouths have a sort of Simpsonsesque overbite. Rather charming if you approach them with the mind of interplanetary explorer. (We'd be thrilled if we found something like that on, say, Ganymede. Creatures just trying to earn a living in a violent cosmos.)

    Over time we got used to all the molluscs and found that by giving them a "feeding corner" (compost zone) and moving them all there as we encountered them, we ended up with none to worry about in the vegetable and flower gardens. Plus the non-native slug numbers went way down. Without poisons or teaching children to be cruel.

    Protip: if you pick one up, the slime can be patted dry with a paper towel and rolled off like rubber cement. Sea creatures carrying around their private ocean. Kind of like amniotes learned to. Less squicky than dog drool IMO. Far more pleasant than unshowered BLM/Antifa types

  172. @Charles Pewitt
    Southerners already are in the Population Biology Woke Party. The Whites in the rest of the nation are too, or they are close to being so. Hillary Clinton moved to the mostly White town of Chappaqua, New York because she is a member of the Population Biology Woke Party. That is why she comes off as such a phony. Blacks know she's a bullshit artist, despite all her praise for the Black Lives Matter mob.

    Kevin MacDonald has nailed those bastards in the Boasian Establishment Party. They don't believe any of their own nonsense either; they just say it to attack European Christian Americans.

    TOO peaked in web traffic… 3 years ago.

    http://www.rank2traffic.com/theoccidentalobserver.net

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  173. @Diversity Heretic
    In one of his columns John Derbyshire wondered if Russian occupation of Western Europe would be worse than what the leadership is doing to them now via the mass importation of Arabs and sub-Saharan Africans. My mother-in-law lived during the German occupation of France and says that they were less intrusive than the Muslims are now.

    Are we being punished by those who loved Communism because we killed off the Soviet Union?

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  174. @Kevin O'Keeffe

    I guess I just don’t know how to play 4D chess – because what we get isn’t what we were told.
     
    Nothing personal towards Mister M, it's just that he wrote a good example of why I won't be perusing this thread any further. Because defeatism is boring. Trump hasn't fundamentally transformed Western civilization in the first four months of his Presidency, so I guess he's just a cuck. I swear, it's like dealing with children.

    No kidding. Stoic ain’t a word associated with this place.

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  175. @Federalist
    I think that Trump does need to let Supreme Court justices know (through back channels) that he is willing to defy them on travel bans if they rule against him. The Supreme Court is, of course, enormously powerful. But its power rests on all other political actors toeing the line.

    Justices that vehemently disagree with one another on just about everything else still very much agree on maintaining the court's power. It's hard to imagine any other recent president or person who is or was likely to be president defying the Supreme Court. Is Trump crazy enough to do it? If I were on the Supreme Court, I would be worried. Trump will be around a few or several more years at most. Supreme Court justices serve for life.

    I don't think that this is the hill to die on for the justices. Every decision is politicized but even judges and justices who will rule or have ruled against Trump know that he is clearly entitled to the ban from an objective standpoint.

    Right now, Trump should rhetorically start laying the groundwork for not following the Supreme Court on immigration. Start dropping hints (as only he can) in speeches about “courts gone amuck” and “unelected judges usurping power” and how the Supreme Court “has had no constitutional basis to do some of the things it’s done” (without being more specific).

    Then get a few legal experts out there to talk about how Marbury v. Madison‘s holding is nowhere in the constitution and how the Founders intended all three branches to be co-equals in defining what is constitutional—and the idea that the Supreme Court is the sole arbiter is a a Supreme Court-only invention.

    Do all this before the arguments are heard on his immigration bans, and let the chips fall where they may. Most of the country is in favor of the bans, and if the Supreme Court wants to lose face it will defy Trump and the country will support Trump defying them. Then the D’s can try impeachment with the R’s help, but the backlash will be so great at that point (with Trump leading it himself) that any politician voting for impeachment will be hung from the squares. And the military will prevent any arrest of Trump, if it comes to it.

    I defy the Left to try it.

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  176. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Anonymous
    I don't think there is any turning around the extreme damage done by the foaming at the mouth Russophobia. It's shocking how out of hand it got so quickly. Russia's resistance to the oligarchs and global cabal started it and their intervention in Syria sent it through the roof. Now the hysteria is so toxic and pervasive it seems beyond repair. Then we had this Russophobia moved into American politics and it's way beyond McCarthyism. McCarthyism on bath salts. The left, the globalists, the neocons, some Stangelovian generals, really do seem to want some confrontation with Russia. In the opinion of retired and highly-respected for military analysts, any conflict with Russia ends with American cities vaporized.

    HBD awareness alert:

    http://www.nbcnews.com/politics/politics-news/james-clapper-trump-russia-ties-my-dashboard-warning-light-was-n765601

    [Clapper:] “… and just the historical practices of the Russians, who typically, almost genetically driven to co-opt, penetrate, gain favor, whatever, which is a typical Russian technique. So we were concerned.”

    Imagine him saying this about any other group. That’s how you know it’s bad.

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  177. @27 year old
    >if he and his team are cynical realists who see the world this way:

    >This suggests Trump has really been a great power conservative all along

    >If true then Trump is going to disappoint... ...white nationalists and fundamentalist Christians who want the US to stand up for “traditional” values.

    WN doesn't care about standing up for traditional values via foreign policy. WN cares about WN -- is it good for Whites.

    On paper you want your country to have a cynical realist FP so that your country can avoid getting dominated other countries therefore allowing a decent life for your citizens. But our rulers don't care about a decent life for us... What's the difference between getting screwed over by DC/Manhattan and screwed over by Beijing/Shanghai?

    As a regular working goy, why do I care whether America is a great power? Might I be better off if America was not a great power?

    As a regular working goy, why do I care whether America is a great power? Might I be better off if America was not a great power?

    In previous years, the American standard of living was better than anywhere I could think of. Now it’s more like a typical white country. I think the petrodollar had a lot to do with it. The US wouldn’t have been able to print money that other countries had to work for in order to buy oil in USD if the US hadn’t been a great enough power to topple regimes who so much as hinted at using another currency to sell the world’s lifeblood, and been great enough to prevent competitor regimes from muscling in. That’s a benefit.

    Being a minor power sucks ass. Ask the Tibetans about whether they would prefer being the hammer or the nail.

    https://g.co/kgs/fz5DUc

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Well, for what it is worth, US real income was highest in the 1950s and has been going downhill since, regardless of the her "position" in the world. Apples and oranges, Switzerland has had comparable if not greater living standard since at least the 2000s when I visited.
    , @27 year old
    >Ask the Tibetans about whether they would prefer being the hammer or the nail.

    Ask White Americans whether we are more like a hammer or a nail. My point is we are already getting screwed by our own homegrown ruling class. If America were not a Great Power (tm) what would change for us?

    America's Great Power (tm) seems to me primarily to function to prop up the ruling class, to enable them to keep ruling. No Great Power (tm), maybe no more ruling class. Maybe we just get a new Chinese ruling class. But still, not seeing why that should matter to me.
  178. I suspect, at this point, that his number one priority is laying the groundwork for a new political family dynasty, ala Kennedy/Clinton/Bush.

    Ideology is a distant second.

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  179. @Kyle a
    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.

    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.

    A great deal of the third Godfather flick has to do with Michael’s guilt about Fredo.

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  180. @Peter Akuleyev

    Some of Trump’s talk about splitting the NATO bill...is heartening.
     
    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption. We aren't paying for Germany's military now, we are just telling the Germans they need to spend more. And to what end? If Russia is not the enemy what exactly do the Germans need to spend billions of euros on? A pan-EU Coast Guard and border patrol to stop refugees would be a very good investment, but that is not what Trump is talking about. Sure, the US may be bankrupting itself spending billions on pointless wars in Afghanistan, Syria and Iraq, while also trying to get involved in North Korea, but most NATO members want to stay out of those flytraps and I don't blame them.

    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption.

    Hey, talk is better than nothing. I don’t want to be accused by Mr. Hanson of being a Debbie Downer or whatever the latest, oh, “Doom Masterbater”. Haha, he is more original in his name-calling than the left – I’ll give him that.

    Hey Hanson, I would give you the book you lent me on Nuclear Armageddon back, but the pages are all stuck together – sorry about that. I should have watched it on Kindle.

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    • LOL: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    C'mon: The aptly named Jack Hanson knows exactly what this guy just finished doing to be so relaxed, satiated, and pensive; why, it's well known his generally cross disposition and pessimism comes of having endured this thing as a small child.

    There: now Jack and I are both writing juvenile nonsense to amuse ourselves.

  181. Trump needs to be more like Le Pen

    An immigration restrictionist but more liberal on other issues such as welfare and non-climate change related environmental issues (i.e. EPA).

    He should abandon the tax cut plan, AHCA, and parts of the freedom caucus.

    As a starting point they should have a medicare opt-in at age 55 (or even 60 would be a good start)

    Chris Ruddy at Newsmax has the right idea.

    In my ideal world, Trumpism should be:

    America First on Immigration, Trade, Foreign Policy

    Conservative on Religions Freedom, Gun Rights, Affirmative Action, States Rights, Education

    Moderate on Environmental, Labor, and Tax Issues

    Liberal on Healthcare, Protecting Social Security Entitlements

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  182. @mobi

    Is this the thread where we claim Trump is gonna pass an amnesty, not build the wall, and fire Bannon part XVII and whine about how put upon we are?
     
    Your points are usually well-taken, but you'd be more effective if you calmed down.

    Your points are usually well-taken, but you’d be more effective if you calmed down.

    NO, he’d be more effective if he could learn the difference between criticism of and active resistance to*, the guy!

    * As in, per utu’s minuses and Pewitt’s post #11, we write what we know he is doing way wrong, but we are not actively resisting his presidency. He’d better shape the hell up soon.

    Oooohhh Bannon’s back, Bannon’s back. I like Bannon and I wish HE were the president. Yeah, well show me some immigration control and work on the southern border. Quit the middle east warmongering. Get something done, you ineffective, twittering dipshit, and we’ll have respect for you again! Turn off your apps and lead already!

    Not you Hanson, President Trump.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Remove the beam from your own eye and realize there's a difference between hasn't done and will not do.
  183. @Kevin C.
    I still can't tell if this whole schtick of yours is just "Internet Tough-Guy"-ism, or more "agent provocateur".

    Nobody pays for that crap. He must be an intern agent provocateur.

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  184. I think it’s tough to see Trump let golden opportunities slip through his fingers, hire enemies who up until they got the job offer were #NeverTrumpers, and embrace a neocon foreign policy. I understand why people are blackpilled but I see people take it to its extremes, like suggesting we’re no better off under Trump than we would be under Hillary or come up with fantasies about how Ted Cruz or Rand Paul would have saved things. Sorry to say, none of those are true.

    There are a few things I’ve found disappointing about Trump but there are measurable accomplishments that we would not get with anyone else. For one, nobody even hints or talks about TPP so a ruinous trade deal is not even on the table. Immigration policy is shifting to where people are not only getting deported but people are voluntarily leaving back to Latin America or trying their luck out in Canada. Trump isn’t decimating what little industry is left by entertaining climate change boondoggles and he isn’t focusing all his political capital on culture war issues like Ted Cruz undoubtedly would have done. He’s also helping to slide the overton window to the right by making people ask about what is good for the country instead of crying over dead Somalis or LGBTBBQWTFLOL issues.

    He’s also exposed so much corruption and rot that it’s hard to believe anything what the media has to say. The days of having to kiss up to the fourth estate are over and that means a lot.

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  185. @Anon7
    I'm similarly frustrated, but they have to play out the hand they've been dealt. Let AG Sessions work it through the courts. Maybe one or more of these leftist judges can be brought up for impeachment by the Senate, once it is clear that their political leanings have overcome their obligation to rule according to the law and established precedent.

    Donald Trump is used to dealing with government bureaucrats and obstructive efforts of all kinds; give him a chance to work.

    The president's policies have been more successful than we know about. You should stop listening to the mainstream media, you (and most Americans) are not permitted a glimpse of the effects of his policies. For example, just this morning there was reported a near-riot in the Texas legislature as protesters (many of whom were in the country illegally, I'm sure) faced ICE authorities. The issue was over the Texas effort to ban sanctuary cities.

    For example, just this morning there was reported a near-riot in the Texas legislature as protesters (many of whom were in the country illegally, I’m sure) faced ICE authorities. The issue was over the Texas effort to ban sanctuary cities.

    I read about this on ZeroHedge, though the story had 2 slightly conflicting stories in one article on who threatened who personally and whether there was a real fist-fight.

    What I wanted to say was that this is confusion of cause with effect, Mr. 7. Trump got elected BECAUSE the voters had had enough of the politicians letting our country get invaded. The CC-license Texan (both names sounded Mexican, so the “good guy”) has got constituents who have enough of it too, and his calling ICE on the blatantly-illegal aliens protesting outside was a nice move and happened BECAUSE people are getting seriously pissed.

    We need more of that, but Trump didn’t make that happen. We need to make this stuff happen, if he will not lead, except as the lead twitterer.

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  186. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Autochthon
    That's all a bit apples and oranges: We've a GDP five times that of Germany, a GDPP thirty-four percent greater; The U.S.A. is almost thirty times as large as Germany; Germany is about eighty-five percent as large as California (a nation's area has enormous ramifications for the size of a military needed to defend it), Germany has about eighty million people, and the U.S.A. has many more than three hundred million.

    I could go on and on, but the horse is long dead.

    That’s all a bit apples and oranges: We’ve a GDP five times that of Germany, a GDPP thirty-four percent greater;

    Germany’s air force is less impressive than the air arm of the US Marine Corps. Let that sink in. The world’s 5th largest economy has an air force with less power than the USMC air component.

    Compare Germany’s air force to that of Israel, a nation with a 10th of the population and GDP. Israel’s Air Force is significantly more impressive especially in frontline fighters.

    As I wrote above the US actually prefers that Germany and the other Euro states refrain from any arms races. So Germany’s current state of military force is a feature not a bug of big US defense spending.

    And I am not trying to pick on Germany. Just look at Canada and Mexico, two large geographical nations with big economies. Canada’s air force is smaller than the USMC air component too.

    And Mexico? Mexico’s air force is weaker than just one US Navy wing on ONE aircraft carrier. In fact, Mexico’s frontline fighter fleet doesn’t even compare to one US navy fighter squadron! The world’s 10th largest economy has fewer fighters than one US Navy fighter squadron!

    They only get away with that because their neighbor has a enormous military who would never let an outsider endanger them.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    They only get away with that because their neighbor has a enormous military who would never let an outsider endanger them.

    There is also the question of realistic threats. Who else in the world is going to be able to project the force to accomplish it? Colombia? Brazil? They have the perfect choke point in Panama, a tiny width of deadly swamp surrounded by oceans on both sides.

    If a China or Russia were to try and project the force necessary to conquer Mexico, yes, the US would not let it happen. And Mexico evidently sees that militarily she cannot repel the US if the US wanted to invade, so why even worry about the threat?
  187. @Ed
    I think it's becoming clear that Trump is not the great managerial force he claimed to be during the campaign. The perceived chaos in the WH scares traditional GOPers who are always on edge with the media. It causes them to retreat even more.

    Trump needs to allow skilled advisors to take greater reins in his administration. That would mean jettisoning his son-in-law and allowing Bannon to reassert control. The Sessions/Miller/Bannon wing have been consistent and have delivered results. Their one perceived misstep, the travel ban, really wasn't one.

    It’s always important to note that neither Kushner or Ivanka are Republicans: they are Liberal Democrats. They also have no idea what Trump’s base (especially the newcomers in the rust belt and upper midwest) wants. This is very much a problem with politics: a bunch of ivy league graduates trying to figure out what a random Trump voter in Wisconsin (who voted Democrat all his life up until 2016) wants. Bannon is much more in tune with this. Donald is listening to his daughter and son-in-law at his own peril.

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    • Replies: @Karl
    190 Random Dude on the internet > neither Kushner or Ivanka are Republicans: they are Liberal Democrats


    and here I was, believing the reports that Jared played a big role in getting Trump into office.
  188. @Jack D
    I really don't see nuclear war as the endpoint of this game. Of course any time you play with fire you're at risk of it spreading out of control, but the main reason to stir up trouble with Russia seems to be for domestic political reasons (to avoid forcing the Democrat base to deal with their anti-white male belief system, which they would really prefer to keep believing in - change is hard) so I think there's a limit to how hard the Democrat leadership and Democrat controlled press is willing to press the issue. Right now dissing Russia and weakening Trump is a cheap twofer - what's the downside? (Also a hilarious one given that the left covered for the Russians, in their guise as "Soviets"for decades). If it required Washington, NY and LA to be vaporized, that's quite another matter. If you are the editor of the NYT or WashPo, having your city vaporized is very bad for the subscription numbers, which are falling badly as it is. Your printing plant might be in the blast zone and insurance doesn't cover nuclear war.

    Putin is obviously not anxious to have Moscow and St. Petersburg vaporized either. Russia also realizes that it is in no position to restore itself as an equal great power alongside the US and that is not really Putin's goal (maybe his dream or fantasy but Putin is a realist and knows what is achievable). This is why Putin confines himself to taking little bites here and there where he can get away with it and spending (relative to the US) paltry sums on hacking, disinformation, influencing foreign elections, etc. Of course the US does exactly the same thing (on steroids - in fact half of what Putin does he does in order to insure that he doesn't end up being Khaddafied), but when we do it, it's in the service of the Goddess of Democracy so it's OK.

    Ironically, by attempting to create a crisis of legitimacy for Trump, the Democrats are making it MORE likely that the administration will be so weakened and distracted that Putin will be able to take back the Baltics or something like that while we are preoccupied with impeachment (see Vietnam). But of course they actually don't give a shit about such faraway places of which we know nothing - Russia is just a stick to beat Trump with.

    Great comment, Jack, and also the reply by Dissident! I would like to add that I think what Putin wants out of the US, and was hopeful about Trump about, was for us via NATO to just QUIT! BOXING! THEM! IN!. Having these Baltic countries part of NATO and continually expanding (which started with GHW Bush) it right up to the Russian border in other areas is something anyone would be angry about.

    Imagine it the other way around. “WARSAW pact invites Mexico and Canada into the fold – story at 11″

    But of course they actually don’t give a shit about such faraway places of which we know nothing – Russia is just a stick to beat Trump with.

    Absolutely!

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  189. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I’m still in the ‘better than Hillary’ camp. We’d have a black tranny Supreme Court justice with her by now. If he’s only 50% better then that’s something. In addition, Melania is the best looking first lady in the history of the USA by eons. That’s worth a lot. Imagine having to look at some sunken screeching dyke having seizures for the next four years? We dodged a bullet and got a stay of execution.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Hey, you and Random Dude (#187) - one of you guys show me a post from ANYONE (besides Tiny Duck) on this whole wide unz site that ever said they'd rather have the Hildabeast - or even that it'd be a wash. Nobody has written that, or paste in a link or 7-digit comment number.

    This is a Duracell D-cell battery on my shoulder. I dare you to find it this comment.

  190. @Prof. Woland
    Had Bernie Sanders been elected President, something which was quite plausible, he would be having a similar set of issues to what President Trump is going through albeit coming from a different angle. Both Trump and Sanders were insurgents so they had very shallow pools to recruit and staff their administrations from. Sanders, like Trump, would have had to hire from within his political party (Democrats) people who did not like him or support him and even oppose him openly. The press would have liked him only as long as he went along with their agenda so he would never had had a moment of peace unless he bent his administration to their will.

    Sanders couldn’t even bend two black lesbians to his will in the struggle over a microphone.

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  191. @Prof. Woland
    Trump is going slowly from being the hunted to being the hunter. I think we will look back at the Comey firing as the beginning of the end of the soft coup. Both Brennan and Clapper have washed their hands. The Democrats are still throwing rocks but are rhetorically backing away from impeachment knowing that is a loser. Pretty soon we will see the very public frog marching of culprits, both in the government and the press, who were smoked out by a combination of Trump Trolling and counter espionage. There is still danger to Trump because of the uncontrollably of the Special Counsel but it is now a problem for Democrats tied to the past administration as well, probably even more so. Susan Rice, Loretta Lynch, Hillary Clinton, and the rest might finally get their rewards, not to mention their boss who so skillfully insulated himself by using them as foils.

    The Russians were a good straw man but by throwing false allegations as a way of smearing Trump means that the Democrats have done their worst and they will be no further real harm other than General Flynn's scalp. In the big picture, he is quite expendable. In fact, by inadvertently stumbling into the minefield first, Flynn probably saved a lot more casualties within the Trump administration.

    Democrats were never going to seriously pursue those matters anyway. Everything they’ve done is an attempt to raise their base’s flagging enthusiasm. It hasn’t worked because the Democrats are utterly incapable of developing a strategy that isn’t just foaming at the mouth outrage. It’s a political loser and having failing to win a single special election (think of what Scott Brown was able to do in 2010), it’s clear that the DNC needs to go back to the drawing board to think of something other than trying to force a Trump = Russia meme into reality. I doubt they will have a coherent strategy for 2020. In hindsight it was an utter mistake for Flynn to step down.

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  192. @Dave Pinsen
    (((Stephen F. Cohen))) is worth a read on Russia. Trump ought to offer him a high-level job in the State Department or in national security.
    https://twitter.com/mtracey/status/869624247399833600

    Dave Pinsen:

    For those interested in hearing Stephen Cohen, he is usually interviewed weekly on the John Bachelor radio show. In New York City the show is on Tuesdays at 9 PM (WABC, 770 AM).

    He is also regularly published in The Nation magazine where his wife is the editor and chief financial donor.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    If you're not in the New York City area, you can listen online here: https://www.iheart.com/live/77-WABC-5349/
  193. @Jack Hanson
    Lmbo, look at all these words to tell us how upset you are at getting called out for your endless doom masturbation.

    I say again, Audie Murphy: just what in the Hell have you been up to that you are so damned superior?

    Take your time; we’ll wait.

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    • Agree: Kevin C.
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Seeing first hand and being part of the changes that AG Sessions is effecting in immigration across the SWB compared to the free for all that was the Obama Admin.

    But don't let me stop the daily struggle session. Being totally wrong about the election didn't stop the majority of you from continuing to expound upon current events like you have a clue. I'm sure in 6 months being wrong repeatedly won't stop you from commenting still.
    , @anonymous
    He did correctly predict the election. And he predicted it early and often. Just saying.
  194. @IHTG
    "Sheriffs are enthusiastic about enforcing U.S. immigration law. That makes a big difference.": https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/monkey-cage/wp/2017/05/30/sheriffs-are-enthusiastic-about-enforcing-u-s-immigration-law-that-makes-a-big-difference/

    The Trump administration has said that it will expand Immigration Authority Section 287(g) of the 2009 Immigration and Nationality Act, a voluntary federal program that deputizes local law enforcement officers to enforce federal immigration laws. The Obama administration curtailed this program (by reducing funding) in favor of Secure Communities, largely because 287(g) is very expensive. Secure Communities requires that law enforcement check the immigration status of anyone booked into jail through the federal fingerprint database.

    ...

    According to the news site FiveThirtyEight, since Trump’s inauguration immigrants in three major cities are reporting fewer crimes to police. Apparently they are afraid that their immigrant status will be checked, leading to deportation.

     

    So immigrants are reporting fewer crimes? I’d much rather they commit fewer crimes.

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  195. OT

    I like it when people have to eat the mess they created. To what degree the supplies to Weinstein I don’t particularly know, but either way it is extraordinary to watch this dyed-in-the-wool, washed in the blood, anti-racist leftist stand up to the mob calling for his blood without flinching from them.

    It seems that he neither seeks out nor fears the spotlight and is managing to keep his cool.

    I didn’t follow this news at first because it is so run-of-the-mill but this fellow’s reaction to it despite being very left-leaning, is not run of the mill and is having an interesting effect. If you haven’t looked into the story yet you might enjoy doing so.

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  196. @anonymous
    The good thing is that no sane politician in Japan (especially in regard to their own career) would risk promoting true open border policies for immigration, not only because of the current overcrowded condition of Japan, but the people there aren't keen on receiving many immigrants, even if they are from white nations.
    I saw once some old news about Shinzo Abe and many if not most politicians thinking twice about loosening citizenship and visas for foreigners risking loss of popularity among their voters. I don't think it would be different now.
    Besides, the opinion of japanese people about the ones who could attain citizenship and visas aren't so good, since the government were allowing more low-skilled people into the country than the high-skilled.

    The good thing is that no sane politician in Japan (especially in regard to their own career) would risk promoting true open border policies for immigration, not only because of the current overcrowded condition of Japan, but the people there aren’t keen on receiving many immigrants, even if they are from white nations.

    The thing that gets me is that when one brings up reciprocity in open-bordersism, other people respond that people should come to the West because their countries are overcrowded. Ok. It’s not an argument, but still:

    https://www.indexmundi.com/g/r.aspx?v=21000

    Why do these people support immigration into the Netherlands? Belgium? The UK? Belgium? Italy? They are not far from Japan, above or below. They are all above China.

    The trouble with being guilt-prone is that it is easy to be guilt-tripped, and as a people we are. On the other hand, it’s part of the reason why our societies are better places to live.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    I meant to write Germany instead of Belgium twice.
  197. @mobi

    Is this the thread where we claim Trump is gonna pass an amnesty, not build the wall, and fire Bannon part XVII and whine about how put upon we are?
     
    Your points are usually well-taken, but you'd be more effective if you calmed down.

    Tell that to the people declaring we’ve been stabbed in the back every week.

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  198. @Achmed E. Newman

    Your points are usually well-taken, but you’d be more effective if you calmed down.
     
    NO, he'd be more effective if he could learn the difference between criticism of and active resistance to*, the guy!

    * As in, per utu's minuses and Pewitt's post #11, we write what we know he is doing way wrong, but we are not actively resisting his presidency. He'd better shape the hell up soon.

    Oooohhh Bannon's back, Bannon's back. I like Bannon and I wish HE were the president. Yeah, well show me some immigration control and work on the southern border. Quit the middle east warmongering. Get something done, you ineffective, twittering dipshit, and we'll have respect for you again! Turn off your apps and lead already!

    Not you Hanson, President Trump.

    Remove the beam from your own eye and realize there’s a difference between hasn’t done and will not do.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    OK, so is he going to reverse his own decision on letting the DACA (dreamers, a million or so 26-y/o illegal teenagers - I don't know ...) stay in the country?

    He didn't have to let that happen. That's on him already. Check out the other points that Charles Pewitt (#11) wrote. Do you think Pewitt is making these up? If not, do you state that all of these happened because of Trump's being blocked by judges or his enemies in Congress (R and D both - they are mostly against him)? Some of these things were active decisions by Trump, and that's what's getting me pissed at him.

    Your reply this time was fairly civil, so that's why I'm replying to you. I've heard you and others write about the "eeyoors" or blackpillers or whatever listening to the "MSM" too much. Hey, that's not the problem - I bet I watch less TV in a year than you do in 1 day (cause it's ZERO). I understand that this is all distractions, but the problem is that President Trump is falling for these distractions. Were Trump to just tell Americans (via twitter if he's gotta twit) that he's ignoring all the Russia BS, all the scandals, and congress can go to hell, but he going to get the border controlled, the overstayed visas out, the legal system curtailed with whatever means under his disposal, we'd be rallying like hell around this guy.

    Trump can tell us Putin personally cast 1,000,000 votes and I don't care - it still doesn't override the illegal aliens/dead people/dead illegal aliens.

    Trump has got to do what he promised to the best of his power - he's Commander-in-Chief, ignore all the BS from Congress and the Senate, and take his story to the people every day. That would make me send my copy of "Nucular Armageddon" back to you, Jack, and I would un-stick every page in shame at having ever doubted you.
  199. @Kyle a
    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.

    Michael had no problem dispatching his brother-in-law in The Godfather.or his actual brother.

    For better or worse, Trump is not Michael Corleone.

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  200. @Autochthon
    I say again, Audie Murphy: just what in the Hell have you been up to that you are so damned superior?

    Take your time; we'll wait.

    Seeing first hand and being part of the changes that AG Sessions is effecting in immigration across the SWB compared to the free for all that was the Obama Admin.

    But don’t let me stop the daily struggle session. Being totally wrong about the election didn’t stop the majority of you from continuing to expound upon current events like you have a clue. I’m sure in 6 months being wrong repeatedly won’t stop you from commenting still.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Is that a cryotographic way of claiming you work for the border-patrol or Immigration & Customs Enforcement? I'm too old to join. Am I a loser because I chose a different career twenty years ago before I realised my elected government was hostile to its own people? MEA CVLPA

    As to your ranting second paragraph: The vast majority of us disillusioned by the betrayal haven't been wrong about any of the things you enumerate, except our confidence Mr. Trump might actually do as he said once elected. We paid treasure, blood, sweat, and tears; some of us endured violent physical confrontations and were driven from our own homes by campaigns of harassment from corrupt governments. We hardly sat 'round since fall of 2015 weeping and gnashing our teeth.

    I don't even think any more you are a serious person; I expect you are like Tiny Duck or Nick Diaz: you just like to come here and mug about what a True Believer you are and how you just knew Zach Morris wouldn't let you down, and everyone else is just a schmoe not worthy to sit with the cool kids or make eye contact with Kelly Kapowski, so Nyaaaah! Grow up, already; we are not impressed.

    , @Stephen R. Diamond
    Trump didn't think he would win. So, what exactly does being wrong on the election prove?
  201. @Anonym
    As a regular working goy, why do I care whether America is a great power? Might I be better off if America was not a great power?

    In previous years, the American standard of living was better than anywhere I could think of. Now it's more like a typical white country. I think the petrodollar had a lot to do with it. The US wouldn't have been able to print money that other countries had to work for in order to buy oil in USD if the US hadn't been a great enough power to topple regimes who so much as hinted at using another currency to sell the world's lifeblood, and been great enough to prevent competitor regimes from muscling in. That's a benefit.

    Being a minor power sucks ass. Ask the Tibetans about whether they would prefer being the hammer or the nail.

    https://g.co/kgs/fz5DUc

    Well, for what it is worth, US real income was highest in the 1950s and has been going downhill since, regardless of the her “position” in the world. Apples and oranges, Switzerland has had comparable if not greater living standard since at least the 2000s when I visited.

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    • Replies: @Anonym

    Switzerland has had comparable if not greater living standard since at least the 2000s when I visited.
     
    Firstly I said "in previous years". These days not so much. Secondly exceptions. They prove the rule.
    , @newrouter
    "US real income was highest in the 1950s and has been going downhill since,"

    That is what happens when you have blown up the productive capabilities world wide in the previous decade.
    , @Logan
    If you have some statistics on that, I'd sure like to see them.

    In the 1950s we were far and away out in front of the rest of the world. But high standard of living, not so much.

    Average new home built in 1955, 115o square feet. 2016 it's 2700 square feet, despite much smaller families.

    When I was growing up in the 60s, my family only ever had one car. Most middle class families today have at least two cars.

    Watched an episode of The Honeymooners recently. The Kramdens didn't even have a phone. They'd make a call from the drugstore downstairs.

    I realize it's difficult to compare "real incomes" from one period to another, or even to define what real income means. But I suspect a person with a the median lifestyle today who went back in time to the 50s and lived a median lifestyle then would feel much, much less wealthy.
  202. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Autochthon
    I say again, Audie Murphy: just what in the Hell have you been up to that you are so damned superior?

    Take your time; we'll wait.

    He did correctly predict the election. And he predicted it early and often. Just saying.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Noted, but so did I, Ann Coulter, and – if you want to talk about being early to the party – Steve Sailer. But none of us runs around chewing the scenery about how weak, gloomy, foolish, and maudlin; maudlin I say! people expressing perfectly reasonable scepticism at the lack of meaningful actions in line with Mr. Trump's position-papers. Such sceptics include fools; fools, I say! such as John Derbyshire and Ann Coulter, famous for their stupidity and cowardice.

    I like the Doom Masturbator business Achmed has picked up on, because Hanson's diatribes really do remind one of a megolomaniacal super-villain with a superiority complex, laughing maniacally about out puny minds' failure to appreciate genius because we dare question the machinations of out betters....
  203. @anonymous

    That’s all a bit apples and oranges: We’ve a GDP five times that of Germany, a GDPP thirty-four percent greater;
     
    Germany's air force is less impressive than the air arm of the US Marine Corps. Let that sink in. The world's 5th largest economy has an air force with less power than the USMC air component.

    Compare Germany's air force to that of Israel, a nation with a 10th of the population and GDP. Israel's Air Force is significantly more impressive especially in frontline fighters.

    As I wrote above the US actually prefers that Germany and the other Euro states refrain from any arms races. So Germany's current state of military force is a feature not a bug of big US defense spending.

    And I am not trying to pick on Germany. Just look at Canada and Mexico, two large geographical nations with big economies. Canada's air force is smaller than the USMC air component too.

    And Mexico? Mexico's air force is weaker than just one US Navy wing on ONE aircraft carrier. In fact, Mexico's frontline fighter fleet doesn't even compare to one US navy fighter squadron! The world's 10th largest economy has fewer fighters than one US Navy fighter squadron!

    They only get away with that because their neighbor has a enormous military who would never let an outsider endanger them.

    They only get away with that because their neighbor has a enormous military who would never let an outsider endanger them.

    There is also the question of realistic threats. Who else in the world is going to be able to project the force to accomplish it? Colombia? Brazil? They have the perfect choke point in Panama, a tiny width of deadly swamp surrounded by oceans on both sides.

    If a China or Russia were to try and project the force necessary to conquer Mexico, yes, the US would not let it happen. And Mexico evidently sees that militarily she cannot repel the US if the US wanted to invade, so why even worry about the threat?

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  204. @Daniel Chieh
    Well, for what it is worth, US real income was highest in the 1950s and has been going downhill since, regardless of the her "position" in the world. Apples and oranges, Switzerland has had comparable if not greater living standard since at least the 2000s when I visited.

    Switzerland has had comparable if not greater living standard since at least the 2000s when I visited.

    Firstly I said “in previous years”. These days not so much. Secondly exceptions. They prove the rule.

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  205. The [Ryan, Koch Brothers] wing of the party has Trump by the balls. I don’t know if there’s that that much he can do, but his budget was frankly obscene. He’s stabbing his middle class/working class supporters in the back.

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  206. @Anonym
    The good thing is that no sane politician in Japan (especially in regard to their own career) would risk promoting true open border policies for immigration, not only because of the current overcrowded condition of Japan, but the people there aren’t keen on receiving many immigrants, even if they are from white nations.

    The thing that gets me is that when one brings up reciprocity in open-bordersism, other people respond that people should come to the West because their countries are overcrowded. Ok. It's not an argument, but still:

    https://www.indexmundi.com/g/r.aspx?v=21000

    Why do these people support immigration into the Netherlands? Belgium? The UK? Belgium? Italy? They are not far from Japan, above or below. They are all above China.

    The trouble with being guilt-prone is that it is easy to be guilt-tripped, and as a people we are. On the other hand, it's part of the reason why our societies are better places to live.

    I meant to write Germany instead of Belgium twice.

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  207. @Peter Akuleyev
    My impression is that for years Trump has relied on his close family - his sons and Ivanka and Kushner - to run the business with him. He seems to be a low trust individual, but also I think he sees the Trump name as a family institution to be preserved across generations.

    My impression is that for years Trump has relied on his close family – his sons and Ivanka and Kushner – to run the business with him. He seems to be a low trust individual

    Trump would be FAR easier for people to understand, and just plain have an intuitive grasp of, if he was Donald MacLeod.

    His Scottish sensibility leaps out at me at all times; no surprise he wanted his clan in the White House with him.

    Agnostic has good posts at his place about Kushner: his lack of power and the mildly successful psyops campaign waged against altright/paleocons that Jared is not Our Guy, a globalist even.

    http://akinokure.blogspot.com/2017/05/intuition-if-kushners-out-good-or-bad.html?m=1

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  208. OT: But this has to be an iSteve topic.

    In a study published May 30 in the journal Nature Communications, scientists looked at DNA from 151 mummified Egyptians, which were entombed from about 1400 B.C. to just after 400 A.D., in the Roman period. They found that the genetic material within the mummies was more similar to ancient peoples of the Near East and the Levant (an area of the eastern Mediterranean including Israel and Palestine) than it is to modern Egyptians.

    Three mummies had enough DNA preserved to allow the scientists to look at genes from throughout their genome. One of these had a gene “which contributes to lighter skin pigmentation and was shown to be at high frequency in Neolithic Anatolia,” or modern-day Turkey, the researchers wrote.

    http://www.newsweek.com/egyptian-mummy-dna-study-suggests-close-ties-middle-east-europe-617767

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  209. @Daniel Chieh
    Well, for what it is worth, US real income was highest in the 1950s and has been going downhill since, regardless of the her "position" in the world. Apples and oranges, Switzerland has had comparable if not greater living standard since at least the 2000s when I visited.

    “US real income was highest in the 1950s and has been going downhill since,”

    That is what happens when you have blown up the productive capabilities world wide in the previous decade.

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  210. @Jack Hanson
    Remove the beam from your own eye and realize there's a difference between hasn't done and will not do.

    OK, so is he going to reverse his own decision on letting the DACA (dreamers, a million or so 26-y/o illegal teenagers – I don’t know …) stay in the country?

    He didn’t have to let that happen. That’s on him already. Check out the other points that Charles Pewitt (#11) wrote. Do you think Pewitt is making these up? If not, do you state that all of these happened because of Trump’s being blocked by judges or his enemies in Congress (R and D both – they are mostly against him)? Some of these things were active decisions by Trump, and that’s what’s getting me pissed at him.

    Your reply this time was fairly civil, so that’s why I’m replying to you. I’ve heard you and others write about the “eeyoors” or blackpillers or whatever listening to the “MSM” too much. Hey, that’s not the problem – I bet I watch less TV in a year than you do in 1 day (cause it’s ZERO). I understand that this is all distractions, but the problem is that President Trump is falling for these distractions. Were Trump to just tell Americans (via twitter if he’s gotta twit) that he’s ignoring all the Russia BS, all the scandals, and congress can go to hell, but he going to get the border controlled, the overstayed visas out, the legal system curtailed with whatever means under his disposal, we’d be rallying like hell around this guy.

    Trump can tell us Putin personally cast 1,000,000 votes and I don’t care – it still doesn’t override the illegal aliens/dead people/dead illegal aliens.

    Trump has got to do what he promised to the best of his power – he’s Commander-in-Chief, ignore all the BS from Congress and the Senate, and take his story to the people every day. That would make me send my copy of “Nucular Armageddon” back to you, Jack, and I would un-stick every page in shame at having ever doubted you.

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  211. @Anonymous
    The Merkel hysteria could easily become the straw that blows up his Administration ... for precisely the reasons you describe.

    It's like Trump's big "oops" about Japan during spring 2016 - he suggested Japan have nuclear arms (or something equivalent). Totally oblivious to geopolitical reality that the Japan policy was carefully crafted and is Absolute Law and Never Ever Questioned. That was the red flag that Trump needed some educational intervention, pronto.

    Now the blunder is with Germany and he is IN office. And I suspect Merkel is floundering as "damsel in distress" role with some heavy backup chorus. The entire weight of the FP establishment will be singing 24/7 on this - and they may even invent a way to integrate it with the "Russian" narrative to boot.

    How is it a blunder?

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  212. @Jack Hanson
    Seeing first hand and being part of the changes that AG Sessions is effecting in immigration across the SWB compared to the free for all that was the Obama Admin.

    But don't let me stop the daily struggle session. Being totally wrong about the election didn't stop the majority of you from continuing to expound upon current events like you have a clue. I'm sure in 6 months being wrong repeatedly won't stop you from commenting still.

    Is that a cryotographic way of claiming you work for the border-patrol or Immigration & Customs Enforcement? I’m too old to join. Am I a loser because I chose a different career twenty years ago before I realised my elected government was hostile to its own people? MEA CVLPA

    As to your ranting second paragraph: The vast majority of us disillusioned by the betrayal haven’t been wrong about any of the things you enumerate, except our confidence Mr. Trump might actually do as he said once elected. We paid treasure, blood, sweat, and tears; some of us endured violent physical confrontations and were driven from our own homes by campaigns of harassment from corrupt governments. We hardly sat ’round since fall of 2015 weeping and gnashing our teeth.

    I don’t even think any more you are a serious person; I expect you are like Tiny Duck or Nick Diaz: you just like to come here and mug about what a True Believer you are and how you just knew Zach Morris wouldn’t let you down, and everyone else is just a schmoe not worthy to sit with the cool kids or make eye contact with Kelly Kapowski, so Nyaaaah! Grow up, already; we are not impressed.

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    • Agree: Kevin C.
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Good heavens, the amount of projection in your post is amazing.

    You are obviously mad and ranting because you know you are wrong and will continue to be wrong. If anyone is tiny duck in their insistence that we are all doomed and there is nothing we can do, its you blackpill eeyores.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Jack Hanson got one thing right. He guessed right in a prediction in which he had a 50/50 chance, and he's been patting himself on the back ever since. I don't think he's like TD or ND, but it is true that he constantly misrepresents the viewpoints of people he disagrees with.

    I propose people stop responding to him and just use the "Troll" button when he's in his Manic Purple Muppet role.
  213. @Anonym
    As a regular working goy, why do I care whether America is a great power? Might I be better off if America was not a great power?

    In previous years, the American standard of living was better than anywhere I could think of. Now it's more like a typical white country. I think the petrodollar had a lot to do with it. The US wouldn't have been able to print money that other countries had to work for in order to buy oil in USD if the US hadn't been a great enough power to topple regimes who so much as hinted at using another currency to sell the world's lifeblood, and been great enough to prevent competitor regimes from muscling in. That's a benefit.

    Being a minor power sucks ass. Ask the Tibetans about whether they would prefer being the hammer or the nail.

    https://g.co/kgs/fz5DUc

    >Ask the Tibetans about whether they would prefer being the hammer or the nail.

    Ask White Americans whether we are more like a hammer or a nail. My point is we are already getting screwed by our own homegrown ruling class. If America were not a Great Power ™ what would change for us?

    America’s Great Power ™ seems to me primarily to function to prop up the ruling class, to enable them to keep ruling. No Great Power ™, maybe no more ruling class. Maybe we just get a new Chinese ruling class. But still, not seeing why that should matter to me.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    It seems like China is currently doing their best to do a few things - have an ethnostate, be a Great Power (TM), make use of their diaspora. The concepts are not mutually exclusive. There is no need to betray your people to be a great power.

    I get your point - with how the US plays at being a "Great Power" at the expense of its people - what's in it for me? The US did a lot to create a competing superpower there by their approach to correcting the trade imbalance, or lack thereof.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/chart-us-trade-deficit-with-china-2013-4?r=US&IR=T
  214. @Achmed E. Newman

    Really? That is mostly just nonsense for domestic political consumption.
     
    Hey, talk is better than nothing. I don't want to be accused by Mr. Hanson of being a Debbie Downer or whatever the latest, oh, "Doom Masterbater". Haha, he is more original in his name-calling than the left - I'll give him that.

    Hey Hanson, I would give you the book you lent me on Nuclear Armageddon back, but the pages are all stuck together - sorry about that. I should have watched it on Kindle.

    C’mon: The aptly named Jack Hanson knows exactly what this guy just finished doing to be so relaxed, satiated, and pensive; why, it’s well known his generally cross disposition and pessimism comes of having endured this thing as a small child.

    There: now Jack and I are both writing juvenile nonsense to amuse ourselves.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Haha.. for 5+ year olds! It seem like I was a LOT older - I'm just not an early adopter, I guess.

    BTW, maybe your comment about Mr. Hanson being on the border patrol of CIS was right. I read the latest on some small portion of fence actually being built.

    I'm an optimist in general, but not when it comes to government and politics. Things have been going the wrong way in this country in almost every aspect since 1995.
    , @Jack Hanson
    Tell me more about how totally not upset you are.
  215. @Moshe
    I don't take seriously any of the media's gossip about The Real Housewives of Pennsylvania Avenue. What Bannon wants or Kushner wants or some other who-knows-who wants and who is slwwping with who[m!] is only known by literal insiders, of which I am not one.

    I also didn't expect much from Trump. I just think rhat a Hillary win would have been grotesque beyond any definition of the word, every day for ever and ever.

    What DOES surprise me is how fully people like Ann Coulter came around to sticking for their principles rather than for "Trump!" as the lowbrow are doing and could always be expected to do.

    Again, I expected nothing from Trump aside for two things.

    1) This is neither good nor bad per se but I thought he would engage the populace as a whole and bwcome more popular among non-Republicans. I knew he would bring Ivanka into the family biz but I thought it would be offset by his becoming a generally loved emperor.

    2) I considered it a possibility that he might actually DO SOMETHING for America and Americans for at least a few months. I never figured he would build an actual wall but I thought he would at least build it in places instead of a completely needless and useless attempt at a ban from various random Muslim countries. Not that I thought he would do any of this out of the goodness of his heart or to keep any campaign promises but just because it might seem like the smart thing to do for a couple of months.

    Really though, what surprises me is that he is not done EITHER 1 or 2 but just floundered around like a retarded fish.

    What DOES surprise me is how fully people like Ann Coulter came around to sticking for their principles rather than for “Trump!” …

    Moshe, Ann Coulter has really come around in 10 years or so. She used to be a typical neocon, as I recall. She is a real truth-seeker now, a libertarian/conservative, and has always been a great writer. No, it’s not like I’m in love with her or anything…. no, …. I don’t think so … sigh ….

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    • Replies: @Moshe
    I thought of her as more of a "make the rich richer" sort of person who claimed christian and neo conservative beliefs as cover.

    Even then I wrote her a piece of fanmail along the lines of how despite the fact that i oppose most of what she's doing, I love how freely she expresses herself and what infelligence and quick wittedness she brings to it.

    Seeing her come around to being more of a citizenist and then even holding trump accountable despite the fawning book she had just written about him (and how little she had to gain by questioning his actions and motives) is pretty impressive.
  216. @Thomas
    Hey Steve! Are you going to ever tell us your thoughts? I have half a feeling that you're working on your second book, and are mining your readership for research, or something.

    Trump got himself a little bit of breathing room with his "big trip" away from the terrible press around the Comey sacking, the appointment of Mueller as special counsel, and the mishandled meeting with the Russians. It's hard to tell, however, how much of this reprieve was just because of fewer opportunities for either Trump himself to commit another gaffe, or maybe possibly one or several people on his staff less able to leak something to the press (it could be possible, if anyone in the White House had enough sense, that the trip provided an opportunity to identify leakers: see if a source drops off from anyone on the trip being less willing to chance things to overseas communications).

    (As far as the supposed falling out with Merkel, et al, on the trip, a couple things to keep in mind are (1) Merkel has an election to deal with this year, so some of what she says and does is for domestic consumption; and (2) Trump has been, in this and likely many other ways, accelerating trends that would have been coming anyway. 25 years after the end of the Cold War and the dissolution of the Soviet Union, the U.S. has much less reason to be interested in NATO, given that the enemy it was established to face no longer exists and its successor is a paltry military threat to the rest of Europe, and the fact that the major European members of NATO show no interest in protecting themselves from the actual threat posed by mass Muslim and African immigration.)

    Now that Trump and his camp are back in Washington, and there's talk of a "shake-up," we will have to see what happens in the next couple of weeks. The big question mark with this presidency has always been Trump's ability and character, and that was clear even as far back as the campaign, when he would regularly drag his campaign off into the weeds with one or another provocative public statement or controversy. It seems clear that he needs to change at least in some respect, even if to the minimal degree of appointing a few key core staffers whom he will listen to when they tell him "no" about something, whom he won't publicly cut the legs out from under, who are able to do the heavy lifting he either can't or won't, and who want the job. The problem is still that probably anyone with the competence and ability to get this presidency (and this President) on a sounder footing who isn't already working there probably already has a decent job, and probably isn't interested in what has come to look like a toxic work environment under a toxic boss that is likely to leave their career and reputation damaged (and likely with both terrible hours and a government-level salary to boot, not to mention an ongoing Justice Department investigation that has everyone lawyering up). Somebody needs to be there to tell him to STFU, stop with the off-message tweeting, the weird and inappropriate statements to foreign dignitaries, etc. Hopefully, maybe, the special counsel investigation will have lawyers necessarily taking charge of the communications to some degree, so it might be a blessing in disguise.

    Politically, Trump is going to have to deliver something to his base, probably on immigration, this year, in order to avoid the Democrats taking over at least one house of Congress (which will kill any hope of legislating anything stone dead and will open up the floodgates of investigations). I can't imagine how anyone who watches the immigration issue didn't have steam coming out of their ears last week with the announcement of the increase in refugee admissions by the State Department this year. Nate Silver last week or so at Fivethirtyeight wrote up some poll findings that Trump's base was softening, mostly by a shift of "enthusiastic support" towards "somewhat support," and I have to see that as failures to deliver and stumbles on issues like immigration (which has been the core of Trump's "enthusiastic support" from the beginning). If his base shrinks or loses interest significantly as the midterms approach and Republicans in Congress and establishment conservatism feel the leash slackening, Trump will have some major problems.

    Bottom line: still Flight 93, the cockpit was breached, but still not clear whether the guy in the seat can fly the plane.

    He cannot for sure. But Bannon can.

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  217. @Anonymous
    Pence could have pulled off this visit (including setting the stage for parting ways over Paris Agreement) without rattling America's second most important "special relationship" with Europe. The US keeps enough reign on Europe so that they don't kill each other. They both depend on and resent us, and it's worked pretty well. It's a matter of existential survival - a complex geopolitical balance that Trump may or may not be aware of. If not, he simply will not be allowed to proceed. Merkel is expressing Middle European distress and confusion on the world stage and may be echoed by the entire CFR/ think tank complex in short order. Maybe she pictured Obama in the beer hall audience.

    What if it all boils down to a personality flaw? ... not admitting he doesn't have enough knowledge. It's hardly a deal breaker- with one or two advisers next to him, NONE of his troubles need to have happened. Including simply keeping his mouth shut. His political neophyte phase has to be brought to a close if he is to have any future in office. Bannon surely has a handful.

    Someone like Gingrich (there have been numerous weighty people along the way), sitting in Jared's seat could advise him in private if need be, even after everyone leaves the room. Someone who knows everything or who can make a call to someone else who does. Apparently no one can be candid with him, or even suggest such a thing! His family in the inner sanctum is one big fat lost opportuni