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Stabby Somali

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Robby Soave of Reason has reported that the name of the course requiring a group project on microaggressions that Ohio State’s Stabby Somali, Abdul Razak Ali Artan, was taking was named “Crossing Identity Boundaries.”

This would appear to be the class’s website. Here are excerpts:

Multicultural Center

The Ohio State University

Crossing Identity Boundaries (ES HESA 2577)

Crossing Identity Boundaries: A Journey Towards Intercultural Leadership is a three-credit course designed to bring together students from different cultural and social identity groups in a facilitated learning environment. Interactive dialogues engage students in exploring issues of diversity and inequality as well as their personal and social responsibility for building a more just university and society. Students gain valuable leadership skills that they can effectively utilize long beyond the classroom. …

ES HESA 2577 courses are carefully structured to explore social group identity, conflict, community, and social justice. Overall, the course will be guided throughout by the following questions:

How have you come to learn about race/gender/sexuality/religion? How has this shaped your world view?

In what ways can you use the information gained in this course to become an actively engaged, socially just global citizen within the Buckeye, Columbus, and greater communities?

At the conclusion of the course, students will be able to:

- Identify micro-aggressions within their daily lives and within society as a whole.
- Define power, privilege, value systems and difference and be able to identify their different forms.
- Recognize the commonalities and differences that exist among people and cultures and how these factors influence their relationship with others.
- Demonstrate a personal ethic geared towards civic responsibility.
- Identify ways in which they can challenge or address systems of power and privilege.
- Demonstrate an appreciation for other points of view and other cultures…
- Discuss how they will be socially just global citizenship as part of their lifelong learning.

Why is racism always a black/white thing? Am I expected to represent everyone in my group? Are guys always expected to pay on a date? Spend the semester exploring these and many other questions in the Multicultural Center’s three credit hour course. Classes meet twice a week and aim to expand self-awareness and develop valuable dialogue skills. Receive credit for the Leadership Minor and/or the Social Diversity in the U.S. GE while examining and discussing issues and experiences relevant to Ohio State and society.

And here are excerpts from this course’s syllabus:

The Ohio State University

College of Education and Human Ecology

Department of Educational Studies

ES HESA 2577 Crossing Identity Boundaries: A Journal Towards Intercultural Leadership

3 credits, Undergraduate …

I. Course Description

This course is built on intellectual and experiential engagement with issues of difference, diversity, social justice, and alliance building. In a multicultural society that is culturally diverse yet socially stratified, discussions about difference, community and conflict are important to facilitate understanding among different social and cultural groups. …

The course is focused on all aspects of social identity, including but not limited to race/ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, religion, socioeconomic status, and national origin. We will explore the topics of identity, social justice, and diversity through these various lenses.

Overall, the course will be guided by the following questions:

  1. How have you come to learn about race/gender/sexual orientation/religion/nationality? How has this shaped your worldview?
  2. In what ways can you use the information gained in this course to become an actively engaged, socially just global citizen/leader within the Buckeye, Columbus, and greater communities?

This course will meet a General Education (GE) requirement for Diversity: Social Diversity in the United States. This course also fulfills the requirement for the leadership minor.

II. Course Objectives: …

Students will begin to develop an understanding of major social justice concepts (e.g., power, privilege, difference, microaggressions).

Through writing as well as individual and group reflections based on readings assignments and class discussions, students will able to:

  • Identify microaggressions within their daily lives and within society as a whole.
  • Identify ways in which they can challenge or address systems of power and privilege.
  • Define power, privilege, value systems and difference and be able to identify their different forms. …

Students will grasp their role within greater society and how they can work to create social justice.

III. Course Readings

Adams, M., Blumenfied, W. J., Castañeda, C., Hackman, H. W., Peters, M. L., & Zuñiga, X. (Eds.). (2013). Readings for diversity and social justice (3rd ed.). New York: Routledge.

$152 in hard cover, but only $59.35 in paperback.

I’m going to put in a page break here, but the course readings below it are pretty funny.

Warning: What follows is not a parody.

Here are a few excerpts from below the fold:

… You will be graded on the following criteria:

Quality of microaggressions chosen (Do you clearly articulate why they are microaggressions and which group is targeted?)

Quality of response (Do you address the microaggression in an appropriate and meaningful way?) …

Remember, kids, it’s not just the quantity of microaggressions, it’s the quality.

*Meiner, J. C. (2000). Memoirs of a gay fraternity brother. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice: An anthology on racism, antisemitism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, and classism (pp. 299-301). New York, NY: Routledge. ….

*McIntosh, P. (1990). White privilege: unpacking the invisible knapsack.*Vega, T. (2014). Students see many slights as racial microaggressions. New York Times

*King, J. (2015). Here’s the perfect explanation for why White people need to stop saying #AllLivesMatter. …

*Bouie, J. (2014). Why do millennials not understand racism? Retrieved from http://www.slate.com…

*Kuo, R. (2015). 6 reasons we need to dismantle the model minority myth of those ‘hard-working’ Asians. Retrieved from http://everydayfeminism.com…

*Cicero, L. (2012). Secret agent – Why queer invisibility matters. Retrieved from http://www.undercoverinthesuburbs.com/2012/04/09/secret-agent-why-queer-invisibility-matters/

*Lim-Hing, S. (2000). Dragon ladies, snow queens, and Asian-American dykes: Reflections on race and sexuality. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice: An anthology on racism, antisemitism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, and classism(pp. 296-299). New York, NY: Routledge.

*Ferguson, S. (2014). 3 examples of everyday cissexism. Retrieved from http://everydayfeminism.com/2014/03/everyday-cissexism/

*Resnick, B. (2015). The science behind why people fear refugees. Retrieved from http://www.vox.com

Nasir, N. S. & Al-Amin, J. (2013). Creating identity-safe spaces on college campuses for Muslim students. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 301-305). New York, NY: Routledge.

 

 

… You will complete a total of 7 journals for this class. …

  1. Respond directly to one of the readings for class. How did the reading change your thinking, if at all? What did you learn? What questions do you still have about the topic? How does this reading relate to your life experience and identity? …
  2. Write about your activities from a recent day in your life. What actions did you take? Where did you go? Who were you with? Now pick one aspect of the social identity wheel. Choose a trait from that wheel that you do not already have (e.g. if you are Christian, pick being Muslim; if you are male, pick being female). Retrace your day and your actions while reflecting on how this new identity would have impacted your day. What challenges would you have? How would others have treated you differently? What privileges might you have gained? Full credit will be given to those journals that fully explore an identity and can relate it to one’s daily life activities
  3. Describe a recent incident where you have seen power/privilege in your life. Reflect on that experience. How did you react in that moment? Why did you react that way and was that an appropriate way to react? How did your social identities play into this experience? Full credit will be given to those entries that reflect deeply about the experience and demonstrate an understanding of how identity impacts power and privilege. Incorporate at least one reading into your response.
  4. Choose one section from the identity wheel. Write a reflection on your childhood memories and experiences that helped shape the identities you chose. What messages, both covert and overt, did you receive about these identities growing up? What are some positive and negative experiences you had with these identities and how have they shaped how you see that identity today? You should use a different identity than you wrote about in the Who Am I? paper. Incorporate at least one reading into your response.
  5. Take two Implicit Bias tests at https://implicit.harvard.edu/implicit/selectatest.html. Write about how you felt when you took the test. Reflect on your results of the test. What surprised or didn’t surprise you? Why do you think you got the result you did? How do these tests and their results relate to what we have learned in class? What implications do these tests have for society? Incorporate at least one reading into your response. Full credit will be given to journals that relate the tests to at least one reading, demonstrate an understanding of how these tests relate to larger social justice issues, and incorporate personal experience.
  6. Learn more about a resource on campus that could further your understanding on the topic(s) of this class (e.g. diversity, specific identities, etc.). You CANNOT use the Multicultural Center. …
  7. The goal of this activity is to help students illustrate how diversity and social justice impact life outside of the classroom. Attend one DICE event sponsored by the Multicultural Center. A list of possible programs can be found at (http://mcc.osu.edu/events.aspx) – programs that can count for this journal will be labeled with “DICE” after the title of the program. Reflect on your experience at the program. What did you learn? How can you use the information in the future? How did the program relate to the course?

Who am I? Paper (5%)

For this 2-3 page paper, you will further explore your social identities. Use the social identity wheel as a starting point. Discuss 1-2 of your social identities. How did you come to learn about those identities? What kind of messages (both positive and negative) have you been given about those identities? What aspects of your identity do you hope to learn more about in the course? Full credit will be given to papers that demonstrate an in-depth and serious reflection that is grounded in personal experiences and to papers that explain fully what you want to learn from the course. This paper is due on September 7.

Microaggressions Group Presentation and Reflective Paper (15%)

The goal of this assignment is for you to evaluate the impact that power and privilege have within social media and to provide a rationale on how you would react to different microaggressions. You will be assigned to groups for this project. Find at least 12 examples of microaggressions using at least 3 different types of social media (e.g., Yik Yak, Twitter, Facebook, Tumblr, Pinterest). Explain who the target of the microaggression is and why your group believes it is an example of a negative remark. Provide an example of how you might respond to such a comment. Your presentation should be between 15 – 20 minutes long and each member of the group should speak at least once during the presentation. Your presentation must also use PowerPoint or Prezi. Your classmates will also be providing feedback for you on your presentation. Your instructors will provide you with more information and an example presentation as the deadline approaches. …

You will be graded on the following criteria:

  • Quality of microaggressions chosen (Do you clearly articulate why they are microaggressions and which group is targeted?)
  • Quality of response (Do you address the microaggression in an appropriate and meaningful way?)
  • Use of PPT etiquette and adherence to general assignment guidelines (Did everyone speak? Did you use two different types of social media? Did you follow the time limit?)
  • Feedback from peer reviews
  • Overall quality of presentation

The presentation will count for 10% of your overall grade. Additionally, you are expected to write a 2-3 page reflective paper on your experience in the group. In this paper, you are expected to discuss how you were engaged in the group. What impact did your social identities have on the group dynamics? If there were conflicts, how were they resolved? …

Course Outline – Session Objectives, Readings, and Assignments

Class Session 1

August 24

  • Introduction to Course

Assignments Due

  • Complete online survey before next class

Class Session 2

August 29

  • Class Norms and Introduction to Social Identities

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • Kirk, G., & Okazawa-Rey, M. (2013). Identities and social locations: Who am I? Who are my people. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 9-15). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Armino, J. (2013). Waking up White: What it means to accept your legacy, for better and worse. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 125-126). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Fayad, M. (2013). The Arab woman and I. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 114-115). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • *Meiner, J. C. (2000). Memoirs of a gay fraternity brother. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice: An anthology on racism, antisemitism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, and classism (pp. 299-301). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 3

August 31

  • Unpacking Power and Privilege

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • Johnson, A. G. (2013). The social construction of difference. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 15-21). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Harro, B. (2013). The cycle of socialization. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 45-51). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • *McIntosh, P. (1990). White privilege: unpacking the invisible knapsack.Retrieved from http://www.feministezine.com/feminist/modern/WhitePrivilege-MalePrivilege.html

Class Session 4

September 7

  • Microaggressions

Assignments Due

  • Who Am I? Paper

Readings Due:

Class Session 5

September 12

  • Understanding Race/Ethnicity

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • *Prewitt, K. (2013) Fix the census’ archaic racial categories. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com/2013/08/22/opinion/fix-the-census-archaic-racial-categories.html
  • Dalmage, H. (2013). Patrolling racial borders: Discrimination against mixed race people. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice: An anthology on racism, antisemitism, sexism, heterosexism, ableism, and classism (pp. 96-101). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Williams, P. J. (2013). The Emperor’s New Clothes. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 119-124). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • *TEDx Talk: How I learned to Stop Worrying and Love Discussing Race: …

Class Session 6

September 14

  • Racism

Assignments Due

  • Journal #1

Readings Due:

Class Session 7

September 19

  • Understanding Sex, Gender Roles, and Sexism

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • Hackman, H. W. (2013). Introduction: Sexism. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 317-322). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Lorber, J. (2013). Night to his day: the social construction of gender. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 323-329). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • hooks, b. (2013). Feminism: A movement to end sexist oppression. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 340-341). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 8

September 21

  • Understanding Sexism

Assignments Due:

  • Journal #2

Readings Due:

  • Johnson, A. G. (2013). Patriarchy, the system: An it, not a he, a them, or an us. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 334-339). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Bernstein, A. (2013). Women’s pay: Why the gap remains a chasm. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 349-350). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • *Truth, S. (1851). Ain’t I a woman?. Retrieved from: http://www.history.com/topics/holidays/womens-history-month/videos/aint-i-a-woman

Class Session 9

September 26

  • Understanding Sexual Orientation

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

Class Session 10

September 28

  • Heterosexism and Homophobia

Assignments Due:

  • Journal #3

Readings Due:

  • Carbado, D. W. (2013). Privilege. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 391-397). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Blumenfeld, W. J. (2013). How homophobia hurts everyone. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 379-387). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • *Editorial Board. (2015). The challenges that remain after marriage equality. The New York Times.
  • *Madden, E. Breaking the cycle of gay shame. Retrieved from http://goqnotes.com/oped/oped_021007a.html

Class Session 11

October 3

  • Understanding Gender Identity and Transgender Identities

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

Class Session 12

October 5

  • Genderism, Cissexism, and Transphobia

Assignments Due:

  • Journal #4

Readings Due:

  • *Ferguson, S. (2014). 3 examples of everyday cissexism. Retrieved from http://everydayfeminism.com/2014/03/everyday-cissexism/
  • Kirk, G. & Okazawa-Rey, M. (2013). He works, she works, but what different impressions they make. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 355-356). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Neely, R. (2013). Promises made. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 356-358). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 13

October 10

  • Understanding Class

Assignments Due:

Readings Due

  • *Cottom, T.M. (2013). Why do poor people ‘waste’ money on luxury goods? Retrieved from http://talkingpointsmemo.com/cafe/why-do-poor-people-waste-money-on-luxury-goods
  • Jaffe, S. (2013). Is the near-trillion dollar student loan bubble about to pop? In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 176-180). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • hooks, b. (2013). White poverty: The politics of invisibility. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 199-202). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Kochar, R., Fry, R., Taylor, P. (2013). Wealth gaps to rise to record highs between Whites, Blacks, Hispanics: Twenty-to-one. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 190-192). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 14

October 12

  • Classism

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • Pittleman, K & Resource Generation. (2013). Deep thoughts about class privilege. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 221-225). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • *Leonhardt, D. (2013). In climbing the income ladder, location matters. Retrieved from http://www.nytimes.com

My initial response to Raj Chetty’s study.

Class Session 15

October 17

  • Understanding Ability

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • *TED talk: I’m not your inspiration, thank you very much https://www.ted.com/talks/stella_young_i_m_not_your_inspiration_thank_you_very_much?language=en
  • Wendell, S. (2013). The social construction of disability. . In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 481-485). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Wolanin, T. R. (2013). Students with disabilities: Financial aid policy issues. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 180-182). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 16

October 19

  • Ableism

Assignments Due:

  • Journal #6

Readings Due:

Class Session 17

October 24

  • Unpacking National Origin

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

Short answer: It has nothing, NOTHING to do with Stabby Somalis.

Class Session 18

October 26

  • Unpacking National Origin

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • *Hernandez, I., Mendoza, F., Lio, M., Latthi, J., & Eusebio, C. (2011). Things I’ll Never Say: Stories of Growing Up Undocumented in the United States. Harvard Educational Review, 81(3), 500-508.
  • *Infographic: Growing Up American and Undocumented: http://visual.ly/growing-american-and-undocumented
  • National Network for Immigrant and Refugee Rights. (2013). Injustice for all: The rise of the U.S. immigration policing regime. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 102-109). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 19

October 31

  • Unpacking Religion

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • *Pew Foundation U.S. Religious Landscape Survey
  • Nasir, N. S. & Al-Amin, J. (2013). Creating identity-safe spaces on college campuses for Muslim students. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 301-305). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Whittaker, C. R., Salend, S., & Elhoweris, H. (2013). Religious diversity in schools: addressing the issues. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 305-309). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 20

November 2

  • Unpacking Religious Oppression

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • Schlosser, L. Z. (2013). Christian privilege: Breaking a sacred taboo. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 243-244). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Eck, D. (2013). Working it out & See you in court. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 270-277). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 21

November 7

  • What does all of this mean?

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • Harro, B. (2013). The cycle of liberation. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 618-625). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • West, C. (2013). Courage. M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 625-627). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 22

November 9

  • Civic Engagement

Assignments Due:

Readings Due:

  • Johnson, A. G. (2013). What can we do? In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 612-618). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • WireTap (2013). Top youth activism victories of 2009. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 641-645). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 23

November 14

  • Civic Engagement

Assignments Due:

  • Civic Responsibility Paper

Readings Due:

  • Smith, R. (2013). Social struggle. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 630-634). New York, NY: Routledge.
  • Anzaldua, G. (2013). Allies. In M. Adams, W. J. Blumenfeld, C. R. Castaneda, H. W. Hackman, M. L. Peters, & X. Zuniga (Eds.), Readings for diversity and social justice (pp. 627-629). New York, NY: Routledge.

Class Session 24

November 16

  • Group Presentations

Assignments Due:

  • Microaggressions Project (half of the groups)

Class Session 25

November 21

  • Group Presentations

Assignments Due:

  • Microaggressions Project (half of the groups)

Class Session 26

November 28

  • Global Citizenship

Assignments Due:

  • Group Reflection Papers

Readings Due:

· *Olds, K. (2012). Global citizenship – what are we talking about and why does it matter? Retrieved from https://www.insidehighered.com/blogs/globalhighered/global-citizenship-%E2%80%93-what-are-we-talking-about-and-why-does-it-matter

· *TEDx Talk: What’s Wrong with Volunteer Travel? https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oYWl6Wz2NB8

Class Session 27

November 30

  • Global Citizenship

Assignments Due:

  • Journal #7

Readings Due:

· *McGovern, E. (1998, December). Doing good work. About Campus, pp. 28-30.

· *Illich, I. (1968). To hell with good intentions. Retrieved from http://www.swaraj.org/illich_hell.htm

Class Session 28

December 5

  • Where do we go from here?

Assignments Due: Final Paper due December 9 by 5:00

 
• Tags: Stabby Somali 
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Charles C. Johnson of GotNews has found a tweet from a classmate of that stabby Somali who ran amok this week at Ohio State showing they were supposed to be working on a group project on “microaggressions.”

I’m not sure that the more stabby Somalis quite grasp that keeping your aggressions micro is a good thing.

 
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I can recall reading a few decades ago that St. Cloud, Minnesota, a small city 66 miles northwest of Minneapolis, then had the lowest crime rate in the U.S.. But St. Cloud is putting its hateful white-bread, plain vanilla past behind it.

From CNN:

ISIS wing claims responsibility for Minnesota mall attack
By Chandrika Narayan and Steve Visser, CNN
Updated 9:11 PM ET, Sun September 18, 2016

The man who stabbed nine people at a Minnesota mall Saturday before being shot dead by an off-duty police officer was a “soldier of the Islamic state,” according to an ISIS-linked news agency….

Fortunately, the Frontlash has gone into action:

Community leaders fear anti-Muslim backlash, call for unity

In response to local reports identifying the attacker as being of Somali descent, members of the Muslim and Somali communities held a news conference Sunday expressing their grief for the victims and calling for unity.

“We are also concerned about the potential backlash,” said Jaylani Hussein, executive director of the Council on American-Islamic Relations (CAIR) chapter in Minnesota. “We understand in St. Cloud there is more anti-Muslim organizing and we hope they do not use this incident to divide … our community.”

 
• Tags: frontlash, Stabby Somali 
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From The Guardian:

Russell Square knife attack suspect ‘a polite and pleasant boy’

Zakaria Bulhan’s neighbours express shock that he might have carried out the London stabbings in which a US woman was killed

… Bulhan’s former friend told the Daily Mail they did not believe him to be religious, but said he was bullied at school.

But if you follow The Guardian’s own link to the Daily Mail article you get a very different picture.

Was ‘devout Muslim’ Russell Square knifeman radicalised? Police to trawl ‘impressionable’ attacker’s PC for links to ISIS as neighbour claims mental illness is a ‘scapegoat’

Anti-terror police are studying computers belonging to London murder suspect Zakaria Bulhan, 19

Neighbour Parmjit Singh said: ‘His mental health problems are a scapegoat. Why would he attack an American woman tourist in a random attack?’

Mother-of-two Darlene Horton, 64, was stabbed to death in front of academic husband Dr Rick Wagner

Couple had chosen to stay in London for an extra day and were due to fly back to Florida yesterday

Bulhan said to have tried to kill himself on three occasions this year as mental health team helps police
Police called to Russell Square after the crazed man ‘went on the rampage’ with kitchen knife

Israeli Yovel Lewkowki, 18, also stabbed when she tried to help him believing he had been attacked

By MARTIN ROBINSON, UK CHIEF REPORTER FOR MAILONLINE
PUBLISHED: 05:15 EST, 5 August 2016 | UPDATED: 09:29 EST, 5 August 2016

Counter-terror police will today forensically study computers belonging to the Russell Square knifeman as a neighbour claimed the ‘impressionable’ teenager could have been inspired by ISIS.

Scotland Yard believe Zakaria Bulhan, 19, a Norwegian national of Somali origin who moved to the UK in 2002, was not ‘motivated by terrorism’ but its officers are trawling his possessions for extremist material.

But neighbour Parmjit Singh, a BBC radio DJ known as ‘DJ Precious’ on the Asian network, said he had known ‘impressionable’ Bulhan for seven years, adding: ‘His mental health problems are a scapegoat.’

The 36-year-old said: ‘They said he had mental health issues but that was not the boy I knew.
‘The news of his mental illness is completely new, we never heard that. Honestly, I think his mental health problems are a scapegoat.’

Asked what he thought motivated the attack, Parmjit said: ‘I think peer pressure, hanging around with gangs. He wasn’t working, he was hanging around with Somalian boys and I think they had possible links to serious ISIS people – not directly, but they see all this stuff and are inspired by it.

‘Why would he attack an American woman tourist in a random attack? I think boys have put pressure on him to go there and do something. He was very impressionable growing up’.

Friends have described their shock at the knife attacks, describing him as a ‘teacher’s pet’ and a ‘devout Muslim’ who would love debating religion.

Online postings show a man named Zak Bulhan is interested in Islamic study, and in another he pledges support to former Guantanamo Bay inmate Moazzam Begg.

Rakesh Naidu, 18, said: ‘I can’t believe it, I’m just telling myself it must be a mistake. We used to get really competitive over grades in maths and debate religion all the time.

‘He was a devout Muslim and he would passionately defend it, but he respected my opinion too. He was a bit socially awkward but as far as I knew he didn’t have mental health problems.

‘He wasn’t the jock but he wasn’t the kid who ate glue at the back of the class. He just flew under the radar.’

Today a family friend claimed the teenager had tried to kill himself three times this year before he stabbed to death an American tourist in front of her ‘absolutely devastated’ husband.

 
• Tags: Stabby Somali 
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Russell Square

Russell Square, named after the English aristocratic family of which mathematician and philosopher Bertrand Russell is the most famous member, is in the heart of intellectual tourist London, near the British Museum and various universities.

So it’s only a coincidence that that’s where a deranged youth from distant Tooting happened to choose to stab to death the wife of an American college professor and wound five other people, including another American, an Israeli, and an Australian. The New York Times reported:

Mr. Rowley said the attacker was a Norwegian citizen of Somali ancestry, but that his background did not appear to be “relevant to the motivation for his actions.” … The man emigrated to Britain from Norway as a child in 2002, the agency said.

Bloomsbury Bobbie

Obviously, some lunatic would choose Bloomsbury to act out because of his deep admiration for E.M. Forster and Lytton Strachey.

Going to a historic tourist center doesn’t have anything to do with trying to get world attention the way terrorists do.

Also, nothing to worry about here involving refugees because the stabber moved to Britain from Norway.

Besides, the plague of Knife Violence has always emanated from the tragic dirt of Bloomsbury. That’s why the mean streets of Bloomsbury have always been patrolled by Bobbies armed with the traditional pistol and machine gun.

After all, who can forget when John Maynard Keynes was beheaded by Virginia Woolf?

The Bloomsbury stabber is not a terrorist, he’s just a Lone Woolf.

Coincidentally, an updated look for London Bobbies was unveiled this week:

And here’s another new style for the Bobbies:

 
• Tags: Stabby Somali 
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Steve Sailer
About Steve Sailer

Steve Sailer is a journalist, movie critic for Taki's Magazine, VDARE.com columnist, and founder of the Human Biodiversity discussion group for top scientists and public intellectuals.


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