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Screenshot 2016-04-29 04.29.37That’s my new motto.

Day 4 of my April iSteve fundraiser.

Nothing more encourages me to keep up the good fight than your support, intellectual, moral, and financial. I greatly appreciate it.

Here are seven ways to contribute:

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service. Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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Screenshot 2015-12-14 02.36.58David Frum writes in The Atlantic:

Donald Trump’s noisy complaints that immigration is out of control are literally true. Nobody is making conscious decisions about who is wanted and who is not, about how much immigration to accept and what kind to prioritize—not even for the portion of U.S. migration conducted according to law, much less for the larger portion that is not.

Nor is there much understanding of what has happened after it has happened. …

Americans talk a lot about the social difficulties caused by large-scale, low-skill immigration, but usually in a very elliptical way. Giant foundations—Pew, Ford—spend lavishly to study the problems of the new low-skill immigrant communities. Public policy desperately seeks to respond to the challenges presented by large-scale low-skill immigration. But the fundamental question—“should we be doing this at all?”—goes unvoiced by anyone in a position of responsibility. Even as the evidence accumulates that the policy was a terrible mistake from the point of view of the pre-existing American population, elites insist that the policy is unquestionable … more than unquestionable, that the only possible revision of the policy is to accelerate future flows of low-skill immigration even faster, whether as migrants or as refugees or in some other way.

Even as immigration becomes ever-more controversial with the larger American public, within the policy elite it preserves an unquestioned status as something utterly beyond discussion. To suggest anything otherwise is to suggest—not merely something offensive or objectionable—but something self-evidently impossible, like adopting cowrie shells as currency or Donald Trump running for president.

Only Donald Trump is running for president—and doing pretty well, too. … And while it’s clear that the immigration issue does not constitute all of Trump’s appeal, it’s equally clear that the issue has been indispensable to that appeal.

Until this very year, Trump’s few sparse comments on immigration fell neatly within the elite consensus….

What seems to have changed Trump’s mind is a book: Adios America by Ann Coulter. The phrase “political book of the year” is a usually an empty compliment, but if the phrase ever described any book, Adios America is it. In its pages, Trump found the message that would convulse the Republican primary and upend the dynastic hopes of former-frontrunner Jeb Bush. Perhaps no single writer has had such immediate impact on a presidential election since Harriet Beecher Stowe.

That reminds me to get back to my fundraising drive, the third of 2015.

Screenshot 2015-12-14 00.39.48Here I am last August in the dining room of the downtown San Diego Embassy Suites with the dining-related sculpture I call The Chicken or the Egg. (If I had a picture of Ramzan Kadyrov dining at the Embassy Suites, it would be The Chechen or the Egg.)

As you may recall, last August during the previous fundraiser, I was whining about not having been able to afford to take my long-suffering wife on vacations. You responded so generously that we immediately took off for San Diego for two days.

I also want to thank everybody who came up with more creative approaches for me regarding affording travel than my rather basic idea of you send me money now. I haven’t taken anybody up on them yet, but I definitely hope to, if events ever stop providing me with so much to blog about seven days a week.

Similarly, I want to express my appreciation for everybody who has come up with more creative ways for me to earn money than my just asking you to send money to me. I haven’t taken any of them up yet, but I intend to, just as soon as events stop providing me with so damned much to blog about 12 hours per day.

I want to thank everybody who contributed in the first days of the December 2015 iSteve fundraiser. Unlike certain personalities in the news, I am not invulnerable to discouragement. Fortunately, there’s nothing more morally encouraging than getting money.

I now have seven ways for you to send me encouragement, including Paypal, Bitcoin, and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. Fee 2.9%.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA
91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Make sure you click the button for “Steve Sailer.” If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Seventh: Google Wallet, which I’ll put below the fold because the instructions are kind of verbose. It’s actually pretty simple, though.

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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It’s been a good 2015 at iSteve. If I kill myself blogging all the way through 12/31/15, I might reach 10,000,000 pageviews for the year, which would be a gratifyingly round number.

On the other hand, because my traffic goes up when terrible and stupid things happen in the world, for the sake of Christmas cheer, I hope I don’t come close.

Moreover, after a huge September driven by Chancellor Merkel’s terrible and stupid blunder, a visit to the doctor revealed that my sleep-blog-sleep-blog lifestyle, while productive of pageviews, wasn’t doing my blood pressure any good. So I’ve been exercising more and eating better and have already shown improvement on all the measures.

Last year I resolved to fundraise three times per year: April, August, and December and stick to it. You’ve been generous in 2015, and I look forward to another encouraging drive. Nothing gets me in the mood to blog better than money.

I now have seven ways for you to send me encouragement, including Paypal, Bitcoin, and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. Fee 2.9%.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA
91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Make sure you click the button for “Steve Sailer.” If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Seventh: Google Wallet, which I’ll put below the fold because the instructions are kind of verbose. It’s actually pretty simple, though.

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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Stavro Ernst Blofeld

Stavro Ernst Blohardt

The first day of the second iSteve fundraising drive of 2015 was extremely successful. I’m most grateful to all those who helped out.

Here’s how you too can help:

- First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

- Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

- Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

- Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

- Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to my Wells Fargo bank account (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

- Sixth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to my Chase bank account (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

- Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service. Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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Steve Sailer 2015a

Steve Sailer

It’s time for the second iSteve fundraising drive of 2015. The April event four months ago was a success due to your generosity. I intend to stabilize upon a steady three panhandling sessions per year, on an April – August – December schedule.

Some stats:

- Over the last four months, I’ve made 468 blog posts on iSteve.

- I don’t have comment stats going back beyond one month, but in that single month you’ve written 12,462 published comments. That’s a pace approaching 150,000 published comments per year. That’s a lot.

- Today saw 585 comments published.

As you might imagine, writing (including my weekly column at Taki’s Magazine) is pretty much all I do. These days I’m a full-time professional writer with no other source of income. I’m at my desk maybe about 27 days per month, six to fourteen hours per day. I’m all in. So I’m extremely grateful for your patronage.

I also want to thank my wife for:

(A) Working extremely hard,

(B) Putting up cheerfully with our substandard of living (but we do, at least, have a dishwasher now), and

(C) Never once complaining — indeed, being hugely encouraging — about my shifting, a dozen years into our marriage, from a decently paid corporate career to the financial exigencies of opinion journalism.

One of the things I’d like to build up some savings to be able to afford once again is travel. Blogging burns out better writers than me who exhaust all their topics. Fortunately, there’s nothing more revivifying than travel. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to afford any overseas jaunts in this century.

As you may have noticed from all my posts over the last six years about strange Turkish developments, attending a conference in Turkey in 2009 was illuminating about a fascinating and opaque land, as was my 2001 trip to Russia.

If you’ve been wondering about all my essays in recent years about the historical importance of the Ohio River watershed and what two hours in Amish country taught me, those are the product of a few cross-country blitzes by car. I’d like to be able to afford another overseas trip in the next couple of years. And my frugal wife would like to have time to at least get out of the car in Amish country.

Anyway, I feel like there’s a whole world out there to explore so I don’t think I’m close to burning out.

Here’s how you can help:

- First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

- Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

- Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

- Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

- Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to my Wells Fargo bank account (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

- Sixth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to my Chase bank account (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

- Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service. Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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Del Mar, CA

A Letter-to-the-Editor published in today’s New York Times:

For a Migrant Airlift to U.S.
APRIL 24, 2015

To the Editor:

Re “Europe’s Duty on Migrants” (editorial, April 21): While it may be convenient to place responsibility for migrants created by the Arab Spring and North African political instability on the European Union, it shirks a responsibility that should also be borne by more distant countries. A migrant airlift could decompress the disaster facing a few Mediterranean countries overwhelmed by refugees seeking their shores.

America and other countries do not deserve a pass as your editorial spells out “Europe’s Duty” to the rushing tide of refugees.

HARVEY SHAPIRO

Del Mar, Calif.

A Del Mar resident contemplates the injustice of life in front of his $39,500,000 house

As you may have noticed, I’ve been posting a lot of hyperbolic African population graphs lately.

So, for something completely different, here’s a screenshot of what Google puts up when you ask about the population of Dr. Shapiro’s Del Mar, the paradisiacal North San Diego County beach community that’s home to a lot of rich people.

(By the way, Zillow lists asking prices for residences in Del Mar ranging from one unit at a mere $975,000 on up to $39,500,000.)

Screenshot 2015-04-24 23.28.13

Del Mar’s 1999 membership drive was a huge success. It drove out 1,000 members. Rimshot. (Nah, it was probably just a recalibration due to the 2000 Census.)

It’s almost as if Dr. Shapiro and the other residents of Del Mar like things just the way they are and don’t want a lot of outsiders moving in.

So, while Dr. Shapiro may be all for Americans, in general, taking in zillions of Africans, history suggests that not many of them would wind up in his municipality.

Dr. Shapiro is a retired UCSD neurosurgeon and former mayor of Del Mar. In other words, he’s smart enough to know better, but who, these days, will tell him? He assumes that the Snow Crash Raft is the result of refugees fleeing temporary political instability in Arab and North African countries, rather than by the long-term lack of contraceptive use by sub-Saharan Africans.

I’m riffing on Del Mar because a philanthropic zillionaire I know used to own a house four doors in from the the beach there, and he used to gallantly let me stay for free a few nights per year in his mother-in-law studio studio apartment in the backyard. It was the one place I could afford to vacation. In the top picture of this post you can see a restaurant on the sand where my wife and I celebrated our 25th wedding anniversary a few year back, and then I taught her how to boogie board the next day.

But my patron of the intellectual arts friend sold his Del Mar house when Jerry Brown raised his taxes, so I haven’t been able to afford a non-working vacation in the years since I lost access to this kind freebie. On the other hand, I have a pretty nice life right where I am, writing for you about 345 to 350 days per year, so things like vacations are a luxury for me compared to priorities like getting my peeling house painted so my neighbors stop looking at me so funny.

By the way, did I mention it’s my Spring Panhandling Drive?

Sometimes I call off panhandling drives quickly because I get an over-the-top donation or two from extravagantly generous patrons. But I’m grinding this one out because, while I’ve been getting many much appreciated and admirable donations this month — and thank you very much for them — they’ve all been generously reasonable in size rather than jaw-droppingly lavish. For example, a reader kindly sent me an envelope with five $1 bills in it. (And, yes, Heidi at the SPLC, that $5 is definitely going on my 2015 tax return.)

So, once more unto the breach, dear friends, once more.

I have seven ways for you to give me money, including Paypal, fee-free bank transfers, and multiple tax deductible methods via VDARE.com. I’ve even finally figured out how to get bitcoin working again, and thanks to all the generous bitcoin donors.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible to you) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like there is with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions. (On the other hand, large contributions are good in general, so feel more than free to send large contributions however you feel like.)

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like there is with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: You can use Bitcoin. This is working well.

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Seventh: Google Wallet: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. I’ll put some more notes about how to use Google Wallet under the page break.

From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless. You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee. Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.) Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app(Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries). Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it. (Non-tax deductible.) Thanks!

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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Thanks to you all, this blog continues to set new records for readership and comments. Over the last week, for example, I’ve approved approximately 3,310 comments.

One interesting aspect of the success of iSteve is how old school this operation is. This is unapologetically an old-fashioned blog for readers with long attention spans rather than contemporary social media clickbait.

Almost nothing on this blog ever “goes viral.”

There are several reasons for that. One is that social media tend to encourage conformity and fear of retribution for any hints of heterodoxy.

Another is that, simply, this is always going to be, underneath it all, a highbrow blog with a very limited (although influential) potential readership.

This blog appeals to small but remarkably varied speciality audiences, such as psychometricians (who in a survey conducted at 2013 International Society for Intelligence Research convention in Melbourne voted iSteve the best generalist outlet for coverage of their field) and comedy writers (I seldom come up with professional-grade punchlines, but I air fresh observations and topics that increasingly inspire pros to work on them to come up with the big laughs).

My goal is always to make iSteve the most thought-provoking and fun single-writer highbrow blog in the English language in the general purpose / current controversies category.

The downsides of delivering this level of originality are several-fold:

First, iSteve is never going to be terribly popular. It’s always going to be too neck-snapping of a ride for most people to mentally keep up with.

Second, it’s never going to be even fashionable outside of the most covert, samzidat passing on from one reader to a few very trusted friends. Even if the Eye of Sauron Era ended tomorrow, I’d rapidly find new ways to make myself unfashionable, simply because my deepest urge is to Afflict the Fashionable.

Third, what I do takes an awful lot of work. It’s enjoyable work, but it leaves time for very little else in my life, other than, maybe, worrying about my lawn. For example, I’m writing this post as part of my annual mid-April uh-oh-I’ve-put-off-doing-my-taxes-and-everything-else-I-need-to-do-to-blog panic.

So it’s time for my spring fundraiser. I’ve promised my wife to run four fundraisers per year, and I’ve already fallen behind that schedule. (The last one ran from early December to New Year’s Eve.)

I now have six seven ways for you to send me money, including Paypal, fee-free bank transfers, and multiple tax deductible methods via VDARE.com. I’ve even finally figured out how to get bitcoin working again.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like there is with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions. (On the other hand, large contributions are good in general, so feel more than free to send large contributions however you feel like.)

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like there is with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: You can use Bitcoin.

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Seventh: Google Wallet: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. I’ll put some more notes about how to use Google Wallet under the page break.

From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless. You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee. Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.) Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries). Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it. (Non-tax deductible.) Thanks!

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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I want to thank everybody who contributed last week to my end of the year fundraising drive. But it’s not the end of the year yet, so it’s not the end of the end of the year fundraiser yet either!

I now have seven ways for you to send me money, including Paypal, fee-free bank transfers, Bitcoin (well, Bitcoin is coming soon).

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer P.O Box 4142 Valley Village,CA 91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

 

Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address(steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

 

Sixth: Google Wallet: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

I’ll put the rest of the instructions for Google Wallet and for Bitcoin (the link for which, unfortunately, seems to have stopped working over the last couple of months) under the fold. I will try to get Bitcoin working shortly.

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless. You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee. Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.) Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries). Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it. (Non-tax deductible.) Thanks!

Seventh: You can eventually use Bitcoin. It used to be working, but like a lot of things online, it seems to have stopped. So I’ll try to figure out how to fix it.

I’m leaving the Bitcoin instructions beneath the fold because they explain how I’m using Bitcoin in a very respectable, transparent to the IRS manner.I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins. The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me. Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars) This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.) Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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It was another good day for fundraising, what with the national media’s fraternity gang rape story taking some hilarious turns (which you can read below). Thanks.

So I’m going to rattle the tin cup again.

My readers have been generous to me over the years, and so I turn to you again for help.

I now have seven ways for you to send me money, including Paypal, Bitcoin (coming soon), and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer P.O Box 4142 Valley Village,CA 91617-0142

 

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

 

Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address(steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

 

Sixth: Google Wallet: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

I’ll put the rest of the instructions for Google Wallet and for Bitcoin (the link for which, unfortunately, seems to have stopped working over the last couple of months) under the fold. I will try to get Bitcoin working shortly.

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless. You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee. Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.) Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries). Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it. (Non-tax deductible.) Thanks!

Seventh: You can eventually use Bitcoin. It used to be working, but like a lot of things online, it seems to have stopped. So I’ll try to figure out how to fix it.

I’m leaving the Bitcoin instructions beneath the fold because they explain how I’m using Bitcoin in a very respectable, transparent to the IRS manner.I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins. The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me. Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars) This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.) Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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Thanks, we’re off to an encouraging start in my end-of-year fundraising drive, with one excessively generous contribution just arriving and many most kinds ones as well. I want to express my appreciation to all those who given so far.

My readers have been generous to me over the years, and so I turn to you again for help.

I now have seven ways for you to send me money, including Paypal, Bitcoin (coming soon), and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer P.O Box 4142 Valley Village,

CA 91617-0142

 

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

 

Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address(steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

 

Sixth: Google Wallet: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

I’ll put the rest of the instructions for Google Wallet and for Bitcoin (the link for which, unfortunately, seems to have stopped working over the last couple of months) under the fold. I will try to get Bitcoin working shortly.

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless. You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee. Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.) Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries). Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it. (Non-tax deductible.) Thanks!

Seventh: You can eventually use Bitcoin. It used to be working, but like a lot of things online, it seems to have stopped. So I’ll try to figure out how to fix it.

I’m leaving the Bitcoin instructions beneath the fold because they explain how I’m using Bitcoin in a very respectable, transparent to the IRS manner.I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins. The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me. Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars) This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.) Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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Thanks, we’re off to a most encouraging start in my end-of-year fundraising drive. I want to express my appreciation to all those who gave on Day 1.

My readers have been generous to me over the years, and so I turn to you again for help.

I now have seven ways for you to send me money, including Paypal, Bitcoin (coming soon), and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer

P.O Box 4142

Valley Village,

CA 91617-0142

 

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

 

Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address(steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

 

Sixth: Google Wallet: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

I’ll put the rest of the instructions for Google Wallet and for Bitcoin (the link for which, unfortunately, seems to have stopped working over the last couple of months) under the fold. I will try to get Bitcoin working shortly.

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless. You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee. Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.) Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries). Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it. (Non-tax deductible.) Thanks!

Seventh: You can eventually use Bitcoin. It used to be working, but like a lot of things online, it seems to have stopped. So I’ll try to figure out how to fix it.

I’m leaving the Bitcoin instructions beneath the fold because they explain how I’m using Bitcoin in a very respectable, transparent to the IRS manner.I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins. The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me. Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars) This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.) Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

 
• Tags: Panhandling 
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I want to thank those kind readers who have spontaneously sent me money today without my even asking. So, this seems like a good time to kick off my end-of-year fundraising drive. I promised my wife I’d do one every quarter this year, but I believe this is only my third of 2014.

The thought occurred to me today: “Being right is its own reward.” I’ve spent quite a few years developing and articulating a viewpoint that appears to be increasingly useful in understanding the way of the world in the 21st Century. It seems as if every week we see an increasing divergence between the conventional wisdom and what you read here. Am I getting more insightful with decades of practice? Or is the reigning dogma just getting crazier?

But then I thought again about whether “Being right is its own reward.” Unfortunately, shopkeepers and retirement plans don’t accept payment in that coin.

My readers have been generous to me over the years, and so I turn to you again for help.

I now have seven ways for you to send me money, including Paypal, Bitcoin, and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer

P.O Box 4142

Valley Village,

CA 91617-0142

 

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

 

Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address(steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

 

Sixth: Google Wallet: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address(that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

I’ll put the rest of the instructions for Google Wallet and for Bitcoin (the link for which, unfortunately, seems to have stopped working over the last couple of months) under the fold. I will try to get Bitcoin working shortly.

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless. You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee. Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.) Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries). Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it. (Non-tax deductible.) Thanks!

Seventh: You can eventually use Bitcoin. It used to be working, but like a lot of things online, it seems to have stopped. So I’ll try to figure out how to fix it.

I’m leaving the Bitcoin instructions beneath the fold because they explain how I’m using Bitcoin in a very respectable, transparent to the IRS manner.I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins. The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible. Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me. Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars) This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.) Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

 
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I want to thank everybody who has contributed to the first day of 2014′s second quarterly iSteve fundraiser.

I now have seven ways for you to send me money, including Paypal, Bitcoin, and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

 

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to: 

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA
91617-0142

 

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

 

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

 

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

 

Sixth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

 

Seventh: Google Wallet, which I’ll put below the fold:

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
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I vowed to my wife last year that I’d get on a schedule of four fundraising drives per year. As usual, though, I’d rather blog for you than deal with workaday issues, so it took me until May to get the first one off the ground for 2014.

I want to thank everybody who made that one a success. Mrs. Sailer says thanks for the dishwasher. (Personally, right now I’m drinking Wine-in-a-Box from a Red Solo Cup, but that’s just me.)

Now I’ve finally figured out how to get seven ways working again for you to send me money, including Paypal and Bitcoin.

They will also be permanently down at the bottom of the right column of this iSteve homepage.

I always appreciate my readers’ financial help.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to me via VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) If you send VDARE a check for me, make sure to put my “For Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Fifth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Seventh: Google Wallet, which I’ll put below the fold:

Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
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I want to thank everybody who has participated in the first 2014 iSteve fundraiser so far.

Due to popular demand, I’m going to try out accepting Bitcoins. I’m using Coinbase as a sort of Paypal for Bitcoins.

This Coinbase startup is backed by the prestigious venture capital firm of Andreesen Horowitz so it has been checked out by people who understand this stuff a lot better than I do.

I’ve been leery about accepting Bitcoins in the past because I’ve long been tracked by extremely deep-pocketed organizations out to get me for ideological reasons. (Hi, Heidi! Hi, David!)

But now the IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Thanks for your support.

 
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My father and I,
Cabo San Lucas, 1986
Today was a very good day in the first iSteve fundraising drive of 2014. I want to thank everybody who has made a sacrifice to help me out. 

My wife got home from work about 8PM tonight and I gave her the encouraging news as we ate dinner off paper plates. The reason we’ve been eating all our meals off paper plates for the last year or so is that the old dishwasher died and they don’t make dishwashers anymore small enough to fit under our kitchen counters. The kitchen counters and cabinets are 63 years old. Dishwashers hadn’t been invented yet in 1951, much less standardized in size at one inch larger than our counters can contain. 

On the other hand, the linoleum is only, I believe, 34 years old. Indeed, the kitchen floor seemed to be back in style around 2005, but at that rate won’t come back into fashion again until maybe 2030.

Unfortunately, even a good day of fundraising doesn’t put much of a dent in the fact that I owe my frugal, hardworking, and patient wife a kitchen that can accommodate a dishwasher so we don’t have to drink solely out of Big Red Cups like some kind of frat house or perpetual Toby Keith video. (The neighbors are wondering how many kegs we go through per week). 

She’s made a lot of sacrifices so I can write for you full time for the last 14 years. (For instance, she never complains about driving a 16 year old car with 237,000 miles on it.) Now that I think about it, I never mentioned to her when we got married in 1987 that when it came to all that “for richer, for poorer, in sickness and in health” stuff, that I was going to spend 1998 fighting cancer and then, when that was over, decide to spend the 21st Century as an unpopular writer. 

So, I need to make more money so I can get my wife the remodeled kitchen she deserves. Therefore, I’m going to keep asking for your contributions. The various ways to donate are described above to the right. The Google Wallet method may look daunting but is actually pretty simple.

As usual with my money transfer method attempts, something has stopped working: in this case the VDARE link as of the wee hours of Friday morning. I have hopes it will be fixed soon, and will let you know.
   
Once again, let me thank everybody who has donated so far.
        
(Republished from iSteve by permission of author or representative)
 
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This is my dog Barney in about 1975. He was a good dog.

Barney isn’t particularly germane to my thanking those of you who have donated to my first fundraising drive of 2014, but these occasions are a fine excuse for posting random old pictures.

I’m informed that up through the end of 2013, my iSteve.Blogspot.com postings come to about 6 million words. That’s a lot, but it doesn’t compare to your 40 million words of comments. Thanks.

For all those of you who haven’t donated yet, please refer to the Panhandling instructions to the upper right.

  
Thanks.
      
 
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Whatever happened to Cocker Spaniels? They were the most popular breed of dog in America about a half century ago, but you seldom hear of them anymore. Here’s me and my puppy Topper in about 1965. This is one of the few pictures from that era in which I’m not pointing a toy gun at the camera.

That reminds me that my first fundraising drive of 2014 is going on. I am most thankful for my readers’ generous support over the years and would direct you to the instructions on donating in the side column to the upper right.
        
(Republished from iSteve by permission of author or representative)
 
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Dear Readers:

It’s time for my first fundraising drive of 2014. I last asked you to help support my work back in December, and you were quite generous. I’d like to thank everyone who chipped in last winter.

Since I last announced a fundraiser, I’ve made 596 posts here at iSteve in 2104. This year, my blog has accounted for 3,242,658 pageviews and 117,821 hours of reading time. Those are not insignificant numbers. iSteve represents a 21st Century perspective that’s becoming harder to ignore. 

To help me continue to put in the long hours required, I am asking for your support. I would greatly appreciate any contribution you can make.

I apologize for my recurrent need to come up with different ways to transfer me money after Paypal, Amazon, and WePay have all been turned off for my use. 

I currently have five ways to send me money. They have all been tested and proven workable over the last week during the soft opening. (I am grateful to those who volunteered to be guinea pigs.)

The latter three methods have been shown to work inside America, but those abroad may have troubles. (I shall look into this. The first two should work everywhere.)

I would appreciate suggestions for other methods.

First: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:
Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91617-0142

Second: You can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.)
Third: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com – replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)
Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.
You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.
Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)
Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone app (Android and iPhone – the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).
Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service. Here’s >how to do it.
(Non-tax deductible.)
Fourth: if you have a Chase bank account (or other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com – replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s Steven Sailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.)

Fifth
: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com – replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.)

I am deeply thankful for your generosity.
   
(Republished from iSteve by permission of author or representative)
 
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I’m not sure what I’m aiming at you in this picture — perhaps the controller for my new wire-guided tank (the big tank, not the little tank to the left of the tree).

A few days ago, we mulled over the musical question raised by Sudden Death of Stars: What Is Winter Good For? Yet the answer is right there on the cover of their new single: me getting presents. 

So as part of my Christmas fundraiser, I’d like to focus today on readers who have donated in the past, but not yet in 2013. I appreciate your past generosity; and look forward to more!

I want to thank everybody who has contributed so far to my latest quarterly iSteve fundraiser. It’s very encouraging to wake up to donations.

Here are some options for donating:

First, you can make a tax deductible contribution via VDARE by clicking here. You can use credit card or check (please put my name on the memo line of any checks).

Second, you can make a non-tax deductible contribution via credit card at WePay by clicking here

Third: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:

Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
Valley Village, CA 91607-4142

Thank you for your support
(Republished from iSteve by permission of author or representative)
 
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Steve Sailer
About Steve Sailer

Steve Sailer is a journalist, movie critic for Taki's Magazine, VDARE.com columnist, and founder of the Human Biodiversity discussion group for top scientists and public intellectuals.


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A simple remedy for income stagnation