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The New York Times explains that while, technically speaking, the Soviets eventually lost the Space Race, they still won the race that really matters, the Race Race to Inclusion in Space.

How the Soviets Won the Space Race for Equality
The U.S.S.R. sent women and people of color to space years before the U.S.

By Sophie Pinkham
July 16, 2019

The Cold War was fought as much on an ideological front as a military one, and the Soviet Union often emphasized the sexism and racism of its capitalist opponents — particularly the segregated United States. And the space race was a prime opportunity to signal the U.S.S.R.’s commitment to equality. After putting the first man in space in 1961, the Soviets went on to send the first woman, the first Asian man, and the first black man into orbit — all years before the Americans would follow suit. …

On June 16, 1963, Valentina Tereshkova, a 26-year-old factory worker-turned-cosmonaut, became the first woman in space. …

Beginning in 1967, the Soviet Union and its socialist allies collaborated on space missions through the Interkosmos program. In July 1980, Vietnamese pilot Phạm Tuân became the first Asian and the first person from a developing country to travel to space. ..

Just two months after Phạm’s voyage, the Cuban Arnaldo Tamayo Méndez became the first person of African descent to go to space, while it would take the U.S. three more years to send an African-American. Like Tereshkova, Tamayo Méndez had impeccable socialist credentials. … When Tamayo Méndez returned to Earth, Fidel Castro delivered a lengthy speech stressing the cosmonaut’s African ancestry.

Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up.

 
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  1. hence my comments about the first person to put their boot on Mars, and what a battle there will be over that.

    it’s possible SpaceX may be able to avoid that, but it depends on how much freedom from NASA they can get by the time of a manned (womanned? theymanned?) Mars mission.

    if NASA still wants to force their way into calling the shots on astronauts by that point, then almost any random insane thing is possible. Intersectionauts?

    if SpaceX can break free from NASA by then, it would probably be a relatively routine space mission. as routine as landing on Mars for the first time can get, anyway.

    the current 2 astronauts assigned to work with SpaceX on the Dragon mission are pale penis person old line americans. there’s no intersectional value in being a test pilot. but once all the SpaceX equipment is tested out and safe and ready to fly, who knows what astronauts NASA will try to assign to the Starship Super Heavy mission (or whatever they are calling it now).

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    I don't know how much influence NASA would have, the Mars mission SpaceX is running isn't part of any NASA project. Assuming things go OK with the two to four astronauts to the ISS, I'm guessing Musk can send anyone he wants. NASA will be too preoccupied with the Artemis Moon project they won't complete on time :).
  2. Someone else posted this link yesterday, showing Outer Space Affirmative Action was already in effect in the early 1960s.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/chuck-yeager-bombed/

    Any story told by Chuck Yeager involving Curtis LeMay is worth reading!

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    There's a great Chuck Yeager story somewhere on the web that I read years ago. If I can find the links again, I'll post them.

    Chuck Yeager was the US Military Attache at the American embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan in 1971, when Pakistan and India went to war. The usual diplomatic protocol in such situations is for foreign countries to be strictly neutral, and for military attaches to recuse themselves from their jobs for the duration of the conflict, unless there is an active military alliance and treaty and we go to war as well.

    Yeager immediately applied for personal leave and disappeared from the Embassy, cryptically saying "my boys need me."

    Apparently, he spent the duration of the short war at Pakistani Air Force headquarters as an observer at the interrogation of Indian Air Force pilots who had been shot down. One Indian reported (again on the web) that he was overwhelmed to learn that the white man in the room was the great Chuck Yeager, and asked for his autograph.

    I'm inclined to believe the story is true, not just because it is too good not to be, but also because of the links that I saw it on. As I said, I'll post if I can find them again.
  3. >Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up.

    He can’t be serious. The Soviet Union in the 1970s was one of the most static societies on the planet. The only thing that approximated a meritocracy was the KGB: which is how somebody like Vladimir Putin could get his start.

    The Soviet Union was also profoundly socially conservative in ways that would downright shock 60s Western liberals.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    [Surely, ] He can’t be serious.
     
    Yes, and don't call them Shirley. They are Sophie.

    Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up.
     
    Seriously though, they don't even mince words about it anymore. These people would be at home with the Godfree Roberts crowd, arguing about who had the best 5-year plans, the Soviets or the Red Chinese.
    , @Ganderson
    Sports (especially hockey) and the arts were meritocratic, no?
    , @Jack D
    But, the Soviets were pretty good at propaganda, at least when aimed at low IQ 3rd world audiences. I can only imagine what the Russians called their diverse 3rd world Cosmonaut buddies behind their backs, but putting them in space was a propaganda coup at a time when America was not yet up to woke standards. But not to worry - future America will be and I expect that someday we will be as successful overall as the late stage Soviet Union.
  4. How do we know that Neil Armstrong identified as a male? It’s possible that the USA was the first country to put a woman on the moon.

  5. We’ll always have elites, but why are ours so banal?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Ours are the proverbial third generation that cannot retain the family wealth.
  6. On YouTube there is an audio recording of a female cosmonaut encountering Soviet safety culture.

    ——-
    Winged hussars save Europe again, ask only for Spiritus and pork products in return:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49037275
    How long before we have this here? There’s a community of patch enthusiasts on 4chan’s weapons board who can generally have a new design out in about a month.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    This recording is dubious. The chances that it is real are pretty slim.
  7. @Arclight
    We'll always have elites, but why are ours so banal?

    Ours are the proverbial third generation that cannot retain the family wealth.

  8. The NY Times carrying on the Soviet Union’s tradition of shameless propaganda!

    • Agree: Hail
  9. Anonymous[285] • Disclaimer says:

    If equality is the thing, how about NO NATION send ships into space? That way, all nations will be equal in non-achievement.

    Also, surely NYT knows it was just a propaganda stunt on the part of USSR. The Russian space program, like the US one, was entirely a white affair. And Russia had its share of ‘Nazi’ engineers working on the project.

    Now, when will NYT include a Palestinian-American columnist? That would truly be one giant step for Diversity-kind.

    • Replies: @Nachum
    I see what you did there. I suppose it would be pointless to mention that the family that "owns" the Times (of course, it's really owned by some Mexican) has been Episcopalian for generations.

    Oh, and that the Times and its Jewish writers do a perfectly good job of attacking Israel on their own. (Wow, Jews don't all have the same opinions? Imagine that!) But I guess the temptation to take the brown man's side is too tempting for anybody.
  10. File under ‘Our new country is gonna be great’.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-07-18/customs-agent-at-long-beach-port-admits-selling-guns-illegally

    Gun running Long Beach customs agent had 41 machines guns stashed at home

    By ALEJANDRA REYES-VELARDESTAFF WRITER
    JULY 18, 2019 10:16 AM

    A U.S. Customs and Border Protection watch commander at the Los Angeles/Long Beach Seaport has admitted running an illegal gun operation, authorities said.

    Wei Xu, 56, of Santa Fe Springs, was arrested Feb. 5 after an investigation involving undercover officers to whom Xu sold three guns out of the trunk of his car, including an “off-roster” pistol, according to the U.S. attorney’s office.

    He has been on unpaid administrative leave since his arrest and will be fired, according to Ciaran McEvoy, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office.

    In court Wednesday, Xu pleaded guilty to illegally selling guns on the internet, some of which he obtained by using his power as a law enforcement official, and to creating a fake company to avoid paying taxes, prosecutors said. He also pleaded guilty to illegally possessing unregistered firearms and making false statements to a federal agency about his involvement with a Chinese company to get a secret-level security clearance…

    …when filling out questionnaires in 2003, 2011 and 2015 for the Office of Personnel Management to obtain a secret-level security clearance, he denied having contacts with foreign nationals or a foreign financial interest, prosecutors said.

    Xu also admitted that between 2005 and 2017, he set up a fake Florida-incorporated company called Trans Pacific Group Inc., which he used to claim business losses, offset his income and evade filing taxes to the Internal Revenue Service.

    OT:

    Today is the 50th anniversary of Chappaquiddick.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    Gun running Long Beach customs agent had 41 machines guns stashed at home
     
    You can tell who never had to run a machine gun. There were no machine guns in the picture of firearms seized. There were some assault rifles, short- and long- barreled. Assault rifles provide a brief interval of automatic fire, intended for use during ambushes and assaults. Magazines were originally limited to 20 rounds to give the barrels time to cool because prolonged automatic fire will overheat the barrel.
    The original machine guns, the Maxims, had a water cooled barrel with a radiator and could literally fire as long as they had ammunition, hours of continuous fire if necessary (as it was at times during WW I). Contemporary machine guns in common use are (as far as I've seen) all air cooled. The machine guns carried by troops are light machine guns. A light machine gun is portable, but too heavy (hence to low a slew rate) to be preferred for close in assault. It has a thicker barrel and more ammunition per magazine (or pouch, or whatever), but is still limited by what the gunner can carry (he current US light machine gun only carries about 600 rounds). It is, getting down to basics, intended to suppress enemy fire until either an assault or maneuver is feasible or until help (air, artillery, another units, previous laid Claymore mines, etc) arrives. It is in no way an assault rifle, although of course it has been used as one.

    A medium machine gun is even heavier than the light machine gun, has a higher basic ammunition load, fires a heavier projectile, and can fire for a very long time. (18,000 rounds for a Stellite lined barrels, http://www.usord.com/weapons/stellite ). It can be slung and fired from the hip, but is intended to provide a "base of fire" that suppresses enemy fire for longer than the light machine gun, and has better armor/sandbag penetration.

    Machine guns have very little civil application, simply because they fire rifle bullets that travel a long way and penetrate most house walls. Collateral damage in defending against, say, a home invasion would be prohibitive; the defender might very well conclude that he would be better off dead than facing the consequences of shooting up the neighborhood and quite likely killing several bystanders. The 5.56 semi-automatic weapons ordinarily used for that task (the RDE bullpup is probably the best 5.56 semi-automatic on the market) are bad enough, and, really, completely unsuitable for use in a built up area. Legal short barreled shotguns (of which there are many on the commercial market) firing rabbit hunting loads are effective against unarmored home invaders at the usual short range, and limit collateral damage, but have limited ammunition capacity and can be ineffective against ceramic armor, which is surprisingly cheap now.

    So: as usual, the media lies its head off trying to make its readers think that something is worse than it is, _and_ simultaneously utterly fail (to put it nicely) to tell their readers about a very real hazard (over-penetration by 5.56mm rounds). The legacy media really do hate their readers (and their reader's neighbors). If they want to see hate, they should invest in a mirror. I, personally, make it a point to not have any friends who hate me.

    Counterinsurgency
  11. Considering Nasa now has to use Russian rockets to launch satellites into orbit, you might well say that the Russians won the space race.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    Considering Nasa now has to use Russian rockets to launch satellites into orbit, you might well say that the Russians won the space race.

     

    After POTUS Kennedy's "stunt" to show US superiority was executed, and JFK got himself assassinated, possibly by giving RFK permission to prosecute organized crime, the Democrats withdrew from the space race because it favored Republicans (those engineers and defense workers were Republicans). The Republicans didn't fight that - capital was short and they'd given up on the great engineering projects of the Gilded Age; those who favored NASA were referred to as 'space nuts".

    Instead, the US withdrew into showbiz. Space generated pictures -- of far off planets, moons, stars, nebulae, and the spectacular launch of Space Shuttles, experimental prototypes that should have been immediately replaced by a next generation, but which were retained until they killed two full crews. The US attempts at the National Launch System (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Launch_System) were cursory at best, and appeared to be a minimum cost effort (more showbiz) to silence the space lobby. There's no business like show business, and the US population, largely European descended at the time, was the target of this vast deception operation. The operation's objective appears to have been to hide that the European descended had no future in government planning.
    The Russian program continued as engineering, and has developed a real space capability, although an underfunded one. The US has recently permitted private sector launch developments (previously forbidden under Federal law), and promises to equal Russian achievements. And, of course, China has vast ambitions in trans-Low earth orbit activities.

    Counterinsurgency
  12. But we laughed at the lady cosmonauts. Russian women were caricatured as homely and masculine. Nobody gave a rats ass if they put a woman or a negro in space.
    Yuri Gargarin appeared in a tv ad for the NY Worlds Fair; we thought him cool!

  13. I’ve met Tamayo Mendez’s daughter and grandson (their family lives in Seattle and are, I believe, American citizens) and seen pictures of him — his grandson looks exactly like him. From their appearance, any African descent would be extremely minor.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Mendez is clearly not white. Nor is he mostly black. He looks sort of like a typical Mexican and I would guess that he has some Indian ancestry. There is some Indian blood in Cuba thought most of the natives died or were killed by the Spanish early on.
  14. On June 16, 1963, Valentina Tereshkova, a 26-year-old factory worker-turned-cosmonaut, became the first woman in space. …

    NASA sent the first chimp into space in 1961. How many intersectional points does a chimp have?

  15. The elites understand that the Apollo program was the high-water mark of Anglo-Saxon and therefore human civilization, thus a campaign of de-emphasis and disparagement is in order.

  16. Hmmm, perhaps the Ruskies sent minorities and women because they were more expendable than the White men. They did send up a female dog into space orbit before they sent a man.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Soviets were not really worried about expending humans. They expended them by the millions. White, male - didn't make any difference to them.
    , @Hypnotoad666

    They did send up a female dog into space orbit before they sent a man.
     
    Yes, poor Laika, the first space dog got sent on a one-way mission into orbit.
  17. After Apollo, NASA was yet another bloated, entrenched, government bureaucracy in search of a mission.

    So it sold a gullible, US voting public on the idea of an “International” (meaning 97.9% paid by US taxpayers) Space Station.

    You know, in order to conduct Earth-shattering, scientific experiments. For example, to see how cockroaches do in zero-g; the Government can always find a meritorious pretext for its schemes.

    Not surprisingly, NASA never made a fuss about post-Soviet Russia selling ISS stay-overs to leisure travelers.

    Once again, middle class, US taxpayers got hammered in order to subsidize billionaires.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    The space shuttle was also full of bogus "science" projects sent up by elementary schools, complete with elementary school teacher. Both the bean seedlings and the teacher never made it back home. It turns out that there is really not that much science that can only be done in space, especially when it costs NASA $10,000/lb. to do it.
    , @Citizen of The World
    I will not weaponize space . . . but my good friends in the PRC will and are! So is my good friend Vlad. So America should not try to so that it does not make the others mad and attack. Weakness and groveling will keep you safe.
  18. Hail says: • Website

    By Sophie Pinkham

    (Pictured in 2018; from interview.)

    Full name: Sophie Charlotte Pinkham.

    Q. Where did you grow up?
    A. New York City.

    2000: Graduates from Hunter College High School, Manhattan. (Notable upperclassmen at the school when she was in 9th and 10th grades: Musical theaterist Lin-Manuel Miranda, class of 1998; MSNBCer Chris Hayes, 1997);
    May 2004: Earns BA from Yale (English);
    Summer [?] 2004: First visit to Russia — “After I graduated, I went on an exchange program to work at the Red Cross in Siberia. I became fascinated by the subject of public health in the former Soviet Union, and worked in that field for several years […];”
    2012: Earns MA from Columbia (Regional Studies — Russia, Eurasia and Eastern Europe);
    2014: Earns another MA at Columbia, in Slavic Languages and Literatures;
    2016: Publishes book Black Square: Adventures in Post-Soviet Ukraine, which includes the essay “The Last Jew in Stalindorf.” It “tells the story of [the writer and friends’] trip to Ukraine to film [a documentary], and our trip to Anya and Leeza’s grandmother’s former village in eastern Ukraine.”
    Late 2010s: PhD candidate in Slavic Languages, Columbia Univ. (began in or about 2014, presumably finished by 2020).

    Q. Where is your favorite place to eat on/around [Columbia Univ.] campus?
    A. Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    • Replies: @trelane
    A name that works
    , @Oleaginous Outrager

    Q. Where is your favorite place to eat on/around [Columbia Univ.] campus?
    A. Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.
     
    I think she misunderstood the question and thought they wanted to know her favorite place to be seen pretending to eat.
  19. I think that last sentence should read ‘Under socialism appearance always matters more than results.’

  20. “I, for one, do not intend to go to sleep by the light of a racist moon! Send up the Spooknik” – Soviet Premier Nikita Khrushchev.

  21. In Right Stuff, Tom Wolfe made mention of the brilliant, unsung, chief designer of the triumphant Soyuz program.

    I remember that the movie briefly showed grainy, B&W footage of some unidentifed Russian, broadly grinning at the sight of another successful launch; ours always blew up.

    When that comrade died, Izvestia finally gave him his due: Like two or three sentences.

    That’s gratitude for ya.

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    I remember that the movie briefly showed grainy, B&W footage of some unidentifed Russian, broadly grinning at the sight of another successful launch; ours always blew up.
     
    Yeah, that was a hilarious touch, in the movie!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Korolev

    Before his death he was officially identified only as Glavny Konstruktor (Главный Конструктор), or the Chief Designer, to protect him from possible cold war assassination attempts by the United States. Even some of the cosmonauts who worked with him were unaware of his last name; he only went by Chief Designer.
     
    , @Jack D
    The Soviets worried that the Americans would assassinate the Chief Constructor if his identity was known. The Soviet space program's main purpose was to build ICBMs aimed at the US. Iranian nuclear scientists have met with many unfortunate accidents (presumably at the hands of the Israelis) so this was not a crazy fear.
  22. @Hail

    By Sophie Pinkham
     
    https://gsas.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/styles/hero_1280x640/public/2018-04/dscf2726_0.jpg

    (Pictured in 2018; from interview.)

    Full name: Sophie Charlotte Pinkham.

    Q. Where did you grow up?
    A. New York City.

    - 2000: Graduates from Hunter College High School, Manhattan. (Notable upperclassmen at the school when she was in 9th and 10th grades: Musical theaterist Lin-Manuel Miranda, class of 1998; MSNBCer Chris Hayes, 1997);
    - May 2004: Earns BA from Yale (English);
    - Summer [?] 2004: First visit to Russia -- "After I graduated, I went on an exchange program to work at the Red Cross in Siberia. I became fascinated by the subject of public health in the former Soviet Union, and worked in that field for several years [...];"
    - 2012: Earns MA from Columbia (Regional Studies -- Russia, Eurasia and Eastern Europe);
    - 2014: Earns another MA at Columbia, in Slavic Languages and Literatures;
    - 2016: Publishes book Black Square: Adventures in Post-Soviet Ukraine, which includes the essay "The Last Jew in Stalindorf." It "tells the story of [the writer and friends'] trip to Ukraine to film [a documentary], and our trip to Anya and Leeza's grandmother's former village in eastern Ukraine."
    - Late 2010s: PhD candidate in Slavic Languages, Columbia Univ. (began in or about 2014, presumably finished by 2020).

    Q. Where is your favorite place to eat on/around [Columbia Univ.] campus?
    A. Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    A name that works

  23. they also won the race to civilizational collapse and the race to having jewish oligarchs control almost the entire economy as people starve.

  24. @nebulafox
    >Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up.

    He can't be serious. The Soviet Union in the 1970s was one of the most static societies on the planet. The only thing that approximated a meritocracy was the KGB: which is how somebody like Vladimir Putin could get his start.

    The Soviet Union was also profoundly socially conservative in ways that would downright shock 60s Western liberals.

    [Surely, ] He can’t be serious.

    Yes, and don’t call them Shirley. They are Sophie.

    Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up.

    Seriously though, they don’t even mince words about it anymore. These people would be at home with the Godfree Roberts crowd, arguing about who had the best 5-year plans, the Soviets or the Red Chinese.

  25. @nebulafox
    >Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up.

    He can't be serious. The Soviet Union in the 1970s was one of the most static societies on the planet. The only thing that approximated a meritocracy was the KGB: which is how somebody like Vladimir Putin could get his start.

    The Soviet Union was also profoundly socially conservative in ways that would downright shock 60s Western liberals.

    Sports (especially hockey) and the arts were meritocratic, no?

  26. Soviet space program has many real achievements, which should be better known in the West. Instead, the great and the good of Current Year choose to highlight a silly propaganda campaign that happened to align with their own priorities.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  27. Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up

    And it was seen as overt propaganda for the Communist cause at the time, even by the beneficiaries. No one in the third world confused the Soviet Union for being a multi-racial paradise rather than the white, Russian dominated society it was.

    The Soviets were pretty big on scholarships for third-worlders, going as far as to set up a university dedicated to foreign students from the third world, the Patrice Lumumba University, named after the assassinated Pan-Africanist Congolese president.

    But a fellowship or a teaching assistantship at an American university was more prized, for obvious reasons. The Soviets sent back their foreign students. We provided a track to green cards and citizenship after graduate school.

    • Replies: @jcd1974
    The NY Times is counting on the fact that few people under the age of 50 will realize that at the time this was correctly dismissed as shameless propaganda. Instead the NYT is betting (and probably correctly so) that its current readership will accept it at face value.
    , @guest
    Racist white racist capitalist countries like the U.S. sent colored folk from around the world to prestigious universities, too. Because it comes in handy when the CIA lands in the Democratic Republic of Ooga-Booga to find Harvard-educated minds at hand.
  28. Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    B.S. Nobody’s favorite food is Ethiopian. Baby food on soggy pancakes.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    At least they use spices. I once was served by an Ethiopian waitress in a well known seafood restaurant in Boston. The food was utterly devoid of seasoning of any kind. I'm not even sure if they used salt and pepper. I asked her how she could stand eating such bland food and she (quite cleverly) retorted that the food was intentionally unseasoned so that you could taste the freshness of the seafood unmasked by any spices. But I would bet that she kept a little jar of berbere in her purse anyway though I couldn't get her to admit it.
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe

    Nobody’s favorite food is Ethiopian. Baby food on soggy pancakes.
     
    I actually like Ethiopian food quite a bit (I've had it about a dozen times since the early 90s).

    Although it is not my favorite, that much is true.
  29. Q. Where is your favorite place to eat on/around [Columbia Univ.] campus?
    A. Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    So damn so of her to pick that restaurant as her favorite. For decades now it has been de rigueur for a certain type of SJW to proclaim Awash as their favorite restaurant. What is Awash’s claim to culinary fame? None really, but the restaurant has schtick where the patrons eat all the entrees with their hands. Keeping it real.

  30. Anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    NASA and the Apollo program were bureaucratic white elephants, which is why they never led anywhere. They should have been privatized from the start, like the Portuguese campaign of discovery, if the goal was actual space exploration. In reality, they were political programs, and there were attempts from the start to try to get black astronauts involved at NASA. NASA has basically held back space exploration by 50 years. Ironically, it was Obama who has done the most for space exploration by making NASA rely on private companies for launch vehicles.

  31. And let’s not forget species equality of the Soviet program.

    Long live Laika the dog.

    To be fair, the US went neck and neck with species equality with chimp in space.

    BanaNASA’s proudest moment:

    • Replies: @res

    Long live Laika the dog.
     
    Right. How could they leave out that the first animal in space was female?! Though perhaps the way that ended took some of the luster off of it as a feminist achievement.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/2367681.stm
  32. The Russian state is so woke. With some of their guiding influence we could get the more of right people elected to help out here.

    In other news:

    A B.C. Human Rights Tribunal hearing devolved into repeated outbursts and name-calling this week as it considered a transgender woman’s complaint that a home-based salon discriminated against her by denying her a Brazilian wax.

    At one point, the complainant compared the business owner to a neo-Nazi…

    https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/accusations-fly-at-human-rights-hearing-into-transgender-womans-brazilian-wax-complaint

    • Replies: @Alden
    I’ve read the wax discrimination story. The intact man who identifies as a woman is suing several salons. He also has a website advising little girls about feminine hygiene. He weighs about 300 pds
  33. NYT now trumpeting Soviet PR victories in their propaganda war against late stage Western Capitalism. (See, the plural possessive pronoun can still allow for some subtle semantic ambiguity..)

    You know, I’d actually be prepared to accept a Soviet style system, if it meant our society functioned sufficiently well enough again to get back to exploring the galaxy?

    F**k it. Let’s put the antisocials into corrective labour camps and ruthlessly neutralise all the objective material forces which undermine the long term interests of the state. I’m literally starting to see old Brezhnev’s point.

    • Replies: @Hail

    NYT now trumpeting Soviet PR victories in their propaganda war against late stage Western Capitalism.
     
    Nicely ambiguized.
    , @inertial
    You are more right than you know. If you want to seriously explore and settle the galaxy your society must look more like the Soviet system than the modern liberal Euro-American.
  34. I knew a Russian graduate of Patrice Lumumba University in 1993 in Chile. She was a committed communist who said the African students there were monkeys.

    • LOL: jim jones
  35. Laika was the first Soviet dog in space. Songs and stories have been written about her, even though she didn’t have impeccable socialist credentials.

    • Replies: @Anon

    Laika was the first Soviet dog in space
     
    The nasty truth about Laika eventually came out, and it is really sad. She was cooked to death in space due to a malfunction.
  36. Nothing says “equality” like starving 7 million Ukrainians to death.

  37. Kind of wish the Russians would have managed to have won the Space Race. You think the communists would have left a big ball of resources there for the taking alone? Hell no! They would have launched rockets every hour on the hour to mine that rock.

    Hopefully the Russians or Chinese pick up the torch. The West thinks progress is an app that lets you crowdsource a dog walker.

    Did the NYT mention that LBJ tried forcing an unqualified black pilot on Yeager? That’s one of the more interesting bits of The Right Stuff. That and the enemas.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    It was the Kennedies (Bobby and Jack), not LBJ.
    , @The Alarmist

    You think the communists would have left a big ball of resources there for the taking alone? Hell no! They would have launched rockets every hour on the hour to mine that rock.
     
    If the US had been the Überkapitalists they claim to be, NASA would have salted the moon with gold nuggets and diamonds, and the place would already look like Vegas via private enterprise.
  38. The Russians sent tortoises to the Moon. They were on that inter-species, inter-planetary shit from the start. Full respect.

  39. @Lot
    Someone else posted this link yesterday, showing Outer Space Affirmative Action was already in effect in the early 1960s.

    https://www.unz.com/sbpdl/chuck-yeager-bombed/

    Any story told by Chuck Yeager involving Curtis LeMay is worth reading!

    http://4.bp.blogspot.com/-HolI7eSVVA8/T3uWYUMF_0I/AAAAAAAAEkY/c8-LW2d2Os8/s1600/General+Curtis+Lemay.jpg

    http://www.oldpoliticals.com/ItemImages/000013/15610_lg.jpeg

    There’s a great Chuck Yeager story somewhere on the web that I read years ago. If I can find the links again, I’ll post them.

    Chuck Yeager was the US Military Attache at the American embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan in 1971, when Pakistan and India went to war. The usual diplomatic protocol in such situations is for foreign countries to be strictly neutral, and for military attaches to recuse themselves from their jobs for the duration of the conflict, unless there is an active military alliance and treaty and we go to war as well.

    Yeager immediately applied for personal leave and disappeared from the Embassy, cryptically saying “my boys need me.”

    Apparently, he spent the duration of the short war at Pakistani Air Force headquarters as an observer at the interrogation of Indian Air Force pilots who had been shot down. One Indian reported (again on the web) that he was overwhelmed to learn that the white man in the room was the great Chuck Yeager, and asked for his autograph.

    I’m inclined to believe the story is true, not just because it is too good not to be, but also because of the links that I saw it on. As I said, I’ll post if I can find them again.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    PiltdownMan:

    Somewhat in confirmation, I do know that Yeager has highly praised the combat proficiency of Pakistani pilots.
  40. Well, gotta give her credit for sounding like a sentimentalist longing for the Soviet Era, when “there were no racial nor ethnic prejudices, and all were treated the same! TM” Everyone knows that was true; the media said so!

    Here’s one of the most famous Soviet science fiction movies. Enjoy the diversity!

  41. @Richard S
    NYT now trumpeting Soviet PR victories in their propaganda war against late stage Western Capitalism. (See, the plural possessive pronoun can still allow for some subtle semantic ambiguity..)

    You know, I’d actually be prepared to accept a Soviet style system, if it meant our society functioned sufficiently well enough again to get back to exploring the galaxy?

    F**k it. Let’s put the antisocials into corrective labour camps and ruthlessly neutralise all the objective material forces which undermine the long term interests of the state. I’m literally starting to see old Brezhnev’s point.

    NYT now trumpeting Soviet PR victories in their propaganda war against late stage Western Capitalism.

    Nicely ambiguized.

  42. Hail says: • Website

    The Cold War was fought as much on an ideological front as a military one, and the Soviet Union often emphasized the sexism and racism of its capitalist opponents — particularly the segregated United States. And the space race was a prime opportunity to signal the U.S.S.R.’s commitment to equality. After putting the first man in space in 1961, the Soviets went on to send the first woman, the first Asian man, and the first black man into orbit — all years before the Americans would follow suit.

    Why is she using the long dash so much here? What value does it add?

    Is there some kind of SJW street-cred to be had in the cramming-in of long dashes?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Take solace knowing she is using those em dashes incorrectly.
  43. @PiltdownMan

    Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up
     
    And it was seen as overt propaganda for the Communist cause at the time, even by the beneficiaries. No one in the third world confused the Soviet Union for being a multi-racial paradise rather than the white, Russian dominated society it was.

    The Soviets were pretty big on scholarships for third-worlders, going as far as to set up a university dedicated to foreign students from the third world, the Patrice Lumumba University, named after the assassinated Pan-Africanist Congolese president.

    But a fellowship or a teaching assistantship at an American university was more prized, for obvious reasons. The Soviets sent back their foreign students. We provided a track to green cards and citizenship after graduate school.

    The NY Times is counting on the fact that few people under the age of 50 will realize that at the time this was correctly dismissed as shameless propaganda. Instead the NYT is betting (and probably correctly so) that its current readership will accept it at face value.

  44. Sophie Pinkham…

    …is likely an unabashed communist. Her big book was titled “Black Square: Adventures in the Post Soviet World.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Sophie Pinkham…
    is likely an unabashed communist. Her big book was titled “Black Square: Adventures in the Post Soviet World.”
     
    Sophie Pinkham =

    Hip pinko. Shame.
    A hippie honk Ms.

    She a honk I pimp.
  45. How the Soviets Won the Space Race for Equality

    Not only did the Soviets “win the space race for equality,” they must’ve won the Cold War, too.

    Because today, most American elites, NYT writers, and the entire Democratic Party really are fucking communists.

  46. @Abolish_public_education
    In Right Stuff, Tom Wolfe made mention of the brilliant, unsung, chief designer of the triumphant Soyuz program.

    I remember that the movie briefly showed grainy, B&W footage of some unidentifed Russian, broadly grinning at the sight of another successful launch; ours always blew up.

    When that comrade died, Izvestia finally gave him his due: Like two or three sentences.

    That’s gratitude for ya.

    I remember that the movie briefly showed grainy, B&W footage of some unidentifed Russian, broadly grinning at the sight of another successful launch; ours always blew up.

    Yeah, that was a hilarious touch, in the movie!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Korolev

    Before his death he was officially identified only as Glavny Konstruktor (Главный Конструктор), or the Chief Designer, to protect him from possible cold war assassination attempts by the United States. Even some of the cosmonauts who worked with him were unaware of his last name; he only went by Chief Designer.

    • Replies: @HunInTheSun
    The real "Chief Designer" was a captive German scientist of the 40s and 50s, Helmut Groettrup, whose team designed the core booster for Soyuz which remains the Russians’ only man-rated launch vehicle. Helmut and his boys were released eventually, then the all-Soviet program for a heavy-lift rocket, the N1, failed miserably, and the Buran shuttle was abandoned.
  47. @Anon000
    File under ‘Our new country is gonna be great’.

    https://www.latimes.com/california/story/2019-07-18/customs-agent-at-long-beach-port-admits-selling-guns-illegally

    Gun running Long Beach customs agent had 41 machines guns stashed at home

    By ALEJANDRA REYES-VELARDESTAFF WRITER
    JULY 18, 2019 10:16 AM

    A U.S. Customs and Border Protection watch commander at the Los Angeles/Long Beach Seaport has admitted running an illegal gun operation, authorities said.

    Wei Xu, 56, of Santa Fe Springs, was arrested Feb. 5 after an investigation involving undercover officers to whom Xu sold three guns out of the trunk of his car, including an “off-roster” pistol, according to the U.S. attorney’s office.

    He has been on unpaid administrative leave since his arrest and will be fired, according to Ciaran McEvoy, a spokesman for the U.S. attorney’s office.

    In court Wednesday, Xu pleaded guilty to illegally selling guns on the internet, some of which he obtained by using his power as a law enforcement official, and to creating a fake company to avoid paying taxes, prosecutors said. He also pleaded guilty to illegally possessing unregistered firearms and making false statements to a federal agency about his involvement with a Chinese company to get a secret-level security clearance...

    ...when filling out questionnaires in 2003, 2011 and 2015 for the Office of Personnel Management to obtain a secret-level security clearance, he denied having contacts with foreign nationals or a foreign financial interest, prosecutors said.

    Xu also admitted that between 2005 and 2017, he set up a fake Florida-incorporated company called Trans Pacific Group Inc., which he used to claim business losses, offset his income and evade filing taxes to the Internal Revenue Service.
     
    OT:

    Today is the 50th anniversary of Chappaquiddick.

    http://extras.mnginteractive.com/live/media/site105/2018/0404/20180404_012153_RememberWhen.jpg

    https://thesplitscreen.files.wordpress.com/2011/06/ghoststoryedited.jpg

     

    Gun running Long Beach customs agent had 41 machines guns stashed at home

    You can tell who never had to run a machine gun. There were no machine guns in the picture of firearms seized. There were some assault rifles, short- and long- barreled. Assault rifles provide a brief interval of automatic fire, intended for use during ambushes and assaults. Magazines were originally limited to 20 rounds to give the barrels time to cool because prolonged automatic fire will overheat the barrel.
    The original machine guns, the Maxims, had a water cooled barrel with a radiator and could literally fire as long as they had ammunition, hours of continuous fire if necessary (as it was at times during WW I). Contemporary machine guns in common use are (as far as I’ve seen) all air cooled. The machine guns carried by troops are light machine guns. A light machine gun is portable, but too heavy (hence to low a slew rate) to be preferred for close in assault. It has a thicker barrel and more ammunition per magazine (or pouch, or whatever), but is still limited by what the gunner can carry (he current US light machine gun only carries about 600 rounds). It is, getting down to basics, intended to suppress enemy fire until either an assault or maneuver is feasible or until help (air, artillery, another units, previous laid Claymore mines, etc) arrives. It is in no way an assault rifle, although of course it has been used as one.

    A medium machine gun is even heavier than the light machine gun, has a higher basic ammunition load, fires a heavier projectile, and can fire for a very long time. (18,000 rounds for a Stellite lined barrels, http://www.usord.com/weapons/stellite ). It can be slung and fired from the hip, but is intended to provide a “base of fire” that suppresses enemy fire for longer than the light machine gun, and has better armor/sandbag penetration.

    Machine guns have very little civil application, simply because they fire rifle bullets that travel a long way and penetrate most house walls. Collateral damage in defending against, say, a home invasion would be prohibitive; the defender might very well conclude that he would be better off dead than facing the consequences of shooting up the neighborhood and quite likely killing several bystanders. The 5.56 semi-automatic weapons ordinarily used for that task (the RDE bullpup is probably the best 5.56 semi-automatic on the market) are bad enough, and, really, completely unsuitable for use in a built up area. Legal short barreled shotguns (of which there are many on the commercial market) firing rabbit hunting loads are effective against unarmored home invaders at the usual short range, and limit collateral damage, but have limited ammunition capacity and can be ineffective against ceramic armor, which is surprisingly cheap now.

    So: as usual, the media lies its head off trying to make its readers think that something is worse than it is, _and_ simultaneously utterly fail (to put it nicely) to tell their readers about a very real hazard (over-penetration by 5.56mm rounds). The legacy media really do hate their readers (and their reader’s neighbors). If they want to see hate, they should invest in a mirror. I, personally, make it a point to not have any friends who hate me.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Jack D
    In order to lie you have to know what you are talking about. The people who write for the MSM have no idea what they are talking about when it comes to guns so they are incapable of actually lying about them. Instead they just print word salad filtered through the fog of ignorance but always with the implication that guns are bad.
    , @Redneck farmer
    There are technical definitions, and there are legal definitions. Legally, assault rifles are machine guns, even though they aren't.
  48. In July 1980, Vietnamese pilot Phạm Tuân became the first Asian and the first person from a developing country to travel to space. ..

    And the first person with those unique diacritics.

    • Replies: @guest
    Would it be crass of me to point out that the difference between communist nations and developing nations was nothing?
  49. On June 16, 1963, Valentina Tereshkova, a 26-year-old factory worker-turned-cosmonaut, became the first woman in space. …

    Laika probably got more training, although at least they bothered to bring Miss Tereshkova back. I heard that she was hysterical with fear the whole way up.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Tereshkova is still alive and kicking and is a member of the Russian Parliament and looking good for 82, an age at which the average Russian man has been dead for a decade:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/Valentina_Tereshkova_%282017-03-06%29.jpg

    She strikes me as the kind of person who always lands on her feet and not as a shrinking violet. She came to cosmonautics via skydiving, not a hobby for the faint hearted.

    You have to give the Russians credit where credit is due and I don't buy the stories that Tereskova was terrified - what are your sources?
  50. I’m confused.

    Are the Russians good or bad?

    • Replies: @Hail
    Wrong question.

    Allow me to answer the proper question:

    Communists: good.
    , @Jack D
    When they were Socialist Nationalists they were good but now that they are National Socialists they are bad. It's like the difference between calling blacks colored people (bad) and people of color (good).
  51. @MikeatMikedotMike
    Sophie Pinkham...

    https://i.ytimg.com/vi/MTqiPek85aE/maxresdefault.jpg

    ...is likely an unabashed communist. Her big book was titled "Black Square: Adventures in the Post Soviet World."

    Sophie Pinkham…
    is likely an unabashed communist. Her big book was titled “Black Square: Adventures in the Post Soviet World.”

    Sophie Pinkham =

    Hip pinko. Shame.
    A hippie honk Ms.

    She a honk I pimp.

  52. @BB753
    Considering Nasa now has to use Russian rockets to launch satellites into orbit, you might well say that the Russians won the space race.

    Considering Nasa now has to use Russian rockets to launch satellites into orbit, you might well say that the Russians won the space race.

    After POTUS Kennedy’s “stunt” to show US superiority was executed, and JFK got himself assassinated, possibly by giving RFK permission to prosecute organized crime, the Democrats withdrew from the space race because it favored Republicans (those engineers and defense workers were Republicans). The Republicans didn’t fight that – capital was short and they’d given up on the great engineering projects of the Gilded Age; those who favored NASA were referred to as ‘space nuts”.

    Instead, the US withdrew into showbiz. Space generated pictures — of far off planets, moons, stars, nebulae, and the spectacular launch of Space Shuttles, experimental prototypes that should have been immediately replaced by a next generation, but which were retained until they killed two full crews. The US attempts at the National Launch System (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Launch_System) were cursory at best, and appeared to be a minimum cost effort (more showbiz) to silence the space lobby. There’s no business like show business, and the US population, largely European descended at the time, was the target of this vast deception operation. The operation’s objective appears to have been to hide that the European descended had no future in government planning.
    The Russian program continued as engineering, and has developed a real space capability, although an underfunded one. The US has recently permitted private sector launch developments (previously forbidden under Federal law), and promises to equal Russian achievements. And, of course, China has vast ambitions in trans-Low earth orbit activities.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Duke84
    JFK's assassination didn't have anything to do with organized crime.Face reality - it was just Oswald.
  53. PiltdownWoman went to the post-Soviet Commonwealth of Independent States on work, in the early 1990s. Every woman in her small delegation was greeted by Valentina Tereshkova at some concluding official dinner. Her sister-in-law, who went on work in the 1980s, also got to meet Tereshkova.

    I got the sense from their accounts that Valentina Tereshkova’s work after that spaceflight was to work as an official greeter, meeting as many women as possible from foreign delegations.

    Not a bad propaganda strategy. That kind of thing makes an impression on women at ab emotive level, no matter how sensible and skeptical they are otherwise. “Their menfolk sent one of us up a long time ago. Their men must be more decent to women.” That sort of thing.

  54. In July 1980, Vietnamese pilot Phạm Tuân became the first Asian and the first person from a developing country to travel to space.

    Gherman Titov was from Altai Krai; he first flew into space in 1961.

    Alexei Leonov is from Tisulsky; he first flew into space in1965.

    Viktor Patsayev was from Aktobe; he first flew into space in 1971 – he was also a man who died tragically and heroically, so ignoring his achievements is especially despicable.

    Vasily Lazarev was also from Altai Krai; he first flew into space for the first time in 1973.

    Vladimir Dzhanibekov is from Tashkent; he flew into space for the first time in 1978. Since he is, I

    Since Leonov and Dzhanibekov are still with us, I’d love to know what they would have to say about Sophie the Pink Ham’s claims (they have better things to do that even know a creature like her exists, of course – I am ashamed I don’t…).

    I can see Sophie the Pink Ham likes her Asians especially squinty-eyed and yellow, and she won’t deign to acknowledge them what’s not sufficiently so. Indeed, it probably galls the Pink Ham that huge swaths of Asia in its north and west are full of white people, and she’d rather that inconvenient fact be forgotten as soon as possible….

  55. @Peripatetic Commenter
    I'm confused.

    Are the Russians good or bad?

    Wrong question.

    Allow me to answer the proper question:

    Communists: good.

  56. She a honk I pimp.

    Magical……

  57. @PiltdownMan

    I remember that the movie briefly showed grainy, B&W footage of some unidentifed Russian, broadly grinning at the sight of another successful launch; ours always blew up.
     
    Yeah, that was a hilarious touch, in the movie!

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sergei_Korolev

    Before his death he was officially identified only as Glavny Konstruktor (Главный Конструктор), or the Chief Designer, to protect him from possible cold war assassination attempts by the United States. Even some of the cosmonauts who worked with him were unaware of his last name; he only went by Chief Designer.
     

    The real “Chief Designer” was a captive German scientist of the 40s and 50s, Helmut Groettrup, whose team designed the core booster for Soyuz which remains the Russians’ only man-rated launch vehicle. Helmut and his boys were released eventually, then the all-Soviet program for a heavy-lift rocket, the N1, failed miserably, and the Buran shuttle was abandoned.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    The security conscious Russians milked Groettrup's group for all the V-2 secrets but wouldn't allow them to see what the Russians were developing on their own or offer any pointers. Korolev was glad to be rid of them anyway so that he could get all the credit. Korolev was a good manager by Russian standards but not much of a scientist.

    The main use for rockets was as ICBMs to carry nuclear warheads - space flight was an accidental byproduct. At the time, the Russians had made less progress than the US in miniaturizing nuclear warhead so they needed bigger rockets. Rockets that were big enough to boost satellites and space capsules into orbit. The US didn't have any big rockets at 1st because it didn't need them to carry smaller American warheads. Once the Russians started send stuff into space with their big ICBM rockets the US had to rush to catch up.
  58. Anybody who had an opinion about it was sent to the gulag.

  59. @Hail

    The Cold War was fought as much on an ideological front as a military one, and the Soviet Union often emphasized the sexism and racism of its capitalist opponents — particularly the segregated United States. And the space race was a prime opportunity to signal the U.S.S.R.’s commitment to equality. After putting the first man in space in 1961, the Soviets went on to send the first woman, the first Asian man, and the first black man into orbit — all years before the Americans would follow suit.
     
    Why is she using the long dash so much here? What value does it add?

    Is there some kind of SJW street-cred to be had in the cramming-in of long dashes?

    Take solace knowing she is using those em dashes incorrectly.

  60. “Cosmonaut diversity” was a priority for the Soviets? They shouldda focused more on feeding their people.

    • Replies: @Hail

    “Cosmonaut diversity” was a priority for the Soviets
     
    Number of humans landed successfully on the Moon and returned alive to Earth:

    - Communists: Zero.
    - White Western Man: Many.

    Case closed.
  61. @Reg Cæsar

    In July 1980, Vietnamese pilot Phạm Tuân became the first Asian and the first person from a developing country to travel to space. ..
     
    And the first person with those unique diacritics.

    Would it be crass of me to point out that the difference between communist nations and developing nations was nothing?

  62. So the New York Times is now literally parroting Soviet propaganda. You can’t make this up.

    • Agree: vinteuil
    • Replies: @res

    So the New York Times is now literally parroting Soviet propaganda. You can’t make this up.
     
    Neither the first nor the last time (most likely).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Duranty
    , @Alden
    Parroting Soviet propaganda since 1918. Did you ever see the Slimes glorification of Castro?
  63. @PiltdownMan

    Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up
     
    And it was seen as overt propaganda for the Communist cause at the time, even by the beneficiaries. No one in the third world confused the Soviet Union for being a multi-racial paradise rather than the white, Russian dominated society it was.

    The Soviets were pretty big on scholarships for third-worlders, going as far as to set up a university dedicated to foreign students from the third world, the Patrice Lumumba University, named after the assassinated Pan-Africanist Congolese president.

    But a fellowship or a teaching assistantship at an American university was more prized, for obvious reasons. The Soviets sent back their foreign students. We provided a track to green cards and citizenship after graduate school.

    Racist white racist capitalist countries like the U.S. sent colored folk from around the world to prestigious universities, too. Because it comes in handy when the CIA lands in the Democratic Republic of Ooga-Booga to find Harvard-educated minds at hand.

    • Replies: @Alden
    Obama’s Mom’s alleged sperm donor was one of the Eisenhower Kennedy African students
  64. @guest
    "Cosmonaut diversity" was a priority for the Soviets? They shouldda focused more on feeding their people.

    “Cosmonaut diversity” was a priority for the Soviets

    Number of humans landed successfully on the Moon and returned alive to Earth:

    – Communists: Zero.
    – White Western Man: Many.

    Case closed.

  65. The lesson here is obvious. The US only need send a queer-gender, left-wing, Blasian sperg into space to shut everyone up about whatever ism offends them.

  66. @nebulafox
    >Cosmonaut diversity was key for the Soviet message to the rest of the globe: Under socialism, a person of even the humblest origins could make it all the way up.

    He can't be serious. The Soviet Union in the 1970s was one of the most static societies on the planet. The only thing that approximated a meritocracy was the KGB: which is how somebody like Vladimir Putin could get his start.

    The Soviet Union was also profoundly socially conservative in ways that would downright shock 60s Western liberals.

    But, the Soviets were pretty good at propaganda, at least when aimed at low IQ 3rd world audiences. I can only imagine what the Russians called their diverse 3rd world Cosmonaut buddies behind their backs, but putting them in space was a propaganda coup at a time when America was not yet up to woke standards. But not to worry – future America will be and I expect that someday we will be as successful overall as the late stage Soviet Union.

  67. @Zera the Ap
    And let's not forget species equality of the Soviet program.

    Long live Laika the dog.

    To be fair, the US went neck and neck with species equality with chimp in space.

    BanaNASA's proudest moment:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=eY-6Kp2MjBQ

    Long live Laika the dog.

    Right. How could they leave out that the first animal in space was female?! Though perhaps the way that ended took some of the luster off of it as a feminist achievement.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/2367681.stm

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Right. How could they leave out that the first animal in space was female?! Though perhaps the way that ended took some of the luster off of it as a feminist achievement.
     
    Life's a bitch, as was Laika.

    She was also homeless, and part Samoyed. That term is microaggressive for people now, and soon it may be for dogs.

    In English it would be autosarcophage.


    https://drmarkgriffiths.wordpress.com/2012/05/04/dinner-for-one-a-beginners-guide-to-autosarcophagy/
  68. @HunInTheSun
    The real "Chief Designer" was a captive German scientist of the 40s and 50s, Helmut Groettrup, whose team designed the core booster for Soyuz which remains the Russians’ only man-rated launch vehicle. Helmut and his boys were released eventually, then the all-Soviet program for a heavy-lift rocket, the N1, failed miserably, and the Buran shuttle was abandoned.

    The security conscious Russians milked Groettrup’s group for all the V-2 secrets but wouldn’t allow them to see what the Russians were developing on their own or offer any pointers. Korolev was glad to be rid of them anyway so that he could get all the credit. Korolev was a good manager by Russian standards but not much of a scientist.

    The main use for rockets was as ICBMs to carry nuclear warheads – space flight was an accidental byproduct. At the time, the Russians had made less progress than the US in miniaturizing nuclear warhead so they needed bigger rockets. Rockets that were big enough to boost satellites and space capsules into orbit. The US didn’t have any big rockets at 1st because it didn’t need them to carry smaller American warheads. Once the Russians started send stuff into space with their big ICBM rockets the US had to rush to catch up.

  69. To the New York Times, the Soviet Union was GOOD, while post-Marxist Russia is very, very naughty, perhaps even the evil that the racist/sexist/anti-Semites called the USSR.

  70. @TheMediumIsTheMassage
    So the New York Times is now literally parroting Soviet propaganda. You can't make this up.

    So the New York Times is now literally parroting Soviet propaganda. You can’t make this up.

    Neither the first nor the last time (most likely).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Walter_Duranty

  71. @Peripatetic Commenter
    I'm confused.

    Are the Russians good or bad?

    When they were Socialist Nationalists they were good but now that they are National Socialists they are bad. It’s like the difference between calling blacks colored people (bad) and people of color (good).

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    Which is pretty odd, because as I alluded to earlier, the Communists held a lot of social and cultural views that would be considered quite reactionary today, state atheism and women in the workforce aside. From what I read in the Mitrokhin Archives, their security services genuinely believed that the woke stuff that originated in the 1960s-particularly concerning gender, sexuality, and family formation-were bizarre forms of late-capitalist decadence that were being actively pushed by the Americans to subvert their societies, and thus needed to be kept out of the Warsaw Pact at all costs.
  72. The 50th anniversary of mankind’s landing on the moon should be a day of mourning. Only a few can imagine what the world today would be like if JFK had challenged American private enterprise to open the space frontier, rather than committing the US to a Soviet-style centrally planned “program”.

    In that single betrayal of American values JFK may have closed off the only escape route for The Nation of Settlers from “The Nation of Immigrants”, with the result that we now face civil war.

    But then, lest we forget, he did, after all, write the book, the title of which helped make “A Nation of Immigrants” into the ersatz identity of “Who We Are”.

    https://jimbowery.blogspot.com/2018/04/necessity-and-incentives-opening-space.html

    • Replies: @Abolish_public_education

    Only a few can imagine what the world today would be like if JFK had challenged American private enterprise to open the space frontier
     
    I’m a true believer in the free-market, but had JFK issued such a challenge to the private sector, I still don’t think it could have pulled it off.

    I don’t think there has ever been enough ultra-rich, thrill/status-seeking, space tourists to go around.

    How many space telescopes, on the Moon, at L1, etc. do amateur astronomers need?

    Gold would have to be a lot more expensive to justify a mining expedition to some distant, celestial object.

    And so on.

    Gravity is just too big of a problem.

    Those billionaires who are currently touting their space ventures are, IMHO, full of baloney. If they have any serious interest in making a profit, it can only come by scheming to win USAF, launch contracts.

    Welfare for billionaires.

  73. @Mr. Anon

    On June 16, 1963, Valentina Tereshkova, a 26-year-old factory worker-turned-cosmonaut, became the first woman in space. …
     
    Laika probably got more training, although at least they bothered to bring Miss Tereshkova back. I heard that she was hysterical with fear the whole way up.

    Tereshkova is still alive and kicking and is a member of the Russian Parliament and looking good for 82, an age at which the average Russian man has been dead for a decade:

    She strikes me as the kind of person who always lands on her feet and not as a shrinking violet. She came to cosmonautics via skydiving, not a hobby for the faint hearted.

    You have to give the Russians credit where credit is due and I don’t buy the stories that Tereskova was terrified – what are your sources?

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    It was something I read once somewhere. It might have been wrong.

    I didn't know she was a Vulcan.

  74. Pretty sure the State Department being held in thrall by communists to this day explains a lot.

  75. @Counterinsurgency

    Gun running Long Beach customs agent had 41 machines guns stashed at home
     
    You can tell who never had to run a machine gun. There were no machine guns in the picture of firearms seized. There were some assault rifles, short- and long- barreled. Assault rifles provide a brief interval of automatic fire, intended for use during ambushes and assaults. Magazines were originally limited to 20 rounds to give the barrels time to cool because prolonged automatic fire will overheat the barrel.
    The original machine guns, the Maxims, had a water cooled barrel with a radiator and could literally fire as long as they had ammunition, hours of continuous fire if necessary (as it was at times during WW I). Contemporary machine guns in common use are (as far as I've seen) all air cooled. The machine guns carried by troops are light machine guns. A light machine gun is portable, but too heavy (hence to low a slew rate) to be preferred for close in assault. It has a thicker barrel and more ammunition per magazine (or pouch, or whatever), but is still limited by what the gunner can carry (he current US light machine gun only carries about 600 rounds). It is, getting down to basics, intended to suppress enemy fire until either an assault or maneuver is feasible or until help (air, artillery, another units, previous laid Claymore mines, etc) arrives. It is in no way an assault rifle, although of course it has been used as one.

    A medium machine gun is even heavier than the light machine gun, has a higher basic ammunition load, fires a heavier projectile, and can fire for a very long time. (18,000 rounds for a Stellite lined barrels, http://www.usord.com/weapons/stellite ). It can be slung and fired from the hip, but is intended to provide a "base of fire" that suppresses enemy fire for longer than the light machine gun, and has better armor/sandbag penetration.

    Machine guns have very little civil application, simply because they fire rifle bullets that travel a long way and penetrate most house walls. Collateral damage in defending against, say, a home invasion would be prohibitive; the defender might very well conclude that he would be better off dead than facing the consequences of shooting up the neighborhood and quite likely killing several bystanders. The 5.56 semi-automatic weapons ordinarily used for that task (the RDE bullpup is probably the best 5.56 semi-automatic on the market) are bad enough, and, really, completely unsuitable for use in a built up area. Legal short barreled shotguns (of which there are many on the commercial market) firing rabbit hunting loads are effective against unarmored home invaders at the usual short range, and limit collateral damage, but have limited ammunition capacity and can be ineffective against ceramic armor, which is surprisingly cheap now.

    So: as usual, the media lies its head off trying to make its readers think that something is worse than it is, _and_ simultaneously utterly fail (to put it nicely) to tell their readers about a very real hazard (over-penetration by 5.56mm rounds). The legacy media really do hate their readers (and their reader's neighbors). If they want to see hate, they should invest in a mirror. I, personally, make it a point to not have any friends who hate me.

    Counterinsurgency

    In order to lie you have to know what you are talking about. The people who write for the MSM have no idea what they are talking about when it comes to guns so they are incapable of actually lying about them. Instead they just print word salad filtered through the fog of ignorance but always with the implication that guns are bad.

  76. @prime noticer
    hence my comments about the first person to put their boot on Mars, and what a battle there will be over that.

    it's possible SpaceX may be able to avoid that, but it depends on how much freedom from NASA they can get by the time of a manned (womanned? theymanned?) Mars mission.

    if NASA still wants to force their way into calling the shots on astronauts by that point, then almost any random insane thing is possible. Intersectionauts?

    if SpaceX can break free from NASA by then, it would probably be a relatively routine space mission. as routine as landing on Mars for the first time can get, anyway.

    the current 2 astronauts assigned to work with SpaceX on the Dragon mission are pale penis person old line americans. there's no intersectional value in being a test pilot. but once all the SpaceX equipment is tested out and safe and ready to fly, who knows what astronauts NASA will try to assign to the Starship Super Heavy mission (or whatever they are calling it now).

    I don’t know how much influence NASA would have, the Mars mission SpaceX is running isn’t part of any NASA project. Assuming things go OK with the two to four astronauts to the ISS, I’m guessing Musk can send anyone he wants. NASA will be too preoccupied with the Artemis Moon project they won’t complete on time :).

  77. @J.Ross
    On YouTube there is an audio recording of a female cosmonaut encountering Soviet safety culture.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9Sgc1I9sjfc
    -------
    Winged hussars save Europe again, ask only for Spiritus and pork products in return:
    https://www.bbc.com/news/world-europe-49037275
    How long before we have this here? There's a community of patch enthusiasts on 4chan's weapons board who can generally have a new design out in about a month.

    This recording is dubious. The chances that it is real are pretty slim.

  78. @Richard S
    NYT now trumpeting Soviet PR victories in their propaganda war against late stage Western Capitalism. (See, the plural possessive pronoun can still allow for some subtle semantic ambiguity..)

    You know, I’d actually be prepared to accept a Soviet style system, if it meant our society functioned sufficiently well enough again to get back to exploring the galaxy?

    F**k it. Let’s put the antisocials into corrective labour camps and ruthlessly neutralise all the objective material forces which undermine the long term interests of the state. I’m literally starting to see old Brezhnev’s point.

    You are more right than you know. If you want to seriously explore and settle the galaxy your society must look more like the Soviet system than the modern liberal Euro-American.

  79. @Darwin
    I've met Tamayo Mendez's daughter and grandson (their family lives in Seattle and are, I believe, American citizens) and seen pictures of him -- his grandson looks exactly like him. From their appearance, any African descent would be extremely minor.

    Mendez is clearly not white. Nor is he mostly black. He looks sort of like a typical Mexican and I would guess that he has some Indian ancestry. There is some Indian blood in Cuba thought most of the natives died or were killed by the Spanish early on.

  80. @res

    Long live Laika the dog.
     
    Right. How could they leave out that the first animal in space was female?! Though perhaps the way that ended took some of the luster off of it as a feminist achievement.

    http://news.bbc.co.uk/2/hi/science/nature/2367681.stm

    Right. How could they leave out that the first animal in space was female?! Though perhaps the way that ended took some of the luster off of it as a feminist achievement.

    Life’s a bitch, as was Laika.

    She was also homeless, and part Samoyed. That term is microaggressive for people now, and soon it may be for dogs.

    In English it would be autosarcophage.

    https://drmarkgriffiths.wordpress.com/2012/05/04/dinner-for-one-a-beginners-guide-to-autosarcophagy/

  81. @AmericanNationalist
    Hmmm, perhaps the Ruskies sent minorities and women because they were more expendable than the White men. They did send up a female dog into space orbit before they sent a man.

    Soviets were not really worried about expending humans. They expended them by the millions. White, male – didn’t make any difference to them.

  82. @Abolish_public_education
    After Apollo, NASA was yet another bloated, entrenched, government bureaucracy in search of a mission.

    So it sold a gullible, US voting public on the idea of an “International” (meaning 97.9% paid by US taxpayers) Space Station.

    You know, in order to conduct Earth-shattering, scientific experiments. For example, to see how cockroaches do in zero-g; the Government can always find a meritorious pretext for its schemes.

    Not surprisingly, NASA never made a fuss about post-Soviet Russia selling ISS stay-overs to leisure travelers.

    Once again, middle class, US taxpayers got hammered in order to subsidize billionaires.

    The space shuttle was also full of bogus “science” projects sent up by elementary schools, complete with elementary school teacher. Both the bean seedlings and the teacher never made it back home. It turns out that there is really not that much science that can only be done in space, especially when it costs NASA $10,000/lb. to do it.

  83. @Abolish_public_education
    In Right Stuff, Tom Wolfe made mention of the brilliant, unsung, chief designer of the triumphant Soyuz program.

    I remember that the movie briefly showed grainy, B&W footage of some unidentifed Russian, broadly grinning at the sight of another successful launch; ours always blew up.

    When that comrade died, Izvestia finally gave him his due: Like two or three sentences.

    That’s gratitude for ya.

    The Soviets worried that the Americans would assassinate the Chief Constructor if his identity was known. The Soviet space program’s main purpose was to build ICBMs aimed at the US. Iranian nuclear scientists have met with many unfortunate accidents (presumably at the hands of the Israelis) so this was not a crazy fear.

    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
    Sometime, there's no "presumably" about it:

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Operation_Opera
  84. @Hail

    By Sophie Pinkham
     
    https://gsas.columbia.edu/sites/default/files/styles/hero_1280x640/public/2018-04/dscf2726_0.jpg

    (Pictured in 2018; from interview.)

    Full name: Sophie Charlotte Pinkham.

    Q. Where did you grow up?
    A. New York City.

    - 2000: Graduates from Hunter College High School, Manhattan. (Notable upperclassmen at the school when she was in 9th and 10th grades: Musical theaterist Lin-Manuel Miranda, class of 1998; MSNBCer Chris Hayes, 1997);
    - May 2004: Earns BA from Yale (English);
    - Summer [?] 2004: First visit to Russia -- "After I graduated, I went on an exchange program to work at the Red Cross in Siberia. I became fascinated by the subject of public health in the former Soviet Union, and worked in that field for several years [...];"
    - 2012: Earns MA from Columbia (Regional Studies -- Russia, Eurasia and Eastern Europe);
    - 2014: Earns another MA at Columbia, in Slavic Languages and Literatures;
    - 2016: Publishes book Black Square: Adventures in Post-Soviet Ukraine, which includes the essay "The Last Jew in Stalindorf." It "tells the story of [the writer and friends'] trip to Ukraine to film [a documentary], and our trip to Anya and Leeza's grandmother's former village in eastern Ukraine."
    - Late 2010s: PhD candidate in Slavic Languages, Columbia Univ. (began in or about 2014, presumably finished by 2020).

    Q. Where is your favorite place to eat on/around [Columbia Univ.] campus?
    A. Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    Q. Where is your favorite place to eat on/around [Columbia Univ.] campus?
    A. Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    I think she misunderstood the question and thought they wanted to know her favorite place to be seen pretending to eat.

  85. In July 1980, Vietnamese pilot Phạm Tuân became the first Asian…to travel to space. Just two months after Phạm’s voyage, the Cuban Arnaldo Tamayo Méndez became the first person of African descent to go to space, while it would take the U.S. three more years to send an African-American.

    Instead of waiting for white people from the U.S. or Soviet Union to give them a ride into space, why didn’t all of the various peoples of color just build their own programs and launch themselves into space? The space race could have been more interesting if there were multiple competitors. The article is about equality in space. If everybody’s equal, it shouldn’t have been a problem.

  86. @Cloudbuster
    Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    B.S. Nobody's favorite food is Ethiopian. Baby food on soggy pancakes.

    At least they use spices. I once was served by an Ethiopian waitress in a well known seafood restaurant in Boston. The food was utterly devoid of seasoning of any kind. I’m not even sure if they used salt and pepper. I asked her how she could stand eating such bland food and she (quite cleverly) retorted that the food was intentionally unseasoned so that you could taste the freshness of the seafood unmasked by any spices. But I would bet that she kept a little jar of berbere in her purse anyway though I couldn’t get her to admit it.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  87. @Jack Hanson
    Kind of wish the Russians would have managed to have won the Space Race. You think the communists would have left a big ball of resources there for the taking alone? Hell no! They would have launched rockets every hour on the hour to mine that rock.

    Hopefully the Russians or Chinese pick up the torch. The West thinks progress is an app that lets you crowdsource a dog walker.

    Did the NYT mention that LBJ tried forcing an unqualified black pilot on Yeager? That's one of the more interesting bits of The Right Stuff. That and the enemas.

    It was the Kennedies (Bobby and Jack), not LBJ.

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke

    It was the Kennedies (Bobby and Jack), not LBJ.
     
    I used to buy into the Kennedy mythology. Now I think, HBD-like, that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. It's pretty amazing that liberals managed to get the public to think of JFK, son of a mobster, as the living incarnation of King Arthur.
  88. @Jack D
    The Soviets worried that the Americans would assassinate the Chief Constructor if his identity was known. The Soviet space program's main purpose was to build ICBMs aimed at the US. Iranian nuclear scientists have met with many unfortunate accidents (presumably at the hands of the Israelis) so this was not a crazy fear.

    Sometime, there’s no “presumably” about it:

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Operation_Opera

  89. @James Bowery
    The 50th anniversary of mankind's landing on the moon should be a day of mourning. Only a few can imagine what the world today would be like if JFK had challenged American private enterprise to open the space frontier, rather than committing the US to a Soviet-style centrally planned "program".

    In that single betrayal of American values JFK may have closed off the only escape route for The Nation of Settlers from "The Nation of Immigrants", with the result that we now face civil war.

    But then, lest we forget, he did, after all, write the book, the title of which helped make "A Nation of Immigrants" into the ersatz identity of "Who We Are".

    https://jimbowery.blogspot.com/2018/04/necessity-and-incentives-opening-space.html

    Only a few can imagine what the world today would be like if JFK had challenged American private enterprise to open the space frontier

    I’m a true believer in the free-market, but had JFK issued such a challenge to the private sector, I still don’t think it could have pulled it off.

    I don’t think there has ever been enough ultra-rich, thrill/status-seeking, space tourists to go around.

    How many space telescopes, on the Moon, at L1, etc. do amateur astronomers need?

    Gold would have to be a lot more expensive to justify a mining expedition to some distant, celestial object.

    And so on.

    Gravity is just too big of a problem.

    Those billionaires who are currently touting their space ventures are, IMHO, full of baloney. If they have any serious interest in making a profit, it can only come by scheming to win USAF, launch contracts.

    Welfare for billionaires.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Manned spacecraft don't make a lot of sense but they seem to be the only kind that capture the public's imagination. Going to Mars or the moon through the vacuum of space is not like Columbus traveling to the fertile shores of Hispaniola. It's a place that is inherently hostile to humans and you have to bring along a lot of extra weight and expense to keep them from dying instantly and put their lives in grave danger each time you send them up. Pretty much anything that a human can do in space can be done better and cheaper and safer by an unmanned mission.
    , @Henry Bowman
    Rather have welfare for Space Colonization rather then welfare for gimmigrants.
  90. @gunther
    The Russian state is so woke. With some of their guiding influence we could get the more of right people elected to help out here.

    In other news:


    A B.C. Human Rights Tribunal hearing devolved into repeated outbursts and name-calling this week as it considered a transgender woman’s complaint that a home-based salon discriminated against her by denying her a Brazilian wax.

    At one point, the complainant compared the business owner to a neo-Nazi...
     
    https://nationalpost.com/news/canada/accusations-fly-at-human-rights-hearing-into-transgender-womans-brazilian-wax-complaint

    I’ve read the wax discrimination story. The intact man who identifies as a woman is suing several salons. He also has a website advising little girls about feminine hygiene. He weighs about 300 pds

  91. @TheMediumIsTheMassage
    So the New York Times is now literally parroting Soviet propaganda. You can't make this up.

    Parroting Soviet propaganda since 1918. Did you ever see the Slimes glorification of Castro?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    One thing I never thought they'd stoop to and still cannot get over is praising Norks for not being named Trump.
  92. @guest
    Racist white racist capitalist countries like the U.S. sent colored folk from around the world to prestigious universities, too. Because it comes in handy when the CIA lands in the Democratic Republic of Ooga-Booga to find Harvard-educated minds at hand.

    Obama’s Mom’s alleged sperm donor was one of the Eisenhower Kennedy African students

  93. @AmericanNationalist
    Hmmm, perhaps the Ruskies sent minorities and women because they were more expendable than the White men. They did send up a female dog into space orbit before they sent a man.

    They did send up a female dog into space orbit before they sent a man.

    Yes, poor Laika, the first space dog got sent on a one-way mission into orbit.

  94. @Jack D
    Tereshkova is still alive and kicking and is a member of the Russian Parliament and looking good for 82, an age at which the average Russian man has been dead for a decade:

    https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/4/4a/Valentina_Tereshkova_%282017-03-06%29.jpg

    She strikes me as the kind of person who always lands on her feet and not as a shrinking violet. She came to cosmonautics via skydiving, not a hobby for the faint hearted.

    You have to give the Russians credit where credit is due and I don't buy the stories that Tereskova was terrified - what are your sources?

    It was something I read once somewhere. It might have been wrong.

    I didn’t know she was a Vulcan.

  95. The Russians, bless ’em, were the first to put a Chimp in space too.

  96. @Anonymous
    If equality is the thing, how about NO NATION send ships into space? That way, all nations will be equal in non-achievement.

    Also, surely NYT knows it was just a propaganda stunt on the part of USSR. The Russian space program, like the US one, was entirely a white affair. And Russia had its share of 'Nazi' engineers working on the project.

    Now, when will NYT include a Palestinian-American columnist? That would truly be one giant step for Diversity-kind.

    I see what you did there. I suppose it would be pointless to mention that the family that “owns” the Times (of course, it’s really owned by some Mexican) has been Episcopalian for generations.

    Oh, and that the Times and its Jewish writers do a perfectly good job of attacking Israel on their own. (Wow, Jews don’t all have the same opinions? Imagine that!) But I guess the temptation to take the brown man’s side is too tempting for anybody.

    • Replies: @HammerJack

    I see what you did there. I suppose it would be pointless to mention that the family that “owns” the Times (of course, it’s really owned by some Mexican) has been Episcopalian for generations.
     
    Not only pointless but totally inaccurate. Jewish propagandists like to pretend that either 1) Carlos Slim is the real owner (he never owned even a substantial proportion of non-voting shares) and when that fails they say that 2) the (Jewish) Sulzberger family is actually Episcopalian (they claim that when it suits them). We've heard it all before. You are an amateur propagandist.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/the-sulzberger-family-a-complicated-jewish-legacy-at-the-new-york-times/

  97. @Counterinsurgency

    Gun running Long Beach customs agent had 41 machines guns stashed at home
     
    You can tell who never had to run a machine gun. There were no machine guns in the picture of firearms seized. There were some assault rifles, short- and long- barreled. Assault rifles provide a brief interval of automatic fire, intended for use during ambushes and assaults. Magazines were originally limited to 20 rounds to give the barrels time to cool because prolonged automatic fire will overheat the barrel.
    The original machine guns, the Maxims, had a water cooled barrel with a radiator and could literally fire as long as they had ammunition, hours of continuous fire if necessary (as it was at times during WW I). Contemporary machine guns in common use are (as far as I've seen) all air cooled. The machine guns carried by troops are light machine guns. A light machine gun is portable, but too heavy (hence to low a slew rate) to be preferred for close in assault. It has a thicker barrel and more ammunition per magazine (or pouch, or whatever), but is still limited by what the gunner can carry (he current US light machine gun only carries about 600 rounds). It is, getting down to basics, intended to suppress enemy fire until either an assault or maneuver is feasible or until help (air, artillery, another units, previous laid Claymore mines, etc) arrives. It is in no way an assault rifle, although of course it has been used as one.

    A medium machine gun is even heavier than the light machine gun, has a higher basic ammunition load, fires a heavier projectile, and can fire for a very long time. (18,000 rounds for a Stellite lined barrels, http://www.usord.com/weapons/stellite ). It can be slung and fired from the hip, but is intended to provide a "base of fire" that suppresses enemy fire for longer than the light machine gun, and has better armor/sandbag penetration.

    Machine guns have very little civil application, simply because they fire rifle bullets that travel a long way and penetrate most house walls. Collateral damage in defending against, say, a home invasion would be prohibitive; the defender might very well conclude that he would be better off dead than facing the consequences of shooting up the neighborhood and quite likely killing several bystanders. The 5.56 semi-automatic weapons ordinarily used for that task (the RDE bullpup is probably the best 5.56 semi-automatic on the market) are bad enough, and, really, completely unsuitable for use in a built up area. Legal short barreled shotguns (of which there are many on the commercial market) firing rabbit hunting loads are effective against unarmored home invaders at the usual short range, and limit collateral damage, but have limited ammunition capacity and can be ineffective against ceramic armor, which is surprisingly cheap now.

    So: as usual, the media lies its head off trying to make its readers think that something is worse than it is, _and_ simultaneously utterly fail (to put it nicely) to tell their readers about a very real hazard (over-penetration by 5.56mm rounds). The legacy media really do hate their readers (and their reader's neighbors). If they want to see hate, they should invest in a mirror. I, personally, make it a point to not have any friends who hate me.

    Counterinsurgency

    There are technical definitions, and there are legal definitions. Legally, assault rifles are machine guns, even though they aren’t.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    There are technical definitions, and there are legal definitions. Legally, assault rifles are machine guns, even though they aren’t.
     
    It's an important distinction, especially if you want to avoid entanglements with the police, but . . .

    "If the law supposes that," said Mr. Bumble,… "the law is a ass—a idiot. If that's the eye of the law, the law is a bachelor; and the worst I wish the law is that his eye may be opened by experience—by experience."
    Charles Dickens, _Oliver Twist_
    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=If+the+law+believes+that%2C+the+law+is+an+ass&t=ffsb&atb=v114-1&ia=web

    Sort of like the classic old wife's comment on a sermon by a celibate priest on marriage:
    "Would to God I knew as little about it as that one."

    Counterinsurgency
  98. I wanted to say that the Times is deliberately trying to conceal the obvious well-known fact that this was all Soviet propaganda aimed at picked up third-world allies, and perhaps more importantly American left-wing ones. (The Soviets *loved* to go on about how supposedly terrible the US was toward blacks, for multiple reasons- get American white liberal support, get American black support, get third world support, fool their own people, etc.)

    But then I remembered that all left-wing media today is run by a bunch of simple-minded, uneducated children. They probably *believe* this nonsense themselves.

    • Replies: @vinteuil

    ...all left-wing media today is run by a bunch of simple-minded, uneducated children. They probably *believe* this nonsense themselves.
     
    Precisely so. To say of them that they've learned nothing and forgotten nothing would be to give them too much credit: they know nothing of the past, and least of all of their own ideological antecedents.
    , @J.Ross
    Yes, there is now a bizarre situation where they try to have it both ways: Russians are bad and scary (witness the glowing horrors of the Soviet Union!!) but Soviet and Marxist thinking is noble.
  99. Putin needs to announce that the USSR is going back into business. The freakout that would cause in NYT contributors would be priceless.

  100. @Nachum
    I see what you did there. I suppose it would be pointless to mention that the family that "owns" the Times (of course, it's really owned by some Mexican) has been Episcopalian for generations.

    Oh, and that the Times and its Jewish writers do a perfectly good job of attacking Israel on their own. (Wow, Jews don't all have the same opinions? Imagine that!) But I guess the temptation to take the brown man's side is too tempting for anybody.

    I see what you did there. I suppose it would be pointless to mention that the family that “owns” the Times (of course, it’s really owned by some Mexican) has been Episcopalian for generations.

    Not only pointless but totally inaccurate. Jewish propagandists like to pretend that either 1) Carlos Slim is the real owner (he never owned even a substantial proportion of non-voting shares) and when that fails they say that 2) the (Jewish) Sulzberger family is actually Episcopalian (they claim that when it suits them). We’ve heard it all before. You are an amateur propagandist.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/the-sulzberger-family-a-complicated-jewish-legacy-at-the-new-york-times/

    • Replies: @Jack D
    I read the article in the link and it only confirms Nachum's point.

    Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. was raised in his mother’s Episcopalian faith and later stopped practicing religion. He and his wife, Gail Gregg, were married by a Presbyterian minister.
     
    No one doubt that the Ochs family was Jewish at one point (although they did a pretty damn good job of trying to hide it by, for example, being anti-Zionist and not running any stories about the Holocaust while it was going on) but that point was a long time ago (Sulzburger Jr. is almost 70 and he has been a Christian his entire life. The last fully (but indifferently) Jewish Sulzberger was his dad Punch, born in 1926. The last Sulzberger who married a Jew was his grandpa Arthur Hays Sulzberger, born in 1891.

    Like most convert families, rather than being pro-Jewish, the Sulzbergers go out of their way to show that they have no special attachment to their former religion.

  101. @Nachum
    I wanted to say that the Times is deliberately trying to conceal the obvious well-known fact that this was all Soviet propaganda aimed at picked up third-world allies, and perhaps more importantly American left-wing ones. (The Soviets *loved* to go on about how supposedly terrible the US was toward blacks, for multiple reasons- get American white liberal support, get American black support, get third world support, fool their own people, etc.)

    But then I remembered that all left-wing media today is run by a bunch of simple-minded, uneducated children. They probably *believe* this nonsense themselves.

    …all left-wing media today is run by a bunch of simple-minded, uneducated children. They probably *believe* this nonsense themselves.

    Precisely so. To say of them that they’ve learned nothing and forgotten nothing would be to give them too much credit: they know nothing of the past, and least of all of their own ideological antecedents.

  102. Hey, the US sent the first monkey into space; there must be some Diversity Wokemon points for that, no?

  103. @Jack Hanson
    Kind of wish the Russians would have managed to have won the Space Race. You think the communists would have left a big ball of resources there for the taking alone? Hell no! They would have launched rockets every hour on the hour to mine that rock.

    Hopefully the Russians or Chinese pick up the torch. The West thinks progress is an app that lets you crowdsource a dog walker.

    Did the NYT mention that LBJ tried forcing an unqualified black pilot on Yeager? That's one of the more interesting bits of The Right Stuff. That and the enemas.

    You think the communists would have left a big ball of resources there for the taking alone? Hell no! They would have launched rockets every hour on the hour to mine that rock.

    If the US had been the Überkapitalists they claim to be, NASA would have salted the moon with gold nuggets and diamonds, and the place would already look like Vegas via private enterprise.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In Heinlein's "The Man Who Sold the Moon," the arch-capitalist Mr. Harriman who finances the first moon trip gives his astronaut a bag of diamonds to take along and bring back and accidentally spill it in front of the press because Mr. Harriman had pre-negotiated with DeBeers that if diamonds were found on the Moon, he'd sell them the monopoly on Moon diamonds.

    The [spoiler alert] surprise is that when the astronaut gets back, he tells Mr. Harriman the surface of the moon is covered with diamonds.

  104. @The Alarmist

    You think the communists would have left a big ball of resources there for the taking alone? Hell no! They would have launched rockets every hour on the hour to mine that rock.
     
    If the US had been the Überkapitalists they claim to be, NASA would have salted the moon with gold nuggets and diamonds, and the place would already look like Vegas via private enterprise.

    In Heinlein’s “The Man Who Sold the Moon,” the arch-capitalist Mr. Harriman who finances the first moon trip gives his astronaut a bag of diamonds to take along and bring back and accidentally spill it in front of the press because Mr. Harriman had pre-negotiated with DeBeers that if diamonds were found on the Moon, he’d sell them the monopoly on Moon diamonds.

    The [spoiler alert] surprise is that when the astronaut gets back, he tells Mr. Harriman the surface of the moon is covered with diamonds.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Which goes to show that there is little new under the Sun. That actually sounds like a Rod Serling Twilight Zone ending.

    I think I recently read a blurb that Tarantino was contemplating doing an R-Rated Star Trek, so we might finally get to see space exploration as it really might be.

  105. @Steve Sailer
    In Heinlein's "The Man Who Sold the Moon," the arch-capitalist Mr. Harriman who finances the first moon trip gives his astronaut a bag of diamonds to take along and bring back and accidentally spill it in front of the press because Mr. Harriman had pre-negotiated with DeBeers that if diamonds were found on the Moon, he'd sell them the monopoly on Moon diamonds.

    The [spoiler alert] surprise is that when the astronaut gets back, he tells Mr. Harriman the surface of the moon is covered with diamonds.

    Which goes to show that there is little new under the Sun. That actually sounds like a Rod Serling Twilight Zone ending.

    I think I recently read a blurb that Tarantino was contemplating doing an R-Rated Star Trek, so we might finally get to see space exploration as it really might be.

  106. @Counterinsurgency

    Considering Nasa now has to use Russian rockets to launch satellites into orbit, you might well say that the Russians won the space race.

     

    After POTUS Kennedy's "stunt" to show US superiority was executed, and JFK got himself assassinated, possibly by giving RFK permission to prosecute organized crime, the Democrats withdrew from the space race because it favored Republicans (those engineers and defense workers were Republicans). The Republicans didn't fight that - capital was short and they'd given up on the great engineering projects of the Gilded Age; those who favored NASA were referred to as 'space nuts".

    Instead, the US withdrew into showbiz. Space generated pictures -- of far off planets, moons, stars, nebulae, and the spectacular launch of Space Shuttles, experimental prototypes that should have been immediately replaced by a next generation, but which were retained until they killed two full crews. The US attempts at the National Launch System (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Launch_System) were cursory at best, and appeared to be a minimum cost effort (more showbiz) to silence the space lobby. There's no business like show business, and the US population, largely European descended at the time, was the target of this vast deception operation. The operation's objective appears to have been to hide that the European descended had no future in government planning.
    The Russian program continued as engineering, and has developed a real space capability, although an underfunded one. The US has recently permitted private sector launch developments (previously forbidden under Federal law), and promises to equal Russian achievements. And, of course, China has vast ambitions in trans-Low earth orbit activities.

    Counterinsurgency

    JFK’s assassination didn’t have anything to do with organized crime.Face reality – it was just Oswald.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency

    JFK’s assassination didn’t have anything to do with organized crime. Face reality – it was just Oswald.
     
    Actually, that's my preferred hypothesis -- Oswald did it. Simple, consistent with the evidence, in character for all participants. Pierson's _Shattered Consensus: The Rise and Decline of America’s Postwar Political Order_ suggests that it was the raw fact that a Communist had murdered their idealized leader was what drove the Jewish community (hence Liberalism) into what amounts to a psychotic break. Kennedy's assassination was, perhaps, the final straw in the failure of long-range Jewish plans to make the world safe for Judaism by:
    a) Converting the Western laboring classes to protect Jews through socialism.
    b) Gaining enough control of Western government to directly protect Jews.
    c) Gaining absolute control of a major Power (Russian Empire/USSR) to enforce protection for the Jews.
    d) Providing a shining example of how great life would be if only Jewish ideology controlled Western politics (USSR again).
    e) Electing a figurehead that would bureaucratize the US and provide jobs and protection to the Jews.

    _Every one of the above plans failed very badly_, many with serious blowback. When even (e) failed, and failed because of (c) (which was supporting F. Castro at the time), they lost it and came up with:
    f) Destroy Western civilization and genocide the whites. (Berkeley Free Speech Movement -> Open Borders)
    which is currently in process of failing.

    Counterinsurgency
  107. @Jack D
    It was the Kennedies (Bobby and Jack), not LBJ.

    It was the Kennedies (Bobby and Jack), not LBJ.

    I used to buy into the Kennedy mythology. Now I think, HBD-like, that the apple doesn’t fall far from the tree. It’s pretty amazing that liberals managed to get the public to think of JFK, son of a mobster, as the living incarnation of King Arthur.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    You're right but Yeager makes it clear in his memoirs that Bobby was the one driving the push to take a black astronaut.
  108. @Duke84
    JFK's assassination didn't have anything to do with organized crime.Face reality - it was just Oswald.

    JFK’s assassination didn’t have anything to do with organized crime. Face reality – it was just Oswald.

    Actually, that’s my preferred hypothesis — Oswald did it. Simple, consistent with the evidence, in character for all participants. Pierson’s _Shattered Consensus: The Rise and Decline of America’s Postwar Political Order_ suggests that it was the raw fact that a Communist had murdered their idealized leader was what drove the Jewish community (hence Liberalism) into what amounts to a psychotic break. Kennedy’s assassination was, perhaps, the final straw in the failure of long-range Jewish plans to make the world safe for Judaism by:
    a) Converting the Western laboring classes to protect Jews through socialism.
    b) Gaining enough control of Western government to directly protect Jews.
    c) Gaining absolute control of a major Power (Russian Empire/USSR) to enforce protection for the Jews.
    d) Providing a shining example of how great life would be if only Jewish ideology controlled Western politics (USSR again).
    e) Electing a figurehead that would bureaucratize the US and provide jobs and protection to the Jews.

    _Every one of the above plans failed very badly_, many with serious blowback. When even (e) failed, and failed because of (c) (which was supporting F. Castro at the time), they lost it and came up with:
    f) Destroy Western civilization and genocide the whites. (Berkeley Free Speech Movement -> Open Borders)
    which is currently in process of failing.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Disagree: Diversity is Great!
  109. @anon
    Laika was the first Soviet dog in space. Songs and stories have been written about her, even though she didn't have impeccable socialist credentials.

    Laika was the first Soviet dog in space

    The nasty truth about Laika eventually came out, and it is really sad. She was cooked to death in space due to a malfunction.

  110. @Redneck farmer
    There are technical definitions, and there are legal definitions. Legally, assault rifles are machine guns, even though they aren't.

    There are technical definitions, and there are legal definitions. Legally, assault rifles are machine guns, even though they aren’t.

    It’s an important distinction, especially if you want to avoid entanglements with the police, but . . .

    “If the law supposes that,” said Mr. Bumble,… “the law is a ass—a idiot. If that’s the eye of the law, the law is a bachelor; and the worst I wish the law is that his eye may be opened by experience—by experience.”
    Charles Dickens, _Oliver Twist_
    https://duckduckgo.com/?q=If+the+law+believes+that%2C+the+law+is+an+ass&t=ffsb&atb=v114-1&ia=web

    Sort of like the classic old wife’s comment on a sermon by a celibate priest on marriage:
    “Would to God I knew as little about it as that one.”

    Counterinsurgency

  111. Looking forward to seeing Tarzan being recast as a black man.

  112. @Johann Ricke

    It was the Kennedies (Bobby and Jack), not LBJ.
     
    I used to buy into the Kennedy mythology. Now I think, HBD-like, that the apple doesn't fall far from the tree. It's pretty amazing that liberals managed to get the public to think of JFK, son of a mobster, as the living incarnation of King Arthur.

    You’re right but Yeager makes it clear in his memoirs that Bobby was the one driving the push to take a black astronaut.

  113. @Nachum
    I wanted to say that the Times is deliberately trying to conceal the obvious well-known fact that this was all Soviet propaganda aimed at picked up third-world allies, and perhaps more importantly American left-wing ones. (The Soviets *loved* to go on about how supposedly terrible the US was toward blacks, for multiple reasons- get American white liberal support, get American black support, get third world support, fool their own people, etc.)

    But then I remembered that all left-wing media today is run by a bunch of simple-minded, uneducated children. They probably *believe* this nonsense themselves.

    Yes, there is now a bizarre situation where they try to have it both ways: Russians are bad and scary (witness the glowing horrors of the Soviet Union!!) but Soviet and Marxist thinking is noble.

  114. @Alden
    Parroting Soviet propaganda since 1918. Did you ever see the Slimes glorification of Castro?

    One thing I never thought they’d stoop to and still cannot get over is praising Norks for not being named Trump.

  115. @Abolish_public_education

    Only a few can imagine what the world today would be like if JFK had challenged American private enterprise to open the space frontier
     
    I’m a true believer in the free-market, but had JFK issued such a challenge to the private sector, I still don’t think it could have pulled it off.

    I don’t think there has ever been enough ultra-rich, thrill/status-seeking, space tourists to go around.

    How many space telescopes, on the Moon, at L1, etc. do amateur astronomers need?

    Gold would have to be a lot more expensive to justify a mining expedition to some distant, celestial object.

    And so on.

    Gravity is just too big of a problem.

    Those billionaires who are currently touting their space ventures are, IMHO, full of baloney. If they have any serious interest in making a profit, it can only come by scheming to win USAF, launch contracts.

    Welfare for billionaires.

    Manned spacecraft don’t make a lot of sense but they seem to be the only kind that capture the public’s imagination. Going to Mars or the moon through the vacuum of space is not like Columbus traveling to the fertile shores of Hispaniola. It’s a place that is inherently hostile to humans and you have to bring along a lot of extra weight and expense to keep them from dying instantly and put their lives in grave danger each time you send them up. Pretty much anything that a human can do in space can be done better and cheaper and safer by an unmanned mission.

  116. @HammerJack

    I see what you did there. I suppose it would be pointless to mention that the family that “owns” the Times (of course, it’s really owned by some Mexican) has been Episcopalian for generations.
     
    Not only pointless but totally inaccurate. Jewish propagandists like to pretend that either 1) Carlos Slim is the real owner (he never owned even a substantial proportion of non-voting shares) and when that fails they say that 2) the (Jewish) Sulzberger family is actually Episcopalian (they claim that when it suits them). We've heard it all before. You are an amateur propagandist.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/the-sulzberger-family-a-complicated-jewish-legacy-at-the-new-york-times/

    I read the article in the link and it only confirms Nachum’s point.

    Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. was raised in his mother’s Episcopalian faith and later stopped practicing religion. He and his wife, Gail Gregg, were married by a Presbyterian minister.

    No one doubt that the Ochs family was Jewish at one point (although they did a pretty damn good job of trying to hide it by, for example, being anti-Zionist and not running any stories about the Holocaust while it was going on) but that point was a long time ago (Sulzburger Jr. is almost 70 and he has been a Christian his entire life. The last fully (but indifferently) Jewish Sulzberger was his dad Punch, born in 1926. The last Sulzberger who married a Jew was his grandpa Arthur Hays Sulzberger, born in 1891.

    Like most convert families, rather than being pro-Jewish, the Sulzbergers go out of their way to show that they have no special attachment to their former religion.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    All of the NYT families are Jewish and if you think Jews consider you "non-Jewish" just because you "decided" you are not-Jewish for public consumption then you are just pretending.

    The NYT is likely the most Jewish of all the major papers in the world. Which is really saying something. Pretending otherwise is pretty foolish.

    , @Johann Ricke

    Like most convert families, rather than being pro-Jewish, the Sulzbergers go out of their way to show that they have no special attachment to their former religion.
     
    There is a reason the phrase "zeal of the convert" exists. Some convert just to blend in. Others are motivated by religious zeal, and go out of their way to demonstrate antipathy towards their prior co-religionists. Given that the vast majority of Christians have pagan ancestors, some of whom were targeted by crusaders (not that pagans were any less prone to coercion in matters of religion), the Sulzberger tilt against their former co-religionists should come as no surprise.
  117. @PiltdownMan
    There's a great Chuck Yeager story somewhere on the web that I read years ago. If I can find the links again, I'll post them.

    Chuck Yeager was the US Military Attache at the American embassy in Islamabad, Pakistan in 1971, when Pakistan and India went to war. The usual diplomatic protocol in such situations is for foreign countries to be strictly neutral, and for military attaches to recuse themselves from their jobs for the duration of the conflict, unless there is an active military alliance and treaty and we go to war as well.

    Yeager immediately applied for personal leave and disappeared from the Embassy, cryptically saying "my boys need me."

    Apparently, he spent the duration of the short war at Pakistani Air Force headquarters as an observer at the interrogation of Indian Air Force pilots who had been shot down. One Indian reported (again on the web) that he was overwhelmed to learn that the white man in the room was the great Chuck Yeager, and asked for his autograph.

    I'm inclined to believe the story is true, not just because it is too good not to be, but also because of the links that I saw it on. As I said, I'll post if I can find them again.

    PiltdownMan:

    Somewhat in confirmation, I do know that Yeager has highly praised the combat proficiency of Pakistani pilots.

    • Replies: @nebulafox
    Rawalpindi doesn't send dummies to go spend time training with the Americans, they send the best they've got. It's part of why, despite Pakistan's more than negative image in America, they punch above their weight in Washington. Those friendships that spawn in America's military-industrial complex can run deep.
  118. @Cloudbuster
    Awash, an Ethiopian restaurant.

    B.S. Nobody's favorite food is Ethiopian. Baby food on soggy pancakes.

    Nobody’s favorite food is Ethiopian. Baby food on soggy pancakes.

    I actually like Ethiopian food quite a bit (I’ve had it about a dozen times since the early 90s).

    Although it is not my favorite, that much is true.

  119. @Jack D
    I read the article in the link and it only confirms Nachum's point.

    Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. was raised in his mother’s Episcopalian faith and later stopped practicing religion. He and his wife, Gail Gregg, were married by a Presbyterian minister.
     
    No one doubt that the Ochs family was Jewish at one point (although they did a pretty damn good job of trying to hide it by, for example, being anti-Zionist and not running any stories about the Holocaust while it was going on) but that point was a long time ago (Sulzburger Jr. is almost 70 and he has been a Christian his entire life. The last fully (but indifferently) Jewish Sulzberger was his dad Punch, born in 1926. The last Sulzberger who married a Jew was his grandpa Arthur Hays Sulzberger, born in 1891.

    Like most convert families, rather than being pro-Jewish, the Sulzbergers go out of their way to show that they have no special attachment to their former religion.

    All of the NYT families are Jewish and if you think Jews consider you “non-Jewish” just because you “decided” you are not-Jewish for public consumption then you are just pretending.

    The NYT is likely the most Jewish of all the major papers in the world. Which is really saying something. Pretending otherwise is pretty foolish.

  120. Ah always said . . . astronaut values don’t stop at the border . . .

    Its better that we fight the space race up there, so we don’t have to fight the space race here, which would be really dangerous space race riots with phasers and photon torpedoes an stuff

  121. @Abolish_public_education
    After Apollo, NASA was yet another bloated, entrenched, government bureaucracy in search of a mission.

    So it sold a gullible, US voting public on the idea of an “International” (meaning 97.9% paid by US taxpayers) Space Station.

    You know, in order to conduct Earth-shattering, scientific experiments. For example, to see how cockroaches do in zero-g; the Government can always find a meritorious pretext for its schemes.

    Not surprisingly, NASA never made a fuss about post-Soviet Russia selling ISS stay-overs to leisure travelers.

    Once again, middle class, US taxpayers got hammered in order to subsidize billionaires.

    I will not weaponize space . . . but my good friends in the PRC will and are! So is my good friend Vlad. So America should not try to so that it does not make the others mad and attack. Weakness and groveling will keep you safe.

  122. @Jack D
    I read the article in the link and it only confirms Nachum's point.

    Arthur Ochs Sulzberger Jr. was raised in his mother’s Episcopalian faith and later stopped practicing religion. He and his wife, Gail Gregg, were married by a Presbyterian minister.
     
    No one doubt that the Ochs family was Jewish at one point (although they did a pretty damn good job of trying to hide it by, for example, being anti-Zionist and not running any stories about the Holocaust while it was going on) but that point was a long time ago (Sulzburger Jr. is almost 70 and he has been a Christian his entire life. The last fully (but indifferently) Jewish Sulzberger was his dad Punch, born in 1926. The last Sulzberger who married a Jew was his grandpa Arthur Hays Sulzberger, born in 1891.

    Like most convert families, rather than being pro-Jewish, the Sulzbergers go out of their way to show that they have no special attachment to their former religion.

    Like most convert families, rather than being pro-Jewish, the Sulzbergers go out of their way to show that they have no special attachment to their former religion.

    There is a reason the phrase “zeal of the convert” exists. Some convert just to blend in. Others are motivated by religious zeal, and go out of their way to demonstrate antipathy towards their prior co-religionists. Given that the vast majority of Christians have pagan ancestors, some of whom were targeted by crusaders (not that pagans were any less prone to coercion in matters of religion), the Sulzberger tilt against their former co-religionists should come as no surprise.

  123. @Jack D
    When they were Socialist Nationalists they were good but now that they are National Socialists they are bad. It's like the difference between calling blacks colored people (bad) and people of color (good).

    Which is pretty odd, because as I alluded to earlier, the Communists held a lot of social and cultural views that would be considered quite reactionary today, state atheism and women in the workforce aside. From what I read in the Mitrokhin Archives, their security services genuinely believed that the woke stuff that originated in the 1960s-particularly concerning gender, sexuality, and family formation-were bizarre forms of late-capitalist decadence that were being actively pushed by the Americans to subvert their societies, and thus needed to be kept out of the Warsaw Pact at all costs.

  124. @Dan Hayes
    PiltdownMan:

    Somewhat in confirmation, I do know that Yeager has highly praised the combat proficiency of Pakistani pilots.

    Rawalpindi doesn’t send dummies to go spend time training with the Americans, they send the best they’ve got. It’s part of why, despite Pakistan’s more than negative image in America, they punch above their weight in Washington. Those friendships that spawn in America’s military-industrial complex can run deep.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  125. @Abolish_public_education

    Only a few can imagine what the world today would be like if JFK had challenged American private enterprise to open the space frontier
     
    I’m a true believer in the free-market, but had JFK issued such a challenge to the private sector, I still don’t think it could have pulled it off.

    I don’t think there has ever been enough ultra-rich, thrill/status-seeking, space tourists to go around.

    How many space telescopes, on the Moon, at L1, etc. do amateur astronomers need?

    Gold would have to be a lot more expensive to justify a mining expedition to some distant, celestial object.

    And so on.

    Gravity is just too big of a problem.

    Those billionaires who are currently touting their space ventures are, IMHO, full of baloney. If they have any serious interest in making a profit, it can only come by scheming to win USAF, launch contracts.

    Welfare for billionaires.

    Rather have welfare for Space Colonization rather then welfare for gimmigrants.

  126. The Soviets could get by with almost anyone in their capsule that early. They didn’t have much to do beyond enjoy the ride. We did the same with Chimps until it was safe enough to put real pilots on board.

  127. So this means that the US beat the Soviets in the Space Race because its program was less diverse…STOP…STOP…CRIMETHOUGHT!

  128. This is pure Brave Samuel. The Russians are deeply racist and the only reason they sent a black person to space is because they wouldn’t miss him if the mission failed fatally. Blacks are not welcome in Russia even today. There are videos on YouTube of black people who are native to Russia who can tell you all about it.

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