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Andrew Yang would rather that Americans live in shipping containers due to overcrowding than that Americans use their democratic rights to vote to cut back on immigration.

Also, maggot burgers!

 
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  1. Flying cars are the consumer product of the future, and always will be. Remember what they said about the amphibious kind– drive like a boat, sailed like a car.

    But containerization of living space doesn’t have to be pedestrian. The tri-national architect Moshe Safdie is still in business.

  2. Andrew solution to the H1B-L1B VISA Problem:let in as many Asian Tech Workers into the US as want to come….

    Doesn’t this make Andrew Yang a GENOCIDAL MANIAC in intent towards Native Born White American Tech Workers?

    BRING BACK THE 1882 CHINESE LEGAL IMMIGRANT EXCLUSION ACT!!!!

    SEND HIM BACK!!!!

  3. Andrew Yang’s solution to the H1B-L1B VISA Problem:let in as many Asian Tech Workers into the US as want to come….

    Doesn’t this make Andrew Yang a GENOCIDAL MANIAC in intent towards Native Born White American Tech Workers?

    BRING BACK THE 1882 CHINESE LEGAL IMMIGRANT EXCLUSION ACT!!!!

    SEND HIM BACK!!!!

  4. Arclight says:

    An honest media might care to look at building permits in CA over the last 50 years, compare the amount of immigration it has experienced and possibly calculate how much cheaper homes would be absent the addition of millions of new arrivals.

    • Agree: Buzz Mohawk, Cortes
    • Replies: @Patriot
    , @Amerimutt Golems
  5. Equilibrating our standard of living with the third world countries our immigrants come from is who we are

  6. I think you’re being uncharitable to Yang. Yang is as close to the steve-o-sphere as any candidate we’ve ever had. He explicitly states, over and over in tweets and a surprisingly lively book, that America is end-stage and explicitly that multiculturalism has destroyed trust and that he views the job of the next president as explicitly managing decline. Not a winning amount of rosy enthusiasm but we now have a guy who’s saying “demographics are baked into the cake and it’s never going to get better”. I appreciate the honesty if nothing else

  7. Kronos says:

    “Also, maggot burgers!”

    Yum Yum!

  8. Ironically President Yang would do more to forestall this dismal future than anyone else, since his policies would arrest economic growth and therefore make America much less appealing to foreigners. A prolonged recession or even depression would surely make Americans a lot less willing to share the dwindling pie with newcomers, also.

    Wall Street-approved Presidents like Obama and Trump create a lot of market confidence and greater investment, thereby kicking the can along on America’s Ponzi scheme economy.

  9. He’s the only candidate with any novel ideas, and the only one thinking about this strange, post-scarce technocracy we’re becoming. But when it comes to Ellis Island schmaltz he might as well be Jerrold Nadler.

    Pity. I could vote for him but until he Yangsplains how you can have open borders and a UBI he’s just like all the other old fossils stuck back in the Great Society. Also, as a typical affluent East Asian he’s hilariously remote from what his parents would call The Blacks.

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Paleo Liberal
  10. tyrone says:

    Shipping container good…..house trailer bad.

    • LOL: Bubba, Kylie
    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Anonymousse
    , @Johnny789
  11. Don’t blame me, I voted for Yodos.

    • LOL: fish
  12. Just think how easy it will be to meet labor demand across industries if everyone lives in shipping containers! No more crops rotting in the fields etc, you can just move whole labor forces on trains to their next job after each harvest/building/whatever.

    It’s been fun to watch people initially sold on a free $1,000 a month return to Trump as Yang’s policy proposals and public statements have become more in line with winning the Democratic nomination.

    • Replies: @Alden
  13. bomag says:

    Maybe the Matrix movie nailed it: people in stacked units of amniotic fluid; live streaming consciousness via brain implants; their duty to generate electricity for the machine overlords.

  14. Andrew Yang would rather that Americans live in shipping containers due to overcrowding than that Americans use their democratic rights to vote to cut back on immigration.

    But the reason homes are not cheaper is not really to do with a relationship between supply and demand, but because of the complex regulatory system in the US, the high cost of land, the high costs of permits, and the high profit margins taken by builders.

    Lots of the immigrants who come from places like rural Honduras and El Salvador are perfectly capable of building their own homes if given the materials. When a group of Mexicans arrives in my street and completely replaces the shingles on the roof of a house in a few hours, they are paid pennies on the dollar compared the the profit taken by the US contractor.

    But why use a shipping container?

    If you taken a garden shed as sold at places like Ted’s Sheds, you could easily make it into a serviceable home as good or better than many homes in the Caribbean or Central America. The shed here is only $2000 retail, so cheaper than a container, and the basic shell could be adapted for residential use.

    This beach hut sold in England for around $400,000, but is not that much different from the Lowes shed shown above. It sleeps 4 people. Click link for video tour.

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-dorset-40686211

    Inside view:

    https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-england-dorset-40686211

    When home prices crashed just around the time that George W Bush was ending his presidency in total ignominy, it was not due to lack of immigrants either.

  15. Patriot says:
    @Arclight

    In 1949, in California, a typical new 4-bedroom house near the beach cost 4 to 6 times the annual salary of a blue-collar worker with just a highschool education.

    Today in California, a new 4-bedroom house near the beach costs 20 to 100 times the salary of a bluecollar worker with just a highschool education.

    Massive immigration into California has greatly reduced quality of life and ability to raise a family for most native Californians, but not for the top 5% (the elites), who make money selling property, goods and services to the millions of struggling workers in the rat-colony. The rich also benefit from unlimeted cheap, desperate workers for their factories, farms, restaurants, and hotels, and as gardeners, house-cleaners, and nannies in their exclusive gated communities, far from the struggling masses.

    This is part of the reason the greedy and selfish rich and powerful want high immigration.

    Note that this massve change happened in my lifetime — so quick!

    • Agree: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Holbylta
  16. Altai says:

    Remember that ad in the 70s with the crying Indian who lamented the loss of control he and his people had over his ancient homeland to outsiders? That’s you now. Everywhere shall be concreted over to sate the needs of the immigrant.

    The labour markets and social geography of cities were terraformed to suit the immigrant, now comes the literal phase. Your neighbourhood, green spaces and farmland must be turned into housing for more immigrants and their descendants.

    In Belgium where this process is hyper advanced and spectacular population growth from mass migration over 40 years combined with little space for growth this process is known as Brusselization.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brusselization

    As I’ve mentioned before, it’s interesting that in the original Star Trek series and films, San Francisco and Paris were always shown as highly preserved and liveable without giant sci-fi skyscrapers. In the new Star Trek, still a supposed utopia, San Francisco looks like Blade Runner. Is Steve not entertained?

    • Replies: @Bill B.
  17. MEH 0910 says:

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
  18. Housing is expensive because we’re trying to live as close as possible to our jobs and still have white neighbors. There are a finite number of places meeting this criteria.

    Your Dorset example is, I suspect, for vacation homes but still illustrative: it’s not the house that’s expensive; it’s the pleasant, low-density surroundings with lots of white people. That’s why a one-room hovel on the beach that you literally tipped off the back of a truck costs $400,000.

    We could make housing cheaper in Dorset by stacking up condos for 20 stories on every square inch. The riffraff would move in, and housing would indeed be cheaper. And everybody you’d want as neighbors would move off to the next low-density place to price away the riffraff.

    In other words, it’s precisely about supply and demand.

  19. The photo:

    That’s a fucking ant colony…..

  20. unit472 says:

    Shipping container still needs a lot to put it on and in coastal California counties that lot will cost more than a nice house in most of the rest of the country.

    I see Elon Musk endorsed Yang so maybe they should put their heads together and create the self propelled Tesla shipping container that could be placed underneath existing homes in a tunnel drilled by the Boring Company.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  21. Anon[191] • Disclaimer says:
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    I think you’re being uncharitable to Yang. Yang is as close to the steve-o-sphere as any candidate we’ve ever had…. I appreciate the honesty if nothing else.

    I agree. As a registered Democrat I might vote for him in the primaries prior to voting for Trump in November.

    He seems the least woke in the sense of wokeness as a glazey eyed, Stockholm-syndromed, living dead robot non-player character. Where his policies intersect with wokeness, you still feel that you could have a discussion with him and he’d listen. Although he’s pathway-to-citizenship and yay-Dreamer all the way, and is really mushy on southern border security, the mushiness sounds like there may be an opening to sanity, and all other Democrat candidates are as bad or worse. Yang’s platform mentions expense, ecological damage, and lack of political consensus regarding southern border proposals. If he’s serious about that, they can all be fixed.

    And his argument that it’s impractical to forcibly deport the 12 million, you could at least point out to him that there are self-deportation options, like bans on non-citizen remittances, e-Verify, cash to get the fuck out payments, so on.

    I’d really like to see Yang in dialog with Peter Thiel.

    Zoning

    Brief Home ownership is a part of the American dream. However, over the past few decades, those who already own homes have made it significantly harder for those who don’t to recognize that dream….

    yang2020.com

    I read this as “home ownership for a brief period of time [until mortgage default] is part of the American dream.” Whoa, that’s being honest about the current situation!, I thought, until I realized that there should be a colon or dash after “Brief.”

  22. SFG says:
    @The Anti-Gnostic

    He has to get elected as a Democrat, remember.

  23. Tiny Duck says:

    This proves that white men cannot create and cannot drive an economy without unfair advantages

    This is why diversity is necessary

  24. In his interview with Joe Rogan, Yang says the U.S. needs to have strong borders since weak borders aren’t compatible with his “Freedom Dividend” (i.e., universal basic income). Admittedly, he says it very quickly, and only after Rogan presses him on the issue. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cTsEzmFamZ8

    • Agree: Kevin O'Keeffe
  25. @Reg Cæsar

    Is your ” doesn’t have to be pedestrian” claim about this Brutalist Kibutzery maybe based on potential presence of elevators in Safdie’s HabibiHut’67?

    If you ask bored identity, this one is to be filed under :”They Build It, Indeed”

    Because this was too pedestrian:

  26. To be fair I am in favor of both restricting immigration AND allowing homes to be made from shipping containers.

    The amount of protectionism given to people’s homes and their values is embarrassing. Your home is a place to live. If you treat it as an investment and you lose money on it why should anyone else care?

    • Agree: Corn
    • Replies: @TWS
  27. “I was in a shipping container apartment in Las Vegas that cost only $30,000 and was downright appealing.”

    The fine print on your downright appealing shipping container mortgage states (in Mandarin) that for half the year your home will double as an actual shipping container, and you will share your living room with food additives, cheap electronics, auto parts and eeeeeevery once in a great while (their words) a few dozen victims of human trafficking, as it is all shipped back and forth from Shanghai to the Port of Long Beach.

    Space might be somewhat tight, but think of the view:

    A few curtains, a little paint, unlimited Dramamine, and you have your self a regular Norman Rockwell painting, roundeye!

  28. There’s a company in Youngstown that will use 2 containers to build a house. Start at $80,000, and are pretty nice inside.

  29. Anon7 says:

    Shipping containers make lovely little starter homes! You might as well get used to liking tiny houses in the barrio, because that’s the plan after the Trump presidency.

    America will be like a botanical garden of diversity once unlimited open borders immigration becomes a reality. A couple million Somalis planted here, a couple million Venezuelans there, against a backdrop of generic Asians. Just imagine the strip mall diversity! Five hundred thousand strip malls with a Vietnamese nail salon, an Asian grocery store, an Indian combo restaurant/video store and a Middle Eastern gas station with a send cash overseas office.

    And don’t forget The Grub Palace ™ where you can pick up your maggot burger!

    • Replies: @Colin Wright
  30. @415 reasons

    And this is what separates the current crop of immigrants with the Irish and Italians who came over a century ago. Both countries have rich histories and traditions and are aesthetically pleasing.

    Immigrants tend to recast the elements of their homeland in the new world. So we got Irish literature and pubs and Italian restaurants and music. Unfortunately, the new groups of immigrants will give us what Mr. Yang suggests here. “Quality of life” doesn’t seem to be a phrase that registers with such people.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
  31. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Next, use shipping containers to bring millions more to America.

    One day, Californians can become the boat people.

    https://www.scmp.com/news/hong-kong/society/article/2163062/whats-next-hong-kong-houseboat-community-facing-eviction

  32. First, “manufactured homes” seem like a more reasonable option than “shipping container homes”. The superficial advantage to shipping container homes is that they don’t have the “trailer trash” stigma of manufactured homes, but the price to features ratio is just much better with manufactured homes.

    Secondly, blaming the problems of housing on immigration is just lazy and wrong. There are housing problems and trends that are happening all over the world that are clearly caused by modernization not simply higher levels of immigration.

    I support immigration issues for other reasons: most specifically politically, I don’t think the existing people deserve to have their voting value diluted. I don’t think housing is a valid reason.

    Thirdly, in material terms, many Americans have high living standards. There are problems with housing and the deaths of despair look terrible, but living standards should hopefully keep going up.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  33. JimB says:

    You can return to your shipping container home after a 12 hour day driving your new Hyundai Accent for Uber. Unfortunately, the forklift elevator is busted so you must use a rope ladder to climb up to the top of the container stack. Ordinarily, you might think living in a top story container was a good thing, with a view and fresh breezes, except the stack is at the bottom of an abandoned gravel pit.

  34. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    We are always told that the number is FIXED, absolutely fixed at 11 million, but we are also constantly reminded of the 100s of thousands, ” processed” IE housed, fed, clothed, treated medically and transported to their area of choice after crossing into The United States illegally every several months.

    Oddly there is no offsetting stream of thousands fleeing or being forcibly removed, still the math is fixed, we know that.

    • Replies: @BB753
  35. AMW says:

    Steve doesn’t believe in supply curves, just demand curves.

  36. Altai says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Of course housing bubbles have elements beyond increased demand and can occur without any immigration at all. But immigration exacerbates them by lowering the price of construction labour in a way that feels like a jackpot to developers rather than an organic process. Flush with sudden easy money they get even more greedy and influential.

    Zoning regulations aren’t a major factor and haven’t ever proven to be of any importance, plenty of other countries have more restrictive laws and similar population processes and don’t have any housing crisis.

    Down the line high population growth through immigration raises the overall price ceiling (In both bubble times of unaffordable prices and post-bubble times of affordable prices) but most important, they needn’t lead to unaffordable prices so much as unavailability. Meaning more time spent living at home, more time delaying life and family formation. Meaning more people settling for places they’d rather not live but have no alternatives.

    In addition to cutting immigration, another an easy law is to copy New Zealand who made it a law that non-citizens can’t buy and own residential property. Every country in the Western world should have this law. I’d even extend it to exclude naturalised citizens.

  37. TWS says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Ants. They want us to be ants.

  38. Logan says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    When a group of Mexicans arrives in my street and completely replaces the shingles on the roof of a house in a few hours, they are paid pennies on the dollar compared the the profit taken by the US contractor.

    Not really very familiar with the roofing industry, are you? I can guarantee you the profit margin is not spectacular, at least not in Florida.

    Workers comp rates of 20%, among other interesting overhead factors.

    • Replies: @Logan
  39. This is the innovation I can always count on silicon valley to come up with! Its a home… but its mobile…. its a Mobility Home!

  40. TWS says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Immigrants were part of the crash. Steve already showed it was subprime lending to minorities, some of whom were illegals.

    Are you a different kind of parody than tiny duck? Because we’ve already got the, ‘duck’.

  41. Anonymous[106] • Disclaimer says:

    Yep.

    Rather like Britain’s odious New Labour government (Economist).

    They promised us the Earth. All they gave us were thousands of plane loads of Pakistanis.

  42. Anonymous[106] • Disclaimer says:

    Can you just *imagine* how damned hot the interior of a shipping container would get under the Las Vegas sun?

  43. Logan says:
    @Logan

    Net profit by contractors is usually somewhere around (or less than) 5% of sales, often less, and almost always less than 10%. Except possibly during major construction booms, and then he has huge problems getting labor, etc. to deal with.

  44. Logan says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    You might want to look up stuff about the “tiny house” movement here in the US. Costs can easily go into the high five figures.

    All of which is really kind of silly, because it would be entirely possible to build a tiny house for less in a factory. We could even call it a “mobile home.”

  45. jimbo says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    On my phone right now so I can’t find the link, but there is a guy on YouTube building a shipping container out in the desert in California. It cost him $25000 in permits before he got started. In the desert. With a shipping container.

  46. debby witt says: • Website

    Early attempts to produce the flying car we were supposed to have by now:

    http://vaviper.blogspot.com/2016/05/early-attempts-to-produce-flying-car-we.html

  47. @Reg Cæsar

    My first thought was that that thing was a photoshop mashup, but (yikes) it’s real. So to save everyone else’s time: it’s called Habitat 67.

  48. @Reg Cæsar

    No: flying cars are the logical endpoint of personal transportation. For speed, safety, & navigability, three dimensions beat one. Way beat.

    It’s just that the tech problems are hard: power source, detection/avoidance, and the (I think) big one: hacking. Tech problems get solved eventually, though.

  49. @Herbert West

    A ban on gasoline-powered garden tools (especially leafblowers) would cut the demand for hispanic immigrants and maybe improve our lives in other ways too.

    • LOL: Realist
  50. @Jonathan Mason

    This beach hut sold in England for around $400,000, but is not that much different from the Lowes shed shown above.

    Unlike tge Lowe’s shed, the beach hut has a toilet, a kitchen and running water. Granted, much of that $400,000 is the land your beach hut sits on.

  51. @Herbert West

    “would make Americans a lot less willing to share.”

    You’re missing the point. It really does not matter at all what Americans are willing or unwilling to do. FUSA erosion will continue on schedule. What Americans want is not in the blueprint.

    The only thing that matters is what the Special People want, and they want you living in a shipping container and eating maggot burgers, surrounded by an ocean of sullen foreign strangers on every side.

  52. @John Derbyshire

    This man can bring your old countrymen a fresh baguette from France.

    I see your flying cars, and I raise you flying shoes.

    • LOL: Bruno
    • Replies: @tr
    , @Autochthon
  53. I like the shed idea.

    Yurts also seem to be a better value proposition than the vaunted Tiny Houses, though optioning out a yurt can add up fast.

    Here is an analysis of the problem with shipping container homes:

    http://markasaurus.com/2015/09/01/whats-wrong-with-shipping-container-housing-everything/

  54. Ibound1 says:

    Flying cars?

    Hell I just wish we had the flying airplanes of my youth.

    Air travel today is far less comfortable (the seats, the food) than it was when I was 18 and, not only that, it takes longer. The planes are no faster but it takes more time to get to the airport and you have to be there earlier to get through security.

    We are already regressing.

  55. Polynikes says:
    @John Derbyshire

    My car navigates two dimensionally.

    • Replies: @Realist
  56. Hmmm…maggots

    The New York Times:
    Why Aren’t We Eating More Insects? …How (and Why) to Cook With Bugs, According to Three Chefs …Insects – Cooking – Entomophagy …A Change in the Menu – …Jiminy Cricket! Bugs Could Be Next Food Craze …Review: ‘Bugs’ Is a Culinary Adventure. Insects Never …Insect Dinners: Waiter, There’s Soup in My Bug …What Is Fried and Has Six Legs? Welcome to Insect Cuisine …

  57. @John Derbyshire

    No: flying cars are the logical endpoint of personal transportation. For speed, safety, & navigability, three dimensions beat one. Way beat.

    Uhhh no….most humans barely have the reflexes and visio-spatial reasoning abilities to pilot a wheeled vehicle.

  58. unit472 says:
    @John Derbyshire

    Actually the main difficulty with ‘flying’ is the weight penalty. Birds, for example, are rather flimsy creatures. Light weight but not very strong. Thus any ‘accident’, say with a sliding glass door is invariably fatal. This has required nature to give them excellent collision avoidance skills save when they dine on fermented berries and become intoxicated. A thousand starlings can all take off from the same tree without benefit of ATC and not have mid air collisions.

  59. @John Derbyshire

    Just in case you missed it, Uncle Derb & Uncle Sailer;

    Both of you just made Global Securitate Top Tiny Hat Shapirescu’s Eine Kleine Namensliste.

    You’re in a good company, along with two former Presidential candidates, and one current White House Resident* :

    Yasher Koaḥ!

    Also, y’all just learned that The Most Overrated Orthodox Joogernaut in the History of Asymmetric Loyalism (yes, Uncle Derb, Tebbit Test & polygraphs don’t match well at all) is still haunted by Sobran’s Specter.

    (* The bad news is that the latter one had already sent his emissaries to Benji & Benji Unlimited, inquiring how many more professional and personal lives has to be completely ruined so his honorable name can be expunged from Zer Liste.)

    • Replies: @Hail
  60. Jack D says:

    There are a huge # of shipping containers that are piled up at US ports because the amount of goods that get shipped FROM China to the US is so much greater than the amount of goods that get shipped back.

  61. 216 says: • Website
    @International Jew

    ?

    There’s a lot of battery operated power equipment now, and its much better than it used to be.

  62. OT:

    [theguardian.com]
    ‘I don’t smell!’ Meet the people who have stopped washing

    Jackie Hong, a reporter in Yukon, north-west Canada, has eschewed soap in the shower for nine years.

    But how does she smell?

    She can’t. She has no nose.

  63. res says:
    @John Derbyshire

    I’m not so sure about safety. Could you elaborate? I think the airborne aspect is a significant negative for safety.

    It may be solvable by tech, but given the typical spatial ability in society I find expecting everyone to be able to navigate effectively in three dimensions at high speed a terrifying concept.

    • Agree: MEH 0910
    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    , @JMcG
  64. @The Anti-Gnostic

    I looked at his immigration positions.
    Better than other Democrats. Sad to say, that is a low bar indeed.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  65. @res

    Consider if the flying cars had Tesla-like self driving, except in 3 dimensions.

    The complexity of that seems rather daunting right now, but with the advances in computing, such as Moore’s Law and AI etc, not as difficult a task in coming decades.

    Consider, the Apollo went to the Moon and back with a computer system less advanced than a modern programmable calculator.

    • Agree: Sean
  66. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    Yang is as close to the steve-o-sphere as any candidate we’ve ever had

    But really though, he’s just another immigration-boosting shyster.

    • Agree: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  67. @Jack D

    Most of those are in cities with high housing costs and homelessness.
    Are you thinking what I’m thinking?

    • Agree: RadicalCenter
  68. @Jonathan Mason

    But the reason homes are not cheaper is not really to do with a relationship between supply and demand, but because of the complex regulatory system in the US, the high cost of land, the high costs of permits, and the high profit margins taken by builders.

    But the high cost of land has everything to do with a relationship between supply (of land) and demand (for land).

    Immigrants can’t live in midair, they must use up some of the supply of land. As Steve pointed out, Hispanic immigrants in particular don’t like high-density living arrangements. They prefer sprawl.

    • Replies: @JSM
  69. El Dato says:

    But not everyone can have mega ranches and forced harems, so you better be content with the appalling shipping container QUALITY home.

  70. Roger Ebert, the film critic, is woke.

    There’s an interesting documentary out about a successful commercial photographer, who in the 60s was able to buy a derelict seven-story former bank building in the Bowery for then-$100,000. A few years ago he had to sell it due to high maintenance costs. (Price: $55M.) A former assistant, now a filmmaker, decided to document the now aged photographer’s life in this huge building before he moved out.

    True, the photographer was talented and self-made, and he was in the right place at the right time to buy up a disused building in a then-blighted part of New York. That’s not the point. Roger Ebert’s review lets us know that in the Current Year, having a lot of living space is privilege.

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  71. @International Jew

    Yes, everyone should be using electric-powered outdoor equipment when feasible.

    The plants that generate the electricity still pollute, but we eliminate the poisonous fumes right in the face of the Homeowners / workers and nearby people, poison that is spewed from these outdated filthy gas-powered devices.

  72. All-powerful ruler of cadre of global elitist/industrialists: “The SPICE must flow errr no I mean the immigrants must flow into America never stopping never diminishing the slightest no matter the will of the President, Congress, or American people”.

  73. OT
    Yet nother shooter has posted his manifesto on 8chan. Second time this week. Even more noteworthy is that 8chan has been offline from the time of the El Paso manifesto was posted there.

    [nytimes.com]
    After Attack on Norway Mosque, Body Found at Home Tied to Assailant

    Aug. 10, 2019

    About two hours before the attack, a post appeared on 8chan, the message board that had hosted the anti-immigrant manifesto of the man accused of the El Paso shooting. The post raised questions of whether it could have been written by the suspect in the Norway attack.

    “Well cobblers it’s my time,” the post began in English, ending with the Norwegian phrase “valhall venter” or “heaven awaits.”


    Website used by El Paso suspect ‘8chan’ goes offline

    8chan far-right forum offline as Cloudflare cuts support

  74. @Paleo Liberal

    I want to like the guy, but he is either incapable of basic reasoning or is lying when he says “it’s only automation that taking jobs from millions of Americans, not immigrants, who are being scapegoated.”

    Actually, Andrew, it is both, and that should be obvious.
    This is not an either/or proposition.

    The guy rightly emphasizes that a frightening number of common jobs are being, and will be, eliminated by drastic increase in the use of machines, robots, and now artificial intelligence. He correctly identifies long-haul truck driving, taxi/Uber/Lyft driving, warehouse distribution jobs, factory manufacturing or assembly jobs, and retail as areas that are very likely to be hit hard.

    Yet Yang still thinks it’s a good idea to import tens of millions more people for whom ACCORDING TO HIS OWN CORRECT ACCOUNT AND PREDICTION, there will be no jobs whatsoever. This is a recipe for widespread permanent poverty, and the violence, family dissolution and dysfunction, racial conflict, and increased government spending and taxation that comes with it.

    Yang’s universal basic income could work, but only with immigration policies nearly opposite to his own. We would need to greatly reduce the number of people likely to be eligible for US Citizenship and therefore the UBI: an end to birthright Citizenship, an end to chain migration / “family reunification”, large scale deportations of illegal aliens, an end to amnesty, etc.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
  75. @Jonathan Mason

    Housing is expensive because we’re trying to live as close as possible to our jobs and still have white neighbors. There are a finite number of places meeting this criteria.

    Your Dorset example is, I suspect, for vacation homes but still illustrative: it’s not the house that’s expensive; it’s the pleasant, low-density surroundings with lots of white people. That’s why a one-room hovel on the beach that you literally tipped off the back of a truck costs $400,000.

    We could make housing cheaper in Dorset by stacking up condos for 20 stories on every square inch. The riffraff would move in, and housing would indeed be cheaper. And everybody you’d want as neighbors would move off to the next low-density place to price away the riffraff.

    In other words, it’s precisely about supply and demand.

    • Agree: JMcG
  76. Anon7 says:

    The average size of a newly constructed single-family detached home is now 2,600 square feet in the USA. The average size of a new house in the USA has doubled since 1960. As of May 8, 2018.

    OTOH, if you google “size of average American…” and let google autocomplete, it defaults to “size of average American woman”.

    So, no shipping container houses unless they come with a rather large shoehorn…

  77. @Paleo Liberal

    Yes, we ought to both provide tiny houses to the homeless AND require that they either live there, make other verified housing arrangement, or go to jail.

    Provide adequate toilet and shower facilities, as well, in part to protect the rest of us from diseases and their carriers, rodents and ticks.

    They WILL shower daily, and they will NOT urinate or defecate in the street, or they go to jail or a mental institution as is appropriate in each case.

    They WILL get the Hell off our sidewalks, out of our alleys, out of our parks, away rom our homes and schools and businesses, or again, they go to jail or a mental institution.

    In places like Los Angeles, where we live, the combination of free tiny houses and associated toughlove measures would be a godsend. We could make our streets safe, civilized, clean, and no longer a setting for blocked sidewalks, intimidation, aggressive panhandling, drug needles and vials, piles of feces, the stench of urine, indecent exposure (public masturbation and other charming things that some of these dirtbags do in view of us and our children).

    When it comes to public decorum and public health, it is past time to bring a little Singapore to LA and our other filthy, unhygienic, offensive Third Worldy cities. Perhaps MORE than a little. The charitable and compassionate side of the reform can include tiny houses, container or otherwise. It would cost a lot and yet be well worth it for us and them.

  78. Hopscotch says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    A prerequisite for self-driving cars is there are traffic laws and drivers halfway attempt to obey them. If you have spent any time recently on a California freeway, you realize this is dubious. And if you have spent anytime in Mexico City, you realize this is laughable.

    Tech companies sell a utopian vision of everyone having a self-driving car. But they are stumped about handling the intermediate term of 10% self-driving cars / 60% law-abiding humans / 30% bumper car Latinos.

  79. @415 reasons

    Think of how much more efficient it will be to allow our citizens to street shit anywhere they want rather than having only a few designated shitting areas per city block? Plus we can save a ton of copper and other valuable items.

  80. Bill B. says:
    @415 reasons

    I’ve said before that Americans don’t seem to be particularly aware of much better their homes are – size, spacing, live-ability – than much of the rest of the world. Including in poorer areas.

    Partly this is land area but it is also the general expectation and the communal ability to cultivate decent public space.

    What Yang is signaling is that this era is coming to an end.

    Shipping containers are only acceptable if you are desperate. Perhaps better than a tent. No-one will live in one if there is a viable alternative.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  81. syonredux says:

    Off-topic:

    Another entry in the annals of self-hatred….

    Meanwhile my ancestor tried to lynch his sister’s fiancée, the first black man to marry a white woman in New Hampshire history. Goy genealogy is just a list of crimes

  82. Sam Patch says:
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    I agree that Steve is being uncharitable on this one. I’m as close to a one issue voter (immigration) as one can get, yet I’ve come around to Yang. We’ve lost the demographic fight, full stop. Contra Steven and Derb, at this point infinite 3rd world immigration may as well be the 2nd law of thermodynamics. The historic American nation is done. Yang’s policies and innovations seem the most likely to stop the bleeding. It’s the best we can hope for, unfortunately.

    • Disagree: Hail, TWS
    • Replies: @ben tillman
    , @MBlanc46
  83. Carol says:
    @Herbert West

    You’re saying immigrants wouldn’t come here for the 1000/month?

  84. Altai says:
    @syonredux

    He works in media in New York, he’s just ingratiating himself to his conquerors.

  85. @International Jew

    Oh man, yes. I used to work a lot of night shifts, and the day after would be almost asleep when, bzzzzzzttttttt! God it was infuriating. People with sleeping babies and whatnot and tech people who worked from home hated it too.

    The crazy thing was our neighborhood had tiny tiny lots. Nobody had more than 1000 square feet of grass on their property. Why in gods name do you need to hire a garden service? It is literally like 300 seconds with a rake once every three days and you are done. These same neighbors also didn’t know how to cook and ate out pretty much every meal, which was kinda pathetic but at least didn’t screw up my attempts to rest.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Bubba
  86. “These shipping container homes are downright appealing!”

    “Would you live in one?”

    “#%^*# No!”

  87. countenance says: • Website

    Hard to believe that so many in our sector were in love with this guy for awhile.

  88. Yeah. Or we could direct the federal departments of defense and homeland security to defend and secure the place from invaders, and stop inviting and welcoming, like grinning imbeciles, the remaining invaders, thus halting overpopulation.

    • Agree: Mr McKenna
  89. GU says:
    @International Jew

    The gasoline leaf blowers should be banned on noise pollution grounds alone. Either use an electric one or try a rake.

  90. this guy is a standard issue leftist who read a book about robots and automation. that’s it. i saw thru him instantly.

    also, he’s not that smart. smarter than the average democrat running for office, but that’s it. this guy doesn’t really know what he’s talking about when it comes to tech, and isn’t even proven in the private sector.

    he tricked some dissident rightists, which was tremendously embarrassing, as a testament to their lack of serious, real world intelligence. the kind of intelligence we’ll need to not get eliminated by our enemies, who are legion.

    • Agree: snorlax
  91. tr says: • Website
    @International Jew

    It was built for the world’s fair in Montreal in 1967. Units seem to be selling for high prices, but that may be due the the views: the buildings are right on the St. Laurence River and it’s one place in Montreal where you can’t see Habitat ’67.

  92. Hans says:

    There are infinitely more opportunities in the new reality. This is one of many –

    • LOL: Buck Ransom
  93. tr says: • Website
    @Buzz Mohawk

    This baguette is soggy, and salty, too.

  94. Lugash says:

    I was in a shipping container apartment in Las Vegas that cost only $30,000 and was downright appealing. There are things we can do to make housing more affordable for many Americans.

    OK Andrew, move your family of four into one as a test and we’ll see how it goes.

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
  95. @syonredux

    His ancestors were dirtbags and he tries to blame it on their whiteness?

  96. Sounds like Snow Crash. When do we get burbclaves and Mafia Pizza Delivery?

  97. @countenance

    I wouldn’t say I’m in love with the guy, but he’s still the best candidate by far. NIMBYism is a real problem and he’s the only one addressing it. The bad policies you get with him you’ll get with any other candidate including Blompf. Do you want to get some of what you want, or none of what you want?

    • Replies: @SFG
  98. Use the shipping Containers to build the border wall like in the TV show Containment where Ebola stricken Atlanta was surrounded by a Wall of double stacked shipping Containers filled with sand and topped with Barbed Wire.

  99. @Reg Cæsar

    Another Episcopalian enriching American life,

  100. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    The demographic cake has a knife baked into it, and it will be used to send them all back.

  101. Bruno says:
    @John Derbyshire

    Urban people will do with flying tables. The others will have flying cars . And city access will be restricted against cars even more than today.

  102. @Jonathan Mason

    This is bullshit. Prima facie bullshit. Such bullshit I shan’t dignify it with a formal refutation. Go read more about mathematics and economics.

    While you are at it, read about carpentry, plumbing, and other aspects of construction.

  103. @John Derbyshire

    We need a catchy name for these flying cars.

    How does “helicoptor” sound?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  104. @Paleo Liberal

    Go one step further: Send the people to China in the containers.

  105. @Paleo Liberal

    Moore’s law [sic] turned out to be a theory. In fact, apropos of a discussion regarding overpopulation, it was always a theory – and a patently foolish one at that – to those of us who realise any given object, whether an integrated circuit or a planet, has a finite mass.

    (Jonathan Mason, I expect, reckons the reason engineers stopped being able to put many more transistors into an integrated circuit is stifling regulations by OSHA and the local building code.)

  106. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Neal Stephenson had characters living in shipping containers in Los Angeles in his novel Snow Crash.

    That was published in 1992, which gives you an idea of how ahead of the curve he was.

    • Replies: @Lot
  107. eah says:

    They Promised You Flying Cars and Gave You Shipping Container Homes Exorbitant Public Employee Pay and Luxury Public Pensions and Retirement Benefits

    Illinois Is the Canary In The Pension Coal Mine

    Illinois is running out of time to fix its public sector pension problem. A new report from Moody’s Investors Service identified the Prairie State as one of the two most likely to suffer during an economic downturn. Illinois towns and cities are already paring back government services to pay for generous benefits packages for retirees, and Chicago’s pension debt alone is larger than that of 41 states.

    • Replies: @ben tillman
    , @eah
  108. @Buzz Mohawk

    A man ahead of his time, Burt Reynolds, the lucky bastard, got to ride on a sexy, flying nun….

    • Replies: @TWS
  109. Mr. Anon says:
    @International Jew

    I could see that working in a more temperate climate, but in Montreal? The high surface-area to volume ratio must make it expensive to heat.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  110. And you thought flying cars was a good idea.

  111. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:

    Big Mag at Maggotdonalds.

  112. Mr. Anon says:

    And while luxuriating in your Conex box, you can dine on this:

    https://soylent.com/

    When we are asked what makes Soylent a superior product, we always give the same answer……….

    ……………..it’s the people.

  113. @syonredux

    “Goy genealogy is just a list of crimes”

    Not to mention how the Planned Inbreeding in the echo chamber always results with multi-generational mental and physical ‘tardation…among goy, of course.

    “I’m as skeptical about “both sides” journalism as anybody and I don’t think there are two sides about questions about whether people should be treated with dignity and with fairness and respect.”

    Dylan Matthews

    http://nosmag.org/disability-is-not-an-asterisk-eric-garcia-interviews-dylan-matthews/

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  114. Lot says:

    San Diego now has 3200 cameras built into street and traffic lights.

    https://www.sandiegouniontribune.com/news/public-safety/story/2019-08-04/san-diego-police-ramp-up-use-of-streetlamp-cameras-to-crack-cases-privacy-groups-raise-concerns

    Another 600 are being added over the next year.

    Partly to solve crime, partly to improve traffic. Both have been happening.

    I have noticed that by now the majority of traffic lights are “smart” and at night change to green the moment a car goes to an empty intersection. They also are slowly being timed better during the day.

    Of course the ACLU, advocate of illegal mass migration and homeless “right” to sleep in camper vans, sidewalk tents, and stink up/watch porn in public libraries is trying to stop it.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Anonymous
  115. @countenance

    Many in our sphere look at the political landscape and see no way out of the Kosher Sandwich, at least in the short term. Their perspective is that if Republicans give you everything the Democrats do while boiling the frog instead of microwaving the frog, then why not collect $1000 a month for your troubles? The same perspective could be applied to some thing like student loan forgiveness. Might as well collect some cash and accelerate the demise of the GOP at the same time.

    The recent ordeal with the GOP promotion of red flag laws, the failure on the wall and the forthcoming push for legal Immigration expansion, the Ziocon posturing in the Middle East, the enforcement of global homosexuality and feminism, and the tax breaks for corporations and the wealthy support this position.

  116. @Jack D

    So you’re saying that shipping containers that are imported from China can only go back to China? They can’t be used to ship goods anywhere else? Wow, that sounds like a pretty inefficient global logistics model you’ve got there.

    I mean, I was in intermodal trucking operations from 2003 to 2014, but perhaps you can enlighten me on the subject. Especially when in 2008, during the big economic downturn, how there was a significant shortage of 40′ containers on the US side because exports were exceeding imports. In fact it was so bad that the liners were paying to have containers shipped back empty, just to meet their customers’ needs. This isn’t optimal of course, but it has happened in both directions. Sometimes, like before a grain harvest, liners will start hording their containers in anticipation of a massive demand for them by the farmers. I am sure containers are horded on the Asian side in the fall months in anticipation of a massive need to ship crappy Christmas gifts out to the US big boxes.

    Empty containers pile up at ports or rail terminals or storage depots, on both sides of the world, for any number of global economic reasons, and it doesn’t always seem to make sense on the surface.

  117. SafeNow says:
    @International Jew

    There is leafblower sound, maddening and infuriating, almost 50% of the time where I live. The tweeting birds cannot compete. In communities that have banned the leafblower, the resident approval of the ban is 100%; and yet this goes on. Interestingly, leafblowing is often the experience steppingstone, the apprenticeship, to being a carpenter, plumber, or electrician.

  118. Lot says:
    @Lot

    The smart light that detects a waiting car at an empty intersection I remember from at least 15 years ago.

    What has changed is that it appears 90% of controlled intersections now have it around here.

    I wonder how much gasoline this saves and pollution it reduces? If we have 2 million drivers, and it saves 90 seconds per week on average, that is 2.6 million car-idle-hours per year. Taking out the electric cars and strong hybrids, 2.4 million. There is a wide range of answers on how much gas is used idling, but taking a midrange of them, that is 500,000 gallons of gas per year not burned.

    This might be an overestimate, some people who commute at night daily might save 6 minutes a week, others never drive at night or early morning so save nothing.

  119. Lot says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    I think shipping container home ideas have been around almost as long as shipping containers, at least at the academic/avant garde architecture level.

  120. I can’t especially see how the idea is so terrible… how many tech employees are sleeping in converted box trucks and stealth van campers in San Jose?

    But they’d not be inexpensive long if you’re going to put them in such markets… you’d just be jamming more people dependent on water transfer from the Hetch Hetchy Water reserve.

    Frankly, I’d be all for tearing down Streisand’s home on the beach for these…

  121. Lot says:
    @SimpleSong

    I don’t work nights but also hate leaf blowers. They don’t seem to even work better or faster than a rake.

    I think we’ll see some areas ban gas powered lawn tools. Electric mowers, leaf blowers, and weed whackers work perfectly well at 1/5 the noise and no smell. An electric mower isn’t practical for a huge lawn yet, but some areas don’t have large lawns at all.

  122. @International Jew

    This was at Expo 67. They should instead have done it across town at Jarry Park. An all-luxury-box stadium!

    The Expos would still be there, and thriving!!

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
  123. Lot says:
    @syonredux

    My goy genealogy was awfully boring, I got everyone back to the GG grandparent level and nearly all another two gens back to the GGGG level, with the oldest reaching the 1600s in England and Germany, though no info other than name, birth/baptism, marriage, and death dates.

    Farmers, miners “laborers” etc is what they put down in the older US censuses.

    Some of them had unrelated borderers living in their houses, which I guess is interesting.

    The Jews don’t have records nearly as far back, but the 19th century ones there is often much more detail about.

    I found a intersection of the two that was interesting, a Russian Jew immigrated to England in the 1700s and married a local Christian lady, and their descendants fully assimilated.

    No details on anyone’s war record, the only way to know they served is they are on military pension lists.

  124. eah says:
    @countenance

  125. Alfa158 says:
    @Herbert West

    Really?
    Wall Street contributions:
    Hillary Clinton $64.3M
    Trump less than $2M
    https://www.politifact.com/wisconsin/statements/2016/oct/06/donald-trump/how-much-money-have-wall-street-and-hedge-funds-gi/
    It is hilarious however how Politifact spins like a Dervish trying to slant the information .
    “Oh yeah, well Trump claimed it was $100M and it was only $64M, which proves Clinton wasn’t a tool of Wall Street, so there!”

    • Replies: @Herbert West
  126. Johnny789 says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    “but is not that much different from the Lowes shed shown above” lolgf!

  127. Lot says:
    @John Derbyshire

    Sometimes the tech problems are impossible though. Even if you could make one, the power consumption would make it cost prohibitive.

    And then there’s the noise issue, how are you going to have a vertical liftoff that isn’t too noisy for urban areas? For rural areas, there isn’t enough avoided traffic to make it worthwhile versus a car.

    I guess we could eventually have small electric helicopters that go from rooftop to rooftop in Manhattan. But that’s not the revolutionary “flying car” people think about. Even then, I am doubtful this will happen due to the repeated failures of helicopter from Manhattan to JFK airport companies. It’s just a tiny niche.

  128. BB753 says:
    @tyrone

    Asians feel cosy in shipping containers.

  129. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    What is the significance or relevance of this?

  130. Bubba says:
    @SimpleSong

    I know that feeling – incessant leaf blowers drove me nuts when I had to work night shifts. Then when the babies came along I had to soundproof (as best as possible) their room ASAP which definitely helped them sleep, but cost us a small fortune especially after running off the 1st window contractor. Soundproofing a room (again, as best as possible) was sort of like putting gold faucets in a middle class home – you’ll never recover the money. However, we had to do it because the alternatives at the time were far more expensive.

    And the looks I would get standing in line to purchase a cold beer at 7AM on the way home while filling up the truck were priceless.

  131. J.Ross says:

    [a large image of Alex Jones looking sad and itoldyousoish but saying nothing — this image doesn’t exist because Alex can’t stay quiet long enough but you know what is meant]

  132. @Alfa158

    Gary Cohn, Larry Kudlow, Steve Mnuchin.

    Wall Street is just fine with Trump. He’s been very amenable to them. That they preferred Clinton is just water under the bridge.

  133. “You know, some of these cardboard box homes look quite comfy! I don’t why these proles are whining about housing costs all the time.”

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Alden
  134. @Lugash

    Try telling someone before the Immivasion, ‘hey, I can get you into a high-end shipping container for only 30 grand!’

  135. J.Ross says:
    @John Derbyshire

    Tech problems nothing*, it comes down to my online conversations with Mexicans about the Second Amendment: one group doesn’t understand it at all at a basic level, one group understands it, wants it, and is stuck waiting for it to be possible there, and the major group doesn’t want it because they view their fellow countrymen (who are mostly in a much lower class than the Mexicans in this major group) as incapable of handling it.
    That’s a primally arrogant mindset in thst case (and missing the concept of the militia), it always reminds me of the well scene in Lawrence of Arabia: an alien society. But in the case of universal personal small aircraft, worthiness is a controlling question. A lot of people who have cars now should not, so the number of people who should be licensed for something that could easily destroy a house should be smaller.
    That said, were it to be started, I would expect the same thing that happened with cars (and for that matter guns): the number of people who can safely handle them is, especially after a learning period, much bigger than anyone would have bet. If we had to start car ownership all over again, magically jumping to the cars, safety features, and rules of the 50s, this generation would say no way, let’s do trains and horses.

    *For what it’s worth I also think the Beanstalk is doable, not in the sense that it would be easy (it would be the space race and the transatlantic cable of our time), but the problems, enormous as they are, are solvable. The Beanstalk and the jet car will be foregone because of man’s inhumanity to man, not because of insurmountable challenges. But maybe I’m innumerate and the problems really are insurmountable.

  136. Alden says:

    He’s Chinese. He’s used to Chinese housing customs and culture. Problem is, he wants to bring those customs to the USA.

  137. notsaying says:
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    I’d like to agree with you about Yang.

    But I am concerned. He’s something else he said at the tweet cited above:

    “Housing costs and rent are going up for more and more Americans while income stagnates. Relaxing zoning laws and NIMBYism would help in many areas as would micro-apartments and innovative approaches to communal housing.”

    He’s facing the problem head-on — and good for him — but he’s leaving out one of the major solutions: less immigration. He could even mention rapidly increasing population growth without specifying the reason and he’d be honest.

    If our population growth rate doesn’t decrease, the problems with housing will be that much worse in future generations. Don’t you think he should have been honest here? Doesn’t he care that he’s planning to squash most people in the future into tiny living spaces when it’s not necessary?

    • Replies: @Ghost of Bull Moose
  138. @Reg Cæsar

    They moved several of those modular homes from Expo 67 to Mountainside Resort at Stowe, Vermont. They are now timeshare ski resort condos.

  139. Daniel H says:

    Doesn’t this make Andrew Yang a GENOCIDAL MANIAC in intent towards Native Born White American Tech Workers?

    As per our “elite”, this is a feature, not a bug.

  140. Alden says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    A lot of Hispanics in agricultural areas already live in prefab garden sheds.

  141. Daniel H says:

    Ironically President Yang would do more to forestall this dismal future than anyone else, since his policies would arrest economic growth and therefore make America much less appealing to foreigners. A prolonged recession or even depression would surely make Americans a lot less willing to share the dwindling pie with newcomers, also.

    A little bump in the road recession like 2008, or even a more prolonged one like the 1930s is not going to do it. To save America, we need a PERMANENT recession, a grinding, leveling generations long state of poverty. One so severe that nobody – low, middle, high – will take any glimpse of hope for granted again. Are we up to it?

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
  142. notsaying says:

    I haven’t heard anybody mention the only cure to our future massive housing problems:

    More government-built housing, on an unprecedented and massive scale; also an unprecedented increase in the Section 8 voucher system.

    That’s it.

    The problem will be far bigger than private enterprise will be able to solve. We will have to use the government to house people who cannot afford market rate housing on their own. According to the Census Bureau “at least 11 million rental households spend more than 50 percent of their income on housing costs like rent and utilities” now, so just imagine the scale of the problem in another generation or two when our population is that much greater.

    I have no idea where we will get all the money needed for all these housing subsidies. I can tell you that we just had a senior citizens housing project open locally and when I divided the number of units into the total price, the cost was about $230,000 per unit. And that was for a mixture of one and two bedroom apartments.

    If people really knew what was coming because of continued high immigration, they’d stop it in a heartbeat. But they don’t.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Anonymous
    , @Ahem
    , @anonymous
  143. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    There’s some kind of tax deduction you can get if you buy a shipping container that just sits in a lot. Deduct what you would have earned from renting it for shipping.

  144. Hans says:

    This is truly horrifying although Capt. Massage is hardly involved: Epstein and the Eugenicists – https://www.bitchute.com/video/XposZwIYoNE/

    • Replies: @SFG
  145. Completely OT:

    Speaking as a Democrat, I think the main thing the Democratic Party needs to do to have a chance in 2020 is to find a way to get Kamala Harris to shut the frack up.

    Sorry for the digression. Back to your regularly scheduled program.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  146. Alden says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    And in some states it only gets below 50F at night about 20 nights a year. So it’s possible to sleep outside all year long.

  147. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    The difference is that Yang merely wants to manage the decline long enough so that China can establish a Special Economic Zone in the Bay Area. Beyond that, he has no vision other than how to live with lower expectations and no social cohesion.

    He’s putting lipstick on a maggot burger.

  148. Alden says:
    @notsaying

    I know where the money for housing subsidizes comes from. Your income tax. Your property tax goes to endless affirmative action city and county’s employees studying task forcing counseling analysing coordinating facilitating and out reaching the homeless problem.

    • Replies: @Anon
  149. @Jonathan Mason

    My ancestors didn’t cross the Atlantic in wooden sailboats, kill the Indians, defeat the British, and tame the west so that I could one day live in a $2K shed from Home Depot.

    We inherited this country. We need to hang on to it for our posterity, not some random Central American’s.

  150. Right now our system incentivizes our best and brightest to develop apps that either try to take advantage of unicorn VC and cash out before the money vanishes (“AN APP THAT AUTOMATICALLY DELIVERS CAT FOOD”) or an app that utilizes addictive psychological triggers directed at 5 year olds to spend hundreds trying to get a “rare” widget for a game.

    Everything is fake and gay in our society and some of you are seriously discussing when we are getting flying cars.

  151. @Jonathan Mason

    But the reason homes are not cheaper is not really to do with a relationship between supply and demand, but because of the complex regulatory system in the US, the high cost of land, the high costs of permits, and the high profit margins taken by builders.

    High housing prices have nothing to with supply and demand, it’s because of the high cost of land

    Trust me on this one, I’ve done the numbers.

    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @Buck Ransom
  152. @John Derbyshire

    … flying cars are the logical endpoint of personal transportation.

    I’ll see your flying cars and raise you teleportation.

  153. @Clifford Brown

    Maybe attributing too much to Yang, but he’s probably smart enough to see that while the coalition of the fringes is ratcheting up the anti-white hate, its also boiling the frog and white awakening is increasing exponentially because of it.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  154. @Lot

    I think shipping container home ideas have been around almost as long as shipping containers, at least at the academic/avant garde architecture level.

    I think it’s a commonly assigned project for architecture students.

  155. @notsaying

    If they continue virtually unlimited immigration to this country, any increase in housing stock is like pouring water into sand.

  156. @Lot

    Note that in the Jetsons clip posted above, George is operating his vehicle (is it a “vehicle”?) with a joystick.

    Why? In the 1960s, they could predict flying cars, which have not yet arrived, but not self-driving vehicles, which are pretty much established now, at least in a niche?

    Is it like the stick shift, which hangs on because a minority like the feeling of control?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @JMcG
    , @snorlax
  157. @International Jew

    Could you supply some links?

    You’d trust the citations of a witch doctor?

  158. @tyrone

    Yep… I realized long ago that the “tiny house” movement was just an elaborate PR campaign to make SWPLs feel cool in trailer homes.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  159. I looked at his immigration positions.
    Better than other Democrats. Sad to say, that is a low bar indeed.

    That’s a bar they are allowed to step over. We, however, are forced to play limbo.

  160. @Hippopotamusdrome

    Don’t blame me, I voted for Yodos.

    Too young, and not natural-born.

  161. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:

    Envy is a powerful emotion.

    Would-be immigrants not only envy Americans but their own kind who made it to America while they themselves are stuck in ‘shitholes’.

    If you let some in, all the others feel envy about the some who made it to America, especially in this age of easy communication.

  162. Also, maggot burgers!

    Will the Hope and Anchor be serving maggots and peas?

  163. @Jonathan Mason

    But the reason homes are not cheaper is not really to do with a relationship between supply and demand, but …

    Stop embarassing yourself with your “but”.

    ~~

    Seriously, immigration driving up housing prices is even more ironclad than more disputable–but still ironclad–effects on jobs, wages, income inequality. (The only possible counter argument on housing is immigrant construction labor is so much cheaper that … which of course blows all the immigration-not-cutting-wages arguments out of the water. And simply isn’t true. Labor is not the big cost of housing where housing has gotten expensive.)

    The reason immigration means higher housing prices should be blindingly obvious. Math isn’t that hard.

  164. Realist says:
    @John Derbyshire

    No: flying cars are the logical endpoint of personal transportation. For speed, safety, & navigability, three dimensions beat one. Way beat.

    I thought you were a math enthusiast…current cars operate in two dimensions….that’s what the steering wheel is for.

    Safety? I think not. Adding another dimension to driving would be a disaster.

    • Replies: @John Derbyshire
    , @Jack D
  165. Realist says:
    @International Jew

    Mexicans and leaf blowers are inseparable.

  166. Realist says:
    @Jack D

    There are a huge # of shipping containers that are piled up at US ports because the amount of goods that get shipped FROM China to the US is so much greater than the amount of goods that get shipped back.

    Place them at the Mexican border to hold illegal immigrants.

  167. Realist says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    The complexity of that seems rather daunting right now, but with the advances in computing, such as Moore’s Law and AI etc, not as difficult a task in coming decades.

    Moore’s Law is dead.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Clifford Brown
  168. J.Ross says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    It’s not a joystick in the arcade sense, it’s a stick like a jet pilot would have in the 60s, because they’re assuming it’s like a plane.

  169. anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Used shipping containers have been fumigated with deadly chemicals and can’t be redeployed as housing.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  170. JMcG says:
    @res

    Exactly right. Flying cars would have to be centrally controlled to work anywhere near a population center.

  171. @Lot

    I think we’ll see some areas ban gas powered lawn tools.

    Not a chance. If they haven’t managed to throttle leaf blowers in my overeducated whiteopian coastal California town, it just ain’t gonna happen.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  172. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @notsaying

    If people really knew what was coming because of continued high immigration,

    Please elaborate.

  173. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-… wrote:

    Yang is as close to the steve-o-sphere as any candidate we’ve ever had. He explicitly states, over and over in tweets and a surprisingly lively book, that America is end-stage and explicitly that multiculturalism has destroyed trust and that he views the job of the next president as explicitly managing decline.

    So instead of offering a cure, he is going to offer us hospice care so we can die peacefully in our sleep?

    You haven’t heard the stories about how “hospice care” is a euphemism for over-dosing the patient on opiates to get rid of him?

    Andrew Yang: the candidate who will euthanize America!

    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Hypnotoad666
    , @ben tillman
  174. @AnotherDad

    The reason immigration means higher housing prices should be blindingly obvious. Math isn’t that hard.

    I’m no fan of immigration, but its effect on real estate isn’t all that straightforward.

    Thanks to Mexican construction workers driving down wages, it’s cheaper to build a house than it would otherwise be.

    Americans fleeing coastal California for Arizona, Nevada and Utah: whatever other goals such people are pursuing (such as raising their children in a more recognizably American environment), they are also reducing their cost of housing.

    Crime-prone immigrants drive down real estate prices same as blacks (if by not quite as dramatic a percent).

  175. Ahem says:
    @notsaying

    The “people” to which you refer have no power in an elective dictatorship.

    The “people” can stop nothing.

  176. @Paleo Liberal

    Paleo Liberal wrote:

    Speaking as a Democrat, I think the main thing the Democratic Party needs to do to have a chance in 2020 is to find a way to get Kamala Harris to shut the frack up.

    Looking at the polls, it seems that Tulsi may actually have popped the Kamala balloon. Something we can thank Tulsi for, even if she cannot get the nomination.

    Of course, that leaves us with Biden, Sanders, and Warren, all of whom make Al Gore look good.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  177. I hate to admit it, but I have to agree with Yang. Change the zoning laws, building codes, occupancy laws, and you solve the high cost of housing and the homeless problems overnight.

  178. Kyle says:

    Shipping containers are not livable spaces. That’s disgusting. That would be in violation of all types of building codes and zoning codes, let alone basic human dignity. This guy is pretty stupid.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  179. J.Ross says:
    @International Jew

    Thanks to Mexican construction workers driving down wages, it’s cheaper to build a house than it would otherwise be.

    Here it is, the most perfectly absent-minded cake-offering water-on-a-grease-fire comment.

  180. @PhysicistDave

    You haven’t heard the stories about how “hospice care” is a euphemism for over-dosing the patient on opiates to get rid of him?

    Hospice care is a double-scam. Once the insurer/gov’t care provider realizes a terminal patient is costing too much money to keep alive, they use access to pain killers to bribe them into “hospice/palliative” care. At that point, they stop medical treatment and just give them so many drugs they check out soon thereafter.

    Sometimes it may be “compassionate” for the patient. Other times it’s mostly “compassionate” for the insurer’s bottom line.

  181. @PhysicistDave

    Much how like Christie merc’d Rubio during the debates.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  182. @International Jew

    Americans fleeing coastal California for Arizona, Nevada and Utah: whatever other goals such people are pursuing (such as raising their children in a more recognizably American environment), they are also reducing their cost of housing.

    They may be reducing demand in coastal California, but they are increasing housing costs in Arizona, Nevada and Utah. You are literally arguing that the sixty million plus additional Americans do not affect the price of housing. Your position is inane on its face.

    Cheap labor is hardly cheap. It leads to increased welfare spending. Localities must tax real estate in order to pay for welfare, schooling and free healthcare for all of that cheap labor.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  183. @Hypnotoad666

    Our entire healthcare system is a sham worthy of Rube Goldberg. The incentives are completely twisted so that the focus is not healthcare, but jumping through the appropriate hoops in order to satisfy the requirements of insurance companies. The entire system should be reconsidered from the top to bottom.

    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat
  184. JMcG says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Flying an airplane with a stick is so much more intuitive than flying one with a yoke that Airbus installs sticks in their airliners now. Plus, it makes you feel like Chuck Yeager.

  185. @Clifford Brown

    High housing prices have nothing to with supply and demand, it’s because of the high cost of land…

    All the talk about “housing” does tend to obscure the fact that you are really talking about two totally distinct components: the underlying land; and the structure that sits on top of it.

    In places like LA and SF, 90% of the value of a “house” is the land.

  186. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    You are literally arguing that the sixty million plus additional Americans do not affect the price of housing. Your position is inane on its face.

    They may drive up demand, but they also reduce construction and maintenance costs, through their contribution to the labor pool. Which tendency prevails?

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  187. KunioKun says:

    I believe the main character of Snow Crash lived in a shipping container before anybody else thought it was cool.

    Politicians are such a joke I can’t bring myself to care if Yang wins or not.

  188. @AnotherDad

    Being in construction, I can tell you modular design has eliminated much of the manual aspect of constructing housing and commercial buildings.

    • Replies: @South Texas Guy
  189. Slooooow Sunday in Sailerlandia;

    The Third Rice vs. White Wheet, Fake but Afromative Moonbat Supercentenarians, Forcefully Beloved Queen B Morrison & Bukz Ophranage, Moar & Meh Ferguson, Unbearable Improbability of Flying Tuckers,…oh, wait…

    ….Will Uncle Sailer consider in the nearest future a post about the Fox News latest ‘Tucker Gone Fishing’ skulduggery ?

  190. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack Hanson

    Maybe attributing too much to Yang, but he’s probably smart enough to see that while the coalition of the fringes is ratcheting up the anti-white hate, its also boiling the frog and white awakening is increasing exponentially because of it.

    Yang may be as anti-White as the rest of them, just differing in his assessment of what the conquerors can get away with and how soon.

    It’s kind of like the differences of opinion between “liberal Zionists” and “rightwing” Zionists.

    • Replies: @SFG
  191. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    Moore’s Law is dead.

    It is?

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
    , @Realist
  192. @Clifford Brown

    Despite this, unlike most politicians, Yang strikes me as a moral and intelligent person. While Yang has some interesting ideas, he lacks vision and the conviction to fight the status quo. He too often buys into the Left’s moral framing. I think when faced with resistance he would fold as opposed to fight back. Yang might make for a brilliant technocrat, but not a visionary leader. America needs a visionary leader, not a technocrat to manage The Decline.

    Still, I prefer Yang to 99% of politicians, but that is not saying very much. Rarely do you find a politician who says anything remotely interesting, but Yang does this weekly.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  193. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Used shipping containers have been fumigated with deadly chemicals and can’t be redeployed as housing.

    But you can place goods inside of them that end up in homes???

    • Replies: @Chris Mallory
    , @anon
  194. J.Ross says:
    @Kyle

    It was a fashion for a long while among jet set billionaire hipsters like David Michael Rothschild (who all have multiple mansions anyway), but their “shipping containers” were expertly designed and magnificently appointed; there is also the “tumbleweed house” subculture (cuck sheds). One office space (in Denmark?) stacked containers in a big warehouse to make a less crazy version of the image in the first comment, and the various containers were supposed to be offices or meeting rooms, with walkways and stairs added.
    Very little of this makes any sense though. The insulation you can expect from a container is what you can expect from a tent. All of the utilities have to be brought in, probably frequently breaking the skin, so really we’re talking about something that makes a double wide look luxurious. A container’s survival in a tornado would be worse than a trailer’s. You would really have to build so much in and around it that you would be better off actually building a small house.

  195. @Jack D

    There are a huge # of shipping containers that are piled up at US ports because the amount of goods that get shipped FROM China to the US is so much greater than the amount of goods that get shipped back.

    I don’t think there is actually any great pile up. They ship ’em back on the same ships to cover the demand in China.

    But if there ever is …
    5280/40 = 132
    132 * 3 = 396
    396 * 1933 = 765, 468 containers to build a wall on the Mexican border 3 containers high.

    At say $3000 a pop for your used container–less if there’s a real slump in trade–containers for your wall cost a mere $2.3 billion. Of course you want you razor wire chain link fence on the border, a road, your container wall must be graded and placed, then another road and another chain link, razor wire topped fence. So you’ve got some construction costs.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  196. @Lot

    It’s amusing how the people who advocate for other people living in small cramped spaces; Yang, Jack D, etc, never actually do so themselves.

    Kind of like politicians who are negro apologists but usually live as far as possible from them.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  197. SFG says:
    @Alexander Turok

    He’ll increase immigration, Trump probably won’t.

    I think it has more to do with his having to run as a Democrat than any innate hatred of white people (which I don’t think Yang has), but there it is.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
  198. SFG says:
    @Anonymous

    Rightwing Zionists are increasingly willing to accept immigration restriction.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  199. @Anonymous

    Demand. Sixty million plus additional Americans affects pricing more than slightly lower wages. Lower wages for Americans is not a good thing. Especially in the case of a completely domestic industry like home building!!!!

    Lower wages that lead to higher taxes to pay for the welfare state to artificially inflate the profits of the builders. As an American patriot, I do not want lower wages for my fellow Americans.

    Your argument is basically, immigration increases the rate of poverty so it is better because I save money. This is asinine thinking. We live in a community and we want everyone to have a decent standard of living even if you have to cut your own grass or strawberries cost a few cents more.

    • Agree: peterike
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  200. SFG says:
    @Hans

    Why? At least he was HBD-aware…

  201. @AnotherDad

    See my reply to him. He speaks about things he knows nothing about.

  202. @Anonymous

    Steel doesn’t wash clean either. (sarc)

  203. @prime noticer

    also, he’s not that smart. smarter than the average democrat running for office, but that’s it.

    Low bar.

    he tricked some dissident rightists, which was tremendously embarrassing, as a testament to their lack of serious, real world intelligence. the kind of intelligence we’ll need to not get eliminated by our enemies, who are legion.

    Agree.

  204. @Realist

    Moore’s Law was never a “Law”, but more of a heuristic. Technology has largely been stagnant for 30 years.

    The real gains have been in the ability of network technology and logistics to pave the way for monopolization of the economy. It remains to be seen if this is actually an improvement. I doubt anyone 100 years from now will marvel at Instagram. One form of media distraction has simply replaced another form of media distraction.

    Technology continues to become more efficient, but true technological breakthroughs are apparently behind us. A modern car is far superior to a car from 40 years ago, but it is still just a car. There are ever increasing marginal improvements, but not paradigm shifts.

    Advanced AI may make the difference. If advanced AI leads to a sustainable cold fusion, then all bets are off the table.

  205. @Anonymous

    I do not see Moore’s late as dead yet.

    There is a bit of controversy, but nothing to show it is dead. Perhaps slowing down a little.

    Realize that Moore’s Law must end sometime, just from the laws of physics. There is a maximum possible computer speed and capacity determined by the size of atoms and the speed of light.

    For decades there has been the idea that, at some point, quantum computers can take up the slack from the inability to make transistors any smaller, etc. The idea is that quantum computers operate not in a binary state, but in an unlimited number of possible quantum states. Further examination shows us that the unlimited number if quantum states has a limit in practice. The higher quantum states require too much energy for too little return. Still, the possibility of having access to several quantum states per atom is a massive jump ahead of two states per bit.

    The eventual limits on quantum computers involve the size of the atom, the speed of light, and the number of quantum states per atom which can be accessed.

    In other words, we’ve got a long way to go.

    Of course there are drawbacks. Combine the mind boggling abilities of a quantum computer with advances in AI and robotics and at some point you don’t just get self-replicating machines, but machines smart enough to design and build a superior model. This creates the possibility that humans will create an artificial species which will render us obsolete.

    The folks who have the idea of the “singularity” believe that at some point humans will be able to meld with super-intelligent machines, and thus live forever in a robotic form. That supposes (a) such a thing is possible, (b) the humans’ consciousness is not destroyed in the transition and instead replaced by duplicates of the brain patterns and (c) that the machines would permit it.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Realist
    , @res
  206. @Faraday's Bobcat

    His ancestors were dirtbags and he tries to blame it on their whiteness?

    Of course! It cannot be that he is an imbecile, because that would be unacceptable to him. The problem for him is that he is an imbecile.

  207. J.Ross says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    RadioLab has an insufferably spastic style but they recently did an interesting show (if you ignore the interruptions and sound effects) about those nightmare runaway Toyotas which were all blamed on the drivers: we are now making transistors so small that they are queered by cosmic particles. And putting them into everything. There is no shielding against these particles, but then again, if we go backwards and make the hardware components larger, we never have to worry about them again (oh and while we’re at it, you cannot hack into a car or an oven if you do not computerize everything and give it all wifi).

  208. @bored identity

    The media has really weaponized autistic spergs like Dylan Matthews against us.

  209. Johnny789 says:
    @tyrone

    Somebody needs to ask Al Cervix’s buddy, “Do you seriously want American citizens to live in Shipping Containers? What the hell is wrong with you?” Plus, if they ever end up doing it they’ll be out in the middle of nowhere where you have to drive 10 miles to buy a six pack of beer. Intolerable.

  210. @Clifford Brown

    The entire system should be reconsidered from the top to bottom.

    If by “reconsidered” you mean “bulldozed into a pile and lit on fire while we all dance around it in a ring singing Hallelujah” then I’m with you.

  211. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @John Derbyshire

    The flying car problem was largely solved by a crank engineer/inventor namd Molt Taylor circa 1955. His solution had flaws, and was strictly flyable ion a day VFR basis,but it worked very well. One or two still fly, in fact.

  212. anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    That’s right.
    Unpacking the contents of an overseas shipping container isn’t a healthy way to make a living either, but only unused containers can be used for housing, making it a pretty expensive way to build.

  213. @syonredux

    LOL at the Dylan Matthews cuck/retard:

    Meanwhile my ancestor tried to lynch his sister’s fiancée, the first black man to marry a white woman in New Hampshire history. Goy genealogy is just a list of crimes.

    A fiancée is a woman.

  214. Hail says: • Website
    @Clifford Brown

    Yang merely wants to manage the decline long enough so that China can establish a Special Economic Zone in the Bay Area

    Correct, and with only mild hyperbole.

  215. @Faraday's Bobcat

    His ancestors were dirtbags and he tries to blame it on their whiteness?

    How were they dirtbags? Stopping adultery is a noble pursuit.

    • Replies: @Faraday's Bobcat
  216. @Sam Patch

    Yang wants to make 22 million illegals citizens. That’s not stopping the bleeding.

  217. @PhysicistDave

    So instead of offering a cure, he is going to offer us hospice care so we can die peacefully in our sleep?

    You haven’t heard the stories about how “hospice care” is a euphemism for over-dosing the patient on opiates to get rid of him?

    In the UK, hospice care means depriving the victim/patient of water.

  218. The Andrew Yang for President 2020 campaign theme.

  219. Jack D says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    I never suggested that anyone live in a shipping container although there’s not a big difference between them and trailers.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  220. @RadicalCenter

    Yet Yang still thinks it’s a good idea to import tens of millions more people for whom ACCORDING TO HIS OWN CORRECT ACCOUNT AND PREDICTION, there will be no jobs whatsoever. This is a recipe for widespread permanent poverty, and the violence, family dissolution and dysfunction, racial conflict, and increased government spending and taxation that comes with it.

    So why do you want to like the guy?

  221. @Anon7

    The average size of a newly constructed single-family detached home is now 2,600 square feet in the USA. The average size of a new house in the USA has doubled since 1960.

    Because you can no longer discriminate on the basis of race, you must instead price the diversity out of the neighborhood.

    • Agree: Anonymousse
    • Replies: @Rosie
  222. @Reg Cæsar

    Anyone know what that’s made of? The floors have to be plywood, the roof, wood construction galore. Be a hell of a bonfire if there are no sprinklers.

    • Replies: @Lugash
  223. @unit472

    I was the shadow of the waxwing slain
    By the false azure in the windowpane …

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  224. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Despite this, unlike most politicians, Yang strikes me as a moral and intelligent person. While Yang has some interesting ideas, he lacks vision and the conviction to fight the status quo.

    The problem with Yang, in my opinion, is that he harbors the same deep-seated fear of Whites that is the prinary driver of non-White political preferences in the USA. Hence, he cannot take the obvious steps that need to be taken on immigration policy. Hence he must condemn manifestations of White identity. Etc.

  225. Luke says:
    @Lot

    I have an ego self propelled battery powered mower; the 56 volt lithium battery lasts an hour

  226. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @silviosilver

    He’s part of the Great Replacement crew.

    • Agree: Hail
  227. Hail says: • Website
    @bored identity

    That is from three years ago, and has numerous weird entries probably attributable to the Semitic ethnic origins and extreme Zionism of the creator of the list.

    In Aug. 2016, people were struggling to understand what the Alt-Right was, after Hillary mentioned it between coughing bouts on the campaign trail.

    By early Sept. 2016, Richard Spencer and then-allies was on a media blitz to (re-)claim the term, and by year’s end it had become much more closely tied to its White racial-nationalist core; hangers-on, peripherals, self-promoters, and indeed non-radicals, either turned against the label (if they ever embraced it in the first place) or otherwise becoming disassociated with the label. Thus was born the Alt-Right vs. Alt-Lite split. But the media-BigTech-state axis has, since 2017, maliciously demonized-deplatformed-censored-prosecuted Alt-Right and Alt-Lite alike.

    So while that list may be useful as a historical document reflecting conditions of confusion in late Aug. 2016, it is not useful today. I imagine the ADL-SPCL’s Enemies Lists include all the above, anyway.

  228. @Bill B.

    Upscale shelter magazines have featured some very costly and avant garde homes put together for wealthy clients using multiple shipping containers. Basic one-container set-ups costing about $30,000 to $50,000 to fully equip also have a following, eccentric as it may seem. Just google shipping container housing…

  229. Whiskey says: • Website

    Semi related, in the sense that technology is getting worse not better, someone in this thread or another mentioned that manual transmissions are “sticking around” because of the illusion of control. Not so — automatic transmissions simply got worse.

    You can’t buy a small car without getting a CVT transmission, save the Volkswagen Jetta which has its own automatic transmission problems*. The CVT transmissions are terrible. They are lighter and have better gas mileage which is why the EPA driven car companies are using them, but they come at a huge repair and reliability and driving cost. They have the “rubber band” effect when accelerating. Nothing happens until wham! the car launches. The CVT is a high tension steel belt on continuously variable pulleys, requiring special transmission fluid and with high operating temperatures. When they go, and they do, around 40-60,000 miles, they send fragments of steel shrapnel all throughout the car’s underbody. The transmission fluid is OEM only, very expensive, and requires lots of changes. Only a few dealers can work on the CVTs, as they are generally a sealed unit.

    *The Volkswagen Jetta and the Toyota Highlander both share the same ASIN manufactured automatic transmission. Toyota will replace it if you really complain, Volkswagen will not. The transmission has the torque converter flaking metal and making scraping sounds and eventually failing. Software fixes do not address this.

    You can buy current larger vehicles without a CVT (they can’t handle the larger vehicles weight) but as Scotty Kilmer points out on Youtube, there are a LOT of consumer complaints about the 8 and 10 speed auto transmissions. The Six speeds were fine, particularly on the Camrys but the new 8 speeds spend most of their time it seems hunting for gears. This increase in gears and thus complexity and computerized shifting is also in the hunt for higher EPA mileage.

    I prefer my manual transmission. Its simpler, cheaper to fix, cannot be hacked, my car has no remote keyless entry, no satellite radio, a real key, and is not that hard to drive. Yes its a pain on hills, stop and go traffic, etc. but otherwise its very nice.

    We could have much better, safer, easier to drive, and more reliable cars but the search for gas mileage means cars in many respects that are worse not better. It would seem the best cars in terms of overall safety, reliability, and pleasure to drive were made in the late 1990s to early 2000’s.

    And this is an issue that none of the Democrats, media, etc. have an answer for. Woke Capital will give you trannies in bathrooms, and Black Lesbian Captain Americas and Jedi Knights, but cannot and will not provide a higher standard of living.

    Worse, whichever candidate the Dems pick (likely Harris, polls mean nothing its delegates and super delegates that matter which means money) is going to throw open the borders completely wide (instead of the semi wide under President Cuckworth Trump) and promise all sorts of free stuff to “immigrants.”

    The only way that can be done is taking houses and bank accounts of the deplorables. [Universal btw is releasing “the Hunt” on video and Netflix so our betters can enjoy Oscar Winner Hillary Swank kill rednecks at home.] That’s not boiling the frog — that’s outright civil war. They figure they have enough firepower with Anti-Fa, the FBI, the military to do that nationwide. Just figure — another 30 million or so in 2021 and 40 million more in 2022 requires seizing White people’s houses and their bank accounts to pay for all that free stuff and house immigrants.

    “And so it begins.”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Lugash
  230. J.Ross says:
    @Hail

    Eli Lake has an interesting twitter feed. He’s a neocon who at one point defends al-Qaeda (when they wear the right helmet), and a never Trumper on incoherent grounds, but he has some good points, links good links, and his statements appear to be an order of magnitude more precise and well-thought-out than those of, say, David Brooks.

  231. @MEH 0910

    Maybe Kanye really is a genius.

    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
  232. snorlax says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    In 1960s and even 2010s TV shows, spaceships were always flown by human pilots, even though *1960s* spaceships were self-piloting.

  233. snorlax says:
    @International Jew

    Thanks to Mexican construction workers driving down wages, it’s cheaper to build a house than it would otherwise be.

    House builders are building bigger (“McMansions”), not cheaper.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  234. MBlanc46 says:
    @John Derbyshire

    Look at the way that most Americans drive. They can barely manage two dimensions. Three dimensions? Not bloomin’ likely.

  235. @snorlax

    Snorlax, congratulations, you’re the only person who’s responded rationally, rather than in a fit of anger.

    So I’ll respond seriously to you: the houses may be bigger, but the price per square foot is smaller.

    And again, I’m not saying it’s a good thing that Americans are fleeing nice coastal California for the moon-like charm of Nevada.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @SaneClownPosse
  236. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    It’s kind of like the differences of opinion between “liberal Zionists” and “rightwing” Zionists.

    Rightwing Zionists are increasingly willing to accept immigration restriction.

    That wasn’t a point I was trying to make.

    My comment referred to how Zionist Jews differ in terms of how aggressively and brazenly they proceed to dispossess the Palestinians. Both “liberal Zionists” and “rightwing” Zionists agree on the ultimate goals of Gentile dispossession and Jewish supremacy. That they fall into different political camps, or that one is seen as more critical of “Israel’s policies” than the other, is primarily a function of varying assessments of what the Jews can get away with in Palestine, and how quickly.

    The other purpose of nice seeming “liberal Zionist” is to run a kind of damage control to lull (or anaesthetize) the Gentile population of Palestine while they are being conquered and replaced.

    Similarly, Yang could be seen as sharing the same goals of White subjugation as other anti-Whites, but just being more subtle in the basic methods employed to that end.

    We are all Palestinians now.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  237. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Thank you for your response, Mr. Brown. I will entertain it as a possibility, but I have to wonder whether things are so clear cut.

  238. J.Ross says:
    @International Jew

    They’re not more affordable (or affordable to a wider range of consumers). They encumber a smaller number of parasites less while locking more people out of home ownership.

  239. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Whiskey

    Government regulations have caused automakers to have to abandon thoroughly debugged, time tested engine and transmission designs and replace them with increasingly baroque and fragile setups that drastically increase maintenance and warranty costs. Buyers are not that concerned with fuel mileage but CAFE regulations say manufacturers have to make more fuel efficient but less reliable, harder to fix cars. Auto manufacturers are run by salesmen ( salesman being the reciprocal of nerd, remember?) and would rather go out of business than tell you this.

    Mechanically, today’s cars are NOT better than old one in some ways. The old foundry work was frequently better, and the cars were easier to work on. They were not well rustproofed and the carbureted engines washed the cylinder walls down with raw gas on shutdown. In some ways late eighties, early nineties cars were a high point.

    CVTs were first used on the humble DAF Daffodil car, never sold in the US, and worked okay because the power of the engine was low. Modern car CVTs are poorly designed. GM and Mopar had very good transmissions in the THM 350, 400, 700R4 and 200R4 and TorqueFlite respectively. now the new designs hve come along at 3 to 5 year intervals and don’t have time to be thoroughly debugged before replacement. Same with engines. FCA is just now getting the Pentastar sorted and Ford’s new diesel is turning out to be like most of the rest, not worth shit.

    Instead of CAFE, the feds should have just encouraged people to go to CNG by making it unprofitable not to build out the last mile infrastructure. We flare off enough natural gas in the US to run a fairly good size city’s entire vehicle fleet every day.

  240. Rosie says:
    @ben tillman

    Because you can no longer discriminate on the basis of race, you must instead price the diversity out of the neighborhood.

    So true. Covenants now sometimes require you to build a 2000 square foot home even in vacation developments where you can’t live there all year! If you’re living on one salary with lots of kids, that’s not happening.

  241. guest says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    Dude, there are countless YouTube videos on construction/engineering “fails” from the Thrid World. I just because you can hire them cheap to do simple jobs here doesn’t mean they’re Swiss Family Robinson at home.

    Shingles aren’t that hard. Regular folk could do it. They just don’t want the bother. Like changing your own oil or painting your house.

  242. Anonymous[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    By early Sept. 2016, Richard Spencer and then-allies was on a media blitz to (re-)claim the term, and by year’s end it had become much more closely tied to its White racial-nationalist core

    Spencer was mostly an onlooker to the energy and creativity of 2014-2016. He tried to ride the coattails of other men (of which that list is a sample) who had authored a true movement, and aided by a willing anti-White media Spencer claimed to be its leader. That dishonorable act sent the true creators and leaders to the exits. With its authentic leadership and foot soldiers scattered to the winds, the movement under the banner now associated with the usurper Spencer collapsed. Tellingly, Spencer has stopped using the label in his own marketing.

  243. MBlanc46 says:
    @Sam Patch

    If America is over, who gives a bleep about “stopping the bleeding”? I suppose that’s more important to those younger than I, but I’d hope that most younger guys would thinking of something other than just shrugging and saying, “Oh well, we’ve lost. Here, Andrew, I’ll just bend over and spread them for you”.

    • Replies: @Hail
  244. Anon55uu says:

    In the 2nd season of “Bosch” there’s a scene filmed at a shipping container shopping mall in Las Vegas and it actually seems pretty cool. The location scouts do a great job on that show.

  245. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    We could do a hell of a lot worse than Kanye. I like the guy. He’s a bit off, but he means well and that is enough in my book.

  246. MBlanc46 says:
    @Daniel H

    I’ve said that many times, Daniel H. For many reasons, the only hope for the West, and, therefore, the human race, is a good, rip-roaring, barn-burning depression that will make the 1930s look like good times.

    • Replies: @anon
  247. @Torontotraveller

    How does “helicoptor” sound?

    Fine, but it looks bad. How about helico- (twist, helix) + -pter (wing)?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  248. @Jack D

    No, but you made a comment a couple months ago about the efficiency of housing people in massive skyscraping concrete apartment complexes, locations you yourself would never have any intention of living in.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  249. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    While some seemingly unlikely people-Vince Neil, Tina Louise-have learned to fly them, the helo is hardly the answer. They are very high maintenance, expensive (even without the mythical devil pwoduct wiability) and demanding to fly.

    A fixed wing aircraft with single lever power control and glidepath control independent of power made t operate out of short strips seems a way better candidate.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    , @Jack D
  250. They’ll be in the flying cars, flying over the people living in shipping containers and shopping at the corner dumpster.

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
  251. @Hail

    Oops.

    You’re Right- bored identity failed to check the expiration date on this canned tweet;

    Today’s lesson:

    DO NOT copy&paste&link&drive!

  252. @Clifford Brown

    And so the number of people competing for land has no impact on the price of land?
    Population density is not related to demand, hence price?

  253. Hail says: • Website
    @MBlanc46

    I don’t know anything about Sam Patch, but some White Christians who say things like that are just waiting for a foreign group to defect to. They think there must be a foreign group out there that will somehow save us. It’s something like a political cargo cult.

    The most common cargo-cult for today’s White Christian is certainly Zionism (aggressive Jewish nationalism). There are occasional cases of defections to Islam for similar reasons; others choose to defect to Mestizodom (see Jeb Bush).

    But East Asia (maybe China specifically, or maybe not) could well, before mid-century, prove more popular than any competitor– except Zionism which has burrowed in deep, indeed (Godfree Roberts, an occasional Unz columnist, is one of the defectors-to-China).

    Andrew Yang is China / East Asia’s vector into US politics in 2019-2020.

    • Replies: @Sam Patch
    , @Bill B.
    , @anonymous
  254. anon[520] • Disclaimer says:
    @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    Not a winning amount of rosy enthusiasm but we now have a guy who’s saying “demographics are baked into the cake and it’s never going to get better”. I appreciate the honesty if nothing else

    Never accept that any bad or unjust policy is baked into the cake and irreversible. Democracy demands that the cake be un-baked.

    Arrest and deport all illegals, including the descendants of illegals.
    Arrest any citizen who hires or rents to an illegal.
    Cancel all student and work visas for non-citizens.
    Deport criminals – a democracy can vote to do this if it wants.
    Deport traitors – people who aid and abet illegal entry can be deported for treason. A democracy can vote to do whatever it wants.

    Nothing is baked into any cake.

    • Agree: ben tillman
  255. anon[520] • Disclaimer says:
    @MBlanc46

    For many reasons, the only hope for the West, and, therefore, the human race, is a good, rip-roaring, barn-burning depression that will make the 1930s look like good times.

    The depression you describe will only be a prelude to a civil war. It is the war that will bring real change.

  256. @countenance

    Hard to believe that so many in our sector were in love with this guy for awhile.

    Young people are clueless.

  257. @eah

    Illinois is running out of time to fix its public sector pension problem. A new report from Moody’s Investors Service identified the Prairie State as one of the two most likely to suffer during an economic downturn. Illinois towns and cities are already paring back government services to pay for generous benefits packages for retirees, and Chicago’s pension debt alone is larger than that of 41 states.

    “That” has no antecedent.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @ScarletNumber
  258. Sam Patch says:
    @Hail

    Ha. That kind of thing is so far from my thought process as to be incomprehensible. We are stuck with a multicultural society and increasing loss of majority status. It’’s not pretty, but we need to start embracing pragmatic policies that will benefit the largest number of our fellow citizens. Yang is the only one who will do that.

  259. MEH 0910 says:
    @Ministry of Tongues

    Roger Ebert, the film critic, is woke.

    Roger Ebert, the film critic, is dead.

    That review, at the late Ebert’s website, is credited to Nick Allen.
    https://www.rogerebert.com/reviews/jay-myself-2019

  260. @ben tillman

    Chicago’s pension debt alone is larger than that of 41 states.

    “That” has no antecedent.

    Chicago’s population is larger than that of 15 states. (In 1950, the number was 36. Out of 48.)

    What is so hard to understand about these sentences?

  261. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Yang’s stream-of-consciousnesses tweeting is occasionally interesting, such as here, where he essentially says that growing up around people who don’t look like you is alienating.

    How much resentment toward America from nonwhite immigrants stems from this?

  262. @Dave Pinsen

    I grew up a skinny Asian kid in upstate New York.

    A crabappleknocker.

  263. @Reg Cæsar

    Why are the majority of maids named Rosie/Rosa in real life?

  264. Lugash says:
    @Whiskey

    We could have much better, safer, easier to drive, and more reliable cars but the search for gas mileage means cars in many respects that are worse not better. It would seem the best cars in terms of overall safety, reliability, and pleasure to drive were made in the late 1990s to early 2000’s.

    Yep. From ~2000 to ~2008 cars bloated due to new safety requirements. There was some weight added to handle the massive power increases in that time frame also. Post 2008 it was all about fuel economy, so we got CVTs, dual clutch transmissions and 6+ gear autos, paired with 4 cylinders in medium to large cars. Give me a 2001 Camry over the present one.

    The Ford Focus’s dual clutch was even worse than any CVT. Google *that* disaster in the name of fuel economy.

    I’d really like to see a study of what the country’s fuel mileage would look like if we moved people out of SUVs and trucks and back into passenger cars. My gut instinct is that it would be far more effective than all the hybrids and over engineered buzz-bombs we have now.

  265. Lugash says:
    @Jim Christian

    It looks like concrete. But imagine emergency services trying to find an apartment on a call.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  266. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @unit472

    it’s amazing the wrecks crop spraying aircraft have and the pilot climbs out unscathed.

  267. @Anon7

    ‘…America will be like a botanical garden of diversity once unlimited open borders immigration becomes a reality. A couple million Somalis planted here, a couple million Venezuelans there, against a backdrop of generic Asians…’

    Au contraire. It all comes to a halt once whites cease to be at least a plurality.

    Then the race wars start. None of these groups are interested in getting along with each other, and none of them are interested in taking crap from each other.

    First everyone gangs up on the blacks, then they turn on each other.

    Ironically, it’s possible whites wind up recovering the country. However, I submit there would be more efficient, less painful ways of reaching the same end.

    • Replies: @Anon7
  268. @Dave Pinsen

    How much resentment toward America from nonwhite immigrants stems from this?

    I’m guessing: plenty. E.g., the bitter standup comedy of Aziz Ansari.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/and-then-they-came-for-aziz-ansari/#comment-2159939

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/white-boys/#comment-1628454

  269. indocon says:

    Lot of iSteve material today, first coalition of fringes firing at itself:

    The broader Hindu-Muslim dynamic one the easiest to rupture in their coalition. With Hindu Americans increasingly (and often stupidly) playing the role of aggrieved minority here while cheerleading their own head guy Modi crushing Muslims in the homeland, it’s already gotten too hot for both these groups to stay in that squad. I am really curious how the politics plays out on this.

    Second, our favorite liberal white whiteopia gets busted for ghettoizing AA and Hispanic kids.
    https://www.pressdemocrat.com/news/9886971-181/marin-countys-sausalito-marin-city?sba=AAS

  270. Johnny789 says:

    Was he allowed to play in the street when he was 9-13 years old? Because if he grew up with me on the West Side of Cleveland in the late 60’s we would have forced him out of his house because we needed someone to play kick ball, touch football, and to go with us to the city pool 4 blocks away. And to roll crabapples down the escalator at the Sears on W. 110 and Lorain. And we wouldn’t have cared if he was a chink. We had Greeks, Germans, Hillbillies, and a bunch of pre-White Flighters.

  271. Bill B. says:
    @Hail

    It is human nature to be attracted to confident people.

    It is a – perhaps unique – weakness of people in and of the west that they mistake race, ethnic or clan confidence for ideological sense or rational argument.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  272. Although immigration isn’t helping, easy access to credit is the main reason house prices are going up. Banks have lots of capital to lend to speculators and are bailed out by the government if they get into trouble. Also, due to industrial decline and lack of tariffs, investors are reluctant to invest in productive businesses.

    Note that houses and rents are relatively affordable in Germany, despite higher levels of red tape than in Anglo countries.

  273. Yang is a visionary: After the Greenies crash the global economy, there will be no shortage of unused shipping containers.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  274. @SFG

    He’ll increase immigration, Trump probably won’t.

    Yes, and that’s what’s left to us on the National Question. Trump will maintain or slightly augment current sky-high levels of invasion, and all of the other candidates are in favor of Open Borders Now.

    So it’s a matter of continuing or slightly intensifying our slide into the abyss, or jumping off the cliff right into the volcano. It could almost be argued either way, but not in a manner any of the various exponents would allow.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  275. @Anonymousse

    Yep… I realized long ago that the “tiny house” movement was just an elaborate PR campaign to make SWPLs feel cool in trailer homes.

    Same here. If the ‘tiny houses’ were actual houses, made on the cheap, I could see it, but most of the stuff I’ve seen on TV are basically trailer homes. For God’s sake, they have wheels! That’s a trailer home.

    • Replies: @Bill
  276. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Being in construction, I can tell you modular design has eliminated much of the manual aspect of constructing housing and commercial buildings.

    Yeah, when I was doing it, the interior and exterior walls were prefab, as were the trusses. Structual construction done from scratch on site is very rare.

  277. @Hypnotoad666

    Hypnotoad666 wrote to me:

    Once the insurer/gov’t care provider realizes a terminal patient is costing too much money to keep alive, they use access to pain killers to bribe them into “hospice/palliative” care. At that point, they stop medical treatment and just give them so many drugs they check out soon thereafter.

    I have reason to believe that this is what happened to my father, my brother, and my brother-in-law’s mom. Neither I nor my brother-in-law were directly involved in the care for various reasons (simple geographic distance in my case), but putting together the information we do have… all three cases sounded very, very suspicious. I’ve talked the matter over with people in the medical field who agree.

    Each passing year, I am getting more and more dismayed at what may really be happening behind the scenes in our society… except most of us can’t (or won’t) see it.

    And now there is the Epstein case… so bizarre that even mainstream pundits suspect foul play.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  278. Realist says:
    @Polynikes

    Cars actually move in three dimensions (x, y, z), though z is dependent on surface terrain.

    Consider the cartesian coordinates of an auto trip up Pikes’s Peak: The absolute value of x and y become smaller as z becomes larger.

  279. Realist says:
    @Anonymous

    Moore’s Law is dead.

    It is?

    Yes, as it was written by Moore.

  280. Realist says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    There is a bit of controversy, but nothing to show it is dead. Perhaps slowing down a little.

    A law that changes is not a law…and it is slowing down more than a little.

  281. Lurker says:
    @Anonymous

    Your comment reminds me – an autogyro flew over my house a week or two back. Something of a rarity. I don’t know how many of your criteria they fulfill.

    Not fixed wing obviously.

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @J.Ross
    , @JMcG
  282. @Anon7

    The average size of a newly constructed single-family detached home

    But…what is the average size of the land the house sits on?

  283. BB753 says:
    @Anonymous

    One day, authorities will come clear, and admit the real number of illegals, say 40 or 50 million people, if they pass an amnesty bill.

  284. anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    Race defections are far and few between. Instead people will go along with race transition. The under 15 population is now 50% white, 25% Hispanic. Whites absorb Hispanics like the Bounty towel on a mess on the counter top. The result is a whitish race and new majority identity.

  285. @unit472

    Unless you’re going to kill or incarcerate / institutionalize* the homeless en masse, you haven’t proposed even a possible partial solution or amelioration of the problem, merely mocked others who are proposing something.

    There is no need to build tiny houses or whatever homeless housing in the most expensive parts of California. In any event, don’t we need to account for the costs that we will incur if typhus spreads? Because we already have typhus in downtown LA recently.

    Do we account for the “cost” of someone stepping on an HIV-infected drug needle on the sidewalk?

    Do we account for the “cost” of our children walking around feces and breathing in urine on public streets at our home?

    ……..

    *Actually, a society with the balls to enforce standards of public hygiene, public decency, and respect for others, WOULD gradually incarcerate or institutionalize tens of thousands of homeless in SoCal alone. Masturbating in public is not a necessary consequence of being homeless, nor is screaming or cursing loudly or swinging one’s arms in an unpredictable or menacing way next to other people. Sleeping on, camping on, or otherwise obstructing sidewalks and even streets is not a necessary consequence of being homeless.

    Every one of those types of behavior imposes on the rest of us and should result in arrest, prosecution, and jail time, however short a term (at first). Lock them up longer and longer if they can’t or won’t control themselves. The massive homeless population would rapidly decrease. And better yet, people all over would hear that they shouldn’t bother coming to SoCal any more if their intent is to live on the street and act in these ways.

    • Agree: Herbert West
  286. Jack D says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    When I lived in NY I lived in (fairly) big apartment buildings. On some days, I think about getting rid of the yard and moving back to the city. I don’t see anything inherently wrong with it. Large apt. buildings are another kind of Magic Dirt which become Tragic Dirt when vibrants touch it.

  287. @Massimo Heitor

    ” living standards should hopefully keep going up”

    I was arguing about this with someone elsewhere. Yes, shiny toys and big TVs are cheaper, medical science has not yet gone into reverse (though life expectancy has) – but the life chances of a black or white American child born in 1948 were far better than those for one born in 1988.

    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor
  288. TWS says:
    @ScarletNumber

    Because my neighbor’s home values directly impacts my own? Because an ugly cheap home attracts the crack head neighbors that shoot the shit out of each other? Because I don’t want to look at an eyesore? Costs me money, is dangerous and ruins my quality of life. No real reason I guess.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  289. @Arclight

    I have read a number of good articles by Thomas Del Beccaro (@tomdelbeccaro) at Forbes.

  290. @Jack D

    There’s nothing inherently wrong with it, if it’s what someone prefers to do. It’s when people start playing central planner that I take exception to.

  291. @Realist

    You may as well argue that when I press the gas pedal to go uphill I’m moving in a third dimension.

    Your car can go forward, or back. That’s all.

  292. Bill B. says:

    Here is the Hong Kong version of living-in-a-container.

    Nobody likes it.

    https://www.scmp.com/magazines/post-magazine/long-reads/article/3019591/why-hong-kongs-angry-and-disillusioned-youth-are

    (Orwell pointed out that a life of work-consume-sleep is only tolerable when electrified by tension and fear usually against an external threat real or imagined. Huxley’s TPTB finessed this with soma. If a population excepts living in containers either their society is a constant challenge or they are made pliable by drugs/tv/eating.)

  293. Brand-new mobile homes, located in good convenient neighborhoods and offering at least 1,080 square feet of living space, are available for purchase in my neck of the woods in northwest Indiana starting at $19,900.

  294. Anonymous[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Alarmist

    Yang is a visionary: After the Greenies crash the global economy, there will be no shortage of unused shipping containers.

    Who are the Greenies? People who print dollars?

  295. @Bill B.

    So outside the west, race and clan aren’t perceived as extremely important? That would be news to billions of people.

  296. Anonymous[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Each passing year, I am getting more and more dismayed at what may really be happening behind the scenes in our society… except most of us can’t (or won’t) see it.

    Welcome to the atomized, indifferent society you yourself helped create by supporting mass immigration/invasion.

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  297. JackOH says:

    John, my math is way behind me, but here goes:

    Airplane – travels a one-dimensional line described (piloted) in three-dimensional space.

    Automobile – travels a one-dimensional line described (steered) on a two-dimensional plane.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  298. @Jack D

    The thing that’s wrong with that lifestyle is it depresses fecundity for people who live there. Else there wouldn’t be such a thing as a suburbs at all.

    Cities are just basically anti-human environments. There’s a justified reason we call their inhabitants “bugmen”.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  299. Jack D says:
    @Realist

    Right now, cars are confined to narrow ribbons of pavement. The only way to increase highway capacity is to build more lanes, which is tremendously expensive and takes years or even decades (especially in the US nowadays) and when you do, they are quickly filled to capacity anyway at rush hour (and underutilized the rest of the time). The amount of space in the air is almost infinite. Now we can’t trust yutzes who are barely capable of steering in two dimensions to pilot a vehicle in 3, but the day is not far off when we can have fleets of man carrying drones in communication with each other so that they will never collide. The passengers can spend their time texting each other on their phones as they are doing already.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  300. anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker

    Daddy Warbucks, still looking for Annie.

  301. @Lugash

    It looks like concrete. But imagine emergency services trying to find an apartment on a call.

    In a bilingual city, no less.

    Appropriately, that structure is in Capt. Kirk’s hometown.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  302. JSM says:
    @Ministry of Tongues

    On a barge 100 miles from shore? And if they litter into the ocean, they get thrown off?

  303. Alden says:
    @Anthony Wayne

    Think of Grapes of Wrath. The family lived in a truck so could easily go where the work was.

  304. Jack D says:
    @Mr. Anon

    In 1967, heating oil was 18 cents/gallon so no one cared. I doubt those units were well insulated but you could build a building like this that is well insulated and sealed and would cost less to heat than a building with less surface area but lacking in effective insulation and air sealing.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  305. Alden says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    What country is that thing in? Those open sections are just chimneys if there’s ever a fire. What kind of columns support the top containers? I suppose the open spaces are to maximize number of containers while giving each one some natural light. But if there’s ever a fire

  306. Jack D says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Believe it or not (I know it’s hard for Americans) humans have the capacity to speak more than 1 language without growing confused. It’s really a joy to hear a native Montrealer (not the pain in the ass Quebec nationalists who pretend not to know English) go back and forth effortlessly between English and French 3 or 4 times in the same sentence. The purists don’t like it but it makes perfect sense because English has better words for some concepts and French has better words for other things.

    As for finding units, it’s actually easy because if you look closely there are certain sections of the building that are vertically contiguous – that’s where the entry doors are that lead to the elevator shaft and stair towers. But there are usually only one or a couple of apts. at each level for any given entry door. It’s a lot less confusing than a long hallway with dozens of doors.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  307. @Jack D

    With the mass permanent unemployment that seems to be coming our way due to automation / AI and other factors, I don’t see many people being able to afford these autonomous vehicles. Or regular vehicles, for that matter. Sounds like fun, though.

  308. @International Jew

    They should ban them. But this is yet another instance of “progressives” not being willing to put their money (or convenience, or safety) where their mouths are.

    Everyone else should change their lifestyle to reduce poisonous emissions, but not them.

    Similarly, very wealthy parts of California were among the worst wasters of water and violators of water-usage restrictions during our recent multi-year drought.

  309. @anonymous

    I agree very much with your main point, but Hispanic is not a race.

    Hispanics include totally white European people — like much of the elite in Mexico, Central, and Latin America — heavily African people from Puerto Rico, and most commonly Indian (Indio) and mixed white/Indian (mestizo) people.

    But your point still stands, because Hispanics in the USA, and those coming to the USA, are mostly people who are not primarily white genetically and are arguably not primarily European culturally.

    White Americans are often under the illusion that Mexicans and other Hispanics are “just like us with an accent”, which I’ll submit from experience and observation is not sufficiently the case. In this sense, Hispanics are more of a threat than Africans, who are so obviously a physical threat and a blight on our society everywhere they go, that it’s harder to believe or pretend otherwise.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  310. Anonymous[367] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    We are all Palestinians now

    No, still just you.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  311. Anonymous[421] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr McKenna

    I’m not sure about this. Democrats e.g. Obama may want more huddled peasants, but they know however dimly it comes at their political cost, provided they are in charge that cycle. Peasants just pack into the cities that Dems win anyway. Trump may or may not want fewer peasants, but if he’s nominally in charge, Dems and unelected gov’t staff can push Refugee Bonanza to the hilt. Washington people couldn’t think more than 2-3 years in the future if they tried. The effects of Third-Worldization on the success of the Dem Party as we know it aren’t completely predictable. Wall Street of course doesn’t care who’s in charge, wants more peasants either way.

    I am beginning to doubt the importance of the democracy theater to controlling the hordes. The only thing that can discourage them is our federal government’s economic collapse. It’s just too easy for poor barbarians to get into the U.S. now, technologically and moral-twistingly. After reading the Washington Post article about ICE Air the pessimism is ineluctable.

  312. @anonymous

    Whites also absorb Native Americans and East Asians well.

    The exogamy rates for East Asian women are claimed to be the highest of any race. Not true. Native American women marry non-Native men over 50%.

    The thing is, at some point Asians and Latin Americans can overwhelm the number of whites. Consider China, where numerous non-Chinese have been absorbed. In some coastal areas where whites have been known to tread, one can find Chinese with blue or hazel eyes. I once spent time in a village in Taiwan that was Dutch before the late 1600s. There were some blue eyed Chinese. I also know an elderly Taishan gentleman in NYC with hazel eyes.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Jack D
  313. Anonymous[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    The exogamy rates for East Asian women are claimed to be the highest of any race. Not true. Native American women marry non-Native men over 50%.

    ‘Native American’ women are East Asian women.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    , @Spangel
  314. J.Ross says:
    @Lurker

    Apparently, early in aviation history it was absolutely taken for granted — scientific consensus — that autogyros would be the way to go.

  315. Jack D says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Your cultural identity and your DNA can differ. If you go to Argentina, almost everyone regards themselves as Argentine or Spanish. To them, being an “Indian” means that you live as a primitive in the jungle – if you wear shoes and speak Spanish and go to church then you are not Indian. But if you do a DNA test (or just use your eyeballs) then a lot of Argentines, especially outside of Buenos Aires, are 30 or 40% Indian. But when they look in the mirror, they don’t see an Indian.

    In America there are a lot of Asian SWPLs. For this generation at least, they may be pure blooded Asian, but they act and think and behave like other SWPLs. Depending on how many of them there are, future Americans may still look white or they may have a little hint or more than a hint of Eurasian in them, but in their heads, they will still be “white”.

  316. @Herbert West

    “since his [Yang] policies would arrest economic growth”

    News flash. There has been no “economic growth” for 99.99% of The People.

    Equity prices rise because of inflation of the currency, not because value is increasing.

    Think of cartons on the shelf that contain less product at a higher price point.

    World Reserve Currency status comes and goes. WRC status is maintained by a premier global naval force, that is, at the point of a gun. It is not a long term strategy for the nation that is the vehicle or for the world at large. The ruling families and their inter-generational trillions will go on and on.

    The Phoenicians are alive and well, and about to repeat their cycle of death and rebirth as told with the legend of the Phoenix. Death of the aged empire and the birth of the new empire out of the ashes (real assets) of the old empire.

    “Meet the new boss, same as the old boss.” We get fooled again.

  317. Anon7 says:
    @Colin Wright

    Yeah, I was being sarcastic. Sorry, it’s always hard to tell for sure.

    When the illusion of plenty is shattered here in the USA – when it no longer becomes possible for the Fed to create money out of nothing, and no one will lend us money – that’s when the scramble will start. Just to have what we are doing now, we would need to come up with an additional $trillion in tax money. There are 140 million tax payers, only half pay any taxes. So 70 million people need to come up with a trillion dollars – that’s about $14,000 per person. Just for one year of thought-free, everyone gets whatever they want living.

    My only hope is that they’d all start to leave. That’s what happened occasionally in this country’s past – immigrants who couldn’t find work starved and had to leave.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  318. @International Jew

    “And again, I’m not saying it’s a good thing that Americans are fleeing nice coastal California for the moon-like charm of Nevada.”

    I like the “moon-like charm” and the low population density outside of Clark and Washoe counties.

    Californians carry a plague.

    • Replies: @International Jew
  319. Jack D says:
    @Anonymous

    Even a short strip is still a strip. I agree that single rotor aircraft are always going to be too tricky/dangerous for the average person to fly but future personal aircraft are most likely going to be quadrotors (like oversized drones) . Quadrotors can (under program control – they are ALWAYS under program control and never flown by hand even if there is a pilot with a stick directing them) even tolerate the loss of a rotor or motor and remain flying on the other three. The highly automated nature of a quadrotor is a virtue because humans are idiots and cause over 80% of crashes.

    • Replies: @Lot
  320. Jack D says:
    @Lot

    If you can buy an electric car that goes 300 miles between charges (and you can) then you can make an electric lawnmower that can cut a lawn of almost any size. Between noise pollution and air pollution and carbon usage, it’s only a matter of time before California decides to go after gas powered lawn equipment and once California goes that way, it’s a big enough market that the rest of the country will be dragged along.

  321. The Chinese solution to all problems, treat people like sardines.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  322. @Jack D

    …English has better words for some concepts and French has better words for other things.

    A French-Canadian pilot was asked for his opinion on the rule requiring English. His reply?

    “I would no sooner use French in the cockpit than use English in the bedroom.”

  323. It all comes down to this:

    Young Working Class Native Born White American Males are competing with Young Muslim Males+Young Hindu Males+Young Korean Males+Young Chinese Males+Young Pakistani Males+ Young Sihk Males And Young Mexican Males for the SCARCE LIVING AND BREEDING SPACE within the borders of America….

    Something for sure has to give…….It’s gonna very primitive…..very primate-brain…and very gut-level-Racial Tribal at some point in time….and all of the aforementioned is by evolution….hardwired into the Homo Sapien brain…….Notwithstanding what the Blank Slatist think….

  324. eah says:
    @eah

  325. @Steve Sailer

    “Pale Fire.”

    Mornington Crescent.

  326. Jack D says:

    Autogyros had a very brief heydey between the mid-20s, when they were invented (by a Spaniard – a fairly rare contribution to technology) and the late ’30s when the helicopter is perfected. The modern helicopter is really a further development of the autogyro and Cierva’s invention of the flapping hinge rotor. Once the helicopter was perfected, autogyros were largely forgotten.

    Ironically, Cierva died in an air crash, not of one of his experimental and cutting edge autogyros but an ordinary airliner crash of an intact aircraft due to fog and the inability of the pilot to fly in a straight line.

  327. Jack D says:
    @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    And yet the subway car, the high rise apartment building, the sardine can itself – these are all Western inventions.

  328. res says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    I do not see Moore’s late as dead yet.

    There is a bit of controversy, but nothing to show it is dead. Perhaps slowing down a little.

    Dying might be a better description than dead.

    But Dennard scaling has been dead for a decade which took away much of the perceived benefit of Moore’s law.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dennard_scaling

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
    • Replies: @Jack D
  329. @Anonymous

    Well, no, not any more. For decades now, a typical so-called Native American is at least half white european. I’ve visited reservations and interacted with enrolled tribal members and councilmen both on and off the Rez in numerous States. This is quite obvious by just looking at supposed Indian people, but their own family stories and tribal enrollment records tell the story in a more concrete, provable way.

    Indian tribes most often require only 1/4 or 1/8 “Indian blood quantum” to be eligible to enroll as a member of the tribe, sometimes only 1/16. Many tribal members don’t qualify by much.

    As far as I know, the tribes never require more than 50% Indian blood quantum. The us government issues Certificates of Indian Blood Quantum (CIBDs) for this purpose.

    When tribes distribute casino profit-sharing checks, or mineral-resource royalty checks, there are a LOT of very white “Indians” driving new pickup trucks and watching new TVs soon afterwards.

  330. @Jack D

    Yes, I know. They are good at imitation. Wilde was right, genius steals. These guys only copy.

    But, the West at least kept suburbs and small towns as the last vestiges of the agrarian/homesteader tradition, the last attachment of Western man to nature. Dwindling through the last 3 centuries, but such attachment was and is still there. How do you explain so many whites hitchhiking everywhere?

    Now the Chinese communists, and the elites that started the sardine packing for profit in the Industrial Revolution, have put aside their phony differences to create the glorious pod-living future. With the traditional, made in China cheapness, as the Yang proposal tells. As if $30k shipping container apartments won’t make real housing more expensive. As if the diverse will not flood “Shipyard Hills” and make them worse anyway – for many of them did live in shipping containers before in their slums, ask them how pretty they made them. Or rather, how pretty their former governments made them… a coat of colorful paint on top of many slum houses. Because the more “diverse” “citizens” won’t be bothered to do anything to upgrade their homes by themselves – they will want the government to do it, yet also want to avoid ever paying higher property taxes.

    In short, the middle class is over.

    2100 will see soyboys and soygirls with metal appendages in oxygen bubbles, the “barbarians” fighting racial wars for crops or cattle or oil pumps, amidst the barren pollution outside. The prequel to Wall-E, or Mad Max.

    Might as well have never listened to Smith, or Luther for that matter. The steam engine and Turing machines might have taken a little longer to achieve, maybe a bunch of us wouldn’t be born, maybe we’d still have sissy kings and bishops, but maybe some relatives would have more land and children than any of us, and passed on our family genes more successfully anyway. Who knows the answer though? What do we do now, Spengler?…

  331. Lot says:
    @Jack D

    Now I want an autogyro.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  332. @Luke

    Funny because natural gas would be less polluting, but they never want you to know that. Non-decaying lithium dug from China, or gasoline/propane clunkers. False dichotomy. Boot on the face regardless. Meanwhile teens that used to cut lawns get weaker and weaker, fatter and fatter, veganer and veganer. Like the Inca Amerindians depended on the Emperor to eat, even as they farmed land, it was His Land first and foremost, for He was the son of the Sun. Now the Millennials will bow to the Soy Emperor, the Yang Emperor, for a shed and a bowl of pho.

    Might as well have kept the Corn Laws. And the monasteries, at least the pansies and crazies were shuttered there.

  333. Jack D says:
    @res

    You can get around Denard scaling (and the manufacturers have) by the use of multicore processors. Thermal issues can be solved with better cooling solutions. The main reason processor performance hasn’t been going up is because computers have reached the point where what we have is perfectly adequate for most people. If all you do is web browsing and word processing and maybe some light gaming, then buying a faster processor isn’t going to get you any noticeable improvement.

    Moore’s Law was always meant to be a rule of thumb and not a true law of the universe. Like all rules of thumb, it was only meant to apply within a certain range and was going to break down at some point, but fortunately that point is one where computers have reached considerable power. The current iPhone is equivalent in processing power to a Cray “supercomputer” of the 1970s. These were considered good enough back in the day to design nuclear weapons, do cryptanalysis, etc.

    • Replies: @Lot
  334. @Reg Cæsar

    Yuck. “Architecture”

    I prefer my American style single family home. But if i’m living multi-family, I’d much rather just live in a nicely styled 20 story apartment building with a nice balcony/deck where i am *not* looking into nor being looked into by my neighbors.

  335. @J.Ross

    Yep. The raise in taxes caused by the lower labor’s inefficiency, crime, and dependence on welfare, will make the already-greedy real estate people raise prices anyway. And since the labor is of lower quality, so are the newer buildings. Florida is aberrant in this regard, McMansions are mostly stucco. And also, relatively small amount of rooms – meaning, no inheritance for white children. Boomers think it will be mah bootstraps 1959 forever.

    Not that this overpricing justifies the other extreme, this “Shipyard Hills” scheme that the Yang Emperor is proposing. If said scheme would emphasize small disheveled Flyover America towns, maybe that would work to a degree; some relaxation of zoning laws would also work too, Trump asked for it in his earlier life. But, if the Yang Emperor wants LA to be as crowded as Shanghai, as it seems, in order to satisfy the craft beer fake socialist bloc… no thanks.

  336. Jack D says:
    @Lot

    The Wallis autogyros were very cool (and remarkably compact) but I kind of get the feeling that their good safety record was attributable to the fact that they were flown mainly by Wing Commander Wallis himself. Wing Commander Wallis was the kind of a guy who would fly his Wellington home even if Jerry had shot off half the tail. I’m not sure how well they would have fared in less capable hands. He was also just about the last person on earth interested in improving the autogyro.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  337. @AnotherDad

    Yep. There will always be burghers, we just need to keep them at manageable levels. The mass panelak lifestyle did not work before.

    That apartment complex though, all windows look into each other and their balconies. Clearly only viable in the porn-producing areas, nowhere else.

  338. @John Derbyshire

    Your car can go forward, or back. That’s all.

    I have a special car. Mine can also go right and left.

    • LOL: Realist
    • Replies: @Autochthon
  339. @International Jew

    I’m no fan of immigration, but its effect on real estate isn’t all that straightforward.

    Thanks to Mexican construction workers driving down wages, it’s cheaper to build a house than it would otherwise be.

    Americans fleeing coastal California for Arizona, Nevada and Utah: whatever other goals such people are pursuing (such as raising their children in a more recognizably American environment), they are also reducing their cost of housing.

    Again, it is ridiculously straightforward.

    You are–mostly–just pointing out that the pattern of price change can be complex. But the overall effect is absolutely not.

    Some individual may end up with cheaper housing because he bails out of an immigrant heavy–expensive housing–area and runs to flyover country and buys a cheaper house. But that isn’t “cheaper housing from immigration”, that’s “more expensive housing from immigration which some individual American can no longer afford, or doesn’t want to live in due to cultural concerns, so runs to cheaper housing elsewhere.” That “cheaper housing”–in say Colorado–has also risen in price because so many other people (native and immigrants) also flee the more expensive housing where the immigrants show up–i.e. California.

    At root it is supply and demand. New housing cost is land+cost of construction, which in turn is cost of material plus cost of labor. It is possible–in some scenario where there is a “skills shortage” or something–for cheaper immigrant labor to be lowering housing cost, enough to make up for the increase in demand immigrants generate. But in fact, in most metro areas–and particularly on the coasts–simply the immigration runup in land costs far outstrips the total labor costs, not to mention even the trivial marginal cost savings from cheaper immigrant labor. (It is not remotely close.)

    That’s the deal. Unlike making widgets or packing chicken or mowing lawns–which may indeed become cheaper because of cheap immigrant labor–housing, past a certain point, which America is way past, is driven by cost of land. And land is not being produced. It is static.

    More immigrants means more competition for available housing/land. Other considerations like not wanting to live with immigrant crime/disorder/behavior/culture actually remove even more existing housing stock furthering price pressure. Immigration actually forces much more land consumption, more building, which actually puts pressure (demand) on housing material and labor costs as well.

    It really is pretty simple–supply and demand. When it comes to land “they aren’t making any more of it”. So immigration drives up demand, but does not, can not, improve supply. QED.

  340. Jack D says:
    @Herbert West

    Back in the day, the slums were packed to the gills and it didn’t suppress fecundity at all (except thru mortality). BTW, some of the big old Upper West Side apartments and townhouses in which people used to raise their families were more spacious than any suburban Levittown rancher. A lot of these got chopped up later on into smaller apartments but originally they were quite spacious and intended not only to house a flock of children but a few servants to help take care of them too. If owning a row house on the UWS with a couple of live in servants was still the domain of middle class families rather than oligarchs, it would be a great place to do so – close to the Natural History Museum, Central Park,
    etc. and you could walk everywhere. The kids had their own social life on the street and didn’t depend on their parents to act as chauffeurs. There is nothing about suburban life that makes it the God given environment for raising children – it’s all driven by culture and economics.

  341. @AnotherDad

    1000% right.
    I’d even argue making wickets or packing chicken or mowing lawns are not making things much cheaper; if American wages are not enough for paying merely the interest on housing, then they also must stretch for these more basic products and services. Not to mention, mowing lawns used to be free; making widgets used to be a breadwinner job; and cheap chicken is steadily getting more poisoned with hormones, loaded with preservatives, and either sold in oversized deep-fried combos or paltry salads.

  342. @Jack D

    Yes, but back in the old days when the middle classes still lived in the cities, the slums were not so big, nor was the urban population that huge, so that green areas would be kept better and middle classes would stay around in the cities. Nor was the material difference between rich and poor that large, nor was the difference between large and small cities. Nor was there a dating culture. Furthermore, it was a less diverse society, ergo higher trust.

    Suburbs really arose when all these conditions started to change in the big-city, bureaucrat-and-artist-friendly New-Deal and postwar, and the accompanying Levittowns that arose in response. Thus, instead of decentralizing, cities concentrated power, and even if the middle classes found themselves evermore squashed in cities, they felt it necessary to commute, because corporate/government offices were still in cities. Fecundity then dropped because both the flashier urban landscape and more boring suburban one combined with the end of the trends on the 1st paragraph, so as to create more sterile people. Gone was the urban jungle, instead came the urban playground (plus vestigial jungle areas which remained dangerous and caused the rest to become even more expensive); and gone was the homestead, supplanted by the white picket fence behind which you could barely farm, thus making you dependent on both a big corp to get paid and a big gov to keep foodstuffs prices and credit rates in check, as Levittowns increased in expense too. Independent unions being decimated was the last step.

  343. @SaneClownPosse

    I like the “moon-like charm” and the low population density outside of Clark and Washoe counties.

    Well, then you’re fortunate. Like other people who like what most others don’t like; you’re arbitraging taste! (Me: I like minor league baseball — I really do, it’s not just that I’m cheap — so I get to enjoy baseball for a lot less money and hassle than people who must go to the big league parks. Unfortunately for my wallet, and unlike you, I greatly value living in coastal California.)

  344. @International Jew

    You can have a Yang Combined Urban Living Manufacturing Shinjiang Industries Public Ltd. Co.* Shipyard Hills container if you want. Just like in the countryside even more will have trailers from that wonderful future conglomerate. This is America. Any color you like, sayeth the gospel-of-wealth-bearer Henry Ford.

    *whatever silly names the Chinese make for their businesses in Alibaba, they never forget their Ltd. Co. disclaimer at the end. The Imperial brand.

  345. Lot says:
    @Jack D

    “The current iPhone is equivalent in processing power to a Cray “supercomputer” of the 1970s.”

    The current iphone is much faster

    Cray 1 (1975) 80 MHz
    Cray 2 (1985) 244 MHz
    Iphone XS: 2,490 MHz x 6

    • Replies: @Jack D
  346. @Anonymous

    Anonymous[107] wrote to me:

    Welcome to the atomized, indifferent society you yourself helped create by supporting mass immigration/invasion.

    Hmmmmm…….

    A) I do not support “mass immigration/invasion.” I favor the “Disney World” solution to immigration: Disney World can keep out pretty much anyone they wish, even if the USA or Florida lets that person in. I.e., I am a political decentralist: if New Mexico wants to admit some people and Arizona does not, let each state have its way (and similarly down to counties, municipalities, wards, individual businesses, etc.).

    B) In any case, I do not think immigrants can be blamed for pot and acid, the Beatles, and tie-dyed clothes. For that matter, I have nothing particular against the Beatles or tie-dyed clothes: de gustibus non disputandum est. I just find it interesting that the “counter-culture” was just as conformist as the “square cutlure.”

  347. Jack D says:
    @Lot

    You can’t just go by clock speed. The correct measure is MFLOPS (floating point operations per second). The Cray 1 was 160 MFLOPS. The 2 was 1.9 GFLOPS. The iphone X does around 800 MFLOPS so it falls between the two models. Maybe the 11 will come even with the Cray 2.

    However the Cray 1 wins on tonnage at 5.5 tons while the iphone only displaces 0.0002 tons and on cost at $8 million (1977 dollars) vs. $1,000 for the iphone.

    • Replies: @Lot
  348. @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    I might add, since the middle class commuted to the city for work, they stayed to party and gather socially; thus folk culture in the countryside died slowly, lively towns became old folks homes, as also the city+suburban+dormitories people started mining the countryside culture, morphing it, and repackaging for profit.

    At first this was great, new aesthetics for a new America, Elvis, James Dean, Marilyn, Camelot et al – until the years passed, and the twisting and repackaging was obviously coopted to disseminate ever-changing fads, through ever larger broadcasts, making sure all culture came top-down from the centers. Marxism, liberalism, capitalism, hand in hand, each carved out a space. Eventually American white culture has totally been spent, and since the multiculti 90s, its faces are browner; not because of the merits of brown art per se (which whites either over or underappreciate), but because urban whites (led by the old internationalists) have become more and more consumers and warpers of art (and everything) instead of creators, and thus now they market and consume lower yet still vital cultures. Thus marketing and postmodernism find confluence in the hip Seattle pasty globalist white app designer making gay-pride stickers with little avocados for cinco de mayo while eating miso soup, making the app heavier, making more ads having to appear, more content being downloaded, more battery consumption, more need to buy new phones, more need to buy new glasses, more need for vitamin d supplements (instead of going out in the sun), more risk of chemo or increased body fat or arteries clogging, more need of insurance, more need of obamacare, more risk of falling prey to oprah-recommended plantbased diet or statins, more risk of alienation, depression, ensuing alcohol, drug usage, porn usage (that was a given with the phone though), hormonal imbalances, etc ad nausea…

    At least the browns play more sports… but even that is a clear example, urban whites warped and commercialized their Victorian sports culture so much that they lost it to the brown underclass they are both importing and extracting culture from. Even small reactions such as retro baseball stadiums or college basketball (heck, even videogames, even though they are more of a crutch) are corporatized, internationalized, demasculinized, and diversified. Yet, browns will soon feel the platform heel of the Big Xister on their culture themselves, and some may even go based and react. However, the lower IQ denominator they have will mean that the smarter browns (including the less inventive but more hardworking East Asians) will be brainwashed harder until they disappear under sterility or crime, given they can usually be only as smart as the increasingly-miscegenating globalists at the top allow them. Meanwhile the lower browns (and probably lower iq traitors of other races) will have their less-organized anger and baser instincts more easily harnessed by the global rulers, probably the future Antifa Inc. soldiers and sex workers (they come in tandem, so they say). In short, browns will be used and spent too, as the machine-metis will survive. Just in a different way whites were used.

    Will anyone survive the cleansing fire? Maybe the big man theory will come to the rescue, it’s about time; but lest we forget, in the old days big men left both tradition and genetics… now, not so much… ergo, the actual rulers are running to the machines. Bezos has a dog already, because he knows that with the rampant decadent miscegenation of the elites, and the lack of traditional and genetic authority, they have no other way to stay above the brown sludge than through machine power… that way, they keep their relatively good business genes and their tech to themselves.
    For the rest, Mad Max, without the silly Charlize Theron fantasies (another example).

  349. Anonymous[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    We are all Palestinians now.

    White Americans are the new Palestinians. Only difference is that Palestinians tried to resist being replaced.

  350. Anonymous[107] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon7

    when it no longer becomes possible for the Fed to create money out of nothing,

    How does the Fed create money out of nothing?

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  351. @PhysicistDave

    Funny, would you advocate for similar decentralization of business? No? In effect you’d be replacing nations for Disney and Nike. How would that be better?

    Then again, you think lower cultures and higher cultures can have the same value for individuals. They are just particular symbols, behind we are all the universal same right? You say that using an old Roman adage. The irony… not only due to your preference for that adage instead of a line from a rap song, but because those Romans were so conformist they would kill you if you touched their Vestal Virgins (the Roman philosophers secularists love were the 1%, as always). Of course there will always be conformity, the question being, to what ethnocultural aesthetics can humans (and concentric-circle subdivisions) conform most naturally, without stagnating, nor breeding resentment and upheaval. The aesthetic of tie-dyes barely scratches the surface; behind that, Lennon supporting Angela Davis. Worse, the neocon Right from there on has only just presented Mickey Mouse versions of the same narratives, thinking appeasement will work, instead of actually building a staircase into left-thought… it’s one thing to be Christians, it’s another to be dupes; even Jesus pulled out a whip once…

    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
  352. Lot says:
    @Jack D

    “The iphone X does around 800 MFLOPS so it falls between the two models. Maybe the 11 will come even with the Cray 2.”

    This page says the iPhone 6s gets 1 to 7 gflops, the lower side on tasks that don’t use multiple cores.

    https://www.quora.com/How-many-FlOps-sec-can-an-iPhone-do

    Apple’s marketing for the XS says 5 trillion operations per second.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  353. Clyde says:
    @Jack D

    More on that shot up/half destroyed tail section. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geodetic_airframe
    Never heard of this before. Quite amazing that the tail at least had “doped up linen stretched across wooden battens” I suppose the entire airplane was built this way. And 80 years later people complain about their comforts on passenger airplanes. They have no idea

    The system was later used by Wallis’s employer, Vickers-Armstrongs in a series of bomber aircraft, the Wellesley, Wellington, Warwick and Windsor. In these aircraft, the fuselage was built up from a number of duralumin alloy channel-beams that were formed into a large framework. Wooden battens were screwed onto the metal, to which the doped linen skin of the aircraft was fixed.

  354. Kyle says:
    @John Derbyshire

    When you go “up hill” you’re actually only going forward. The added force of acceleration due to gravity is bending space time making it seem like you’re moving up.

    • Replies: @Realist
  355. Jack D says:
    @Lot

    Ops and flops are not the same thing. In any case, a modern iphone is a damn powerful computer, more powerful than the “supercomputers” of the past. This puts the need for even more power into question – if you already have a supercomputer in your pocket, do you really need an even more powerful supercomputer to check your email?

  356. Mr. Anon says:
    @Jack D

    In 1967, heating oil was 18 cents/gallon so no one cared. I doubt those units were well insulated but you could build a building like this that is well insulated and sealed and would cost less to heat than a building with less surface area but lacking in effective insulation and air sealing.

    But not less than a normal building that is – like most buildings – actually insulated. Those apartments must have been cold.

  357. @Disordered (with a bad memory)

    Disordered (with a bad memory) wrote to me:

    Funny, would you advocate for similar decentralization of business? No? In effect you’d be replacing nations for Disney and Nike. How would that be better?

    I’d let businesses do as they wished, just as I’d let states, counties, etc., down to individuals do as they wished.

    I suspect we are somehow talking past each other. The main point here is that McDonald’s does not compel people in any area to eat Big Macs: if the people of Dubuque or New Delhi or Shanghai do not like Big Macs (I don’t myself), then McDonald’s is not going to sell Big Macs in that area.

    Anyone can “opt out” of McDonald’s by just not patronizing McDonald’s. Everyone takes that for granted, which is why I did not mention it and most people do not mention it.

    On the other hand, if most of the people of South Carolina choose not to patronize the Federal Government, the Feds most assuredly do not allow them to “opt out”: indeed, South Carolina tried that back in 1860, with rather unfortunate results.

    (For the record: no, I am not defending slavery or the South’s position on slavery. My sympathies are with the radical abolitionists. I think the free states should have seceded from the Union, as a number of abolitionists advocated.)

    So, the fact that I favor local polities being allowed to opt out of larger polities is a distinctive position, which there is reason for me to explain.

    Dis also wrote to me:

    The irony… not only due to your preference for that adage instead of a line from a rap song, but because those Romans were so conformist they would kill you if you touched their Vestal Virgins…

    A) The fact that I quoted a Latin aphorism does not mean I admire everything Roman.

    B) I most assuredly would have had enough sense to keep my hands off the Vestal Virgins!

    C) Like you, I am not an admirer of Angelia Davis or the Neocons. But if the Neocons want on their own to go and fight for Israel, I certainly will not stop them. However, I would like to be able to “opt out” of their idiocy, which returns us to my initial point.

    The political decentralism I am advocating was, by the way, largely embodied in the Articles of Confederation as worked out by the Founders in the 1770s. It is sort of an American tradition, you know!

  358. @Anonymous

    Anonymous[107] asked:

    How does the Fed create money out of nothing?

    This is covered in any decent intro econ textbook.

    Personally, I recommend my old friend Murray Rothbard’s The Mystery of Banking, which is clear and readable, but, as I recall, even the old Samuelson covered this.

    In our monetary and financial system, money is ultimately nothing but bookkeeping entries on the books of the Federal Reserve (nowadays, of course, in the Fed’s computers). In a strange sort of Ponzi scheme, commercial banks pyramid ordinary money upon this “high-powered money,” which consists of 1s and 0s in the Fed’s computers.

    And, yes, this is an extremely dangerous and unstable system — hence the financial and monetary crises we have experienced for the last century, most notably 1929 and 2008.

    Lots of people grasp how unstable the system is, but let’s just say that it serves the interests of the people in power to keep it as it is.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  359. Realist says:
    @John Derbyshire

    You may as well argue that when I press the gas pedal to go uphill I’m moving in a third dimension.

    Thanks…I do argue that…using a Cartesian coordinate system (x, y, z) you are moving in a third dimension. If you go up a hill on a curve you are moving in three dimensions at the same time.

    Your car can go forward, or back. That’s all.

    Of all the dumbass things you have said in your articles…that may be the top.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    , @Anonymous
  360. anonymous[405] • Disclaimer says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Blacks will probably be absorbed by the Bounty paper towel within 200 years. They are only 13% of the overall population.

  361. Anonymous[421] • Disclaimer says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Thank you.

  362. Realist says:
    @Kyle

    When you go “up hill” you’re actually only going forward. The added force of acceleration due to gravity is bending space time making it seem like you’re moving up.

    WTF, Einstein?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  363. @YetAnotherAnon

    Yes, shiny toys and big TVs are cheaper, medical science has not yet gone into reverse (though life expectancy has) – but the life chances of a black or white American child born in 1948 were far better than those for one born in 1988.

    By some measures and stats, things have gotten much better, and by others, things have gotten worse…

    Even when things are genuinely bad, you can’t just mope and complain, you have to develop solutions, and win. A losing fight isn’t worth fighting. I don’t want to dismiss or downplay the real problems that exist. But I want to encourage optimism, a can-do attitude, and constructive solutions. I want to make my small contribution to improving things for myself, my children, and others, although I have limited say, myself.

  364. @Oo-ee-oo-ah-ah-ting-tang-walla-walla-bing-bang

    I actually plan to re-register (albeit temporarily) as a Democrat next year, in order to vote for Yang. I want to encourage the Democratic Party to be less insane, and not so treasonous. Wish me luck!

  365. Anon[319] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alden

    Your property tax goes to endless affirmative action city and county’s employees studying task forcing counseling analysing coordinating facilitating and out reaching the homeless problem

    My mid-size FL city has an annual $60K budget for homeless outreach. The salary for the director of the program is $50K.

  366. @William Badwhite

    Anyway, a car that only went forward a backward would travel in a line – one dimension.

    But, yes, yes: We’ve all read Abbott’s Flatland and remember our rudimentary geometry. I’m sure (as are all other interlocutors) Mr. Derbyshire knows this stuff; mostly, people are speaking past each other, as it were….

  367. @Realist

    It’s sarcasm, mate. You’re meant to be the realist, not the literalist.

    • Replies: @Realist
  368. @Realist

    I reckon he envisions flying cars which may travel in any almost direction, as a hummingbird or a helicopter may; his emphasis on conventional cars’ going only forward and backward (as conventional, fixed-wing aircraft also must do) is obviously meant to emphasis that their changes in direction must be made concurrently with forward or backward motion. One cannot drive current cars “sideways” (although it is possible to craft a very zany suspension that could accommodate it).

    Again, I think everyone involved knows good and well what the others mean, and some folks are being hasty to reply or obtuse about the semantics.

    Carry on.

    • Replies: @Realist
  369. Holbylta says:
    @Patriot

    how did you jump from “1949” to “immigrants”? There is plenty of room in California for three times as many people and 5 times as a many 4 bedroom houses, if anybody wanted to make it so.

    what if the “immigrants” were all white? would that make a difference? California is is 163,696 mi² (according to google) so that’s 640 acres x 164,000 more or less. About 100 million acres of space.

    Nobody is taking up too much room, there might be demand for more houses though, if there weren’t so many vacant homes and buildings:

    https://www.sfgate.com/realestate/article/An-estimated-100-000-homes-are-sitting-empty-in-13692007.php

    do you ever bother to check any of these completely fake calculations? Go take a free house from any vacant place that says “Fannie Mae” or “Freddie Mac”. These are all abandoned homes, because I assure you, it is not occupied by a federal agency.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  370. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Realist

    Timothy Leary of all people remarked that a train could go forward or back on its track, or stop. A Model T could turn, as well. And a Ford Trimotor could move in three axes, left/right, up/down, though it wasn’t very good at backing up.

  371. JMcG says:
    @Lurker

    Rarity for a reason.
    Despite the best efforts of AOPA, not everyone is capable of flying even the simplest fixed wing airplane. The original Beech Bonanza rapidly acquired a nickname – The V-Tailed Surgeon Killer.
    Very intelligent people crash airplanes all the time.
    Self piloted flying cars will never, ever be scalable.
    Just picture a sky full of the drips you see wearing Lycra and screwing up traffic on bicycles except in three dimensions.

    • Replies: @Corn
    , @Jim Don Bob
  372. JMcG says:
    @Jack D

    One place I could live is the Paris that Hemingway described in “A Moveable Feast”
    An apartment in a city without skyscrapers. Surrounded by my own kind. Parks to walk in and cafes for a drink in the evening. Mountains only a train ride away.
    But there is no place like that any longer.

  373. JMcG says:
    @JackOH

    Many more lines are available for use in three dimensions.

  374. Corn says:
    @JMcG

    “Self piloted flying cars will never, ever be scalable.
    Just picture a sky full of the drips you see wearing Lycra and screwing up traffic on bicycles except in three dimensions.”

    Sadly, I think you’re right. We were discussing flying and private pilots a few months ago on this blog and I mentioned how plane ownership seemed more expensive and unattainable then in my uncle’s day. Jack D pointed out that in a nation of 300+ million people, the government probably didn’t want alot of yahoos in the air and was probably content private planes were the domain of the wealthy. Sadly, I think he’s right too.

  375. Anonymous[235] • Disclaimer says:
    @Holbylta

    how did you jump from “1949” to “immigrants”? There is plenty of room in California for three times as many people and 5 times as a many 4 bedroom houses, if anybody wanted to make it so.

    What about water? Is there enough?

  376. Realist says:
    @Autochthon

    It’s sarcasm, mate. You’re meant to be the realist, not the literalist.

    Since I don’t know you it’s hard to tell if you’re sarcastic or stupid.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  377. Spangel says:
    @Anonymous

    I thought David reichs book last year indicated that current thinking is that native Americans are slightly closer to ancestral Europeans than East Asians. By this I mean an ancestral European group from more than 10k years ago, not current Europeans.

  378. Realist says:
    @Autochthon

    …his emphasis on conventional cars’ going only forward and backward (as conventional, fixed-wing aircraft also must do)

    Have you seen a conventional, fixed-wing aircraft fly backward?

    Derbyshire should be more precise in his comments. At the least if a car is moving up hill it is moving in two dimensions. Derbyshire claimed cars only move in one dimension…and that is wrong.

    Derbyshire used the term dimension…not direction (although cars can move in a number of directions). While cars are not able to move sideways, they can stop and turn to move in a different dimension. If a car is moving along an x axis it can stop, turn and move along the y axis, thereby travelling in two dimensions.

    Again, I think everyone involved knows good and well what the others mean, and some folks are being hasty to reply or obtuse about the semantics.

    For someone who claims to be a math enthusiast, Derbyshire is loose with semantics.

    He also stated that flying cars would be safe which is ridiculous.

    Your attempt to cover for Derbyshire is a fail.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  379. @JMcG

    Not to mention the soccer moms applying makeup while clutching a Starbucks in one hand and their iPhone in another.

  380. Bill says:
    @South Texas Guy

    The wheels are another tell. It will be harder to destroy the value of your house via ethnic cleansing if you can just hook your house up to a truck and move on. It’s the solution to “white flight.”

  381. anonymous[252] • Disclaimer says:
    @notsaying

    “at least 11 million rental households spend more than 50 percent of their income on housing costs like rent and utilities”

    What’s the breakdown on these renters? Are they poorly educated minorities or entitled liberals who think that they deserve an apartment/house only on their salary? Families with kids? When I was a younger single, I used to have roommates to save on rent. In decades past, homeowners in tight circumstances would have boarders. Sure, housing costs are a problem but fiscal stupidity is too.

    The question is what is reasonable for living conditions for people in this day and age? I don’t think we’re talking about people living in shacks with no running water and outhouses but that may well happen again if we’re bringing in massive numbers of immigrants who can’t pull their weight and we run out of money.

  382. @Realist

    Have you seen a conventional, fixed-wing aircraft fly backward?

    Seen one? Hell, I used to help make them do that…

    I know, I know; you’ll demur that now I and Mr. Derbyshire both are being careless with diction. I half concede the point. It’s all long ago degenerated in to parliamentarian minutiae, squabbling about who meant what, and so on. I’ve made my point to this effect. Everyone understands each other perfectly well, but some are playing “gotcha” with diction (a game at which I admit I am myself too often guilty).

    I just wanted an excuse to showcase the beauty of the Hornet.

  383. @ben tillman

    “That” has no antecedent.

    Is English your first language? If it isn’t, I will rewrite the sentence: Chicago’s pension debt alone is larger than the pension debt of 41 states.

  384. @TWS

    These seem like TWS problems, not ScarletNumber problems. No one told you to make your house your biggest investment. If it is too risky for you, rent. ¯\_(ツ)_/¯

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