The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
The Zeitgeist Graphed, 1970-2018
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Another 90 trend charts showing the New York Times’ usage of terms from 1970-2018 (midpoint is mid-1990s) from David Rozado and his new Media-Analytics website:

And here’s his original 100 graphs, which I posted yesterday, but perhaps too small to be viewed easily in the original format:

 
Hide 55 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. Aww darn, we almost got rid of Nazis and Jews.
    Now, apparently, they’re both back, with a vengeance.

    Check under your bed!

  2. Nihilism makes no sense.

    Alzheimer appears to track Ronald Reagan, or maybe Glen Campbell.

    Theater and psychology— come on, Simon and Garfunkel addressed those 53 years ago:

    Can analysis be worthwhile? Is the theater really dead?

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the ’70s and ’80s.

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the ’70s and ’80s.
     
    And just like that, the thread turns into a 'favorite music' post war. Steve Hoffman's thataway!

    But seriously, both Pauls turned out top-quality work throughout much of the 70s and even into the 80s. It's just that they also turned out a lot of dross too. In the 60s, though, Simon wasn't in McCartney's league. If he ever was.

    , @The Alarmist

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the ’70s and ’80s.
     
    McCartney was never much of a lyracist, but his tunes were always catchy, even in the doldrums of the '70s.
    , @Desiderius

    Nihilism makes no sense.
     
    Hence the word.
    , @SFG
    The song was a nice slice of life of a milieu I missed by a decade or so. Back in the 60s and 70s people in places like NYC actually would take psychoanalysis and things like that seriously.

    I always mocked it and wished the left would find something more real to get into. Be careful what you wish for...
  3. I used to read the NYT like a religion and I can’t remember once encountering the term “ultra-liberal”–with or without the hyphen. I don’t even think the concept exists for them.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    I used to read the NYT like a religion and I can’t remember once encountering the term “ultra-liberal”–with or without the hyphen. I don’t even think the concept exists for them.
     
    Those people are progressive.

    These are the sort of people that brought us Prohibition and forcible eugenic sterilization. Liberal is the very opposite of what they are.
    , @JosephB
    Another interesting exercise is to look at "right-wing extremists" vs "left-wing extremists". Pooling some variations (e.g. "far right extremists") could provide insight into when the NYT went from moderately partisan to crazy. I like the language-based analysis as what constitutes "far right" and "far left" is determined by where you think the center is.

    joe
    , @Almost Missouri
    If those graphs were of absolute values rather than values relative to a term's peak, I expect that "ultra-liberal" would be practically undetectable.
  4. @Reg Cæsar
    Nihilism makes no sense.

    Alzheimer appears to track Ronald Reagan, or maybe Glen Campbell.

    Theater and psychology-- come on, Simon and Garfunkel addressed those 53 years ago:

    Can analysis be worthwhile? Is the theater really dead?

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the '70s and '80s.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nntOYUODSV0

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the ’70s and ’80s.

    And just like that, the thread turns into a ‘favorite music’ post war. Steve Hoffman’s thataway!

    But seriously, both Pauls turned out top-quality work throughout much of the 70s and even into the 80s. It’s just that they also turned out a lot of dross too. In the 60s, though, Simon wasn’t in McCartney’s league. If he ever was.

  5. Gee, whatever happened to liberation? Some of these terms get embarrassing over time. They have to be replaced.

    Sprawl likewise took a dive in the lead-up to the Obama era. It was originated by developers themselves, then used against them. However, it must have acquired an implicitly racist odor along the way.

    And the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same…

    Were truer words ever sung? When fascism comes to America, they’ll call it antifa.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    White flight, you know.

    The song was written by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by Pete Seeger. Both of them were left-wing social activists. Seeger was at one time a member of the Communist party.

    Although we might today think it is true that "...the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same," we are seeing this from the other end of the telescope. Groupthink today is actually a result of snobbish attacks on the American middle-class, like Little Boxes, that were pushed on the public half-a-century ago (and have been ever since) by people like Reynolds and Seeger.

    The song is a good example of the kind of projection that comes at us from the very people who all think alike and insist that we live and think like them too. It is offensive garbage, and we had to sing it in school.

    BTW, there is another song, from a later, more cynical time, that includes lyrics that go something like this:

    What the world needs now,

    is another folk singer,

    like I need a hole in my head.

    Truer words were never sung.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n8rfFRvIH0
  6. @Mr McKenna
    I used to read the NYT like a religion and I can't remember once encountering the term "ultra-liberal"--with or without the hyphen. I don't even think the concept exists for them.

    I used to read the NYT like a religion and I can’t remember once encountering the term “ultra-liberal”–with or without the hyphen. I don’t even think the concept exists for them.

    Those people are progressive.

    These are the sort of people that brought us Prohibition and forcible eugenic sterilization. Liberal is the very opposite of what they are.

    • Replies: @dr kill
    I'm a liberal, They are Lefties.
  7. Lot says:

    Opioids became common partly because journalists picked up from scientific publications that opiate is sometimes confined to drugs derived from actual poppies, while opioids includes them as well as similar synthetics.

    Likewise, narcotic used to mean only depressant drugs, then all of the police “narcotics divisions” made the term ambiguous between its original and new meaning of all illegal drugs.

  8. Anon[483] • Disclaimer says:

    If he has the full text of the post-1970 New York Times corpus, there are some really interesting things he could do.

    For instance, you can analyze for co-ocurring words, either adjacent or separated. This is used by search engines to generate refining searches, x AND y. You can take this further using co-ocurring adjacent words to generate lists of phrases that should be considered as words, like “gender studies,” without human intervention. This is used by search engines for more efficient indexing.

    Once you have co-occurring words and phrases, you can do clustering analysis to get groups that tend to be used in the same sort of articles. With a little manual processing, maybe using Mechanical Turk, he could come up with a taxonomy of article types or subjects, or tags, that after the first couple of rounds could be used for auto-tagging. This could further be processed to auto classify by wokeness.

    If he has put the byline into a separate field, he could create a ranking of journalists and opinion writers by wokeness.

    I wish he would tarball the corpus and upload it somewhere so that NYT lawyers can’t disappear it by threatening him. I’m sure there are a lot of people who would like to work on it.

    • Agree: Almost Missouri
    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    I strongly agree. Ideally this could be applied to a whole basket of publications, not just the New York Times. I'd be interested to see how effective the NYT is at imposing the Narrative on other publications.
    , @January
    See this is somebody who actually understands statistics and data analysis. Homeboy who made these charts, and the other conservative who made ones before these, neither of them are staticians. These are deeply flawed graphs that are often directly contradicted by other sources that also claim to be NYT articles. I keep telling people that because the methodology behind the creation of these was not shared, because there was no peer-review, because I don't think anyone who contributed to making these even had a bachelors yet, that no one should draw conclusions from them.

    Yet, they're being spread all over right-wing social media as some kind of proof of something. These are proof of nothing, except the danger of casual hobbyist chart makers spreading around meaningless charts like they tell us something about the world. They don't.
  9. Those kind of little charts are called “sparklines.” There are various libraries that support them. Maybe Ron should install one here.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    AFAIK, chart guru Edward Tufte calls these displays "small multiples".

    "Sparklines" are more like this:

    https://www.edwardtufte.com/bboard/images/0001OS-15656.gif

  10. The success of these little charts has no doubt got Rozado pretty motivated, but it would be good to see these for lots of organisations. The Economist would be interesting. Like many on here I have an impression they veered off the road sometime in the past decade. I wonder if there’s a way of looking at the languages used by universities too.

  11. @Reg Cæsar
    Nihilism makes no sense.

    Alzheimer appears to track Ronald Reagan, or maybe Glen Campbell.

    Theater and psychology-- come on, Simon and Garfunkel addressed those 53 years ago:

    Can analysis be worthwhile? Is the theater really dead?

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the '70s and '80s.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nntOYUODSV0

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the ’70s and ’80s.

    McCartney was never much of a lyracist, but his tunes were always catchy, even in the doldrums of the ’70s.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    McCartney was never much of a lyricist...
     
    He had his high points, though. In the folkier mid-60s stuff, and the later story songs.

    BTW, you misspelled lyricist, and Chrome autocorrect gave me a choice of lyricist or racist. I gave you the benefit of the doubt!
  12. It’s funny how common reference points go in and out of fashion. When was the last time you heard any journalist/pundit make a reference to Will Rodgers? Remember when you couldn’t pass a single Sunday/weekend news/gab fest without at least one Will Rodgers reference inserted? When was the last time you heard “catch-22” referred to (just thinking about that one because the movie flashed up on Amazon Prime watchlist). So many others.

    It’s really notable and encouraging that AIDs is almost falling off the charts. May it continue to do so.

    Do people get infected with AIDs anymore?

    Time creeps on.

    • Replies: @SFG
    They do, but they have drugs to treat it now, so it's not a death sentence anymore. They're actually advocating protease drugs for sexually active gay men.

    There are side effects like weird humps on your back, but given what came before people don't complain.
  13. @Reg Cæsar
    Gee, whatever happened to liberation? Some of these terms get embarrassing over time. They have to be replaced.

    Sprawl likewise took a dive in the lead-up to the Obama era. It was originated by developers themselves, then used against them. However, it must have acquired an implicitly racist odor along the way.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UO8sD81NVTg

    And the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they're all put into boxes and they all [think] the same...

    Were truer words ever sung? When fascism comes to America, they'll call it antifa.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2_2lGkEU4Xs

    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    White flight, you know.

    The song was written by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by Pete Seeger. Both of them were left-wing social activists. Seeger was at one time a member of the Communist party.

    Although we might today think it is true that “…the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same,” we are seeing this from the other end of the telescope. Groupthink today is actually a result of snobbish attacks on the American middle-class, like Little Boxes, that were pushed on the public half-a-century ago (and have been ever since) by people like Reynolds and Seeger.

    The song is a good example of the kind of projection that comes at us from the very people who all think alike and insist that we live and think like them too. It is offensive garbage, and we had to sing it in school.

    BTW, there is another song, from a later, more cynical time, that includes lyrics that go something like this:

    What the world needs now,

    is another folk singer,

    like I need a hole in my head.

    Truer words were never sung.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • Replies: @peterike

    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.... The song was written by Malvina Reynolds

     

    Agree, and as if it even needed saying...

    Malvina Milder was born in San Francisco to David and Abagail Milder, Jewish and socialist immigrants, who opposed involvement in World War I. She married William ("Bud") Reynolds, a carpenter and labor organizer, in 1934.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.
     
    And their small towns. Unfortunately, they didn't bring the beauty of the cities and villages into the 'burbs with them, especially in the churches, nearly all modern, and some frighteningly brutalist.

    The problem
    with new-style churches
    isn't just that they're ugly -- they actually distort the Faith


    The Quietly Dangerous Suburban Church

    Butt-Ugly Churches Of Our Time

    Rod Dreher has an enjoyable rant against the worst:

    I have a perverse fascination with ugly churches. They're supposed to lift our eyes toward heaven, and to help us connect to God. It is vitally important for churches to be beautiful, no matter what style (and many different styles can be beautiful ... though not all styles are). Given the stakes, when churches fail aesthetically, they fail epically. Consider Our Lady of Chernobyl, in suburban New York, or the Florida church complex that looks like a bologna ziggurat sculpted by Oscar Mayer, next to a giant tortilla warmer. This is what happens when people forget what church architecture and design is for, and when insecure clergy and church lay leadership get fugaboo'd and intimidated by architects who want to make a Statement.

     

    https://i1.wp.com/citymuseumedmonton.ca/wp-content/uploads/20150920_SundayModernism_Ebenezer-0117.jpg?w=1030&h=687&crop&ssl=1
    , @Steve Sailer
    I was too old to pay much attention to it, but 1990s rock was great. Here's another by Cracker:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dn05f4WYFJ0

    , @Anonymous
    Little Boxes was an attack on Levittown, the irony was that the Levittown houses were actually very well built and today command very good money especially if not substantially altered.

    Seeger was not a doctrinaire communist exactly but certainly covered for them and harbored substantial extreme left wing ideologies. He was not particularly a great singer but he was famed for his books on banjo playing and folk guitar and his sheer longevity-he had a career of well over seventy years.

    "Folk Music" as a postwar (and immediate prewar) genre of popular music was in its day widely, and largely correctly, regarded as "the parlor music of communists". The "folk music scare" or "boom" went through the mid-50s and was largely dead by the late sixties, having segued into folk rock in the era of the Byrds an the Flying Burrito Brothers, the Mamas and Papas, and several others. The original folkies often carried on to a hardcore audience and still do.

    Probably the best sendup of "folk music" was the film, <i. A Mighty Wind:

    A Mighty Wind is a 2003 American mockumentary comedy film about a folk music reunion concert in which three folk bands reunite for a television performance for the first time in decades. The film was co-written (with Eugene Levy), directed and composed by Christopher Guest.[2] The film is widely acknowledged to reference the 2003 tribute concert to folk music producer Harold Leventhal that reunited several of the folk groups that Leventhal had managed.[3] More broadly, the film is a parody of the American folk music revival of the early 1960s and its personalities.

    Guest co-stars and reunites many of his company of actors from This Is Spinal Tap, Waiting for Guffman, and Best in Show for this film. They include Eugene Levy (who also co-wrote the screenplay), Catherine O'Hara, Michael McKean, Harry Shearer, Fred Willard, Bob Balaban, Ed Begley Jr., Jennifer Coolidge, John Michael Higgins, Jane Lynch and Parker Posey.
     
    It's interesting and a sign of how shallow most "folk music" really was that the "fake" folk music written for and performed by the film's actors was actually at leaat as good as and often better than most genuine music by "folk" artists of the period.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I wonder if he got one of the lyric lines from old James Taylor, he of some very good folk-style music, ironically.

    From Hey Mister that's me up on the Jukebox off of Mudslide Slim and the Blue Horizon in the 1970's:

    Southern California,
    that's as blue as a girl can be,
    blue as the deep blue sea.


    Won't you listen to me now?
    I need your golden gated cities
    like a hole in the head.
    Just like a hole in the head
    ,
    I'm free.


    Not everyone was enamored with Southern California, even in it's heyday. JT just was homesick for the Carolinas, I'm pretty sure. It's one of my favorites off of Mudslide Slim.

    Really, the next song ought to say "just like another hole in the head" to be accurate, as we have 5 already... I mean if it fits the meter, that is.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=waOLnpuKUME
  14. @Anon
    If he has the full text of the post-1970 New York Times corpus, there are some really interesting things he could do.

    For instance, you can analyze for co-ocurring words, either adjacent or separated. This is used by search engines to generate refining searches, x AND y. You can take this further using co-ocurring adjacent words to generate lists of phrases that should be considered as words, like "gender studies," without human intervention. This is used by search engines for more efficient indexing.

    Once you have co-occurring words and phrases, you can do clustering analysis to get groups that tend to be used in the same sort of articles. With a little manual processing, maybe using Mechanical Turk, he could come up with a taxonomy of article types or subjects, or tags, that after the first couple of rounds could be used for auto-tagging. This could further be processed to auto classify by wokeness.

    If he has put the byline into a separate field, he could create a ranking of journalists and opinion writers by wokeness.

    I wish he would tarball the corpus and upload it somewhere so that NYT lawyers can't disappear it by threatening him. I'm sure there are a lot of people who would like to work on it.

    I strongly agree. Ideally this could be applied to a whole basket of publications, not just the New York Times. I’d be interested to see how effective the NYT is at imposing the Narrative on other publications.

  15. @Reg Cæsar
    Nihilism makes no sense.

    Alzheimer appears to track Ronald Reagan, or maybe Glen Campbell.

    Theater and psychology-- come on, Simon and Garfunkel addressed those 53 years ago:

    Can analysis be worthwhile? Is the theater really dead?

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the '70s and '80s.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nntOYUODSV0

    Nihilism makes no sense.

    Hence the word.

  16. @Daniel H
    It's funny how common reference points go in and out of fashion. When was the last time you heard any journalist/pundit make a reference to Will Rodgers? Remember when you couldn't pass a single Sunday/weekend news/gab fest without at least one Will Rodgers reference inserted? When was the last time you heard "catch-22" referred to (just thinking about that one because the movie flashed up on Amazon Prime watchlist). So many others.

    It's really notable and encouraging that AIDs is almost falling off the charts. May it continue to do so.

    Do people get infected with AIDs anymore?

    Time creeps on.

    They do, but they have drugs to treat it now, so it’s not a death sentence anymore. They’re actually advocating protease drugs for sexually active gay men.

    There are side effects like weird humps on your back, but given what came before people don’t complain.

  17. @Mr McKenna
    I used to read the NYT like a religion and I can't remember once encountering the term "ultra-liberal"--with or without the hyphen. I don't even think the concept exists for them.

    Another interesting exercise is to look at “right-wing extremists” vs “left-wing extremists”. Pooling some variations (e.g. “far right extremists”) could provide insight into when the NYT went from moderately partisan to crazy. I like the language-based analysis as what constitutes “far right” and “far left” is determined by where you think the center is.

    joe

  18. SFG says:
    @Reg Cæsar
    Nihilism makes no sense.

    Alzheimer appears to track Ronald Reagan, or maybe Glen Campbell.

    Theater and psychology-- come on, Simon and Garfunkel addressed those 53 years ago:

    Can analysis be worthwhile? Is the theater really dead?

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the '70s and '80s.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nntOYUODSV0

    The song was a nice slice of life of a milieu I missed by a decade or so. Back in the 60s and 70s people in places like NYC actually would take psychoanalysis and things like that seriously.

    I always mocked it and wished the left would find something more real to get into. Be careful what you wish for…

    • Replies: @Intelligent Dasein
    Psychoanalysis is real. Like everything else mankind lays his hand to, he introduced a lot of falsity and nonsense into it (and this process certainly started with Freud himself), but the basic principles are solid. How could they not be? They are just the same old truths about human nature that have been recognized since time immemorial.
  19. There are some fun pairings in those charts.

    For example, as the failed global warming hysteria peaks then crashes in the aughties as the globe fails to warm sufficiently, then ambiguous and meaningless climate change magically comes online to take up the slack.

    Or sustainability peaks then crashes in the first Obama term as its irrelevancy becomes apparent, superseded by the next graph showing the fracking that rendered it obsolete, followed by the NYT just not wanting to talk about it anymore.

    Or mathematics and philosophy tanking as gender studies rises triumphant across the Grey Lady’s pages.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Global Warming ---> Climate Change ---> Global Climate Disruption (TM-A.E.N.) Try the latter after a couple of years - all royalties go to me.

    Oh, speaking of the sustainability of the term sustainability, Peak Stupidity suggests we should all be working toward Sustainable Stupidity.
  20. @Mr McKenna
    I used to read the NYT like a religion and I can't remember once encountering the term "ultra-liberal"--with or without the hyphen. I don't even think the concept exists for them.

    If those graphs were of absolute values rather than values relative to a term’s peak, I expect that “ultra-liberal” would be practically undetectable.

  21. @Anon
    Those kind of little charts are called "sparklines." There are various libraries that support them. Maybe Ron should install one here.

    AFAIK, chart guru Edward Tufte calls these displays “small multiples“.

    Sparklines” are more like this:

    • Replies: @Anon
    Yeah, I guess sparklines are when you can literally include the graph inline, without increasing the leading.
  22. Sincerest thanks to both Mr Rozado and (but of course) Steve.

    In a world where perception now IS reality, a chart like this is invaluable. We may be a long way from mandatory university courses studying such practical applications of modern semantics, but I would think every parent would be obligated to sit their college-age children down and explain to them how charts like this can act as a visible crucifix, or hanging garlic at every window or entrance, when in the presence of vampires. (Whih they will be, soon enough.)

    We’re in a war, in which words are bullets. So for Pete’s sake, arm yourselves accordingly.

  23. Huh… I didn’t see graphs for “Oriental” or “Negro.”

  24. So many terms recently invented like the “internet”. They would probably match up fairly closely with “twitter”, “facebook”, etc.

  25. remember that time fracking was going to kill us all?Do these people ever admit being full of shite?

  26. @SFG
    The song was a nice slice of life of a milieu I missed by a decade or so. Back in the 60s and 70s people in places like NYC actually would take psychoanalysis and things like that seriously.

    I always mocked it and wished the left would find something more real to get into. Be careful what you wish for...

    Psychoanalysis is real. Like everything else mankind lays his hand to, he introduced a lot of falsity and nonsense into it (and this process certainly started with Freud himself), but the basic principles are solid. How could they not be? They are just the same old truths about human nature that have been recognized since time immemorial.

  27. @Almost Missouri
    There are some fun pairings in those charts.

    For example, as the failed global warming hysteria peaks then crashes in the aughties as the globe fails to warm sufficiently, then ambiguous and meaningless climate change magically comes online to take up the slack.

    Or sustainability peaks then crashes in the first Obama term as its irrelevancy becomes apparent, superseded by the next graph showing the fracking that rendered it obsolete, followed by the NYT just not wanting to talk about it anymore.

    Or mathematics and philosophy tanking as gender studies rises triumphant across the Grey Lady's pages.

    Global Warming —> Climate Change —> Global Climate Disruption (TM-A.E.N.) Try the latter after a couple of years – all royalties go to me.

    Oh, speaking of the sustainability of the term sustainability, Peak Stupidity suggests we should all be working toward Sustainable Stupidity.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Global Warming —> Climate Change —> Global Climate Disruption

     

    Yes, good call. If one uses 'global warming' in discussion with a climatista, a correction is quickly issued. It's treated almost as a provocation, because we're all supposed to know that 'climate change' is the accepted diagnosis of Gaia's ills.

    But since the threat of even this new-and-impoved climate change has failed to move the proles' hearts and minds, there are several new terms being tried out.

    As you note, 'climate disruption' is one; 'weather weirding'/'global weirding' is another I've seen; 'climate crisis' is in there; and so on.

    In the past, climatistas would frequently lecture us deplorables about how 'weather is not climate!' when we'd point out record low temperatures, etc., but now their goal is to invent new ways to blame all forms of unusual weather on our carbon sins. For this reason, pseudo-scientific jargon such as 'polar vortex' is invoked to try to link normal weather variability (in this case, unusually cold temperatures) to climate change. It's also obviously behind terms such as 'weather weirding', i.e. the climatistas want to be able to look out the window and assert 'that's climate change happening right now!', no matter what the weather of day might be.

  28. anonymous[375] • Disclaimer says:

    Many of these terms have been invented out of thin air very recently. The ‘left’ have become very adept at coining new phrases and ideas and inserting them into the culture through their media (such as the NYTimes).

    Microaggression, White Fragility, Toxic Masculinity, Etc., Etc…seem to come from a Buzzword assembly line. In contrast, as Steve pointed out, we don’t even have a term that might simply convey the idea of Jewish resentment of Gentiles. This idea doesn’t even exist for the average person, which is remarkable given the issue is so prevalent and ancient.

  29. @Buzz Mohawk
    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    White flight, you know.

    The song was written by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by Pete Seeger. Both of them were left-wing social activists. Seeger was at one time a member of the Communist party.

    Although we might today think it is true that "...the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same," we are seeing this from the other end of the telescope. Groupthink today is actually a result of snobbish attacks on the American middle-class, like Little Boxes, that were pushed on the public half-a-century ago (and have been ever since) by people like Reynolds and Seeger.

    The song is a good example of the kind of projection that comes at us from the very people who all think alike and insist that we live and think like them too. It is offensive garbage, and we had to sing it in school.

    BTW, there is another song, from a later, more cynical time, that includes lyrics that go something like this:

    What the world needs now,

    is another folk singer,

    like I need a hole in my head.

    Truer words were never sung.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n8rfFRvIH0

    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities…. The song was written by Malvina Reynolds

    Agree, and as if it even needed saying…

    Malvina Milder was born in San Francisco to David and Abagail Milder, Jewish and socialist immigrants, who opposed involvement in World War I. She married William (“Bud”) Reynolds, a carpenter and labor organizer, in 1934.

  30. @Reg Cæsar

    I used to read the NYT like a religion and I can’t remember once encountering the term “ultra-liberal”–with or without the hyphen. I don’t even think the concept exists for them.
     
    Those people are progressive.

    These are the sort of people that brought us Prohibition and forcible eugenic sterilization. Liberal is the very opposite of what they are.

    I’m a liberal, They are Lefties.

  31. Even though “nazi” has fluctuated, the overall trend line has remained essentially unchanged over the years. Why? Are there fewer or more nazis now than in the past? Did they find Hitler in Argentina or something? That doesn’t make any sense to me. It’s a complete mystery.

  32. @The Alarmist

    As a serious writing talent, Paul Simon fell as far as Paul McCartney did in the ’70s and ’80s.
     
    McCartney was never much of a lyracist, but his tunes were always catchy, even in the doldrums of the '70s.

    McCartney was never much of a lyricist…

    He had his high points, though. In the folkier mid-60s stuff, and the later story songs.

    BTW, you misspelled lyricist, and Chrome autocorrect gave me a choice of lyricist or racist. I gave you the benefit of the doubt!

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Homer nods. I only saw it after the edit button had gone.
  33. @Buzz Mohawk
    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    White flight, you know.

    The song was written by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by Pete Seeger. Both of them were left-wing social activists. Seeger was at one time a member of the Communist party.

    Although we might today think it is true that "...the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same," we are seeing this from the other end of the telescope. Groupthink today is actually a result of snobbish attacks on the American middle-class, like Little Boxes, that were pushed on the public half-a-century ago (and have been ever since) by people like Reynolds and Seeger.

    The song is a good example of the kind of projection that comes at us from the very people who all think alike and insist that we live and think like them too. It is offensive garbage, and we had to sing it in school.

    BTW, there is another song, from a later, more cynical time, that includes lyrics that go something like this:

    What the world needs now,

    is another folk singer,

    like I need a hole in my head.

    Truer words were never sung.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n8rfFRvIH0

    and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    And their small towns. Unfortunately, they didn’t bring the beauty of the cities and villages into the ‘burbs with them, especially in the churches, nearly all modern, and some frighteningly brutalist.

    The problem
    with new-style churches
    isn’t just that they’re ugly — they actually distort the Faith

    The Quietly Dangerous Suburban Church

    Butt-Ugly Churches Of Our Time

    Rod Dreher has an enjoyable rant against the worst:

    I have a perverse fascination with ugly churches. They’re supposed to lift our eyes toward heaven, and to help us connect to God. It is vitally important for churches to be beautiful, no matter what style (and many different styles can be beautiful … though not all styles are). Given the stakes, when churches fail aesthetically, they fail epically. Consider Our Lady of Chernobyl, in suburban New York, or the Florida church complex that looks like a bologna ziggurat sculpted by Oscar Mayer, next to a giant tortilla warmer. This is what happens when people forget what church architecture and design is for, and when insecure clergy and church lay leadership get fugaboo’d and intimidated by architects who want to make a Statement.

  34. @Buzz Mohawk
    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    White flight, you know.

    The song was written by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by Pete Seeger. Both of them were left-wing social activists. Seeger was at one time a member of the Communist party.

    Although we might today think it is true that "...the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same," we are seeing this from the other end of the telescope. Groupthink today is actually a result of snobbish attacks on the American middle-class, like Little Boxes, that were pushed on the public half-a-century ago (and have been ever since) by people like Reynolds and Seeger.

    The song is a good example of the kind of projection that comes at us from the very people who all think alike and insist that we live and think like them too. It is offensive garbage, and we had to sing it in school.

    BTW, there is another song, from a later, more cynical time, that includes lyrics that go something like this:

    What the world needs now,

    is another folk singer,

    like I need a hole in my head.

    Truer words were never sung.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n8rfFRvIH0

    I was too old to pay much attention to it, but 1990s rock was great. Here’s another by Cracker:

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Another great song. Thanks. I was too immature not to pay attention to the music of the time. It was the soundtrack of my extended bachelorhood/adolescence. Delayed maturity is a symptom of societal ills I believe you yourself have noticed and explicated here. Mea culpa.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I'd almost forgotten this one. Great song! How about the Gin Blossoms? From just the one album I bought, New Miserable Experience, there was a lot of good stuff. Here's the best, or at least, most catchy. (I love those pinky pick-offs on the D-chord (?)):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_-UBnjzJMQ0

    The music video would have been a lot easier to make today, what with the lighter flat-screen TVs*. Too bad MTV turned to crap by the 1990's (about the time of this song).

    .

    * You see, Rosie? There's lots of things men can do that you can't. One is carrying large Cathode-Ray Tubes around the house. ;-}
  35. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    White flight, you know.

    The song was written by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by Pete Seeger. Both of them were left-wing social activists. Seeger was at one time a member of the Communist party.

    Although we might today think it is true that "...the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same," we are seeing this from the other end of the telescope. Groupthink today is actually a result of snobbish attacks on the American middle-class, like Little Boxes, that were pushed on the public half-a-century ago (and have been ever since) by people like Reynolds and Seeger.

    The song is a good example of the kind of projection that comes at us from the very people who all think alike and insist that we live and think like them too. It is offensive garbage, and we had to sing it in school.

    BTW, there is another song, from a later, more cynical time, that includes lyrics that go something like this:

    What the world needs now,

    is another folk singer,

    like I need a hole in my head.

    Truer words were never sung.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n8rfFRvIH0

    Little Boxes was an attack on Levittown, the irony was that the Levittown houses were actually very well built and today command very good money especially if not substantially altered.

    Seeger was not a doctrinaire communist exactly but certainly covered for them and harbored substantial extreme left wing ideologies. He was not particularly a great singer but he was famed for his books on banjo playing and folk guitar and his sheer longevity-he had a career of well over seventy years.

    “Folk Music” as a postwar (and immediate prewar) genre of popular music was in its day widely, and largely correctly, regarded as “the parlor music of communists”. The “folk music scare” or “boom” went through the mid-50s and was largely dead by the late sixties, having segued into folk rock in the era of the Byrds an the Flying Burrito Brothers, the Mamas and Papas, and several others. The original folkies often carried on to a hardcore audience and still do.

    Probably the best sendup of “folk music” was the film, <i. A Mighty Wind:

    A Mighty Wind is a 2003 American mockumentary comedy film about a folk music reunion concert in which three folk bands reunite for a television performance for the first time in decades. The film was co-written (with Eugene Levy), directed and composed by Christopher Guest.[2] The film is widely acknowledged to reference the 2003 tribute concert to folk music producer Harold Leventhal that reunited several of the folk groups that Leventhal had managed.[3] More broadly, the film is a parody of the American folk music revival of the early 1960s and its personalities.

    Guest co-stars and reunites many of his company of actors from This Is Spinal Tap, Waiting for Guffman, and Best in Show for this film. They include Eugene Levy (who also co-wrote the screenplay), Catherine O’Hara, Michael McKean, Harry Shearer, Fred Willard, Bob Balaban, Ed Begley Jr., Jennifer Coolidge, John Michael Higgins, Jane Lynch and Parker Posey.

    It’s interesting and a sign of how shallow most “folk music” really was that the “fake” folk music written for and performed by the film’s actors was actually at leaat as good as and often better than most genuine music by “folk” artists of the period.

  36. @Reg Cæsar

    McCartney was never much of a lyricist...
     
    He had his high points, though. In the folkier mid-60s stuff, and the later story songs.

    BTW, you misspelled lyricist, and Chrome autocorrect gave me a choice of lyricist or racist. I gave you the benefit of the doubt!

    Homer nods. I only saw it after the edit button had gone.

  37. @Achmed E. Newman
    Global Warming ---> Climate Change ---> Global Climate Disruption (TM-A.E.N.) Try the latter after a couple of years - all royalties go to me.

    Oh, speaking of the sustainability of the term sustainability, Peak Stupidity suggests we should all be working toward Sustainable Stupidity.

    Global Warming —> Climate Change —> Global Climate Disruption

    Yes, good call. If one uses ‘global warming’ in discussion with a climatista, a correction is quickly issued. It’s treated almost as a provocation, because we’re all supposed to know that ‘climate change’ is the accepted diagnosis of Gaia’s ills.

    But since the threat of even this new-and-impoved climate change has failed to move the proles’ hearts and minds, there are several new terms being tried out.

    As you note, ‘climate disruption’ is one; ‘weather weirding’/’global weirding’ is another I’ve seen; ‘climate crisis’ is in there; and so on.

    In the past, climatistas would frequently lecture us deplorables about how ‘weather is not climate!’ when we’d point out record low temperatures, etc., but now their goal is to invent new ways to blame all forms of unusual weather on our carbon sins. For this reason, pseudo-scientific jargon such as ‘polar vortex’ is invoked to try to link normal weather variability (in this case, unusually cold temperatures) to climate change. It’s also obviously behind terms such as ‘weather weirding’, i.e. the climatistas want to be able to look out the window and assert ‘that’s climate change happening right now!’, no matter what the weather of day might be.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    They do this because they know we can’t resist assuming good faith on their part and trying to convince them with facts.

    It’s an easy smarter than thou hit.
  38. The word “Bilderberg” is used ten times in 1976, fourteen times in 2004 and seven times in 2013. A grand total of thirty-one times over nearly five decades.

    And yet:
    Mike Pompeo & Henry Kissinger attend mysterious Bilderberg 2019 (VIDEO)
    https://www.rt.com/news/460876-bilderberg-pompeo-kissinger-video/

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Bilderberg Conference is real and attracts a center-right list of heavyweight insiders like Henry Kissinger. Somebody could figure out how many Theranos board members have attended a Bilderberg Conference.
  39. Do these graphs represent a spiking in a general level of hysteria, or just on specific topics? At first blush, they certainly seem to show a broad spiraling out of control. Were there other sets of topics covered with equal mania in earlier decades?

    It would be good to see some way of combining these graphs into one that tracks general hysteria.

    This might confirm my general sense that we have entered an era of nervous breakdown.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    At first blush, they certainly seem to show a broad spiraling out of control.
     
    The "broad" is The New York Times, which has long been referred to as "The Gray Lady" among newspapers.

    What the graphs show is the frequency of individual words in that one paper, so what you are interpreting is only hysteria as printed in the Times. By now we all should have learned that New York City's old, gray hag does not represent what the mood of the country would be if not agitated by that very paper itself.

    Even though we are presumed to enjoy democracy and freedom of speech, the truth is that a very small part of the country manipulates both to a degree hugely out of proportion to its size.

    That single newspaper over-influences thinking across America. Only Americans themselves can decide if that will continue. There is hope and evidence that internet sites like unz.com can eventually out-megaphone mainstream mediums like The Old, Gray, Overrepresented New York Times.


    Graphs of NYT words are useful glimpses of the zeitgeist over time, but there is a chance that in future years they will not be.

    , @Desiderius
    No one I know irl is having anything close to a nervous breakdown. It’s a social media/cable news/late night phenomenon.
  40. I’m not sure what these graphs are meant to show.

    In 1970, no one ever called Archie Bunker a “sexist” or “white nationalist.” Back then Gloria always called Archie a “male chauvinist,” and Meathead called him a “bigot.”

    The terms have changed but the debate is still the same.

    • Replies: @Lucas McCrudy
    I do remember Gloria calling Archie a "racist" in one episode but use of the word "prejudiced" was still a more common epithet than "racist" circa 1971 (not sure about "sexist"). IMO prejudiced is a much more tame word than racist, the latter having the same kind of odious connotations the word Communist once had in our society (but this time around it's the Left with the lingustic upper hand).
  41. @Almost Missouri
    AFAIK, chart guru Edward Tufte calls these displays "small multiples".

    "Sparklines" are more like this:

    https://www.edwardtufte.com/bboard/images/0001OS-15656.gif

    Yeah, I guess sparklines are when you can literally include the graph inline, without increasing the leading.

  42. @candid_observer
    Do these graphs represent a spiking in a general level of hysteria, or just on specific topics? At first blush, they certainly seem to show a broad spiraling out of control. Were there other sets of topics covered with equal mania in earlier decades?

    It would be good to see some way of combining these graphs into one that tracks general hysteria.

    This might confirm my general sense that we have entered an era of nervous breakdown.

    At first blush, they certainly seem to show a broad spiraling out of control.

    The “broad” is The New York Times, which has long been referred to as “The Gray Lady” among newspapers.

    What the graphs show is the frequency of individual words in that one paper, so what you are interpreting is only hysteria as printed in the Times. By now we all should have learned that New York City’s old, gray hag does not represent what the mood of the country would be if not agitated by that very paper itself.

    Even though we are presumed to enjoy democracy and freedom of speech, the truth is that a very small part of the country manipulates both to a degree hugely out of proportion to its size.

    That single newspaper over-influences thinking across America. Only Americans themselves can decide if that will continue. There is hope and evidence that internet sites like unz.com can eventually out-megaphone mainstream mediums like The Old, Gray, Overrepresented New York Times.

    Graphs of NYT words are useful glimpses of the zeitgeist over time, but there is a chance that in future years they will not be.

  43. @Steve Sailer
    I was too old to pay much attention to it, but 1990s rock was great. Here's another by Cracker:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dn05f4WYFJ0

    Another great song. Thanks. I was too immature not to pay attention to the music of the time. It was the soundtrack of my extended bachelorhood/adolescence. Delayed maturity is a symptom of societal ills I believe you yourself have noticed and explicated here. Mea culpa.

  44. @Steve Sailer
    I was too old to pay much attention to it, but 1990s rock was great. Here's another by Cracker:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dn05f4WYFJ0

    I’d almost forgotten this one. Great song! How about the Gin Blossoms? From just the one album I bought, New Miserable Experience, there was a lot of good stuff. Here’s the best, or at least, most catchy. (I love those pinky pick-offs on the D-chord (?)):

    The music video would have been a lot easier to make today, what with the lighter flat-screen TVs*. Too bad MTV turned to crap by the 1990’s (about the time of this song).

    .

    * You see, Rosie? There’s lots of things men can do that you can’t. One is carrying large Cathode-Ray Tubes around the house. ;-}

  45. @Buzz Mohawk
    Little Boxes was an odious attack on the growing, post-WWII, middle-class of Americans who were succeeding in their modest efforts to actually own their own homes and escape the landlords and decay of the cities.

    White flight, you know.

    The song was written by Malvina Reynolds and popularized by Pete Seeger. Both of them were left-wing social activists. Seeger was at one time a member of the Communist party.

    Although we might today think it is true that "...the kids all go to summer camp, and then to the university, and they’re all put into boxes and they all [think] the same," we are seeing this from the other end of the telescope. Groupthink today is actually a result of snobbish attacks on the American middle-class, like Little Boxes, that were pushed on the public half-a-century ago (and have been ever since) by people like Reynolds and Seeger.

    The song is a good example of the kind of projection that comes at us from the very people who all think alike and insist that we live and think like them too. It is offensive garbage, and we had to sing it in school.

    BTW, there is another song, from a later, more cynical time, that includes lyrics that go something like this:

    What the world needs now,

    is another folk singer,

    like I need a hole in my head.

    Truer words were never sung.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1n8rfFRvIH0

    I wonder if he got one of the lyric lines from old James Taylor, he of some very good folk-style music, ironically.

    From Hey Mister that’s me up on the Jukebox off of Mudslide Slim and the Blue Horizon in the 1970’s:

    Southern California,
    that’s as blue as a girl can be,
    blue as the deep blue sea.

    Won’t you listen to me now?
    I need your golden gated cities
    like a hole in the head.
    Just like a hole in the head
    ,
    I’m free.

    Not everyone was enamored with Southern California, even in it’s heyday. JT just was homesick for the Carolinas, I’m pretty sure. It’s one of my favorites off of Mudslide Slim.

    Really, the next song ought to say “just like another hole in the head” to be accurate, as we have 5 already… I mean if it fits the meter, that is.

  46. @Anon
    If he has the full text of the post-1970 New York Times corpus, there are some really interesting things he could do.

    For instance, you can analyze for co-ocurring words, either adjacent or separated. This is used by search engines to generate refining searches, x AND y. You can take this further using co-ocurring adjacent words to generate lists of phrases that should be considered as words, like "gender studies," without human intervention. This is used by search engines for more efficient indexing.

    Once you have co-occurring words and phrases, you can do clustering analysis to get groups that tend to be used in the same sort of articles. With a little manual processing, maybe using Mechanical Turk, he could come up with a taxonomy of article types or subjects, or tags, that after the first couple of rounds could be used for auto-tagging. This could further be processed to auto classify by wokeness.

    If he has put the byline into a separate field, he could create a ranking of journalists and opinion writers by wokeness.

    I wish he would tarball the corpus and upload it somewhere so that NYT lawyers can't disappear it by threatening him. I'm sure there are a lot of people who would like to work on it.

    See this is somebody who actually understands statistics and data analysis. Homeboy who made these charts, and the other conservative who made ones before these, neither of them are staticians. These are deeply flawed graphs that are often directly contradicted by other sources that also claim to be NYT articles. I keep telling people that because the methodology behind the creation of these was not shared, because there was no peer-review, because I don’t think anyone who contributed to making these even had a bachelors yet, that no one should draw conclusions from them.

    Yet, they’re being spread all over right-wing social media as some kind of proof of something. These are proof of nothing, except the danger of casual hobbyist chart makers spreading around meaningless charts like they tell us something about the world. They don’t.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Lol.

    You’re such a maroon!
  47. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Global Warming —> Climate Change —> Global Climate Disruption

     

    Yes, good call. If one uses 'global warming' in discussion with a climatista, a correction is quickly issued. It's treated almost as a provocation, because we're all supposed to know that 'climate change' is the accepted diagnosis of Gaia's ills.

    But since the threat of even this new-and-impoved climate change has failed to move the proles' hearts and minds, there are several new terms being tried out.

    As you note, 'climate disruption' is one; 'weather weirding'/'global weirding' is another I've seen; 'climate crisis' is in there; and so on.

    In the past, climatistas would frequently lecture us deplorables about how 'weather is not climate!' when we'd point out record low temperatures, etc., but now their goal is to invent new ways to blame all forms of unusual weather on our carbon sins. For this reason, pseudo-scientific jargon such as 'polar vortex' is invoked to try to link normal weather variability (in this case, unusually cold temperatures) to climate change. It's also obviously behind terms such as 'weather weirding', i.e. the climatistas want to be able to look out the window and assert 'that's climate change happening right now!', no matter what the weather of day might be.

    They do this because they know we can’t resist assuming good faith on their part and trying to convince them with facts.

    It’s an easy smarter than thou hit.

  48. @January
    See this is somebody who actually understands statistics and data analysis. Homeboy who made these charts, and the other conservative who made ones before these, neither of them are staticians. These are deeply flawed graphs that are often directly contradicted by other sources that also claim to be NYT articles. I keep telling people that because the methodology behind the creation of these was not shared, because there was no peer-review, because I don't think anyone who contributed to making these even had a bachelors yet, that no one should draw conclusions from them.

    Yet, they're being spread all over right-wing social media as some kind of proof of something. These are proof of nothing, except the danger of casual hobbyist chart makers spreading around meaningless charts like they tell us something about the world. They don't.

    Lol.

    You’re such a maroon!

  49. @candid_observer
    Do these graphs represent a spiking in a general level of hysteria, or just on specific topics? At first blush, they certainly seem to show a broad spiraling out of control. Were there other sets of topics covered with equal mania in earlier decades?

    It would be good to see some way of combining these graphs into one that tracks general hysteria.

    This might confirm my general sense that we have entered an era of nervous breakdown.

    No one I know irl is having anything close to a nervous breakdown. It’s a social media/cable news/late night phenomenon.

  50. @Cagey Beast
    The word "Bilderberg" is used ten times in 1976, fourteen times in 2004 and seven times in 2013. A grand total of thirty-one times over nearly five decades.

    And yet:
    Mike Pompeo & Henry Kissinger attend mysterious Bilderberg 2019 (VIDEO)
    https://www.rt.com/news/460876-bilderberg-pompeo-kissinger-video/

    The Bilderberg Conference is real and attracts a center-right list of heavyweight insiders like Henry Kissinger. Somebody could figure out how many Theranos board members have attended a Bilderberg Conference.

  51. @Thatgirl
    I’m not sure what these graphs are meant to show.

    In 1970, no one ever called Archie Bunker a “sexist” or “white nationalist.” Back then Gloria always called Archie a “male chauvinist,” and Meathead called him a “bigot.”

    The terms have changed but the debate is still the same.

    I do remember Gloria calling Archie a “racist” in one episode but use of the word “prejudiced” was still a more common epithet than “racist” circa 1971 (not sure about “sexist”). IMO prejudiced is a much more tame word than racist, the latter having the same kind of odious connotations the word Communist once had in our society (but this time around it’s the Left with the lingustic upper hand).

  52. It would be interesting to look at terms relating to economic neoliberalism. I’m guessing that while “hate speech” and “queer” have taken off, terms like “free trade” and “worker’s rights” have become less common.

    With the New York Times, its probably a case of Jews getting richer over the last 50 years or so, and thus getting less interested in economic justice issues and more interested in fringe social issues which don’t affect their socio-economic status.

  53. the arcus center for social justice was built in 2012. might just be a coincidence but it is sponsored by a gay billionaire and they put out a lot of propaganda

  54. Thread:

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://twitter.com/ZachG932/status/1135649816766271488
  55. @MEH 0910
    Thread:
    https://twitter.com/ZachG932/status/1133441085118853120

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?