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Lots of B-list celebrities, including 3 cases of B-list celebrities — Tippi Hedren, Jayne Mansfield, and Ed Begley — riding with their future celebrity children — Melanie Griffith, Mariska Hargitay, and Ed Begley Jr., respectively. Celebrityhood is fairly heritable, it appears.

 
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  1. BB753 says:

    All good examples of regression to the mean.

  2. 1965 was great. All those white kids! Girls in skirts! Parades without rainbows!

    I’d say “wouldn’t it be great if knowing what we do now, we could time travel back for a do-over?” But we’d need to time travel back to Christmas of 1964 to get a redo on the mistakes of 1965. Or Christmas 1963 for the mistakes of 1964. Or …

    Sadly the damage was already underway.

  3. Guy on the first float (no relation) was an interesting illustration of what Cali was once about:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernest_E._Debs

  4. As with everything else, it’s still hard to separate out the nature from the nurture. Did it not help Ed Begley Jr. (the guy from that hospital show) get parts on TV or in the movies, that his Dad was an actor? It’s the same with the other 2, I’d guess. There are likely more talented, gracious and beautiful women than them all over the country, but they didn’t get that break. Some end up like Helena right there in your Los Angeles:

    Would identical twin studies help? Maybe the GaBoor sisters?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  5. Daniel H says:

    Yes. And viewing scenes like this THEY were saying at the time, “Delenda est America”. And it has been.

  6. ziel says:

    You say “B-List”, but back in 1965 I don’t I would have been head-over-heels seeing Capt. Binghamton and Lt. Carpenter, not to mention Mr Drysdale and Miss Hathaway!

    I like Santa at the end carrying his own loudspeaker in his lap – ah, simpler times.

    • Agree: kikz
  7. istevefan says:
    @AnotherDad

    I’d say “wouldn’t it be great if knowing what we do now, we could time travel back for a do-over?” But we’d need to time travel back to Christmas of 1964 to get a redo on the mistakes of 1965. Or Christmas 1963 for the mistakes of 1964. Or …

    Sadly the damage was already underway.

    I get the gist of your comment, but it wasn’t too late in December 1965. The new immigration law had just been passed on October 3rd, and hadn’t yet started to have an impact. Strict immigration limits and even a repeal of that act could still have been done, especially if the knowledge of what it would bring were available.

    Heck, I’d even venture to say that December 1975 would not have been too late.

    • Agree: Charon
  8. J.Ross says:

    Interesting 4chan thread about normie PhD’s trying to understand memecraft. But normie PhD’s can’t understand why kids love the taste of cinnamon toast crunch.

    “Studies show:”
    https://arxiv.org/pdf/1911.10517.pdf

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/234960676

    Long story, possibly larp but it squares with everything:
    (tldr, CIA defamed American dissidents as Russian hackers, as you have known for years.)

    [MORE]

    Up until earlier this year I worked as a counter-terrorism researcher out of Benhall GCHQ.

    In 2016 we were briefed on online far-right extremism becoming a threat to national security and I was assigned to a task force made up of various analysts, think tank researchers and sociologists to study the spread of far-right ideology from places like /pol/. Our job was to make a determination on threat category so it could be handled by the relevant authorities.

    The three main lines of inquiry were:

    1. Astroturfing by adversarial nation states to influence elections and/or to spread civil unrest. Countering this would be the job of signals and human intelligence compartments at GCHQ, MI6 and their counterparts in allied nations.
    2. The organic spread of extremist ideology which would require government policy changes to regulate social media, proscription of far-right websites and working with the education sector to create early intervention policies to prevent radicalization of young people and provide counter-narratives through various forms of media.
    3. Corporate conspiracy which can mean a whole manner of scenarios.

    We found evidence of all three. We came to the conclusion that the vast majority of ideas, memes and methods originated on /pol/, that Russian intelligence was mainly regurgitating memes on an inconsequential scale but there was a small but significant level of artificial generation of ideas by several companies here but only one of them, Cambridge Analytica was exposed, because the UK NCA, FCA + US RICO & DoJ stonewalled on more powerful entities.

    MI6 and the CIA became involved and basically attempted to spin 1 & 3 to give the impression that 2 did not exist. After this backfired terribly, things took a very strange turn when we were assigned to work with the US Department of Energy and National Laboratories on what they called Collective Intelligence and C-Factor ranking which focused on studying /pol/.

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  9. istevefan says:

    A couple of observations.

    First, that film is depressing because it shows what we were and what has been lost. I think Steve commented at Youtube that he was 7 years old during that parade. So well within the lifetime of an average individual a lot has been lost.

    Second, it would be good to show this film to young people. I think they need to know what the USA was just a short time ago because many are under the impression that were always multi-culti.

    Third, I wouldn’t mind seeing the graves of Cellar, Hart, LBJ and Teddy K desecrated.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes, Charon
    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
    , @Paleoconn
  10. I note that “Christmas” was already unmentionable even then.

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @Hibernian
  11. Currahee says:

    How fortunate are we that boring old white america is gone forever.

  12. Ron Unz attended Walter Reed Junior High School. (6:53 mark)

    Ed Begley Jr. and Steve Sailer attended the same school. Begley Jr.’s mother died when he was seven years old. When he was 16, he found out that she was not his biological mother.

  13. eah says:

    OT

    “which isn’t just about the environment” — good to know

    • Replies: @Aardvark
    , @obwandiyag
  14. @AnotherDad

    The damage was already done by 1865.

  15. Beliavsky says:

    Off-topic but maybe of interest to Steve and his readers: a new article “Spare the Suspensions, Spoil the Child? Maybe the Reverse Is True” finds that suspending more (black male) students in Charlotte, NC caused more of the suspended students to later be incarcerated but improved the academic performance of white boys:

    https://www.nber.org/digest/dec19/w26257.shtml
    ‘For the full sample of students, the researchers find that stricter disciplinary policies had no effect on state math and reading test scores. They find small, temporary, positive effects on the academic performance of white males; the effects did not lead to higher education attainment or reduced criminality. The researchers conclude that “it seems unlikely that the gains from removing disruptive peers would outweigh the substantial long-term costs to students who are suspended because of stricter disciplinary policy.”‘

  16. Midway through the parade a group of African Americans began shooting. Several people were wounded. It wasn’t quite as idyllic as you might think.

    • LOL: Daniel H
  17. @istevefan

    I tend to agree with AnotherDad. Go back, for example, to the 1950s and you’ll just get another version of the 1960s: the attitudes that led to the 60s were already present in the 50s. IMHO, the seeds of our present problems go back to the Progressives and U.S. involvement in World War I, possibly even the Spanish-American War.

    • Replies: @David
    , @krustykurmudgeon
  18. The population of California in 1910 was 2.4 million people rounding up.

    California had 20 million people in 1970.

    There are now 40 million people packed into parts of California. The recent increase is mostly due to the mass importation of foreigners from mass immigration.

  19. Not to quibble, but was Tippi Hedren really B-list? “Birds” and “Marnie” and I’m sure if she had “cooperated” more closely with Hitchcock she would have been a long term leading lady of his. (In the films, I mean.)

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Jane Plain
  20. @istevefan

    Most of LA’s change came from within the Americas, i.e., unconnected to Hart-Celler. One tweak in the law backfired– the family reunification clause was meant to favor Europeans, and did for the first decade or so. That part should have been sunsetted.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Travis
  21. Tiny Duck says:

    You guys need to watch Knives out to see how most people view white racists and online alt right trolls. It is smashing the box office

    • Replies: @MEH 0910
  22. Mansfield and Hargitay, of course, would have a much more memorable car ride a year and a half later.

    Just before they appear in the parade, a postal vehicle makes an appearance, touting the use of ZIP codes, which had been introduced 2½ years prior.

  23. istevefan says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Most of LA’s change came from within the Americas, i.e., unconnected to Hart-Celler.

    You are correct in a way. But you fail to consider the implications of Hart-Celler beyond the opening of immigration to non-European areas. It in effect was a decision that the USA was no longer a White, European nation. It was akin to Australia dumping its ‘White Australia’ policy.

    So without the mindset that America was and would continue to be a European nation, the will and ability to check massive immigration from the Americas was not there. So even though Hart-Celler did not call for more immigration from the Americas, its effect of abandoning the notion of a European America helped set the table towards a feeble effort to oppose it.

    Contrast that effort with the effort under Eisenhower, pre-1965. This article on Operation Wetback is very interesting. In the post Hart-Celler era where the USA is no longer defined as a European nation, this would not happen.

    • Agree: Charon
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  24. @Triumph104

    Ed Begley Jr. and Steve Sailer attended the same school.

    Perhaps, but Steve is the type of guy who drives a sensible vehicle until it has depreciated to zero. Ed drives some exotic contraption powered solely by his own self-satisfaction.

    • LOL: fish
    • Replies: @Realist
    , @ScarletNumber
  25. The high point of my youth way back then was to visit my cousins in the then demographically homogenous San Fernando valley, where one could swim in January. Seeing this parade would have seemed unremarkable, normal, American. California was magical back then.

  26. anon[294] • Disclaimer says:

    I visited LA once, in 2005. Of course I had to see Hollywood and went to that Chinese theatre with the handprints. We walked down that street with the stars in front of the theatre. The street turned all Mexican after two blocks

    • Replies: @Alden
  27. Realist says:
    @AnotherDad

    Sadly the damage was already underway.

    Yes, underway, but could have possibly been undone shortly thereafter. Here is an article that addresses what probably needs to happen now to ‘Make America Great Again’.
    https://www.strategic-culture.org/news/2019/12/01/why-second-american-revolution-necessary-for-entire-world/

  28. Realist says:
    @Another Canadian

    Ed Begley Jr. and Steve Sailer attended the same school.

    Perhaps, but Steve is the type of guy who drives a sensible vehicle until it has depreciated to zero. Ed drives some exotic contraption powered solely by his own self-satisfaction.

    The difference is Steve’s superior IQ.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  29. 1965 was a watershed year on many levels…the Vietnam “Buildup” in July…the Byrds and what would evolve into folk-rock/psychedelic rock…the beginning of the hippie movement…the Voting Rights Act…Griswold vs. Connecticut (featuring constitutional “penumbras” and “emanations” guaranteeing something called a “right to privacy”)…and what may have turned out to be the most lasting legacy of that year— the Hart-Cellar Immigration Act.

  30. @Achmed E. Newman

    My old neighbor Bill died a few years ago. He was a schoolteacher who did some stuntwork — martial arts fighting, etc. — and a little acting in movies and TV. He taught his younger brother how to get into acting, and he had some minor success. I just saw the brother in a role in an indy comedy and he has the same laugh as my late friend, which was very nice.

  31. @Another Canadian

    Ed drives some exotic contraption powered solely by his own self-satisfaction.

  32. That can’t be video of the Hollywood Xmas parade.

    • Hollywood Blvd looks normal.
    • Hollywood idiots aren’t wearing parkas.

  33. MEH 0910 says:
    @Tiny Duck

  34. Entirely OT:

    Three bits of news, all from today, indicating the Russians and Chinese are coming together against Washington at an accelerating speed.

    1) Note the source:
    China imposes sanctions on US
    China urges US to stop interfering in its internal affairs, Chinese Foreign Ministry Spokesperson Hua Chunying said

    https://tass.com/world/1094643

    2) This one could easily be a matter of the Chinese or Russians getting these guys on a plane. If so, it indicates a desire by one or both governments to make common cause. Note the source again:
    Why Are Ukrainian Neo-Nazis Joining the Hong Kong Protests?
    Prominent Ukrainian neo-Nazi figures have been spotted in the Hong Kong protests just weeks after hosting an “academy of street protest” in Kiev.
    https://sputniknews.com/asia/201912021077466396-why-are-ukrainian-neo-nazis-joining-the-hong-kong-protests/

    3)

  35. Aardvark says:
    @eah

    What kind of douche-wad expects a system that produces energy to also “dismantle systems of oppression”? The state I live in seems to have about a 50/50 split between coal and nuclear but I don’t evaluate what sort of social impact it has; “oppressive” or not, I just consume electricity.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  36. Dumbo says:

    Celebrityhood is fairly heritable, it appears.

    I don’t think so. Talent and looks are partially heritable, so that’s part of it. But what’s really important in the industry is networking. If you’re the son or daughter of a famous actor, director or producer, it is much, much more likely that you will end working in that field too, compared to someone who may be equally talented/beautiful but has no contacts in the industry. It is a very nepotistic industry, particularly in Hollywood.

  37. Travis says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    True. Hart-Celler actually imposed quotas on Mexican immigration. prior to 1965 there were no limits on the number of green cards issued to Mexicans. In the decade prior the 1965 over 50,000 Mexicans each year were granted resident visas (green cards). This was capped at 20,000 per year after 1965.

    In the decades before Hart-Celler was passed, as many as 450,000 Mexicans had been legally entering the United States each year using temporary work permits issued by the “bracero” program, which supplied a migrant workforce for farms in the United States. On top of that huge influx, some 50,000 Mexicans annually entered the U.S. as permanent residents prior to 1965.

    The end of the bracero program was actually a liberal reform that put an end to the systemic exploitation of Mexican workers, while 20,000 quotas imposed on Mexican green cards were put forth to accommodate conservative senators who wanted to make it more difficult for Mexicans to move to the United States legally. Once Hart-Celler went through, there were less than half as many visa slots allotted to the entire hemisphere as had been received in previous years by Mexican alone.

    Hart-Celler significantly reduced Legal immigration from Mexico and eliminated the bracero program. Yet the Mexicans didn’t stop coming, but they were now mostly illegal aliens. If Hart-Celler was never passed, we would not have quotas on Mexican immigration and the bracero program would have remained. We can blame Hart-Cellar for increasing immigration from Africa and Asia , but the 1965 law actually greatly reduced Legal immigration from Mexico.

  38. Corvinus says:
    @istevefan

    “But you fail to consider the implications of Hart-Celler beyond the opening of immigration to non-European areas. It in effect was a decision that the USA was no longer a White, European nation. It was akin to Australia dumping its ‘White Australia’ policy.”

    Imagine how the stout English, Scots, Scots-Irish, and Welsh felt when the nation they helped create–the United States of America–became overrun by first the Irish and Germans (drunks and Catholics), and later on the Italians (swarthy Catholics with a mafia mean streak) and Poles (dullard Catholics). Between 1880 and 1930, the foreign-born population represented between 12 and 15 percent of the total population. We are talking about flipping a nation that was predominately Anglo-Saxon to one that now contained a heavy Eastern and Southern European influence, altering a country to the point that it became unrecognizable. It’s not about “whiteness” or “being European”, but it’s about “remaining Anglo-Saxon”.

    Novelist John Dos Passos, a freaking halfbreed! (Portuguese and English), characterized the period well–“The people of this country are too tolerant. There’s no other country in the world where they’d allow it…After all we built up this country and then we allow a lot of foreigners, the scum of Europe, the offscourings of Polish ghettos to come and run it for us.”

    So, it would appear that America had lost its “identity” a century earlier with the influx of the Poles, Italians, Greeks, and other “lesser” European stock. Had you NOTICED, our nation’s history has tended to veer in the direction of “granting preferences” to immigrants. The 1880 Chinese Exclusion Act and the 1924 Quota Act come to mind. Those preferences were based on nativists attitudes toward “different” groups of people tied directly to ethnicity whose traits were inferior. Heritage Americans, aka WASPs, were particularly insistent on not having their bloodlines become vitiated.

    Yet those sentiments run counter to one of our Founding Fathers, Thomas Jefferson, who in reference to Native Americans, stated, “You will unite yourselves with us and we shall all be Americans. You will mix with us by marriage. Your blood will run in our veins and will spread with us over this great Island.” I suppose given his proclivities to race mix, we ought to discount his thoughts on this important matter. Although one has to wonder if the late, great Strom Thurmond was inspired by those words…

    Now, I’m not saying we should “import” anyone and everyone–I have been on record as saying we need to significantly limit immigration–but it really comes down to Who/Whom in the same vein as our ancestors when they made similar decisions. There is the argument by some on the Alt Right, however, that the Constitution was meant secure the rights of Englishmen and only applies to this particular group of people, since the non-English–meaning white Europeans–lack the intellectual capacity to properly comprehend its ideals. So those American citizens who came from Portugal or Romania or Italy are other than American.

  39. Corvinus says:
    @Realist

    “The difference is Steve’s superior IQ.”

    Allegedly.

  40. istevefan says:
    @Corvinus

    … the offscourings of Polish ghettos to come and run it for us.”

    I don’t think you know what that means.

    the 1924 Quota Act come to mind. Those preferences were based on nativists attitudes toward “different” groups of people tied directly to ethnicity whose traits were inferior. Heritage Americans, aka WASPs, were particularly insistent on not having their bloodlines become vitiated.

    You mean the act with put quotas on the English and gave the Irish the third highest quota?

    Yet those sentiments run counter to one of our Founding Fathers,

    You mean the fellas who passed the First Naturalization Act of 1790?

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  41. @Aardvark

    That nuclear power tweet was satirical.

  42. David says:
    @Diversity Heretic

    “Many were increasingly of the opinion that they’d all made a big mistake in coming down from the trees in the first place. And some said that even the trees had been a bad move, and that no one should ever have left the oceans.”

    –Douglas Adams

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  43. Anon[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve in Greensboro

    Not to quibble, but was Tippi Hedren really B-list? “Birds” and “Marnie” and I’m sure if she had “cooperated” more closely with Hitchcock she would have been a long term leading lady of his. (In the films, I mean.)

    Hitch had an unhealthy hard-on for Tippi. After years of intermittent harassment, Tippi essentially called Hitchcock a fat fuck in front of the entire crew of “Marnie,” I believe, and that was it for her. Hitch had another two years on her contract, he refused to speak to her when she tried to apologize, and wouldn’t let her work, except the Hollywood Xmas Parade, and some chickenshit TV work, which was a humiliating step down for her.

    Following that, he bad-mouthed her around town, his minions backed him up, and her A-List movie goose was cooked.

    Now you know the rest… of the fucking story.

  44. Alden says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    I noted the Disappearance of the word Christmas too. Given that the entire retail sector makes all its yearly profit in
    November and December I hate spending any money at all in those months. Bought all Christmas presents and some other things in October so as not to give the anti Christmas capitalist Chinese crap any money.

  45. Corvinus says:
    @istevefan

    “I don’t think you know what that means.”

    I know exactly what it means. Obviously the reference is way above your pay grade. Here, let me help you understand. The WASPs built up and ran our nation. Then, worthless and contemptible peoples arrive in droves and thought they could simply replace WASPs and manage the country by themselves.

    “You mean the act with put quotas on the English and gave the Irish the third highest quota?”

    It was the lesser of two evils. The Irish were still reviled by WASPs, but at that time Poles, Czechs, and Italians were deemed to be even more repulsive. The 1924 Act based ceilings on the number of immigrants from any particular nation on the percentage of each nationality recorded in the 1890 census—a blatant effort to limit immigration from Southern and Eastern Europe, which mostly occurred after that date.

    “You mean the fellas who passed the First Naturalization Act of 1790?”

    Yeah, those fellas, who allowed future generations to chart their own course when it came to immigration. It was other than surprising that this act centered around Europeans, which was reflective of the times. Eligibility to citizenship would become more expansive over time, although the racial restriction was not eliminated entirely until 1952.

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  46. @istevefan

    I think Steve commented at Youtube that he was 7 years old … well within the lifetime of an average individual..

    What kind of iSteve fan are you? Sailer is an “average individual”?

  47. Anonymous[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    the United States of America–became overrun by first the Irish and Germans (drunks and Catholics)

    You dare to speak of Germans and the fucking Irish as peers on this planet in any significant way?

    Either you haven’t met many German or Irish people, or you’re quite mad, sir.

    Or even worse, Irish!

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  48. Alden says:
    @Corvinus

    Thomas Cromwell deported 250K Irish Irish to the Caribbean and American colonies 1640-50. The ones sent to America are as old stock American as I am, ( December 1620).

    There were so many Germans in Pennsylvania Ben Franklin considered then a threat to the anglos of Pennsylvania. They too, especially German Amish and Mennonites religious minorities arrived as early as the 1650s escaping Calvinist run areas of Switzerland and Germany Most came for economic opportunity and or were recruited by shipping companies.

    America east west between the Appalachians and the Rockies and north south between the Gulf of Mexico and Canada was claimed by France prior to 170o and sparsely, very sparsely settled by French Canadians and French immigrants.

    You’re not an American. You’re an Ellis Island nomad living in America until you destroy us and move on to your next targets, China and Ukraine. So shut up and don’t boast about your ignorance about America and us Americans.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  49. Alden says:
    @anon

    Turning Mexican was a vast improvement over the gay tranny prostitutes, pimps real women prostitutes druggies and lowlifes.

  50. @Triumph104

    Ron Unz attended Walter Reed Junior High School … Ed Begley Jr. and Steve Sailer attended the same school. Begley Jr.’s mother … was not his biological mother.

    Wow! California was truly Progressive with a capital “P” wasn’t it? Back in Detriot, I was born in a special hospital just for bastards, but these guys actually had a high school for bastards?

    It’s long past time that we bastards were recognized as victims of oppression and discrimination, given special rights and privileges, and our own congressional caucus. Unlike fags and men in dresses pretending to be women, there is absolutely no doubt whatsoever that we bastards were “born this way.” And historically, what group can possibly claim to have been so stigmatized and mistreated for so many millennia as us bastards? We are even bigger victims than the Jews!

    #BastardStrong

  51. @Corvinus

    There is the argument by some on the Alt Right, however, that the Constitution was meant secure the rights of Englishmen and only applies to this particular group of people

    Firearms politics is pretty much an unspoken admission that this is right. So are “safe spaces”, speech restrictions, and other such incursions on freedom of expression.

    It’s like we all know in our bones that the First and Second Amendments are Anglo-Saxon fetishes unsuited for a multicultural, muktiracial mélange.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  52. @Stan d Mute

    So you’re the guy always requesting “Bastards of Young” at the lunchtime show!

  53. Corvinus says:
    @Anonymous

    “You dare to speak of Germans and the fucking Irish as peers on this planet in any significant way?”

    How anti-white of you to say.

    • Replies: @Anon
  54. Corvinus says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Firearms politics is pretty much an unspoken admission that this is right.”

    According to Who/Whom?

    “It’s like we all know in our bones that the First and Second Amendments are Anglo-Saxon fetishes unsuited for a multicultural, muktiracial mélange.”

    The reality is that those two amendments are suited for American citizens regardless of race, ethnicity, or creed.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Reg Cæsar
  55. Corvinus says:
    @Alden

    “Thomas Cromwell deported 250K Irish Irish to the Caribbean and American colonies 1640-50. The ones sent to America are as old stock American as I am, ( December 1620).”

    Anyone can say anything on the Internet.

    “You’re not an American. You’re an Ellis Island nomad living in America until you destroy us and move on to your next targets, China and Ukraine. So shut up and don’t boast about your ignorance about America and us Americans.”

    That is an anti-white statement on your part. Have you no shame?

  56. Sparkon says:

    This is great! I especially enjoyed the Casa Burger dude on the old school skateboard @2:46. I had one much like that in the Spring of 1965, when I was the only sidewalk surfer at Indiana Univ.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  57. Celebrityhood is fairly heritable, it appears.

    Back a decade or so ago when Bill Maher at least put up the pretense of objectivity, he’d go on about the nepotism that is rampant in Hollywood. Or at least the proximity issue. Take, for example, that jackass Sean Penn, class president or the equivalent at a tony So Cal high school. Loves him some socialism, but doesn’t practice it himself. Or Charlize Theron. Loves lefty politics but doesn’t want to live in her native S. Africa because of rapey stuff, but criticizes you for criticizing her about it. OK tits and OK ass are only good for so much, baby.

    The culture there amongst actors must be off the charts. Mel Gibson had to humiliate himself for saying something that a F#$#ton of others have said before him. The cocktail circuit is extremely powerful indeed. (Maybe I’m an outlier, but I’d be happy working at the hardware store.)

  58. Anon[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @Corvinus

    How anti-white of you to say.

    Why do you try to create anti-intellectual rabbit holes as if it’s never been done before? You certainly cannot help being an ass, but the private personal glee you exhibit while wrapped in your occupation is what’s puzzlingly perverse.

    You’re like the Tesla of assholes.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  59. @Corvinus

    Allowing each generation to chart its own course is exactly my belief. It’s certainly a very effective response against emotional appeals to any ‘nation of immigrants’ nonsense. Most Americans are getting sick of basing immigration policy on the fact that neighbors or co-workers or friends have a grandpa or parent from Ireland or Argentina or Vietnam. Good for them — seriously — yet so what. It’s 2019, America is getting expensive and crowded, and absolutely needs to focus on citizens first. And if that means zero immigration for a good while, that is the right of this American generation — that is who we are.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  60. Yes. Hollywood, just to add to the list of its atrocities, is a hotbed of nepotism. Just look, pick a name out of the hat, at Carrie Fischer’s family tree.

    No wonder all movies suck.

  61. @eah

    Nuclear is consummate evil whatever you or that douchewad say.

  62. @J.Ross

    /pol/ is for cucks and NPCs. Just as sure as Stormfront is the LARP-of-choice for obese tattooed white trash (like the lead character in CUCK[1]).

    Tri-force shitposters (and Gold members) are in /b/; they always have been; they never left.

    My personal theory is that /pol/ has been ejaculated into the limelight for two reasons: ① people looking to make bank by writing about ‘subversives’ don’t have the stomach for /b/; ② raising /pol/’s profile made it an attractor for the weakest of the /b/ herd, and concentrated them in /pol/ which facilitates surveillance and ‘study’.

    [1] CUCK is actually a decent film whose lead character is much more sympathetic than you would imagine… I shook my head a dozen times during that movie, thinking “Jesus, I’ve done stuff that dumb. Poor bugger“.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  63. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sparkon

    I had one much like that in the Spring of 1965, when I was the only sidewalk surfer at Indiana Univ.

    • Replies: @Sparkon
  64. @Diversity Heretic

    there’s also the fact that what people think of as the 60s wasn’t really that big of a phenomenon outside of a few select areas/demographics. The bigger distinction is between the 60s and 70s.

    When I think of the 60s I think of something like this which is to say, still pretty clean cut:

    When I think of the 70s, otoh, I think of something like this.

  65. @Corvinus

    According to Who/Whom?

    The descendants of “free negroes and mulattoes” are perfectly happy with the 19th-century laws that disarmed their ancestors– as long as they apply to everybody equally. There’s the rub.

    Democracy is by definition the rule of the majority. “Minority rights”, whatever else they are, are undemocratic.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  66. @Corvinus

    The reality is that those two amendments are suited for American citizens regardless of race, ethnicity, or creed.

    Only those who want them. What happens to the minority (i.e., us) when the majority no longer believes in them? I think you know as well as the rest of us.

  67. @krustykurmudgeon

    When I think of the 60s I think of something like this which is to say, still pretty clean cut:

    Billboard Year-End Hot 100 chart for 1969.

    America’s first reggae charttopper– and last “kissing booth”:

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  68. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @krustykurmudgeon

    The seventies were “The Sixties” for middle class Middle America. The things the media talked about, like smoking dope and openly admitting to sex outside of marriage, in the 60s (especially in the later half of the decade) were done by hippies and freaks and the people on the far ends of the economic spectrum, but not by Middle America back then. That started up in the early to mid 70s for most people and all hell broke loose in the late 70s and early 80s.

    That said, in terms of the leading edge indicators-people in the media, what was shown on TV and in magazines and the newest best selling books-the sixties had the most rapid rate of change of any decade of the century. What looked fresh and modern in ’62 was horribly out of date in ’65 and by ’68 that too was old hat. Mad Men was set in the decade where one can most easily identify the exact year, or pretty close, quite easily from any photograph of, say, a newly constructed public area in a motel, or a laundromat, or the furniture or clothing areas in a department store. I think Sears and JC Penneys each had several different store logos you’d see on a storefront if it was a new build. Women’s fashions likewise, if the women are “fashionable” you can pinpoint the year pretty closely.

    • Agree: BB753, Mark G., PiltdownMan
    • Replies: @Desiderius
  69. Corvinus says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “The descendants of “free negroes and mulattoes” are perfectly happy with the 19th-century laws that disarmed their ancestors…”

    How are you able to determine their “perfect happiness”? What laws are you specifically referring to that “disarmed their ancestors”? You are speaking in code here. Flesh out your ideas.

    “Democracy is by definition the rule of the majority. “Minority rights”, whatever else they are, are undemocratic.”

    You mean there are rights afforded to people who are in the minority. Moreover, the majority may also trespass on the rights of the minority, which affords the minority to seek redress of grievances.

    “What happens to the minority (i.e., us) when the majority no longer believes in them?”

    Who is this “us”?

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  70. Corvinus says:
    @Anon

    “Why do you try to create anti-intellectual rabbit holes as if it’s never been done before?”

    Trigger much? YOU were the one who put two groups of whites–Germans and Irish–as being “beneath you”. Is not the overall health of the white race more important than your ethnic pride? Pray tell, what is your ethnicity? Why do you believe that the Germans and Irish are other than your peers on this planet in any significant way?

  71. Corvinus says:
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    “effective response against emotional appeals to any ‘nation of immigrants’ nonsense.”

    But we are a nation of immigrants. It’s not nonsense at all.

    “It’s 2019, America is getting expensive and crowded, and absolutely needs to focus on citizens first.”

    Assuredly. Our citizens consist of whites and non-whites, Europeans and non-Europeans. As Johnny Cash sang, “these are my people”.

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  72. BB753 says:

    When you look back 3 generations ago, there are deep changes that go beyond race. How many people wore tattoos, glasses or were obese back then? I’m slowly but surely turning into an old fart, as a GenXer, but I can still remember a time when women wore skirts and dresses and didn’t swear or look like fat, tattooed skanks. Now even middle class pre-teen girls and old “ladies” (yes, I mean Boomer gals!) dress and act and talk like crack whores. Even heroin-addicted dirty hippie girls didn’t walk around half-naked in the seventies.
    As for men, or lack thereof, they universally dress and act like oversized toddlers, with shorts, shirts, sneakers and caps (which they never remove indoors). No need to mention that they all proudly sport ugly tattoos on their flabby obese bodies and are obsessed with inane TV series and childish video games. On the other hand, the few guys who don’t look like fat disgusting pigs are juiced-up unhealthy guys who lift weights and carry around way too many unnecessary pounds of muscle which they need to feed with an enormous intake of artificial protein and calories shakes and strenuous and pointless exercises. There’s no middle-ground: men either have excess fat or excess muscle.
    Also, what’s with myopia? Guys who needed glasses before their forties were a minority just 2 generations ago, but now it’s the other way around.
    But by far, the worst change has been in manners and conversation, no longer civil or fluent the latter, and the overwhelming numbers who have turned their backs on Christianity to embrace atheism or New Age cults.

    • Replies: @Anon
  73. @Steve in Greensboro

    I think she was thought of as a “starlet” rather than a star. Starlet was the word used before B-list.

    Hedren was astoundingly good-looking. Maybe the best-looking of the Hitchcock blondes, Kelly excluded. Kim Novak had a gorgeous face but a squat body.

  74. tbmcc says:
    @AnotherDad

    We would have to go back to when the court allowed that african to own that other african. Importing that black plague doomed our nation long before the Declaration of Independence was ever written.

  75. @Reg Cæsar

    1969. A year in which both Sugar, Sugar and Honky Tonk Women were in the top five of the Billboard 100 charts for the year.

    The late Sixties—a complex time.

    • Replies: @Anon
  76. @krustykurmudgeon

    I think 1965 or 1966 was pretty much the last of the “pretty clean cut” years of the Sixties, at least in popular culture and the zeitgeist. By 1967-68, things had changed.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  77. J.Ross says:
    @Kratoklastes

    >/b/ over /pol/
    >sitting through the “incel” demonization propaganda “Cuck” (like “Joker” but without the success or competence)
    You are a brave man.

  78. In some cities, the damage began at the turn of the 20th Century.

  79. @Corvinus

    Summing the total number of Americans who have ever lived, the vast majority were both born here, and had parents born here, and perhaps 2 or 3 grandparents born here. That is not a nation of immigrants at all — til the mid 20th Century the natural increase of the American population was quite healthy. We are, and have always been since the late 18th Century, a nation of Americans. Immigrants (even going so far as to include American born children) were never remotely dominant demographically nationwide. The ‘nation of immigrants’ is a fictional creation for political purposes. The American people as a group comprise multiple races, no argument there.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  80. Anon[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @PiltdownMan

    1969. A year in which both Sugar, Sugar and Honky Tonk Women were in the top five of the Billboard 100 charts for the year.

    The late Sixties—a complex time.

    Very good insight that the trends began with the outliers, and then were aped by the middle-class, and the trend-clutching hipsters. By 1967, the middle-class was discovering acid. The Beatles had already gone down that rabbit hole, and Sgt. Pepper got the middle-class hipster party started. You’d start seeing “concepts” on variety television that was certainly acid-laced. Pedestrian songs highlighted by… weirdness. Uncreative people trying to keep up with it.

    At times, it was hard to tell the difference between a creative and a poser, when we were in the thick of it. Too many thought just being incongruent was a creative act.

    That said, enjoy this 1969 classic that shot to number 3 on the Billboard charts,, achieving gold record certification…

  81. Anon[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @BB753

    With the zoomers (Generation Z), I keep seeing relatively skinny guys walking down the street with their skinny arms wrapped around fairly large fat chicks.
    If they got in a fist fight, I wouldn’t know which one to bet on. The girls are getting LARGE! Fat AND big! I’ve never seen the like until this generation.

    Also, as a boomer, we used to call women like that a “Vespa Date.” That is, you didn’t mind riding it, as long as none of your friends saw you. These guys do NOT care who see’s them hugging on a big fat chick!

    I guess this era is a social renaissance period if you’re a fat chick. For us poor boomer people looking on, it’s the social dark ages. Thin guys with big fat chicks. And they like it.

    I want to grab the poor kid and say, “Kid! It doesn’t have to be this way! You don’t have to accept this! There’s skinnier girls… at the beach… or the health club… or somewhere! As she gets older, she’s gonna get worse! That fat’s gonna turn into folds, kid! It’s gonna hang on her like drapes! Never mind what drapes are! KID!!! LISTEN TO ME!!!”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @BB753
  82. @Anon

    Sherman’s “Easy Come, Easy Go” was probably the last hit pop song written to earlier adult standards. Sherman retired to serve as an EMT, which is also a pretty grown-up thing to do.

    • Replies: @anon
  83. @Anon

    …we used to call women like that a “Vespa Date.” That is, you didn’t mind riding it, as long as none of your friends saw you.

  84. Corvinus says:
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    “Summing the total number of Americans who have ever lived, the vast majority were both born here, and had parents born here, and perhaps 2 or 3 grandparents born here.”

    Right, with their ancestors having been born somewhere else in the world, then they came here to work and have (large) families…as immigrants. From 1836 to 1914, over 30 million Europeans migrated to the United States. Nothing fictional at all.

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  85. @Anonymous

    That started up in the early to mid 70s for most people and all hell broke loose in the late 70s and early 80s.

    It was pretty played out by ’79. Disco Demo Night and Stripes were the turning points.

    But yeah, I remember having to walk through the smokers benches (where students could go out to smoke and hang out between classes or during their free bell) out front of my dad’s high school and thinking I was lucky to survive in the late 70s. In the early 70s my uncles took me to parties where I drank beer and tried to figure out how a pipe could smoke water. I was 4. UishMC.

  86. @PiltdownMan

    The irony being that the Jimi underneath all the fluff was straight out of 1945.

    • Agree: PiltdownMan
  87. @Corvinus

    And in that same time period, 1836 to 1914, the US population increased from 15 million to 100 million — most of that growth from births to American born parents who themselves had American parents. And of course, a large percentage of immigrants in the 19th Century returned to their homelands.

    That is not a nation of immigrants. It’s an American nation that allowed some immigrants to mix into an existing American culture — not the same thing at all. But you know that.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  88. @Anon

    my view is that the “in” people in 1969 thought that type of music was garbage. Peter Green era Fleetwood Mac was more up there alley.

  89. anon[710] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Sherman’s “Easy Come, Easy Go” was probably the last hit pop song written to earlier adult standards. Sherman retired to serve as an EMT, which is also a pretty grown-up thing to do.

    I liked Bobby Sherman’s little songs as a kid because they were silly, easy to remember, and easy to sing. His handlers probably gave him those songs for the same reason. He also seemed like a nice guy.

    Having to sing those songs as an adult… I would have retired too.

    Trying to sing “Little Woman” at 40, at some nostalgia fest, all that former jailbait, still staring at ya, but now fat, horny middle-aged women. Not a fun way to close out the ol’ life.

    Ask David Cassidy how it worked out for him.

  90. BB753 says:
    @Anon

    Those skinny guys you mention are soyboys, hipsters, etc. That is, low-testosterone men. The kind of guys who will transition into “women” as their fat wives transition into “men”, which might explain the odd couplings. But you’re right, some younger guys are still thin, though in the minority.

  91. Corvinus says:
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    “And in that same time period, 1836 to 1914, the US population increased from 15 million to 100 million most of that growth from births to American born parents who themselves had American parents.”

    Whose ancestors came from Europe as immigrants.

    https://www2.census.gov/library/publications/decennial/1910/volume-1/volume-1-p11.pdf

    “And of course, a large percentage of immigrants in the 19th Century returned to their homelands.’

    What is that percentage?

    “That is not a nation of immigrants.”

    Actually, we are a nation of immigrants. We are mutts–the mixing of different races and ethnicities who forged their own unique identity. The Irish and German influx, followed by Eastern and Southern Europeans, along with the Assyrians, the Chinese/Japanese, and assorted cast of characters, brought untold (and unwanted) diversity to the Anglo-French-Dutch amalgamation of our founding stock.

    But you already knew that. As Johnny Cash stated, “This is my people”.

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  92. Sparkon says:
    @Anonymous

    That’s it. Thanks for posting that. I think I probably got into “Sidewalk Surfing” because of that song.

    But what about Mr. Dick Clark referring to Jan & Dean as “my two idiot friends over there?” Nice guy.

    My first skateboard was little more than a pair of steel wheel roller skate trucks screwed directly into the board fore and aft. It was an unmaneuverable, rough riding, and dangerous POS with its narrow-track, rigid wheel sets, but I did get some valuable practice jumping off the fool thing when it went out of control, or stopped suddenly upon hitting a crack or pebble, which was frequently. The trick was to land in a trot, and bleed off momentum, or do a jump-stop, but always lead with the feet, not the head.

    For that reason, I think riding a skateboard in bare feet is entirely idiotic, but that’s what some kids did in Cal because you don’t wear shoes on a surfboard, I guess. In the Midwest, I couldn’t care less, and at Indiana, I wore navy blue U.S. Keds sneakers, no socks, white t-shirt and patchwork madras bermuda shorts. Must ride in style because beautiful co-eds are watching!

    Patti McGee, famous skateboarder from San Diego

    After some hairy adventures on steel wheels, I bought a board like the one Dean is riding in the video, and also used by Patti McGee. Note even with the better composite wheels and wider track truck with a rubber grommet to enable turns and slaloms, the little board’s wheels could not get over the camera cable. Even a small pebble or crack in the concrete could bring the whole affair to a dead stop, and send the unwary rider flying headfirst into a bad wipeout.

    “Bust your buns, now”

    Patti McGee, Life, May 14, 1965

    In fact, there were so many injuries, even a few deaths, from bad skateboard crashes that there was a big backlash against skateboarding by late 1965, so the rider in Steve’s video is a little more daring than may be readily apparent.

    Quarterly Skateboarder in 1965, “The sport is being molded and we believe that doing the right thing now will lead to a bright future for the sport. Already there are storm clouds on the horizon with opponents of the sport talking about ban and restriction.”

    Safety was the issue. Some manufacturers were using wheels made out of clay, which was actually a compressed mixture of paper, plastic, and finely ground walnut shells. Clay wheels were cheaper to make, but they wore out easily. Worn-out clay wheels and dented steel wheels made falls very likely for all but the most experienced riders. As more people, especially younger kids, took up skateboarding, injuries became much more common and severe.

    By the fall of 1965, parents and medical professionals were pressuring shops to stop selling skateboards. After several head injuries lead to deaths, many cities across America banned skateboarding altogether. Almost overnight, the popularity of skateboarding evaporated. Skate shops closed, other stores stopped carrying skateboards, Christmas orders were canceled, and manufacturers went out of business. The Quarterly Skateboarder stopped publication. Skateboarding as a sport entered what was to be first of several slumps during its history.

    Skateboarding, Lizabeth Craig

    I don’t know if it was the wheels as much as it was reckless riders inspired by bad examples in the mass media.

    Epilogue: I was sitting at a stoplight near campus riding a friend’s Honda Cub that spring in 1965 when a beautiful, leggy co-ed in short shorts pulled up next to me on a Triumph 650. We looked at each other. The light changed, and she twirled the wick and roared off, leaving me eating her, you know, dust.

    Not long after that, I hung up my skateboard, borrowed $800, and bought a brand new black & silver 1965 Honda CL72, the famous Scrambler, which was not only much, much safer than any skateboard, but also had room on the saddle for a co-ed.

  93. @Corvinus

    Immigrants and colonists are not the same — conflating two distinct terms is simply wrong, but not surprising. The United States was founded by descendants of various colonists — calling the Plymouth or Jamestown settlers, or the Scotch-Irish setting Appalachia, ‘immigrants’ is sheer nonsense. If fact, anyone settling a new land is a pioneer or colonist, and much much different than anyone immigrating into an existing country.

    Perhaps unlike many isteve commenters, I don’t really care much about any genetic dilution of founding stock — I’m not fully white myself — I’m merely stating a historic fact: most of the American population increase in the 19th Century and up to mid 20th Century was due to American births, and not to immigrant parents. Stressing Ellis Island and ‘nation of immigrants’ over and over again won’t change the fact that there were plenty of white protestant rural women popping out tons of kids.
    The average American woman had 7 children in 1800, although this dropped to about 4 by 1900. Densely populated immigrant rich cities in the Northeast don’t change this fact at all, and there were plenty of states — especially in the American South — with little or no foreign born population in the 19th Century to mid 20th Century, but saw large demographic increases anyway, even with slavery and the Civil War.

    Note I’m not discounting the achievements of individual immigrants, or suggesting immigrants did not help America grow faster and be even more successful. They absolutely did. But immigrants as a group have always had a supporting actor role in American history, with the lead role always being the existing American people. The fact that this sentence would be heresy, or a hate crime, to many people is the result of relentless pro-immigrant propaganda, not some factual error.

    Regarding returning immigrants, about half of Italian immigrants returned to Italy. I think most immigrants from the British Isles and Canada stayed, which is a logical outcome during a time when there was no government assistance for immigrants, and Americans felt no need to assimilate to the immigrants, which is common now.

    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @Corvinus
  94. @Corvinus

    Who is this “us”?

    Dick Heller, for one. Otis McDonald.

    You keep suggesting newcomers agree to play by our rules, then question whether there is an “our” on which those rules are based. That’s dishonest.

    The Bill of Rights is the work of the powdered slaveholders of 230 years ago. Of a limited range of heritage. If these rights are so universal, why aren’t they more, well, universal? The multiculturalists have a point.

    But it weakens, not strengthens, their case for immigration.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  95. Corvinus says:
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    “Immigrants and colonists are not the same — conflating two distinct terms is simply wrong, but not surprising. ”

    That would be a strawman on your part–I never directly nor indirectly made that argument. The Thirteen Colonies were founded by settlers and colonists who emigrated for a host of reasons. By 1700, those areas were established–Europeans who had come here had blended their cultures and ideas through intermarriage to form a distinct brand–American. The Thirteen Colonies was now a “recipient society”. Newcomers arrived to established areas while forging ahead to create “new” societies. Then, we experienced two waves of immigrants, one in the 1850’s and one in the 1880’s–by which these groups had children–lots and lots of children, especially Catholic Irish and Italian families. And, with immigrants, they had a major role in forging our nation’s history.

    That is who we are. We ALL came over from there, where ever that is.

    • Replies: @XYZ (no Mr.)
  96. Corvinus says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Dick Heller, for one. Otis McDonald.”

    That is not “us”, that is more “they”. Again, who is this “us” you refer to?

    “You keep suggesting newcomers agree to play by our rules…”

    They do generally agree to play by these rules, those first being created by the Founding Fathers and given to us to figure out whether those rules should remain or be changed. So, yes, there is an “our”
    component here, as in “our posterity”.

    “The Bill of Rights is the work of the powdered slaveholders of 230 years ago”.

    You mean of learned men, with 25 of the 55 delegates at the Constitutional Convention owning slaves.

    “If these rights are so universal, why aren’t they more, well, universal?”

    Life, liberty, and property are universal rights.

  97. @Corvinus

    ‘We all came over from there’ is absolutely not remotely the equivalence of we are a ‘nation of immigrants’. Because we are not. As stated, lots of groups have moved around in history and have not been immigrants, and the founders of the United States were not immigrants. High birthrates are not in the least bit limited to immigrants or Catholics, especially in an agricultural to developing country in an age prior to widespread birth control — which was the United States up until the early 20th Century. Catholics families in America were certainly not any larger than protestant farm families, to assume otherwise is simply ignorance of actual historical demographics. The United States had tremendous natural population growth in the 19th and early 20th Centuries, much larger than any immigrant driven population growth (including the American kids of those immigrants as immigration growth). And lots of immigrants — mainly single men — returned to their homelands. The facts are that immigration did make America grow faster, but America would have grown rapidly in population and industrial advancement anyway.

    • Replies: @Corvinus
  98. Corvinus says:
    @XYZ (no Mr.)

    “‘We all came over from there’ is absolutely not remotely the equivalence of we are a ‘nation of immigrants’. Because we are not.”

    Of course it is. “Coming over from there” in the context of this conversation refers to people arriving from one place to live permanently in another place.

    “As stated, lots of groups have moved around in history and have not been immigrants, and the founders of the United States were not immigrants.”

    That is a strawman on your part. I never directly nor indirectly stated otherwise.

    “High birthrates are not in the least bit limited to immigrants or Catholics, especially in an agricultural to developing country in an age prior to widespread birth control — which was the United States up until the early 20th Century.”

    I never made that claim.

    “Catholics families in America were certainly not any larger than protestant farm families, to assume otherwise is simply ignorance of actual historical demographics.”

    Again, I never made that claim.

    “The United States had tremendous natural population growth in the 19th and early 20th Centuries, much larger than any immigrant driven population growth (including the American kids of those immigrants as immigration growth).”

    The United States had tremendous natural population growth combined with a significant immigrant driven population growth, as evident by the census link I provided. Millions of those immigrants who came over here from there married and had children, lots of children. It’s who we are.

    “And lots of immigrants — mainly single men — returned to their homelands.”

    I never disputed that point.

    “The facts are that immigration did make America grow faster, but America would have grown rapidly in population and industrial advancement anyway.”

    The immigrants who worked in the factories and plants played an integral role in that industrial advancement in the late 1800’s.

    As population expert Francis A. Walker noted in a famous essay published in 1891, this very high native birthrate dropped subsequent to the upward turn of immigration after 1830 and the even sharper increase of immigration after 1840. The reason, Walker argued, was that immigrants lowered living standards, wage levels, and working conditions, which resulted in reduced prospects for the native population, which made having large families for natives less attractive. Immigration thus caused a drop in the native birthrate, replacing those lost native births with immigrants.

  99. Paleoconn says:
    @istevefan

    I intend to pour a glass of fine scotch over the graves of each of those men. After having drunk said libation, that is.

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