The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
The Way We Feelz Now
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Screenshot 2017-04-10 18.20.05

 
Hide 30 CommentsLeave a Comment
30 Comments to "The Way We Feelz Now"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. Pat Casey says:

    I find so many comments unworthy of remark that I forget what a struggle my people faced……

    Read More
    • Replies: @Taco
    I mean, your people faced a struggle because my people didn't want violent sociopaths and their descendants in our country, but you sure proved us wrong, right? I mean it's not like you've ever killed anyone, right?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/the-way-we-feelz-now/#comment-1832532
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. This NYT article seems quite reasonable.

    While I never saw the specific movie referenced and can’t speak directly to that. I had a similar experience: I raised a step daughter as a real full time parent. I took her to see a Disney movie, Tangled, 1-on-1 with my step daughter. The movie featured an evil stepmother and idealized bio parents and really did paint absentee biological parents as saintly and active step parents as sinister. It made me feel bad and that’s a reasonable reaction. That Disney movie is an authoritative piece of pop culture. I’m not going to stage a protest, it’s not the biggest problem in the world, but I felt bad about it, and that emotional response is justified. Our cultural movies should celebrate loving adopted/step parents more than absentee biological parents.

    Read More
    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @ziel
    Okay, but wouldn't another reaction be "Thank God I have a loving step father to help raise me and I don't have to worry about my real father coming to rescue me because I know who he is and he's a worthless...".

    Mary Poppins, for example, demonized fathers who work all day for unappreciative companies and who have to miss a good deal of their childrens' big days. While I thought it was silly, I figured my kids would understand. Sure enough, my youngest daughter spouted off one day how she hates it on tv shows when the father is vilified for not going to the kid's recital: "Uh, sorry, but I have to WORK!"
    , @inertial
    Oh boy, Tangled. Good movie but full of toxic tropes that make my teeth ache (I am a father of a girl.)

    Your mom makes you do chores and doesn't give you as much freedom as you think you deserve? Run away from her! She is probably not your real mom anyway.

    Do fall in love with the first man who smiles at you. But certainly not if he is something boring, like a plumber or an accountant. It's far more exciting if he is, let's say, a thief. Who just broke into your home. Because everyone knows that random thieves you meet on the street (or in your own bedroom) are really nice guys with the heart of gold.

    While running away with you lovable criminal you must hide from police. On the other hand, you are perfectly safe going in the midst of the worst lowlifes of the realm. They are only a bunch of wacky misunderstood misfits; there is nothing dangerous about them for a young girl. You see, they all have a dream! And it's never a dream about something like, for instance, rape or murder. No, it's always something cute like becoming a mime.

    Okay, I'll shut up.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Eh. Something has to bring them back to reality after Harry Potter.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  4. O'Really says:

    “Colored people don’t like Little Black Sambo. Burn it. White people don’t feel good about Uncle Tom’s Cabin. Burn it. Someone’s written a book on tobacco and cancer of the lungs? The cigarette people are weeping? Burn the book. Serenity Montag. Peace Montag.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  5. And, in normal America, a number of people were offended by the gay crap they dribbled into the wholly unnecessary remake of “Beauty and the Beast”. We were told to deal with it. They should go and do likewise …

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sammler
    You are not The Who. You are the Whom.
    , @Stan Adams
    The '91 cartoon was more than a little gay itself ... it was soaked in the early-'90s AIDS-angst that so many fruity Disney songwriter types were dealing with at the time:
    http://articles.latimes.com/1992-03-22/entertainment/ca-7396_1_aids-metaphor

    The Beast is--just in case you've been in Frontierland and haven't heard the story yet--a prince who has a limited amount of time (the life span of a single flower) to find true love and break the spell that's made him into a gruesome monster. He's cast out by society, even tracked down and attacked by an angry mob, and his only companions are also under the same spell. He's so desperate to break the spell, to rescue himself and his friends, that he can't control his temper--he smashes things, frightens people--and winds up even harder to love. He can't help himself.

    You really feel for the guy. He reminds you of the hopeless klutz you were the first time you fell in love, always saying the wrong things, stepping on toes, trampling the flowers. And he reminded me of somebody else, somebody I've seen over and over as I've covered the news in the last decade: a Person With AIDS.

    The more I think about it, the more sense it makes. Think of the spell as AIDS, with the same arbitrary and harshly abbreviated limitations on time, and you feel the Beast's loneliness and desperation a little more deeply. He's just a guy trying as hard as he can to find a little meaning--a little love, a little beauty-- while he's still got a little life left....

    The folks at Disney tell me that "Beauty and the Beast" was well under way before lyricist and executive producer Howard Ashman tested HIV positive, and long before Ashman died of AIDS. They say this isn't autobiographical. Instead, it's a part of Ashman's living legacy--one that also includes wonderful words in shows like "The Little Mermaid" and "Little Shop of Horrors," and some of the lyrics in the forthcoming "Aladdin."

    But think what that legacy means if my interpretation is valid.

    Susan Sontag has said that every society picks an illness and assigns it meaning--people force diseases to say something about themselves. "Illness as Metaphor" is the title of her book, and it's a tidy phrase, too. In the 19th Century, we were obsessed by tuberculosis (think of Greta Garbo in "Camille"), and for most of the 20th Century, we were fascinated by cancer (think of Ali MacGraw in "Love Story"). So far, there hasn't been a drama about AIDS with that kind of mainstream success.
     

    (Philadelphia was released in late 1993, about two years after BatB. Incidentally, I know a few gay guys who hated that movie - their straightdar kept blaring every time Tom Hanks' face appeared on screen.)

    The character design for Gaston was based on a Tom of Finland cartoon.

    (Tom of Finland was a creepy-looking Finnish guy who drew a bunch of pictures of leather-clad - if clad at all - musclemen, seamen, policemen, and Nazi SS troopers with very large ... anatomical features. Few, if any, of his drawings are SFW; all are flaming.)

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. But there’s no escaping the fact that rooted in our culture’s literary DNA is a proclivity for treating the disrupted family unit as a conveniently poignant narrative device. The parentless child — one whose mother or father has been killed, kidnapped, lost or just left — is a mainstay of our fiction. Evil stepmothers predate the Grimms. Fagin was a truly bad surrogate father. Tarzan probably got the best of it, being raised by apes.

    Nothing against adopting and fostering children, but it’s as if a millenia of folk wisdom through storytelling intuited that close kin is central to what makes us human, and can’t easily be shaken by what a given society includes under the definition of family. But children are very resilient, and articles like this go deeper than approaching adoption or foster care sensitively. This is about anger that the modern leftist belief that a family can be anything “as long as there is love” isn’t shared by everyone.

    On an interesting note, he’s somewhat wrong about evil stepmothers predating the Grimms. It’s not that common. The stepmothers from the Grimms’ ethnography of folktales were actually evil biological mothers, but the Grimms found that idea too cruel to bear in their adaptations.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The Orphan of Destiny goes way back: Moses, Oedipus, etc.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  7. @AnotherGuessModel
    But there’s no escaping the fact that rooted in our culture’s literary DNA is a proclivity for treating the disrupted family unit as a conveniently poignant narrative device. The parentless child — one whose mother or father has been killed, kidnapped, lost or just left — is a mainstay of our fiction. Evil stepmothers predate the Grimms. Fagin was a truly bad surrogate father. Tarzan probably got the best of it, being raised by apes.

    Nothing against adopting and fostering children, but it's as if a millenia of folk wisdom through storytelling intuited that close kin is central to what makes us human, and can't easily be shaken by what a given society includes under the definition of family. But children are very resilient, and articles like this go deeper than approaching adoption or foster care sensitively. This is about anger that the modern leftist belief that a family can be anything "as long as there is love" isn't shared by everyone.

    On an interesting note, he's somewhat wrong about evil stepmothers predating the Grimms. It's not that common. The stepmothers from the Grimms' ethnography of folktales were actually evil biological mothers, but the Grimms found that idea too cruel to bear in their adaptations.

    The Orphan of Destiny goes way back: Moses, Oedipus, etc.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. ziel says:
    @Massimo Heitor
    This NYT article seems quite reasonable.

    While I never saw the specific movie referenced and can't speak directly to that. I had a similar experience: I raised a step daughter as a real full time parent. I took her to see a Disney movie, Tangled, 1-on-1 with my step daughter. The movie featured an evil stepmother and idealized bio parents and really did paint absentee biological parents as saintly and active step parents as sinister. It made me feel bad and that's a reasonable reaction. That Disney movie is an authoritative piece of pop culture. I'm not going to stage a protest, it's not the biggest problem in the world, but I felt bad about it, and that emotional response is justified. Our cultural movies should celebrate loving adopted/step parents more than absentee biological parents.

    Okay, but wouldn’t another reaction be “Thank God I have a loving step father to help raise me and I don’t have to worry about my real father coming to rescue me because I know who he is and he’s a worthless…”.

    Mary Poppins, for example, demonized fathers who work all day for unappreciative companies and who have to miss a good deal of their childrens’ big days. While I thought it was silly, I figured my kids would understand. Sure enough, my youngest daughter spouted off one day how she hates it on tv shows when the father is vilified for not going to the kid’s recital: “Uh, sorry, but I have to WORK!”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. jJay says:

    I watched Boss Baby this weekend with my wife, 9 yo boy, and his pal. Here’s my movie review: Mom and I liked it but the boys not so much. (I’m not quite ready to write a Sailer-level movie review.)

    In the movie, all kids are adopted. That is, they are made in a factory on an assembly line. Shouldn’t the unadopted kids be offended by that instead?

    Why didn’t the boys like it? I don’t know but I’ll guess it was a little heavy on low-brow (and some mid-brow) adult humor and a little light on fart jokes.

    We stayed to watch the credits, incidentally. I was struck by how few animators there were. A lot of the animation in this movie is just fantastic in and of itself. A few years ago the animation credits went for a thousand or so names to get the same impact. Boss Baby only had about 100 or so animators in the credits.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  10. Okay, but wouldn’t another reaction be “Thank God I have a loving step father to help raise me and I don’t have to worry about my real father coming to rescue me because I know who he is and he’s a worthless…”.

    That’s a reaction some kids with step/adopted parents have. But the movie Tangled doesn’t encourage that at all. A movie that does paint a well intentioned step father as a good guy is “Are We There Yet” staring Ice Cube, which is a dumb movie to any adult, but it does paint he step dad as a hero, which is admirable.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thea
    Tangled has many issues but there are lots of step parent movies & TV shows that portray them Favorably.

    I used to wish I had step siblings because it looked fun.

    But romantic portrayals of family break up aren't good for society and children remain safest with two married bio parents.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. inertial says:
    @Massimo Heitor
    This NYT article seems quite reasonable.

    While I never saw the specific movie referenced and can't speak directly to that. I had a similar experience: I raised a step daughter as a real full time parent. I took her to see a Disney movie, Tangled, 1-on-1 with my step daughter. The movie featured an evil stepmother and idealized bio parents and really did paint absentee biological parents as saintly and active step parents as sinister. It made me feel bad and that's a reasonable reaction. That Disney movie is an authoritative piece of pop culture. I'm not going to stage a protest, it's not the biggest problem in the world, but I felt bad about it, and that emotional response is justified. Our cultural movies should celebrate loving adopted/step parents more than absentee biological parents.

    Oh boy, Tangled. Good movie but full of toxic tropes that make my teeth ache (I am a father of a girl.)

    Your mom makes you do chores and doesn’t give you as much freedom as you think you deserve? Run away from her! She is probably not your real mom anyway.

    Do fall in love with the first man who smiles at you. But certainly not if he is something boring, like a plumber or an accountant. It’s far more exciting if he is, let’s say, a thief. Who just broke into your home. Because everyone knows that random thieves you meet on the street (or in your own bedroom) are really nice guys with the heart of gold.

    While running away with you lovable criminal you must hide from police. On the other hand, you are perfectly safe going in the midst of the worst lowlifes of the realm. They are only a bunch of wacky misunderstood misfits; there is nothing dangerous about them for a young girl. You see, they all have a dream! And it’s never a dream about something like, for instance, rape or murder. No, it’s always something cute like becoming a mime.

    Okay, I’ll shut up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    Speaking as the father of a girl myself, I'm glad you didn't shut up. That was good.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. kihowi says:

    It comes down to this: your own parents are better. Anybody else, no matter how well meaning, will at the very least lack the behavioral subtleties dictated by genetics. The evil step mom trope exists for a reason.

    You can consult any society that has moved beyond showering with cow piss and they’d tell you the same, but the more white people describe themselves as cosmopolitan, the less they know about what the rest of the world thinks about anything. That’s how you get the NYT.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  13. Taco says:
    @Pat Casey
    I find so many comments unworthy of remark that I forget what a struggle my people faced......

    I mean, your people faced a struggle because my people didn’t want violent sociopaths and their descendants in our country, but you sure proved us wrong, right? I mean it’s not like you’ve ever killed anyone, right?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. BB753 says:

    Children’s films are written by the usual suspects. SJW’s and most of the time people who have no practical knowledge of how to raise kids. As such, animated films are to be avoided by responsible parents. Hollywood drivel. Save the money and take your kids to the park.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  15. WGG says:

    I think the bigger story is that Boss Baby is a “runaway hit.” Good Lord. It shows that people are desperate for something safe to watch (safe from Poz and P.C.) and that even the most vegged out normies agree that Hollywood stopped producing anything worthwhile some time ago. I used to see upcoming previews and have some glimmer of imterest. Now it feels like I am perusing the Bollywood section of my local bodega- I have no interest whatsoever.

    Hollywood studios are now primarily in the money laundering business. In the past, that was secondary. A.G. Sessions: help us out.

    Read More
    • Agree: Triumph104
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's a movie about sibling rivalry, which is a Real Thing.

    The single best known example of brothers using rationality to avoid sibling rivalry since the Smith Brothers got into the cough drop business together are the Coen Brothers. Before the Coens, brothers didn't work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.

    By the way, the Belgian Dardennes Brothers started making movies together before the Coen Brothers. They had similar educational backgrounds: philosophy and drama/filmmaking majors in college. But the Dardennes didn't become internationally famous until a decade or so after the Coens. Perhaps that's just due to the Dardennes being born into a small country. I don't know.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardenne_brothers

    It's a pretty interesting topic: where did all these frauteurs comes from?

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. @WGG
    I think the bigger story is that Boss Baby is a "runaway hit." Good Lord. It shows that people are desperate for something safe to watch (safe from Poz and P.C.) and that even the most vegged out normies agree that Hollywood stopped producing anything worthwhile some time ago. I used to see upcoming previews and have some glimmer of imterest. Now it feels like I am perusing the Bollywood section of my local bodega- I have no interest whatsoever.

    Hollywood studios are now primarily in the money laundering business. In the past, that was secondary. A.G. Sessions: help us out.

    It’s a movie about sibling rivalry, which is a Real Thing.

    The single best known example of brothers using rationality to avoid sibling rivalry since the Smith Brothers got into the cough drop business together are the Coen Brothers. Before the Coens, brothers didn’t work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.

    By the way, the Belgian Dardennes Brothers started making movies together before the Coen Brothers. They had similar educational backgrounds: philosophy and drama/filmmaking majors in college. But the Dardennes didn’t become internationally famous until a decade or so after the Coens. Perhaps that’s just due to the Dardennes being born into a small country. I don’t know.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardenne_brothers

    It’s a pretty interesting topic: where did all these frauteurs comes from?

    Read More
    • Replies: @slumber_j

    Before the Coens, brothers didn’t work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.
     
    Warner Bros.?
    , @Yngvar
    Jerry and David Zucker? (Airplane!, 1980)
    , @Laugh Track

    The single best known example of brothers using rationality to avoid sibling rivalry since the Smith Brothers got into the cough drop business together are the Coen Brothers. Before the Coens, brothers didn’t work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.
     
    e.g., the Wachowskis

    Hmm...
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. Thea says:
    @Massimo Heitor

    Okay, but wouldn’t another reaction be “Thank God I have a loving step father to help raise me and I don’t have to worry about my real father coming to rescue me because I know who he is and he’s a worthless…”.
     
    That's a reaction some kids with step/adopted parents have. But the movie Tangled doesn't encourage that at all. A movie that does paint a well intentioned step father as a good guy is "Are We There Yet" staring Ice Cube, which is a dumb movie to any adult, but it does paint he step dad as a hero, which is admirable.

    Tangled has many issues but there are lots of step parent movies & TV shows that portray them Favorably.

    I used to wish I had step siblings because it looked fun.

    But romantic portrayals of family break up aren’t good for society and children remain safest with two married bio parents.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor

    But romantic portrayals of family break up aren’t good for society and children remain safest with two married bio parents.
     
    A two married bio parent situation is ideal for children.

    But a step parent who chooses to provide a more stable home for a child who would never have married bio parents is a positive act of charity.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  18. Leander says:

    FWIW, my kids are adopted, the younger one (10) went to see this, and he liked it.

    So, based on this sample of one, the movie is fine for adopted kids.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  19. Sammler says: • Website
    @The Only Catholic Unionist
    And, in normal America, a number of people were offended by the gay crap they dribbled into the wholly unnecessary remake of "Beauty and the Beast". We were told to deal with it. They should go and do likewise ...

    You are not The Who. You are the Whom.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. slumber_j says:
    @Steve Sailer
    It's a movie about sibling rivalry, which is a Real Thing.

    The single best known example of brothers using rationality to avoid sibling rivalry since the Smith Brothers got into the cough drop business together are the Coen Brothers. Before the Coens, brothers didn't work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.

    By the way, the Belgian Dardennes Brothers started making movies together before the Coen Brothers. They had similar educational backgrounds: philosophy and drama/filmmaking majors in college. But the Dardennes didn't become internationally famous until a decade or so after the Coens. Perhaps that's just due to the Dardennes being born into a small country. I don't know.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardenne_brothers

    It's a pretty interesting topic: where did all these frauteurs comes from?

    Before the Coens, brothers didn’t work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.

    Warner Bros.?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. @inertial
    Oh boy, Tangled. Good movie but full of toxic tropes that make my teeth ache (I am a father of a girl.)

    Your mom makes you do chores and doesn't give you as much freedom as you think you deserve? Run away from her! She is probably not your real mom anyway.

    Do fall in love with the first man who smiles at you. But certainly not if he is something boring, like a plumber or an accountant. It's far more exciting if he is, let's say, a thief. Who just broke into your home. Because everyone knows that random thieves you meet on the street (or in your own bedroom) are really nice guys with the heart of gold.

    While running away with you lovable criminal you must hide from police. On the other hand, you are perfectly safe going in the midst of the worst lowlifes of the realm. They are only a bunch of wacky misunderstood misfits; there is nothing dangerous about them for a young girl. You see, they all have a dream! And it's never a dream about something like, for instance, rape or murder. No, it's always something cute like becoming a mime.

    Okay, I'll shut up.

    Speaking as the father of a girl myself, I’m glad you didn’t shut up. That was good.

    Read More
    • Agree: ic1000
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. @Thea
    Tangled has many issues but there are lots of step parent movies & TV shows that portray them Favorably.

    I used to wish I had step siblings because it looked fun.

    But romantic portrayals of family break up aren't good for society and children remain safest with two married bio parents.

    But romantic portrayals of family break up aren’t good for society and children remain safest with two married bio parents.

    A two married bio parent situation is ideal for children.

    But a step parent who chooses to provide a more stable home for a child who would never have married bio parents is a positive act of charity.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  23. Yngvar says:
    @Steve Sailer
    It's a movie about sibling rivalry, which is a Real Thing.

    The single best known example of brothers using rationality to avoid sibling rivalry since the Smith Brothers got into the cough drop business together are the Coen Brothers. Before the Coens, brothers didn't work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.

    By the way, the Belgian Dardennes Brothers started making movies together before the Coen Brothers. They had similar educational backgrounds: philosophy and drama/filmmaking majors in college. But the Dardennes didn't become internationally famous until a decade or so after the Coens. Perhaps that's just due to the Dardennes being born into a small country. I don't know.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardenne_brothers

    It's a pretty interesting topic: where did all these frauteurs comes from?

    Jerry and David Zucker? (Airplane!, 1980)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. I don’t quite understand the issue here. I never internalized any messages from Disney animation from the 1960′s forward, and I was an adoptee. Did I miss my cue?

    Reality is where the complexities of being an adoptee arise. And they do arise, in my view.

    And I like Tangled, it’s my favorite Disney movie (and contains one of my favorite duets.)

    If your kid is learning too much from pop culture (toxic), maybe you need to crowd it out more with parent-kid discussion.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  25. @The Only Catholic Unionist
    And, in normal America, a number of people were offended by the gay crap they dribbled into the wholly unnecessary remake of "Beauty and the Beast". We were told to deal with it. They should go and do likewise ...

    The ’91 cartoon was more than a little gay itself … it was soaked in the early-’90s AIDS-angst that so many fruity Disney songwriter types were dealing with at the time:

    http://articles.latimes.com/1992-03-22/entertainment/ca-7396_1_aids-metaphor

    The Beast is–just in case you’ve been in Frontierland and haven’t heard the story yet–a prince who has a limited amount of time (the life span of a single flower) to find true love and break the spell that’s made him into a gruesome monster. He’s cast out by society, even tracked down and attacked by an angry mob, and his only companions are also under the same spell. He’s so desperate to break the spell, to rescue himself and his friends, that he can’t control his temper–he smashes things, frightens people–and winds up even harder to love. He can’t help himself.

    You really feel for the guy. He reminds you of the hopeless klutz you were the first time you fell in love, always saying the wrong things, stepping on toes, trampling the flowers. And he reminded me of somebody else, somebody I’ve seen over and over as I’ve covered the news in the last decade: a Person With AIDS.

    The more I think about it, the more sense it makes. Think of the spell as AIDS, with the same arbitrary and harshly abbreviated limitations on time, and you feel the Beast’s loneliness and desperation a little more deeply. He’s just a guy trying as hard as he can to find a little meaning–a little love, a little beauty– while he’s still got a little life left….

    The folks at Disney tell me that “Beauty and the Beast” was well under way before lyricist and executive producer Howard Ashman tested HIV positive, and long before Ashman died of AIDS. They say this isn’t autobiographical. Instead, it’s a part of Ashman’s living legacy–one that also includes wonderful words in shows like “The Little Mermaid” and “Little Shop of Horrors,” and some of the lyrics in the forthcoming “Aladdin.”

    But think what that legacy means if my interpretation is valid.

    Susan Sontag has said that every society picks an illness and assigns it meaning–people force diseases to say something about themselves. “Illness as Metaphor” is the title of her book, and it’s a tidy phrase, too. In the 19th Century, we were obsessed by tuberculosis (think of Greta Garbo in “Camille”), and for most of the 20th Century, we were fascinated by cancer (think of Ali MacGraw in “Love Story”). So far, there hasn’t been a drama about AIDS with that kind of mainstream success.

    (Philadelphia was released in late 1993, about two years after BatB. Incidentally, I know a few gay guys who hated that movie – their straightdar kept blaring every time Tom Hanks’ face appeared on screen.)

    The character design for Gaston was based on a Tom of Finland cartoon.

    (Tom of Finland was a creepy-looking Finnish guy who drew a bunch of pictures of leather-clad – if clad at all – musclemen, seamen, policemen, and Nazi SS troopers with very large … anatomical features. Few, if any, of his drawings are SFW; all are flaming.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    Just goes to show that Disney hasn't been family-friendly for at least 40 years.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. @Steve Sailer
    It's a movie about sibling rivalry, which is a Real Thing.

    The single best known example of brothers using rationality to avoid sibling rivalry since the Smith Brothers got into the cough drop business together are the Coen Brothers. Before the Coens, brothers didn't work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.

    By the way, the Belgian Dardennes Brothers started making movies together before the Coen Brothers. They had similar educational backgrounds: philosophy and drama/filmmaking majors in college. But the Dardennes didn't become internationally famous until a decade or so after the Coens. Perhaps that's just due to the Dardennes being born into a small country. I don't know.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dardenne_brothers

    It's a pretty interesting topic: where did all these frauteurs comes from?

    The single best known example of brothers using rationality to avoid sibling rivalry since the Smith Brothers got into the cough drop business together are the Coen Brothers. Before the Coens, brothers didn’t work together in the movie business. Since the Coens, they have.

    e.g., the Wachowskis

    Hmm…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  27. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    A lot of step-mothers are evil though. The stereotype is justified. I don’t know the reason for it. It’s probably the dark side of a mother’s nurturing instinct. Women have a powerful instinctive urge to protect and nourish their children, which is rightly praised and honored. But they probably also have a powerful instinctive urge to drive out “cuckoo” children who divert food, warmth and affection away from their children.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  28. BB753 says:
    @Stan Adams
    The '91 cartoon was more than a little gay itself ... it was soaked in the early-'90s AIDS-angst that so many fruity Disney songwriter types were dealing with at the time:
    http://articles.latimes.com/1992-03-22/entertainment/ca-7396_1_aids-metaphor

    The Beast is--just in case you've been in Frontierland and haven't heard the story yet--a prince who has a limited amount of time (the life span of a single flower) to find true love and break the spell that's made him into a gruesome monster. He's cast out by society, even tracked down and attacked by an angry mob, and his only companions are also under the same spell. He's so desperate to break the spell, to rescue himself and his friends, that he can't control his temper--he smashes things, frightens people--and winds up even harder to love. He can't help himself.

    You really feel for the guy. He reminds you of the hopeless klutz you were the first time you fell in love, always saying the wrong things, stepping on toes, trampling the flowers. And he reminded me of somebody else, somebody I've seen over and over as I've covered the news in the last decade: a Person With AIDS.

    The more I think about it, the more sense it makes. Think of the spell as AIDS, with the same arbitrary and harshly abbreviated limitations on time, and you feel the Beast's loneliness and desperation a little more deeply. He's just a guy trying as hard as he can to find a little meaning--a little love, a little beauty-- while he's still got a little life left....

    The folks at Disney tell me that "Beauty and the Beast" was well under way before lyricist and executive producer Howard Ashman tested HIV positive, and long before Ashman died of AIDS. They say this isn't autobiographical. Instead, it's a part of Ashman's living legacy--one that also includes wonderful words in shows like "The Little Mermaid" and "Little Shop of Horrors," and some of the lyrics in the forthcoming "Aladdin."

    But think what that legacy means if my interpretation is valid.

    Susan Sontag has said that every society picks an illness and assigns it meaning--people force diseases to say something about themselves. "Illness as Metaphor" is the title of her book, and it's a tidy phrase, too. In the 19th Century, we were obsessed by tuberculosis (think of Greta Garbo in "Camille"), and for most of the 20th Century, we were fascinated by cancer (think of Ali MacGraw in "Love Story"). So far, there hasn't been a drama about AIDS with that kind of mainstream success.
     

    (Philadelphia was released in late 1993, about two years after BatB. Incidentally, I know a few gay guys who hated that movie - their straightdar kept blaring every time Tom Hanks' face appeared on screen.)

    The character design for Gaston was based on a Tom of Finland cartoon.

    (Tom of Finland was a creepy-looking Finnish guy who drew a bunch of pictures of leather-clad - if clad at all - musclemen, seamen, policemen, and Nazi SS troopers with very large ... anatomical features. Few, if any, of his drawings are SFW; all are flaming.)

    Just goes to show that Disney hasn’t been family-friendly for at least 40 years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    Supposedly Walt once took his employees to a weekend retreat and it devolved into an orgy. Walt and his wife were so appalled that they left. He never spoke of it again.

    There's a nude "Easter egg" in The Rescuers, no doubt added by a bored (and horny animator).
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. @BB753
    Just goes to show that Disney hasn't been family-friendly for at least 40 years.

    Supposedly Walt once took his employees to a weekend retreat and it devolved into an orgy. Walt and his wife were so appalled that they left. He never spoke of it again.

    There’s a nude “Easter egg” in The Rescuers, no doubt added by a bored (and horny animator).

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    Swinger's orgies, provided husband and wife attend, can be family - friendly in a way.
    My point was, 40 or 45 years ago Disney scripts turned openly liberal. And now they have gone on full SJW mode. You can also feel that Disney writers hate kids or hated their own childhood. Boys act like girls and vice-versa, while adults are blundering fools.
    To paraphrase John Derbyshire: Walt Disney is filth.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. BB753 says:
    @Stan Adams
    Supposedly Walt once took his employees to a weekend retreat and it devolved into an orgy. Walt and his wife were so appalled that they left. He never spoke of it again.

    There's a nude "Easter egg" in The Rescuers, no doubt added by a bored (and horny animator).

    Swinger’s orgies, provided husband and wife attend, can be family – friendly in a way.
    My point was, 40 or 45 years ago Disney scripts turned openly liberal. And now they have gone on full SJW mode. You can also feel that Disney writers hate kids or hated their own childhood. Boys act like girls and vice-versa, while adults are blundering fools.
    To paraphrase John Derbyshire: Walt Disney is filth.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The unspoken statistical reality of urban crime over the last quarter century.
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?