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As I pointed out in my Taki’s Magazine review of the Oscar frontrunner, La La Land:

Demographically, [Damien] Chazelle’s fantasy Los Angeles is much like Woody Allen’s New York or Paris: no Mexicans, Koreans, Persians, or Russians, just good-looking white Americans and dignified old black jazz musicians. To a semi-French artist like Chazelle, America will always be culturally white and black, and the post-1965 newcomers don’t much matter.

From Paste:

The Unbearable Whiteness of La La Land
What does Damien Chazelle hope we see when we look back?

By Geoff Nelson | January 6, 2017 | 4:30pm

By the way, here’s a list of article titles featuring the “unbearable whiteness” cliche / racial slur I found earlier this year. My favorite was “The Unbearable Whiteness of Milk: Food Oppression and …

… The film has been hailed by critics and fans alike as a piece of popular art in which to rest for a moment at the close of a punishing year. It’s escapism. However, the politics of the past do not satisfy universally. A McClatchy poll on the eve of the election found 56 percent of America’s white population believed life was better in the 1950s, and, according to the same poll, 72 percent of likely Trump voters agreed. Meanwhile, 62 percent of black voters thought contemporary life was better. The 2016 election wasn’t a chasm into which the nation fell, it was a time machine into which many white Americans hoped to escape.

If La La Land holds the power to transport, we might ask where—and importantly when—it takes us. There lies a profound irony in liberal white folks heading to La La Land to repair after a political season overflowing with the nostalgia of white supremacy. (For all its gauzy backwards glancing, Chazelle’s film might be subtitled Make Hollywood Great Again.) If seeing Gosling and Stone tap dance in the Hollywood Hills tickles something deep in some viewers, perhaps it’s worth investigating the roots of that feeling and its supposed universality. Quite simply: The past represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.

Novelist Zadie Smith spoke recently of white nostalgia while receiving the Welt Literature Prize in Berlin. “Meanwhile the dream of time travel—for new presidents, literary journalists, and writers alike—is just that: a dream,” she said. “And one that only makes sense if the rights and privileges you are accorded currently were accorded to you back then, too.”

White fantasies of the past are not innocuous, it turns out; they link to discrete economic and political policy. Even in the platitudinous past tense of “Make America Great Again,” Trump’s red hats told a truth of a kind: Their way forward was back. Smith rejects the image of white, regressive time-space with the succinct, “But neither do I believe in time travel.” How could a person of color long for a past bleaker than the already admittedly bleak present? Many white viewers of La La Land may well consider nostalgic escapism as a horizontal unifier—something with which everyone identifies—but longing for the past is itself a political act.

Through a Los Angeles ruined by modernity, technology and commerce, Mia and Sebastian wander. The latter longs to open a “real” jazz club to save the genre; Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall. Eventually they long for each other, and Chazelle’s camera conspicuously longs for the days of the Hollywood musical. Mia and Sebastian watch Rebel Without a Cause on their first date, only now the generational conflict isn’t between disaffected young people and their conservative parents, it’s between young people and their present. La La Land’s cultural language speaks in the vocabulary of loss. Like Trump voters pining for an idealized, mythic past, La La Land articulates a displaced, if no less powerful, nostalgia.

So where exactly does Chazelle send the viewer? The allusions begin with Rogers and Astaire, whom Chazelle first saw while studying film at Harvard. Of the moment he discovered Rogers and Astaire, he told the New York Times this fall that he felt like he’s “been sleeping on a gold mine.” The Times interview was even aptly titled “‘La La Land’ Makes Musicals Matter Again,” beating the reader about the head with Trump-ish sloganeering.

… When Hollywood did traffic in nostalgia in the first part of the 20th century, it looked, famously, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind being two of the most famous and, to put it extremely mildly, racially problematic films of the era. The racial politics of nostalgia, not unlike America’s racial history, are rarely anything but gnarled. … Chazelle, in returning to the visual aesthetics of Rogers and Astaire, suggests that escapism is instead found in the past.

… As with so much of American cultural history, looking backwards with a romantic eye courts dangerous contemporary politics. What does Chazelle hope we see when we look back? …

Which brings us back to La La Land and its longing. What Gosling’s Seb and Stone’s Mia share is a commitment to the past—a place where, supposedly, dreamers dream their dreams awake. But which dreamers dreaming what dreams? Why do white Americans (in politics and film) often so wistfully return to the era before federally mandated desegregation, voting and civil rights? (Would La La Land ever have been made with two leading actors of color? Obviously not.) The film only functions as an ode to a lost era of white supremacy, and its viewers, consciously or unconsciously, participate in the delusion. The film’s politics of nostalgia and whiteness are inextricable.

La La Land contains other more explicitly problematic politics—in fact, Gosling’s “white jazz savior” narrative has been unpacked well by MTV’s Ira Madison III. John Legend’s Keith is cast as a sell-out to “pure jazz,” which Gosling promises to successfully save by the movie’s end. The movie concludes with Gosling taking over the piano from a black musician: The erasure of black art is complete. Madison documents the opening number, full of the many diverse faces of Los Angeles, only to see the film retrench into the middle-class bourgeois love affair of two white people. That one of them drives a Prius and the other a drop-top convertible seems to be the extent of the film’s commitment to diversity.

…. Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie? Or what of the historical record of housing discrimination, whereby 80 percent of 1940s Los Angeles real estate was off-limits to buyers or renters of color? …

Redlining! Or as it should be called: The Houseocaust.

When Gosling and Stone walk into the stars, and into the past itself, at Griffith Observatory, they traffic in a dangerous political invention. People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.

… La La Land isn’t the escapism America needs right now, it’s a regressive effort at time travel with no sense of shame for America’s many historical sins. Chazelle engages in the most dangerous type of cultural production: to have an audience feel without thinking. In this case that means the past seems like a good enough place to escape our current problems. The film isn’t as far as you might think from the asinine phraseology of “Make America Great Again.”

The word “nostalgia” originates from a merging of the ancient Greek words “nostos” and “algos”—meaning “returning home” and “pain.” Modern application means “nostalgia” translates to home-sickness. Of course, bizarrely enough, the Trump voter and the La La Land viewer, however separate from one another they imagine themselves, often long for a past they never experienced. They feel homesickness for a home in which they never lived.

Part of the artistic satisfaction of La La Land is in its ability to produce the pain of longing. For many white viewers—and voters—the pain reads as pleasure, like a middle-aged person walking the halls of their high school, remembering themselves more grandly than they ever were. While the romanticizing of one’s youth isn’t the purview of one race or another, longing for the historical past has become a dangerous cultural habit for white Americans, and whiteness more globally in the age of Brexit.

For a better hostile review of La La Land that focuses on Damien Chazelle’s personal artistic weaknesses rather than his racial faults, here’s Richard Brody’s in The New Yorker. I think it’s excessively focused on the Chazelle glass being part empty — his ideology of artistic ambition is what has pushed him so far so fast — but there is a danger Chazelle might flame out like M. Night Shyamalan or George Lucas.

By the way, here’s a similar review from a couple of years ago about the unbearable whiteness of Richard Linklater’s Boyhood.

It’s just unforgivable that white guys keep accomplishing stuff. White men should stop so that everybody else won’t have to feel so resentful.

 
• Tags: Unbearable Whiteness 
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  1. I’m trying to think of some other form of literature as boring as all this racially-correct crap. How about the lists of who begat whom in the Old Testament? Same topic, really, I suppose.

  2. Once again, clueless white people fail to recognize what was said in an article due to their white privilege getting in the way. But what else is new?

    Here’s a similar article to this one that morons like you need to read: Nostalgia: a Sport for the Privileged: https://www.facebook.com/notes/racialicious-race-identity-and-pop-culture-in-a-colorstruck-world/nostalgia-a-sport-for-the-privileged/91784832286/

    Grayson Allen is a prime example https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/01/14/grayson-allen-tangles-with-a-louisville-player-and-gets-slapped-in-the-face/?utm_term=.c7fd645b00f1

    Why isn’t he called a thug?

    You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with."

    Rapists all agree that "that bitch" and her not putting out are the problem and needs to be dealt with. That is the logic of violent, envious non-entities like you.
    , @Tim Howells
    Tiny Duck, I have a serious question: Given the pervasiveness of racial privilege and supremacism among White people, and the anger, frustration and resentment this engenders in People of Color, don't you agree that racial separation is the only feasible path forward. Clearly this would benefit both groups. The most strenuous and burdensome social engineering programs have been attempted since at least the Great Society programs initiated by LBJ over 50 years ago, and they have failed miserably. If you're not a separatist, what exactly do you propose?
    , @Daniel Chieh
    Your trolling is improving, well done. You should also link to MillionDollarBonus on ZeroHedge.
    , @Jefferson
    "You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with."

    Do White women need to be dealt with as well? After all 53 percent of them voted for Adolf Hitler on November 8 over the angel who was sent from the Gods, Crooked Cankles.
    , @Eric Novak
    Tiny Duck-Alt Right straw poster keeping the fire stoked among the complacent backsliders still reveling in the Trump victory. Well done! The screen name helps too-it inspires the impulse to stomp on this Tiny Duck with a size 14 Caterpillar work boot, then submit a photo of the mess to the creator of the Roadkill Calendar.
  3. How many times has “the unbearable whiteness of [blank]” been a headline in mainstream journalism? Like a billion?

    Comparing this who’s-it to Shamalamadingdong is hyperbolic, and to Lucas ridiculous. What’s he done? Whiplash, which was a one-trick pony in my opinion. It was a good trick, but J.K. Simmons deserves most of the credit. La-La Land might be the greatest movie ever made, but so far, like that Hamilton! thing I keep hearing about, it has only caught on like wildfire among the elite and certain niche audiences.

    The mass audience is aware of it, and may like it. I don’t know how well it’s doing. But if it were a genuine cultural phenomenon like The Sixth Sense, American Graffiti, or (obviously) Star Wars, I couldn’t help but notice. It would be hammered into my head every day.

    I don’t want to talk him down, because I like when indie films are made for normal people, too. Or when mass audience films are at least middle-brow and not made to appeal only to morons. But let’s not get carried away. Hollywood is bubbled enough as it is.

    • Replies: @anonguy

    How many times has “the unbearable whiteness of [blank]” been a headline in mainstream journalism? Like a billion?
     
    I wonder how many even remember that there is a movie, much less a book as the source for the cliche.

    Or even more improbably, actually read the book and realize that the unbearable to which it refers is a state of grace to be exalted.

    I dunno, I hear they are off deconstructing classics now, which is a good start.
  4. “The Unbearable Whiteness of la la Land”

    The unbearable Blackness of Barack Hussein Obama’s attorney generals (Loretta Lynch and Eric Holder).

    100 percent of all attorney generals have been Black under the Obama administration, even though Blacks make up only 13 percent of The U.S population.

    • Replies: @Warner
    Lynch and Holder

    Holder and Lynch

    Definitely sounds like an edgy sitcom duo. Racial CSI.
    , @bomag

    100 percent of all attorney generals have been Black under the Obama administration, even though Blacks make up only 13 percent of The U.S population.
     
    Instructive; we are told over and over that we need this to counter past slights; but it doesn't help, and things get worse.
  5. Why do white Americans (in politics and film) often so wistfully return to the era before federally mandated desegregation, voting and civil rights?

    This reminds me of the time some BLM guy made what he thought was genius rhetorical question something along the lines of:

    “Why is it throughout history and cultures, the dark skinned are subservient to the light skinned?”

    To pose something as avoidable, unnatural or changeable you first have to provide a counter example. The author of the piece thinks he has refuted the irrationality of whites longing for a time of homogeneity, demographic security (As well as a time when inequality was much lower and prospects for the average person were looking up and increasing) and the absence of haranguing like this when in fact he has just exposed the utter, raw rationality of it.

    Of course, La La Lands appeal could also be assigned to people’s love of the aesthetics and music of the time as well as musicals, but that would just be ignoring the primary elements of the film, what’s important is (nearly) everyone is white. But as Steve notes, they barely put Hispanics into films set in modern day LA, why expect them to do it for one set when there were practically none?

  6. White guys stop doing stuff and in less than a week there will be no food, water, or electricity.

    • Agree: Realist
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "White guys stop doing stuff and in less than a week there will be no food, water, or electricity."

    Indeed. If you want to know what a non-white future will look like, just play 2001: A Space Odyssey backwards.

  7. Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie?

    From the Wikipedia article on the Zoot Suit Riots:

    Within weeks, Detroit was in the midst of the worst race riot in its history in which whites attacked African Americans and destroyed much of their neighborhood.

    Huh, that sounds like about exactly the opposite of what occurred.

    And indeed, compare the “Detroit race riot of 1943″ page today to the same article as it appeared in 2010.

    As events — riots, the space program — pass from the memory of those now living, they’re quickly retconned to serve the narrative. Fake history.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    In 10-15 years it'll be an undisputed fact amongst the fashionable set that O.J. was framed. The most fashion-forward already make that assertion when the topic comes up and their more respectability-craving friends get tickled pink by all the naughty, transgressive things they're hearing, so certain to piss off Racist Uncle in Flyover Country.
    , @Randal

    And indeed, compare the “Detroit race riot of 1943″ page today to the same article as it appeared in 2010.
     
    That's enlightening, thanks. The "new, improved" version reads like a propaganda piece seeking at every opportunity to slant things in a particular direction, whereas the older version reads as much more sticking to the bare facts without engaging in advocacy.

    In truth, the story seems to be one of racial conflict caused by mass immigration and its consequences.
    , @Bill
    I don't know. As long as you know how to read that sort of article, it's still very clear. It has this line:

    At the time, white commissions attributed the riot to black hoodlums.
     
    Sort of like the way that, at the time, white television reporters attributed the post-Katrina unpleasantness in New Orleans to black thugs.
  8. This is the author’s twitter

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Another example of his endless cucking:


    "This is outstanding unpacking of our tragic, schlubby, white, twisted fantasy."


    https://twitter.com/32feet/status/820665969769148417
  9. La La Land is that very rare movie that doesn’t insist white people despise their own unbearableness. Relax, reviewers, 10 more ‘Hidden Figures’ will pop up in its empty slot.

  10. It was the whiteness of the whale that above all things appalled me.

  11. Speaking of the accomplishments of whites it’s as if coloreds ever only focus on race while whites focus on their dreams. Who needs to succeeds when you can cry racism in your chosen field and be lauded and feted as the new Ta Nahesi ah ah Achoo Coates? In the article what comes across more than anything else is the authors loathing of all things caucasoid and the concomitant white genocide.

  12. After seeing the hopelessly sentimental “Whiplash” I have no interest in being subjected to any more of Chazelle’s romantic notions of artistic integrity. Every jazz musician I’ve spoken to about the former has one of two reactions: uncontrollable laughter or dismissive disdain.

    https://www.allaboutjazz.com/whiplash-snidely-damien-chazelle-by-steven-hahn.php

  13. @snorlax

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie?
     
    From the Wikipedia article on the Zoot Suit Riots:

    Within weeks, Detroit was in the midst of the worst race riot in its history in which whites attacked African Americans and destroyed much of their neighborhood.
     
    Huh, that sounds like about exactly the opposite of what occurred.

    And indeed, compare the "Detroit race riot of 1943" page today to the same article as it appeared in 2010.

    As events — riots, the space program — pass from the memory of those now living, they're quickly retconned to serve the narrative. Fake history.

    In 10-15 years it’ll be an undisputed fact amongst the fashionable set that O.J. was framed. The most fashion-forward already make that assertion when the topic comes up and their more respectability-craving friends get tickled pink by all the naughty, transgressive things they’re hearing, so certain to piss off Racist Uncle in Flyover Country.

    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Nah. They'll say he did it but that he was justified given all the microaggressions Nicole committed towards him.

    I have no doubt that, if left unchecked, our legal system will come to allow the murder of whites by blacks for literally any reason.

  14. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    If whiteness is so awful, why don’t non-whites remain in their nations of wonderful non-whiteness? Why do they insist on moving to white nations? Why are they so attracted to and attached to what they cannot bear?

    This is the paradox of PC. On the one hand, whiteness is unbearable, but non-whites must be given the chance to depart from their non-white world and go live with whiteness.
    So, in actual practice, non-whites cannot bear their own kind and wanna live with whites. They bitch and whine that whites are not ‘inclusive’ enough — even though white nations are more ‘inclusive’ than others — , but their entire self-worth depends on whether whites will include them or not. Without white acceptance/approval, they feel without worth. Every non-white immigrant in the West obviously prefers to live with whites than with their own kind. They reject their own kind to move to white nations, but they bitch about whites not being ‘welcoming’ enough. “I don’t want to live with fellow darkies cuz they stink, but why aren’t whites sufficiently welcoming of a darky like me?” Well, maybe for the same reason YOU don’t want live with darkies and left your own ancestral land to live with whites.

    It’s like Hindus. They initially bitched about how SLUMDOG MILLIONAIRE showed too much ugliness and poverty in India. But when the white Academy Awards chose it as Best Picture, the Hindus were ecstatic. Whitey gave the top award to a movie set in our country. Just connect-the-dots.

    PS. When Amelie came out, there was lots of bitchin’ about how it didn’t reflect new Paris with tons of dark folks.

    PSS. L’APPARTEMENT looks great cuz it looks like European France. White, like in YOUNG GIRLS OF ROCHEFORT.
    French should have kept it that way.

  15. Bob Barker reminds you: “have your college leftists spayed or neutered.”

    2nd California Student vows to remove penis if Trump builds wall
    … In a recent Open Borders Friends assembly, Greenberg invited other members to join him in taking a pledge to remove a bodily appendage if Trump strengthens the border wall.
    … “As far as why I am choosing to remove my penis instead of maybe a finger, or a toe, I feel that the penis represents my anger about an oppressive male dominated culture, and I would be fine with not having one.”

    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe
    From the Onion?
  16. Quite simply: The past represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.

    Whereas the future represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another…..

    Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.

    Can’t have that; too hideously White……

    only now the generational conflict isn’t between disaffected young people and their conservative parents, it’s between young people and their present. La La Land’s cultural language speaks in the vocabulary of loss.

    Yeah, I mean come on, using art to express a sense of loss….Talk about an alien concept:

    “By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

    2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

    3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.

    4 How shall we sing the Lord’s song in a strange land?

    5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy.”

    So where exactly does Chazelle send the viewer? The allusions begin with Rogers and Astaire, whom Chazelle first saw while studying film at Harvard.

    Dear God, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers….What’s next, Triumph of the Will?

    When Hollywood did traffic in nostalgia in the first part of the 20th century, it looked, famously, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind being two of the most famous and, to put it extremely mildly, racially problematic films of the era.

    And don’t get me started on Westerns like Fort Apache or Red River….Really, we need to make sure that people only watch these kinds of “problematic” films under properly controlled conditions:

    http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccManager/clips/clockworkOrangeVidi.mp4/view

    As with so much of American cultural history, looking backwards with a romantic eye courts dangerous contemporary politics.

    Look, don’t get the wrong idea; I’m not saying that it’s bad when non-White people look backward with a romantic eye. I mean, it’s totally OK for Arabs to wax nostalgic over the Caliphate. It’s just bad when, you know, European people do it….

    Which brings us back to La La Land and its longing. What Gosling’s Seb and Stone’s Mia share is a commitment to the past—a place where, supposedly, dreamers dream their dreams awake. But which dreamers dreaming what dreams? Why do white Americans (in politics and film) often so wistfully return to the era before federally mandated desegregation, voting and civil rights? (Would La La Land ever have been made with two leading actors of color? Obviously not.)

    Well, I suppose that it could be done with two Black leads….You know, a romantic hymn to the indomitable spirit of Black America in an era of Nazi-esque oppression….If someone’s interested, I’d be more than happy to do a treatment….Of course, I understand that I’ll need a Black co-author….

    The film only functions as an ode to a lost era of white supremacy, and its viewers, consciously or unconsciously, participate in the delusion. The film’s politics of nostalgia and whiteness are inextricable.

    Look, let me spell it out for you:WE CAN’T ALLOW WHITE ANGLOS TO REMEMBER THAT THE COUNTRY USED TO BELONG TO THEM

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie? Or what of the historical record of housing discrimination, whereby 80 percent of 1940s Los Angeles real estate was off-limits to buyers or renters of color? …

    Again, remember, romanticized images of the past are reserved for POC. So, heavily fictionalized portraits of heroic Black women saving the Space Program in films like Hidden Figures are totally fine….

    People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.

    Again, unless it’s the right kind of past,capisce? Somebody wants to do a film about how great Gandhi was, that’s fine.

    The word “nostalgia” originates from a merging of the ancient Greek words “nostos” and “algos”—meaning “returning home” and “pain.” Modern application means “nostalgia” translates to home-sickness. Of course, bizarrely enough, the Trump voter and the La La Land viewer, however separate from one another they imagine themselves, often long for a past they never experienced. They feel homesickness for a home in which they never lived.

    See, we’ve gotta separate White people from any sense of connection to their past. They have to be deracinated, as it were…..

    Roots, connections, historical memory: those are reserved for the POC.

    • Replies: @guest
    He didn't see Fred Astaire until he got to Harvard? What bubble was he in? They probably know Fred in the ghetto.

    Also, who studies film at Harvard? (I might ask who studies film at all, but there's gotta be a fallback position for failed filmmakers; that's what art school is for artists.)

    , @guest
    Homesickness is what you get when you aren't home. Pain upon returning home is something else. Don Draper translated "nostalgia" in a famous scene from Mad Men as "pain from an old wound," or something like that. Of course, Mad Men is smarter than this article, with continents of room to spare
    , @syonredux
    Sorry, Geoff Nelson, but this juxtaposition is just too tempting to pass up:

    Through a Los Angeles ruined by modernity, technology and commerce, Mia and Sebastian wander. The latter longs to open a “real” jazz club to save the genre; Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.
     
    And then we have Zadie Smith:

    Novelist Zadie Smith spoke recently of white nostalgia while receiving the Welt Literature Prize in Berlin. “Meanwhile the dream of time travel—for new presidents, literary journalists, and writers alike—is just that: a dream,” she said. “And one that only makes sense if the rights and privileges you are accorded currently were accorded to you back then, too.”
     
    Doing something strikingly similar when she was a girl:

    From the earliest age I was devoted to her. My teenage bedroom, for many years a shrine to the Golden Age of Hollywood, reserved a whole half-wall for her alone. Amid the pictures of Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Donald O’Connor, Ava Gardner, and the rest, Ms Hepburn – imperious, regal and red-headed (although this last was often disguised in the publicity shots) – sat high up by the cornice of the ceiling, like a madonna looking over the lesser saints.
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2003/jul/01/film.zadiesmith

    If anything, Zadie's veneration is even more extreme, what with its hierarchical aspects (Hepburn is "regal" and "imperious"). Heck, the commingling of pagan celebrity worship with Catholic symbolism (Hepburn, elevated above her Hollywood peers, is "like a madonna looking over the lesser saints") brings Camille Paglia to mind.....
    , @Daniel Chieh

    People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.
     
    I just don't understand the distress with this. Not all people like animal documentaries, but this does not mean that animal documentaries shouldn't be made for the people who do enjoy them.

    I'm fond of the past myself anyway. I mean, it had its issues. Perhaps I wouldn't have done as well then, but regardless, isn't that part of escapism? For an hour or two, to have everything go well and be happy?

  17. Woody Allen’s New York has Russians, just Russians of a minority ethnicity (guess which one). I remember a line in Annie Hall about his grandmother having been raped by Cossacks. Did the Cossacks make it to London, or do you think maybe his family hailed from somewhere on the steppes?

    Why did this author pick Russia, anyway? Evidence that their brains are on autopilot? Or maybe it’s good news that the word “Russian” makes them think of actual Russians. Maybe we’ll get that over here, eventually.

  18. That’s a long way to go to steal a Louis C.K. joke:

    • Replies: @syonredux
    RE: Time Travel as a White Privilege,

    Dunno. It's Awfully easy to imagine scenarios where being White would be problematic....like, say, in 17th Century Japan:

    On February 5, 1597, twenty-six Christians – six European Franciscan missionaries, three Japanese Jesuits and seventeen Japanese laymen including three young boys – were executed by crucifixion in Nagasaki. These individuals were raised on crosses and then pierced through with spears. While there were many more martyrs, the first martyrs came to be especially revered, the most celebrated of which was Paul Miki. The Martyrs of Japan were canonized by the Roman Catholic Church on June 8, 1862 by Blessed Pius IX,[18] and are listed on the calendar as Sts. Paul Miki and his Companions, commemorated on February 6, February 5, the date of their death, being the feast of Saint Agatha.
    Persecution continued sporadically, breaking out again in 1613 and 1630. On September 10, 1632, 55 Christians were martyred in Nagasaki in what became known as the Great Genna Martyrdom. At this time Catholicism was officially outlawed. The Church remained without clergy and theological teaching disintegrated until the arrival of Western missionaries in the 19th century.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi


    Really, I have a sneaking suspicion that SJWs simply can't imagine periods when non-Europeans were not in control.....
  19. @syonredux

    Quite simply: The past represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.
     
    Whereas the future represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.....

    Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.
     
    Can't have that; too hideously White......

    only now the generational conflict isn’t between disaffected young people and their conservative parents, it’s between young people and their present. La La Land’s cultural language speaks in the vocabulary of loss.
     
    Yeah, I mean come on, using art to express a sense of loss....Talk about an alien concept:

    "By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

    2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

    3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.

    4 How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?

    5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy."

    So where exactly does Chazelle send the viewer? The allusions begin with Rogers and Astaire, whom Chazelle first saw while studying film at Harvard.
     
    Dear God, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers....What's next, Triumph of the Will?

    When Hollywood did traffic in nostalgia in the first part of the 20th century, it looked, famously, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind being two of the most famous and, to put it extremely mildly, racially problematic films of the era.

     

    And don't get me started on Westerns like Fort Apache or Red River....Really, we need to make sure that people only watch these kinds of "problematic" films under properly controlled conditions:

    http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccManager/clips/clockworkOrangeVidi.mp4/view

    As with so much of American cultural history, looking backwards with a romantic eye courts dangerous contemporary politics.
     
    Look, don't get the wrong idea; I'm not saying that it's bad when non-White people look backward with a romantic eye. I mean, it's totally OK for Arabs to wax nostalgic over the Caliphate. It's just bad when, you know, European people do it....

    Which brings us back to La La Land and its longing. What Gosling’s Seb and Stone’s Mia share is a commitment to the past—a place where, supposedly, dreamers dream their dreams awake. But which dreamers dreaming what dreams? Why do white Americans (in politics and film) often so wistfully return to the era before federally mandated desegregation, voting and civil rights? (Would La La Land ever have been made with two leading actors of color? Obviously not.)
     
    Well, I suppose that it could be done with two Black leads....You know, a romantic hymn to the indomitable spirit of Black America in an era of Nazi-esque oppression....If someone's interested, I'd be more than happy to do a treatment....Of course, I understand that I'll need a Black co-author....

    The film only functions as an ode to a lost era of white supremacy, and its viewers, consciously or unconsciously, participate in the delusion. The film’s politics of nostalgia and whiteness are inextricable.
     
    Look, let me spell it out for you:WE CAN'T ALLOW WHITE ANGLOS TO REMEMBER THAT THE COUNTRY USED TO BELONG TO THEM

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie? Or what of the historical record of housing discrimination, whereby 80 percent of 1940s Los Angeles real estate was off-limits to buyers or renters of color? …
     
    Again, remember, romanticized images of the past are reserved for POC. So, heavily fictionalized portraits of heroic Black women saving the Space Program in films like Hidden Figures are totally fine....

    People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.
     
    Again, unless it's the right kind of past,capisce? Somebody wants to do a film about how great Gandhi was, that's fine.

    The word “nostalgia” originates from a merging of the ancient Greek words “nostos” and “algos”—meaning “returning home” and “pain.” Modern application means “nostalgia” translates to home-sickness. Of course, bizarrely enough, the Trump voter and the La La Land viewer, however separate from one another they imagine themselves, often long for a past they never experienced. They feel homesickness for a home in which they never lived.
     
    See, we've gotta separate White people from any sense of connection to their past. They have to be deracinated, as it were.....

    Roots, connections, historical memory: those are reserved for the POC.

    He didn’t see Fred Astaire until he got to Harvard? What bubble was he in? They probably know Fred in the ghetto.

    Also, who studies film at Harvard? (I might ask who studies film at all, but there’s gotta be a fallback position for failed filmmakers; that’s what art school is for artists.)

    • Agree: NickG
  20. @Anonymous
    This is the author's twitter

    https://twitter.com/32feet/status/821022494987583488

    Another example of his endless cucking:

    “This is outstanding unpacking of our tragic, schlubby, white, twisted fantasy.”

  21. @syonredux

    Quite simply: The past represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.
     
    Whereas the future represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.....

    Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.
     
    Can't have that; too hideously White......

    only now the generational conflict isn’t between disaffected young people and their conservative parents, it’s between young people and their present. La La Land’s cultural language speaks in the vocabulary of loss.
     
    Yeah, I mean come on, using art to express a sense of loss....Talk about an alien concept:

    "By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

    2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

    3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.

    4 How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?

    5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy."

    So where exactly does Chazelle send the viewer? The allusions begin with Rogers and Astaire, whom Chazelle first saw while studying film at Harvard.
     
    Dear God, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers....What's next, Triumph of the Will?

    When Hollywood did traffic in nostalgia in the first part of the 20th century, it looked, famously, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind being two of the most famous and, to put it extremely mildly, racially problematic films of the era.

     

    And don't get me started on Westerns like Fort Apache or Red River....Really, we need to make sure that people only watch these kinds of "problematic" films under properly controlled conditions:

    http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccManager/clips/clockworkOrangeVidi.mp4/view

    As with so much of American cultural history, looking backwards with a romantic eye courts dangerous contemporary politics.
     
    Look, don't get the wrong idea; I'm not saying that it's bad when non-White people look backward with a romantic eye. I mean, it's totally OK for Arabs to wax nostalgic over the Caliphate. It's just bad when, you know, European people do it....

    Which brings us back to La La Land and its longing. What Gosling’s Seb and Stone’s Mia share is a commitment to the past—a place where, supposedly, dreamers dream their dreams awake. But which dreamers dreaming what dreams? Why do white Americans (in politics and film) often so wistfully return to the era before federally mandated desegregation, voting and civil rights? (Would La La Land ever have been made with two leading actors of color? Obviously not.)
     
    Well, I suppose that it could be done with two Black leads....You know, a romantic hymn to the indomitable spirit of Black America in an era of Nazi-esque oppression....If someone's interested, I'd be more than happy to do a treatment....Of course, I understand that I'll need a Black co-author....

    The film only functions as an ode to a lost era of white supremacy, and its viewers, consciously or unconsciously, participate in the delusion. The film’s politics of nostalgia and whiteness are inextricable.
     
    Look, let me spell it out for you:WE CAN'T ALLOW WHITE ANGLOS TO REMEMBER THAT THE COUNTRY USED TO BELONG TO THEM

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie? Or what of the historical record of housing discrimination, whereby 80 percent of 1940s Los Angeles real estate was off-limits to buyers or renters of color? …
     
    Again, remember, romanticized images of the past are reserved for POC. So, heavily fictionalized portraits of heroic Black women saving the Space Program in films like Hidden Figures are totally fine....

    People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.
     
    Again, unless it's the right kind of past,capisce? Somebody wants to do a film about how great Gandhi was, that's fine.

    The word “nostalgia” originates from a merging of the ancient Greek words “nostos” and “algos”—meaning “returning home” and “pain.” Modern application means “nostalgia” translates to home-sickness. Of course, bizarrely enough, the Trump voter and the La La Land viewer, however separate from one another they imagine themselves, often long for a past they never experienced. They feel homesickness for a home in which they never lived.
     
    See, we've gotta separate White people from any sense of connection to their past. They have to be deracinated, as it were.....

    Roots, connections, historical memory: those are reserved for the POC.

    Homesickness is what you get when you aren’t home. Pain upon returning home is something else. Don Draper translated “nostalgia” in a famous scene from Mad Men as “pain from an old wound,” or something like that. Of course, Mad Men is smarter than this article, with continents of room to spare

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Homesickness is what you get when you aren’t home. Pain upon returning home is something else. Don Draper translated “nostalgia” in a famous scene from Mad Men as “pain from an old wound,” or something like that. Of course, Mad Men is smarter than this article, with continents of room to spare
     
    Indeed:



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=suRDUFpsHus
  22. @Ghost of Bull Moose
    That's a long way to go to steal a Louis C.K. joke:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=87LGmm1M5Is

    RE: Time Travel as a White Privilege,

    Dunno. It’s Awfully easy to imagine scenarios where being White would be problematic….like, say, in 17th Century Japan:

    On February 5, 1597, twenty-six Christians – six European Franciscan missionaries, three Japanese Jesuits and seventeen Japanese laymen including three young boys – were executed by crucifixion in Nagasaki. These individuals were raised on crosses and then pierced through with spears. While there were many more martyrs, the first martyrs came to be especially revered, the most celebrated of which was Paul Miki. The Martyrs of Japan were canonized by the Roman Catholic Church on June 8, 1862 by Blessed Pius IX,[18] and are listed on the calendar as Sts. Paul Miki and his Companions, commemorated on February 6, February 5, the date of their death, being the feast of Saint Agatha.
    Persecution continued sporadically, breaking out again in 1613 and 1630. On September 10, 1632, 55 Christians were martyred in Nagasaki in what became known as the Great Genna Martyrdom. At this time Catholicism was officially outlawed. The Church remained without clergy and theological teaching disintegrated until the arrival of Western missionaries in the 19th century.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi

    Really, I have a sneaking suspicion that SJWs simply can’t imagine periods when non-Europeans were not in control…..

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    It's the last refuge of white supremacism.
    , @Jefferson
    " Time Travel as a White Privilege"

    Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown are White. So is Biff Tannen when he steals the DeLorean in Back To The Future Part 2.

    Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown. Biff of course would still be a White male, because we can no longer have Black villains in Hollywood movies as that would be extremely racist.

    The Blackened Back To The Future of course would have a Hip Hop soundtrack, no more Huey Lewis And The News.

    , @Brzjp
    Interesting detail which was conviniently forgotten - Portuguese enslaved Japs, this was one of reasons why shogun shut down portuguese colonization in japan.
  23. @Jefferson
    "The Unbearable Whiteness of la la Land"

    The unbearable Blackness of Barack Hussein Obama's attorney generals (Loretta Lynch and Eric Holder).

    100 percent of all attorney generals have been Black under the Obama administration, even though Blacks make up only 13 percent of The U.S population.

    Lynch and Holder

    Holder and Lynch

    Definitely sounds like an edgy sitcom duo. Racial CSI.

  24. This guy should write an article on “The Unbearable Whiteness of Spelling Your Name ‘Geoffrey’”.

    • Replies: @Njguy73
    Like this guy?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geoffrey_Holder
  25. The original “Unbearable lightness….” was about a frustrated, former communist who later in life acquired taste for more comfort and suffered some serious regrets. Thus the ‘lightness’ he was unable to bear and the stereotype feeding half-truths, lies, and just pure nonsense that Milan Kundera turned into a very popular book.

    The “Unbearable whiteness…” is along the same lines and it doesn’t belong in the adult world. Nietzsche said ‘if you regret, you suffer twice’, time to move on….

    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    The only reason we are inundated with "Unbearable Whiteness of Being ...." titles is due to Kundera's novel, and everyone who uses it thinks they are being clever, but it is already an old joke.

    You may expect the meme will dominate the field until Kundera writes his next novel about a frustrated gun collector dissatified with the action of his weapons: "The Unbearable Slackness of Triggers."
  26. OT: Bruce Springsteen cover band pulls out of inauguration:

    http://www.backstreets.com/news.html

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    That's it! I am definitely not going.
  27. @guest
    Homesickness is what you get when you aren't home. Pain upon returning home is something else. Don Draper translated "nostalgia" in a famous scene from Mad Men as "pain from an old wound," or something like that. Of course, Mad Men is smarter than this article, with continents of room to spare

    Homesickness is what you get when you aren’t home. Pain upon returning home is something else. Don Draper translated “nostalgia” in a famous scene from Mad Men as “pain from an old wound,” or something like that. Of course, Mad Men is smarter than this article, with continents of room to spare

    Indeed:

  28. Sh*t, transitioning to a multicultural society is a pain! The necessary step of recognizing your country’s sinful past of monochromaticity is a tough one. Luckily, we have good thinking men like Geoff Nelson to shepherd us through the rocky terrain and guide us on the correct path. Thank heavens we have an elite that gives us the proper dosage of hate and creates enough self-loathing that we never ever look back!

  29. Novelist Zadie Smith spoke recently of white nostalgia while receiving the Welt Literature Prize in Berlin. “Meanwhile the dream of time travel—for new presidents, literary journalists, and writers alike—is just that: a dream,” she said. “And one that only makes sense if the rights and privileges you are accorded currently were accorded to you back then, too.”

    Oh, dear, it appears that Miss Zadie Smith’s taste in films is rather un-PC:

    Katharine Hepburn was the star of my very favourite film, The Philadelphia Story. She was also the star of my second favourite film (Adam’s Rib), and my third (Woman of the Year),

    From the earliest age I was devoted to her. My teenage bedroom, for many years a shrine to the Golden Age of Hollywood, reserved a whole half-wall for her alone. Amid the pictures of Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Donald O’Connor, Ava Gardner, and the rest, Ms Hepburn – imperious, regal and red-headed (although this last was often disguised in the publicity shots) – sat high up by the cornice of the ceiling, like a madonna looking over the lesser saints.

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2003/jul/01/film.zadiesmith

    The poor woman….her imagination has been corrupted by the White Man’s cinematic voodoo…

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Zadie Smith seems like a nice lady who probably deep down doesn't believe most of the things she's supposed to believe.
    , @Jefferson
    "The poor woman….her imagination has been corrupted by the White Man’s cinematic voodoo…"

    If White people perform voodoo that is cultural appropriation, because it's a Haitian creation.
  30. Actually, I think that the author does get much of his analysis right. Whites of all stripes (even liberals) are beginning to understand that they are losing (have lost) something. Even if they never experienced it, they know that somehow there was a better world for them at some point. They can feel it.

    It’s why “Make America Great Again” and La La Land resonate. It’s not about wanting to go back in time; it’s simply about connecting with that feeling.

    What scares the shit out people like Nelson and others is the possibility that whites (even a small number of whites) will figure out that that feeling is the desire to live among their own. That diversity doesn’t work, especially for whites.

    If that damn ever breaks, game over for them, and they know it. Whites pushing for self-determination would be a disaster for multi-kulti America.

    It’s not whites longing for their past that keeps people like Nelson up at night. It’s whites longing for (acting to achieve) their own future.

    • Agree: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    It’s not whites longing for their past that keeps people like Nelson up at night. It’s whites longing for (acting to achieve) their own future.
     
    That Louis CK clip above imagines a future of non-whites anally raping whites forever. His next line is that we'll deserve it. That's where our competition is at right now. If we can't beat that we hardly deserve a future.
    , @NickG
    Well put.

    The question is, will white identity politics blossom before whites are reduced to discriminated against minorities -like they are in South Africa now - rather than discriminated against majorities.

    It's the boily frog thing.
  31. 80 percent of 1940s Los Angeles real estate was off-limits to buyers or renters of color? …

    Redlining! Or as it should be called: The Houseocaust.

    I believe he is referring to restrictive covenants and not redlining. Redlining just meant that certain (high risk) areas were not eligible for mortgages (on the crazy theory that you should only grant mortgages where there is good collateral likely to keep its value and a high likelihood that the borrower will pay you back – that’s so racis’) . Restrictive covenants meant you couldn’t live there period.

  32. @Beckow
    The original "Unbearable lightness...." was about a frustrated, former communist who later in life acquired taste for more comfort and suffered some serious regrets. Thus the 'lightness' he was unable to bear and the stereotype feeding half-truths, lies, and just pure nonsense that Milan Kundera turned into a very popular book.

    The "Unbearable whiteness..." is along the same lines and it doesn't belong in the adult world. Nietzsche said 'if you regret, you suffer twice', time to move on....

    The only reason we are inundated with “Unbearable Whiteness of Being ….” titles is due to Kundera’s novel, and everyone who uses it thinks they are being clever, but it is already an old joke.

    You may expect the meme will dominate the field until Kundera writes his next novel about a frustrated gun collector dissatified with the action of his weapons: “The Unbearable Slackness of Triggers.”

    • Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    Trigger warning indeed...

    A new code for our dear Mr. Derbyshire.
    , @Beckow
    Kundera wasn't clever. He used the phrase "unbearable lightness..." - actually translated a very common expression in Czech (cross-language plagiarism is by far easiest) - but his deep thoughts were a collection of hackneyed nonsense and aging regret about his very active communist past in Prague.

    Kundera is despised in his home country. His books are seen as plagiarizing the local language and adding a dose of silly stereotypes to please his Western 'intellectual' audience. None of what he wrote rings true to anyone in the Czech Republic - he invented nonsense and he could had put it on the moon or in Timbuktu. He is a great example of elite alienation - in Kundera's case he moved to Paris to handle it better as he got older. Some Hollywood hacks also end up on the French Riviera or Lake Como - same dynamic, same regret, same alienation.

    But the silly expression lives on...

  33. Maybe we should start a list of the Unbearable Blackness/Brownness/Yellowness of…?

  34. Waydaminit

    Isn’t this the same Steve Sailer who criticized Singin’ in the Rain for its lack of Jews in Hollywood?

    Now he’s applauding La La Land for its lack of Latinos in LA.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Isn’t this the same Steve Sailer who criticized Singin’ in the Rain for its lack of Jews in Hollywood?
     
    Well, you know, Jews run Hollywood. Gary Trudeau would call that "punching up."Which means that it's PC?
  35. @snorlax
    In 10-15 years it'll be an undisputed fact amongst the fashionable set that O.J. was framed. The most fashion-forward already make that assertion when the topic comes up and their more respectability-craving friends get tickled pink by all the naughty, transgressive things they're hearing, so certain to piss off Racist Uncle in Flyover Country.

    Nah. They’ll say he did it but that he was justified given all the microaggressions Nicole committed towards him.

    I have no doubt that, if left unchecked, our legal system will come to allow the murder of whites by blacks for literally any reason.

  36. @anony-mouse
    Waydaminit

    Isn't this the same Steve Sailer who criticized Singin' in the Rain for its lack of Jews in Hollywood?

    Now he's applauding La La Land for its lack of Latinos in LA.

    Isn’t this the same Steve Sailer who criticized Singin’ in the Rain for its lack of Jews in Hollywood?

    Well, you know, Jews run Hollywood. Gary Trudeau would call that “punching up.”Which means that it’s PC?

  37. A bit OT, but, I just turned on PBS and see they are showing two hours of Antiques Roadshow, then something about Stalin. This is the first time in my memory their MLK Day broadcast has been anything other than MLK. What’s up with that?

    • Replies: @Matra
    Depends on the local affiliate. I'm also seeing two hours of the Antiques Roadshow followed by a Jackie Robinson documentary. A NY PBS is showing a British baking show. MLK day is always a bad day for movies on TCM.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Negro Fatigue seems to be going around. I have a chronic case. Too much blackety-blackety-black. Ht: The Derb

    Slight OT: is it racist that February, the shortest month, is also Black History Month?
  38. What do these critics not get about movies largely being entertainment? La-La Land was a lot of fun and has sold over $75 M in tickets. Most black movies don’t do too well – Fences is falling like a stone, Birth of a Nation and Moonlight fared very poorly. I can’t imagine why; who wouldn’t want date night to involve watching black pissing and moaning?

    When SJWs buy all the movie tickets then you’ll get casts that look like an Obama cabinet, until then …

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Central Intelligence" with Kevin Hart and The Rock did over $125 million domestically. Those two guys can sell tickets.
    , @Steve Sailer
    La La Land will sell more than $100 million domestically and might break $150 million if it wins Best Picture. It will likely be one of the top five box office movies for grown-ups released in 2016 -- e.g., Clint Eastwood's "Sully" with Tom Hanks did a solid $125 million.

    I can also imagine a huge backlash against Chazelle if his next movie isn't great. I've only seen two movies of his but I feel like I can kind of predict the rut he's in danger of falling into.

  39. @Hippopotamusdrome
    Bob Barker reminds you: "have your college leftists spayed or neutered."


    2nd California Student vows to remove penis if Trump builds wall
    ... In a recent Open Borders Friends assembly, Greenberg invited other members to join him in taking a pledge to remove a bodily appendage if Trump strengthens the border wall.
    ... "As far as why I am choosing to remove my penis instead of maybe a finger, or a toe, I feel that the penis represents my anger about an oppressive male dominated culture, and I would be fine with not having one."

     

    From the Onion?

  40. @PSR
    What do these critics not get about movies largely being entertainment? La-La Land was a lot of fun and has sold over $75 M in tickets. Most black movies don't do too well - Fences is falling like a stone, Birth of a Nation and Moonlight fared very poorly. I can't imagine why; who wouldn't want date night to involve watching black pissing and moaning?

    When SJWs buy all the movie tickets then you'll get casts that look like an Obama cabinet, until then ...

    “Central Intelligence” with Kevin Hart and The Rock did over $125 million domestically. Those two guys can sell tickets.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, Central Intelligence is a dumb movie that is carried by its two stars. Kevin Hart is very funny.
    , @Desiderius
    Most blacks are just super-red rednecks. An all-black Fast and Furious would pack them in.
  41. traffic in a dangerous political invention

    You’ve got to love it when a leftist criticizes a “dangerous political invention”! I suppose they think socialism has proven to be purely beneficial, without any dangers or downsides at all.

  42. @PSR
    A bit OT, but, I just turned on PBS and see they are showing two hours of Antiques Roadshow, then something about Stalin. This is the first time in my memory their MLK Day broadcast has been anything other than MLK. What's up with that?

    Depends on the local affiliate. I’m also seeing two hours of the Antiques Roadshow followed by a Jackie Robinson documentary. A NY PBS is showing a British baking show. MLK day is always a bad day for movies on TCM.

    • Replies: @Another Canadian
    On our PBS we have 1 hour of Antiques Roadshow from Ft. Worth, 1 hour of British baking - pastry followed by 1 hour of Penelope Keith's Hidden Villages - Devon & Cornwall. I couldn't have asked for a better MLK Day! Thanks PBS!
  43. @PSR
    What do these critics not get about movies largely being entertainment? La-La Land was a lot of fun and has sold over $75 M in tickets. Most black movies don't do too well - Fences is falling like a stone, Birth of a Nation and Moonlight fared very poorly. I can't imagine why; who wouldn't want date night to involve watching black pissing and moaning?

    When SJWs buy all the movie tickets then you'll get casts that look like an Obama cabinet, until then ...

    La La Land will sell more than $100 million domestically and might break $150 million if it wins Best Picture. It will likely be one of the top five box office movies for grown-ups released in 2016 — e.g., Clint Eastwood’s “Sully” with Tom Hanks did a solid $125 million.

    I can also imagine a huge backlash against Chazelle if his next movie isn’t great. I’ve only seen two movies of his but I feel like I can kind of predict the rut he’s in danger of falling into.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    Oh, don't wish him bad, seriously. I loved his 2 movies; all the Millennials ( I know) loved Whiplash because that was the movie that exemplified their parents, for crying out loud.


    He is now, well, famous for Whiplash, which was a truly, amazing movie...it is so good. I want him to be part of making Hollywood movies great again. My thoughts: Chazelle is a unicorn...he knows he is an outsider. He is smart. He may do nothing for 5 years. To me, if a film maker does nothing for 5-10 years, is natural. And, perhaps, making money is not the impetus for art after all (duh, I add) ? I can only hope. I say: if you win; rest take your time for the next film. Do nothing unless you have a great idea. Am, I distracted from Friday?
  44. @SPMoore8
    The only reason we are inundated with "Unbearable Whiteness of Being ...." titles is due to Kundera's novel, and everyone who uses it thinks they are being clever, but it is already an old joke.

    You may expect the meme will dominate the field until Kundera writes his next novel about a frustrated gun collector dissatified with the action of his weapons: "The Unbearable Slackness of Triggers."

    Trigger warning indeed…

    A new code for our dear Mr. Derbyshire.

    • Agree: SPMoore8
  45. @Anonymous
    OT: Bruce Springsteen cover band pulls out of inauguration:

    http://www.backstreets.com/news.html

    That’s it! I am definitely not going.

  46. @PSR
    A bit OT, but, I just turned on PBS and see they are showing two hours of Antiques Roadshow, then something about Stalin. This is the first time in my memory their MLK Day broadcast has been anything other than MLK. What's up with that?

    Negro Fatigue seems to be going around. I have a chronic case. Too much blackety-blackety-black. Ht: The Derb

    Slight OT: is it racist that February, the shortest month, is also Black History Month?

  47. @Steve Sailer
    "Central Intelligence" with Kevin Hart and The Rock did over $125 million domestically. Those two guys can sell tickets.

    Yeah, Central Intelligence is a dumb movie that is carried by its two stars. Kevin Hart is very funny.

  48. @Matra
    Depends on the local affiliate. I'm also seeing two hours of the Antiques Roadshow followed by a Jackie Robinson documentary. A NY PBS is showing a British baking show. MLK day is always a bad day for movies on TCM.

    On our PBS we have 1 hour of Antiques Roadshow from Ft. Worth, 1 hour of British baking – pastry followed by 1 hour of Penelope Keith’s Hidden Villages – Devon & Cornwall. I couldn’t have asked for a better MLK Day! Thanks PBS!

    • Agree: Desiderius
  49. @syonredux

    Novelist Zadie Smith spoke recently of white nostalgia while receiving the Welt Literature Prize in Berlin. “Meanwhile the dream of time travel—for new presidents, literary journalists, and writers alike—is just that: a dream,” she said. “And one that only makes sense if the rights and privileges you are accorded currently were accorded to you back then, too.”
     
    Oh, dear, it appears that Miss Zadie Smith's taste in films is rather un-PC:

    Katharine Hepburn was the star of my very favourite film, The Philadelphia Story. She was also the star of my second favourite film (Adam's Rib), and my third (Woman of the Year),
     

    From the earliest age I was devoted to her. My teenage bedroom, for many years a shrine to the Golden Age of Hollywood, reserved a whole half-wall for her alone. Amid the pictures of Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Donald O'Connor, Ava Gardner, and the rest, Ms Hepburn - imperious, regal and red-headed (although this last was often disguised in the publicity shots) - sat high up by the cornice of the ceiling, like a madonna looking over the lesser saints.
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2003/jul/01/film.zadiesmith



    The poor woman....her imagination has been corrupted by the White Man's cinematic voodoo...

    Zadie Smith seems like a nice lady who probably deep down doesn’t believe most of the things she’s supposed to believe.

  50. @syonredux

    Novelist Zadie Smith spoke recently of white nostalgia while receiving the Welt Literature Prize in Berlin. “Meanwhile the dream of time travel—for new presidents, literary journalists, and writers alike—is just that: a dream,” she said. “And one that only makes sense if the rights and privileges you are accorded currently were accorded to you back then, too.”
     
    Oh, dear, it appears that Miss Zadie Smith's taste in films is rather un-PC:

    Katharine Hepburn was the star of my very favourite film, The Philadelphia Story. She was also the star of my second favourite film (Adam's Rib), and my third (Woman of the Year),
     

    From the earliest age I was devoted to her. My teenage bedroom, for many years a shrine to the Golden Age of Hollywood, reserved a whole half-wall for her alone. Amid the pictures of Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Donald O'Connor, Ava Gardner, and the rest, Ms Hepburn - imperious, regal and red-headed (although this last was often disguised in the publicity shots) - sat high up by the cornice of the ceiling, like a madonna looking over the lesser saints.
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2003/jul/01/film.zadiesmith



    The poor woman....her imagination has been corrupted by the White Man's cinematic voodoo...

    “The poor woman….her imagination has been corrupted by the White Man’s cinematic voodoo…”

    If White people perform voodoo that is cultural appropriation, because it’s a Haitian creation.

    • LOL: Abe
  51. @syonredux
    RE: Time Travel as a White Privilege,

    Dunno. It's Awfully easy to imagine scenarios where being White would be problematic....like, say, in 17th Century Japan:

    On February 5, 1597, twenty-six Christians – six European Franciscan missionaries, three Japanese Jesuits and seventeen Japanese laymen including three young boys – were executed by crucifixion in Nagasaki. These individuals were raised on crosses and then pierced through with spears. While there were many more martyrs, the first martyrs came to be especially revered, the most celebrated of which was Paul Miki. The Martyrs of Japan were canonized by the Roman Catholic Church on June 8, 1862 by Blessed Pius IX,[18] and are listed on the calendar as Sts. Paul Miki and his Companions, commemorated on February 6, February 5, the date of their death, being the feast of Saint Agatha.
    Persecution continued sporadically, breaking out again in 1613 and 1630. On September 10, 1632, 55 Christians were martyred in Nagasaki in what became known as the Great Genna Martyrdom. At this time Catholicism was officially outlawed. The Church remained without clergy and theological teaching disintegrated until the arrival of Western missionaries in the 19th century.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi


    Really, I have a sneaking suspicion that SJWs simply can't imagine periods when non-Europeans were not in control.....

    It’s the last refuge of white supremacism.

  52. Another dishonest lofty conversation about race. In 1950, in my all white Norman Rockwell countryside – you could pay after you pumped. There were no locks on mailboxes. Pedophilia and incest were unheard of . Need I go on?

    I really don’t care if blacks and hispanics feel left out from my nostalgia. A peek at half time at our Super Bowl tells you why I want the past… without blacks and hispanics and their tawdry additions to my world.

    [MORE]

    The same people who worried about their children learning of Trump’s locker room talk let their children watch Beyonce bumping and grinding. They bought millions of copies of a book on the wonders of sado masochism.

    It was Bing Crosby who gave voice to many black musicians… and he was as good a jazz man as any of them. Whites have been charitable, receptive and supportive of the goals of blacks and hispanics. Until we weren’t. And for good reason.

    The problem is human bio diversity + multi cultural experimentation between unequal intelligent quotients = RACE WAR .

    Until and unless we begin to address the very real problem of blacks with an IQ below 100, we will continue to talk past each other.

    Alack and alas… Whites discovered that sharing real estate with a population of African Americans with a mean IQ below the minimum for self governance .. wanted out of the bargain.

    Below 90, blacks cannot defer gratification, suppress harmful urges, including their libidos. They don’t resolve conflict without violence, and have no concept of intermediate and final ends.

    When you try to solve this with affirmative action, all you have are ill equipped blacks, laboring under the assumption that equality of results eludes them because whites cheat.

    Even high IQ blacks have the problem of children whose IQ reverts to the mean. Happens all the time.

    So save the speeches about the evil of whiteness. I’ve had a snoutful of trying to educate, vaccinate, elevate and civilize blacks and hispanics who have had ZERO success achieving anything beyond the borders of La La Land.

  53. @Steve Sailer
    "Central Intelligence" with Kevin Hart and The Rock did over $125 million domestically. Those two guys can sell tickets.

    Most blacks are just super-red rednecks. An all-black Fast and Furious would pack them in.

  54. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Actually, I think that the author does get much of his analysis right. Whites of all stripes (even liberals) are beginning to understand that they are losing (have lost) something. Even if they never experienced it, they know that somehow there was a better world for them at some point. They can feel it.

    It's why "Make America Great Again" and La La Land resonate. It's not about wanting to go back in time; it's simply about connecting with that feeling.

    What scares the shit out people like Nelson and others is the possibility that whites (even a small number of whites) will figure out that that feeling is the desire to live among their own. That diversity doesn't work, especially for whites.

    If that damn ever breaks, game over for them, and they know it. Whites pushing for self-determination would be a disaster for multi-kulti America.

    It's not whites longing for their past that keeps people like Nelson up at night. It's whites longing for (acting to achieve) their own future.

    It’s not whites longing for their past that keeps people like Nelson up at night. It’s whites longing for (acting to achieve) their own future.

    That Louis CK clip above imagines a future of non-whites anally raping whites forever. His next line is that we’ll deserve it. That’s where our competition is at right now. If we can’t beat that we hardly deserve a future.

  55. @syonredux
    RE: Time Travel as a White Privilege,

    Dunno. It's Awfully easy to imagine scenarios where being White would be problematic....like, say, in 17th Century Japan:

    On February 5, 1597, twenty-six Christians – six European Franciscan missionaries, three Japanese Jesuits and seventeen Japanese laymen including three young boys – were executed by crucifixion in Nagasaki. These individuals were raised on crosses and then pierced through with spears. While there were many more martyrs, the first martyrs came to be especially revered, the most celebrated of which was Paul Miki. The Martyrs of Japan were canonized by the Roman Catholic Church on June 8, 1862 by Blessed Pius IX,[18] and are listed on the calendar as Sts. Paul Miki and his Companions, commemorated on February 6, February 5, the date of their death, being the feast of Saint Agatha.
    Persecution continued sporadically, breaking out again in 1613 and 1630. On September 10, 1632, 55 Christians were martyred in Nagasaki in what became known as the Great Genna Martyrdom. At this time Catholicism was officially outlawed. The Church remained without clergy and theological teaching disintegrated until the arrival of Western missionaries in the 19th century.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi


    Really, I have a sneaking suspicion that SJWs simply can't imagine periods when non-Europeans were not in control.....

    ” Time Travel as a White Privilege”

    Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown are White. So is Biff Tannen when he steals the DeLorean in Back To The Future Part 2.

    Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown. Biff of course would still be a White male, because we can no longer have Black villains in Hollywood movies as that would be extremely racist.

    The Blackened Back To The Future of course would have a Hip Hop soundtrack, no more Huey Lewis And The News.

    • Replies: @guest
    Interestingly enough, the black version of Huey Lewis is Huey Lewis, according to Patrick Bateman in American Psycho.

    On the other hand, there's Ray Parker, Jr., who borrowed liberally from a Huey Lewis song to make the theme from Ghostbusters. Key and Peele did a good sketch about the rejected follow-ups he submitted to movie producers, all of which (Jumanji, The Pelican Brief, Apt Pupil, etc.) sounded suspiciously like Ghostbusters.

    Maybe he's still available. Or his son, or something.

    , @Mr. Anon
    "Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown."

    Great Motherf**kin' Scott!
    , @Rod1963
    It will happen. Hollywood is creatively bankrupt and the Back To Future movies are one of the last gold mines they can reboot. They'd probably do a reboot of Indiana Jones if they could get away with it as well.

    That said they have retconned Little Ophan Annie, Uncle Buck, the Magnificent Seven, the Wild Wild West, The Equalizer and oh yeah "24" has a black male lead now. No more Jack Bauer.

    Right now I'm just waiting for them to reboot 007 as a black man.

    It's not to say there's a lack of creative talent, the problem is they're outsiders and relegated to making shorts put on Youtube or direct to dvd.


    .
    , @DWB
    "Black to the Future," perhaps?
    , @The Millennial Falcon
    Come on, how did you leave Black to the Future untouched?

    And the Delorean would go to 1855 of course.

  56. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Click on the Paste link which is second excerpt in Steve’s post and there is a large pic of the two romantic white people sitting in a saloon with the jazz combo in the background.

    The look on the girl’s face is classic. I don’t care what the plot of the movie is or what her character is supposed to be feeling at that moment. I know that female look. Young women hate instrumental jazz. THEY HATE IT. “This place sucks. Why the fuck did you bring me here?”

    My guess is the actress was completely annoyed with the band in real life in real time right there on the film set and she used that in her acting.

    • Replies: @Ivy
    #JazzFansTooWhite?
    , @Autochthon
    I think this observation may be true of young women for all instrumental music. I still vividly recall a party in high school. A few of us guys, all musicians, put on "La Villa Strangiato" because another of us had never heard it ("What?! You hafta hear it!").

    About thirty second into the song, every single one of the girls assumed an air of bewildered petulance, as if someone had farted and they couldn't quite decide how to address it without being gauche. One of them, a pretty and popular cheerleader (but very bright, too; she took AP Calculus and was in the National Honor Society) finally demanded "Where are the words?!"

    It was now us guys' turn to react as if someone had just farted.
  57. @syonredux

    Quite simply: The past represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.
     
    Whereas the future represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.....

    Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.
     
    Can't have that; too hideously White......

    only now the generational conflict isn’t between disaffected young people and their conservative parents, it’s between young people and their present. La La Land’s cultural language speaks in the vocabulary of loss.
     
    Yeah, I mean come on, using art to express a sense of loss....Talk about an alien concept:

    "By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

    2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

    3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.

    4 How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?

    5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy."

    So where exactly does Chazelle send the viewer? The allusions begin with Rogers and Astaire, whom Chazelle first saw while studying film at Harvard.
     
    Dear God, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers....What's next, Triumph of the Will?

    When Hollywood did traffic in nostalgia in the first part of the 20th century, it looked, famously, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind being two of the most famous and, to put it extremely mildly, racially problematic films of the era.

     

    And don't get me started on Westerns like Fort Apache or Red River....Really, we need to make sure that people only watch these kinds of "problematic" films under properly controlled conditions:

    http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccManager/clips/clockworkOrangeVidi.mp4/view

    As with so much of American cultural history, looking backwards with a romantic eye courts dangerous contemporary politics.
     
    Look, don't get the wrong idea; I'm not saying that it's bad when non-White people look backward with a romantic eye. I mean, it's totally OK for Arabs to wax nostalgic over the Caliphate. It's just bad when, you know, European people do it....

    Which brings us back to La La Land and its longing. What Gosling’s Seb and Stone’s Mia share is a commitment to the past—a place where, supposedly, dreamers dream their dreams awake. But which dreamers dreaming what dreams? Why do white Americans (in politics and film) often so wistfully return to the era before federally mandated desegregation, voting and civil rights? (Would La La Land ever have been made with two leading actors of color? Obviously not.)
     
    Well, I suppose that it could be done with two Black leads....You know, a romantic hymn to the indomitable spirit of Black America in an era of Nazi-esque oppression....If someone's interested, I'd be more than happy to do a treatment....Of course, I understand that I'll need a Black co-author....

    The film only functions as an ode to a lost era of white supremacy, and its viewers, consciously or unconsciously, participate in the delusion. The film’s politics of nostalgia and whiteness are inextricable.
     
    Look, let me spell it out for you:WE CAN'T ALLOW WHITE ANGLOS TO REMEMBER THAT THE COUNTRY USED TO BELONG TO THEM

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie? Or what of the historical record of housing discrimination, whereby 80 percent of 1940s Los Angeles real estate was off-limits to buyers or renters of color? …
     
    Again, remember, romanticized images of the past are reserved for POC. So, heavily fictionalized portraits of heroic Black women saving the Space Program in films like Hidden Figures are totally fine....

    People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.
     
    Again, unless it's the right kind of past,capisce? Somebody wants to do a film about how great Gandhi was, that's fine.

    The word “nostalgia” originates from a merging of the ancient Greek words “nostos” and “algos”—meaning “returning home” and “pain.” Modern application means “nostalgia” translates to home-sickness. Of course, bizarrely enough, the Trump voter and the La La Land viewer, however separate from one another they imagine themselves, often long for a past they never experienced. They feel homesickness for a home in which they never lived.
     
    See, we've gotta separate White people from any sense of connection to their past. They have to be deracinated, as it were.....

    Roots, connections, historical memory: those are reserved for the POC.

    Sorry, Geoff Nelson, but this juxtaposition is just too tempting to pass up:

    Through a Los Angeles ruined by modernity, technology and commerce, Mia and Sebastian wander. The latter longs to open a “real” jazz club to save the genre; Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.

    And then we have Zadie Smith:

    Novelist Zadie Smith spoke recently of white nostalgia while receiving the Welt Literature Prize in Berlin. “Meanwhile the dream of time travel—for new presidents, literary journalists, and writers alike—is just that: a dream,” she said. “And one that only makes sense if the rights and privileges you are accorded currently were accorded to you back then, too.”

    Doing something strikingly similar when she was a girl:

    From the earliest age I was devoted to her. My teenage bedroom, for many years a shrine to the Golden Age of Hollywood, reserved a whole half-wall for her alone. Amid the pictures of Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Donald O’Connor, Ava Gardner, and the rest, Ms Hepburn – imperious, regal and red-headed (although this last was often disguised in the publicity shots) – sat high up by the cornice of the ceiling, like a madonna looking over the lesser saints.

    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2003/jul/01/film.zadiesmith

    If anything, Zadie’s veneration is even more extreme, what with its hierarchical aspects (Hepburn is “regal” and “imperious”). Heck, the commingling of pagan celebrity worship with Catholic symbolism (Hepburn, elevated above her Hollywood peers, is “like a madonna looking over the lesser saints”) brings Camille Paglia to mind…..

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I skimmed Zadie Smith's breakthrough novel "White Teeth." I thought it was almost good, but pretty bad. But that may be because it seemed like something I might write, with lots of twins and other HBD tropes. My impression is that her career got jet-propelled early on, perhaps before she fully merited it (but she had shown potential), because the left liked her for being sort of black and the right liked her for being sort of conservative, kind of like how Obama got elected editor of the Harvard Law Review by the Federalist Society because they hated the white Critical Theory leftist running against him.

    She seems like a nice lady and I wish her well.
  58. @Jefferson
    " Time Travel as a White Privilege"

    Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown are White. So is Biff Tannen when he steals the DeLorean in Back To The Future Part 2.

    Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown. Biff of course would still be a White male, because we can no longer have Black villains in Hollywood movies as that would be extremely racist.

    The Blackened Back To The Future of course would have a Hip Hop soundtrack, no more Huey Lewis And The News.

    Interestingly enough, the black version of Huey Lewis is Huey Lewis, according to Patrick Bateman in American Psycho.

    On the other hand, there’s Ray Parker, Jr., who borrowed liberally from a Huey Lewis song to make the theme from Ghostbusters. Key and Peele did a good sketch about the rejected follow-ups he submitted to movie producers, all of which (Jumanji, The Pelican Brief, Apt Pupil, etc.) sounded suspiciously like Ghostbusters.

    Maybe he’s still available. Or his son, or something.

    • Replies: @guest
    Oh, I should add that he kept trying to replicate "Who you gonna call?" The best was for Face/Off: "That ain't even yo face!"
  59. @guest
    Interestingly enough, the black version of Huey Lewis is Huey Lewis, according to Patrick Bateman in American Psycho.

    On the other hand, there's Ray Parker, Jr., who borrowed liberally from a Huey Lewis song to make the theme from Ghostbusters. Key and Peele did a good sketch about the rejected follow-ups he submitted to movie producers, all of which (Jumanji, The Pelican Brief, Apt Pupil, etc.) sounded suspiciously like Ghostbusters.

    Maybe he's still available. Or his son, or something.

    Oh, I should add that he kept trying to replicate “Who you gonna call?” The best was for Face/Off: “That ain’t even yo face!”

  60. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    The leads in this flick don’t look like movie stars. More like TV people. Meaning the audience for television (women/gays) would like the looks of these two stars. The movie audience is supposed to skew much more male/hetero than TV.

    This guy Gosling is like Ashleigh in Gone With the Wind with Clark Gable. Second banana. Same guy was in Petrified Forest with Bogart. Second banana.

    So where is Rhett Butler in this flick? It’s like GWTW starring the second banana. The first banana has been removed by the audience (women/gays).

    Emma Stone is for women/gays.

  61. @Anonymous
    This guy should write an article on "The Unbearable Whiteness of Spelling Your Name 'Geoffrey'".
  62. Bravo Steve! – your last two lines on the post…excellent. This was a lovely movie and my son and his best HS friend (both hugely critical of EVERYTHING) were so moved. She had tears in her eyes. And, in my opinion, if the actors were black, white, Latino, Asian, Armenian LA:ish, Finnish :), Hawaiians, Poles, recent Russians, or Saudis, in this movie……… what difference would it make? – great post. We should all be dancing while rockets may be launched.

  63. Right now, the famous Eisenhower handover speech is being replayed a lot. In it we see the Zenith of American government. It’s a message for grown ups – elite white men, the leadership cohort, to be more specific.
    In his prescription for the incoming administration we get a B&W glimpse of a functional America. Political discourse today is infantile by comparison.

  64. @Tiny Duck
    Once again, clueless white people fail to recognize what was said in an article due to their white privilege getting in the way. But what else is new?

    Here's a similar article to this one that morons like you need to read: Nostalgia: a Sport for the Privileged: https://www.facebook.com/notes/racialicious-race-identity-and-pop-culture-in-a-colorstruck-world/nostalgia-a-sport-for-the-privileged/91784832286/


    Grayson Allen is a prime example https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/01/14/grayson-allen-tangles-with-a-louisville-player-and-gets-slapped-in-the-face/?utm_term=.c7fd645b00f1

    Why isn't he called a thug?

    You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with

    “People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with.”

    Rapists all agree that “that bitch” and her not putting out are the problem and needs to be dealt with. That is the logic of violent, envious non-entities like you.

  65. “By the way, here’s a list of article titles featuring the “unbearable whiteness” cliche / racial slur I found earlier this year.”

    The unbearable triteness of journalism.

  66. @Jefferson
    " Time Travel as a White Privilege"

    Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown are White. So is Biff Tannen when he steals the DeLorean in Back To The Future Part 2.

    Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown. Biff of course would still be a White male, because we can no longer have Black villains in Hollywood movies as that would be extremely racist.

    The Blackened Back To The Future of course would have a Hip Hop soundtrack, no more Huey Lewis And The News.

    “Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown.”

    Great Motherf**kin’ Scott!

  67. @Jim Don Bob
    White guys stop doing stuff and in less than a week there will be no food, water, or electricity.

    “White guys stop doing stuff and in less than a week there will be no food, water, or electricity.”

    Indeed. If you want to know what a non-white future will look like, just play 2001: A Space Odyssey backwards.

  68. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Actually, I think that the author does get much of his analysis right. Whites of all stripes (even liberals) are beginning to understand that they are losing (have lost) something. Even if they never experienced it, they know that somehow there was a better world for them at some point. They can feel it.

    It's why "Make America Great Again" and La La Land resonate. It's not about wanting to go back in time; it's simply about connecting with that feeling.

    What scares the shit out people like Nelson and others is the possibility that whites (even a small number of whites) will figure out that that feeling is the desire to live among their own. That diversity doesn't work, especially for whites.

    If that damn ever breaks, game over for them, and they know it. Whites pushing for self-determination would be a disaster for multi-kulti America.

    It's not whites longing for their past that keeps people like Nelson up at night. It's whites longing for (acting to achieve) their own future.

    Well put.

    The question is, will white identity politics blossom before whites are reduced to discriminated against minorities -like they are in South Africa now – rather than discriminated against majorities.

    It’s the boily frog thing.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "The question is, will white identity politics blossom"

    According to the Left Wing megaphone, Make America Great Again is White identity politics.
  69. @guest
    How many times has "the unbearable whiteness of [blank]" been a headline in mainstream journalism? Like a billion?

    Comparing this who's-it to Shamalamadingdong is hyperbolic, and to Lucas ridiculous. What's he done? Whiplash, which was a one-trick pony in my opinion. It was a good trick, but J.K. Simmons deserves most of the credit. La-La Land might be the greatest movie ever made, but so far, like that Hamilton! thing I keep hearing about, it has only caught on like wildfire among the elite and certain niche audiences.

    The mass audience is aware of it, and may like it. I don't know how well it's doing. But if it were a genuine cultural phenomenon like The Sixth Sense, American Graffiti, or (obviously) Star Wars, I couldn't help but notice. It would be hammered into my head every day.

    I don't want to talk him down, because I like when indie films are made for normal people, too. Or when mass audience films are at least middle-brow and not made to appeal only to morons. But let's not get carried away. Hollywood is bubbled enough as it is.

    How many times has “the unbearable whiteness of [blank]” been a headline in mainstream journalism? Like a billion?

    I wonder how many even remember that there is a movie, much less a book as the source for the cliche.

    Or even more improbably, actually read the book and realize that the unbearable to which it refers is a state of grace to be exalted.

    I dunno, I hear they are off deconstructing classics now, which is a good start.

    • Replies: @guest
    I haven't read that book, but I did read some of Kundera's The Joke. He came off to me as too clever by half. Then again, I've never lived in the upside-down world of communism.

    So long as you're wondering, let me join in and wonder how many of the journalists, wits, brights, hipsters, dandies, token minorities, and just plain hacks to invoke the cliche could invent an oxymoron like that. Get it, unbearable lightness!
  70. @Steve Sailer
    La La Land will sell more than $100 million domestically and might break $150 million if it wins Best Picture. It will likely be one of the top five box office movies for grown-ups released in 2016 -- e.g., Clint Eastwood's "Sully" with Tom Hanks did a solid $125 million.

    I can also imagine a huge backlash against Chazelle if his next movie isn't great. I've only seen two movies of his but I feel like I can kind of predict the rut he's in danger of falling into.

    Oh, don’t wish him bad, seriously. I loved his 2 movies; all the Millennials ( I know) loved Whiplash because that was the movie that exemplified their parents, for crying out loud.

    He is now, well, famous for Whiplash, which was a truly, amazing movie…it is so good. I want him to be part of making Hollywood movies great again. My thoughts: Chazelle is a unicorn…he knows he is an outsider. He is smart. He may do nothing for 5 years. To me, if a film maker does nothing for 5-10 years, is natural. And, perhaps, making money is not the impetus for art after all (duh, I add) ? I can only hope. I say: if you win; rest take your time for the next film. Do nothing unless you have a great idea. Am, I distracted from Friday?

  71. As for Zadie Smith and the “no time machine” argument:
    1. Progressivism started as optimism: History is a god who will fulfill all our wishes.
    2. Progressivism finishes as fatalism: History is a god who is apathetic towards our wishes,
    3. which is connected with dark warnings and threats: You cannot escape history. You wouldn’t really dare to escape history, would you?
    For me, all this thinking stopped with the lecture of Karl Popper (his denunciation of the “deification of history”). In fact the only intelligent kind of life is Popper’s “piecemeal technology”, an attempt to combine different parts: reactivate the best parts of your past, keep the best parts of your present, work out how this combination works well.

  72. @anonguy

    How many times has “the unbearable whiteness of [blank]” been a headline in mainstream journalism? Like a billion?
     
    I wonder how many even remember that there is a movie, much less a book as the source for the cliche.

    Or even more improbably, actually read the book and realize that the unbearable to which it refers is a state of grace to be exalted.

    I dunno, I hear they are off deconstructing classics now, which is a good start.

    I haven’t read that book, but I did read some of Kundera’s The Joke. He came off to me as too clever by half. Then again, I’ve never lived in the upside-down world of communism.

    So long as you’re wondering, let me join in and wonder how many of the journalists, wits, brights, hipsters, dandies, token minorities, and just plain hacks to invoke the cliche could invent an oxymoron like that. Get it, unbearable lightness!

  73. @NickG
    Well put.

    The question is, will white identity politics blossom before whites are reduced to discriminated against minorities -like they are in South Africa now - rather than discriminated against majorities.

    It's the boily frog thing.

    “The question is, will white identity politics blossom”

    According to the Left Wing megaphone, Make America Great Again is White identity politics.

    • Replies: @snorlax

    According to the Left Wing megaphone, Make America Great Again is White identity politics.
     
    Well, it is — even Mitt Romney was. It's just operating at about the same level of abstraction as FDR being Catholic identity politics. (Romney was around the abstraction level of Coolidge being black identity politics).
  74. @Jefferson
    " Time Travel as a White Privilege"

    Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown are White. So is Biff Tannen when he steals the DeLorean in Back To The Future Part 2.

    Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown. Biff of course would still be a White male, because we can no longer have Black villains in Hollywood movies as that would be extremely racist.

    The Blackened Back To The Future of course would have a Hip Hop soundtrack, no more Huey Lewis And The News.

    It will happen. Hollywood is creatively bankrupt and the Back To Future movies are one of the last gold mines they can reboot. They’d probably do a reboot of Indiana Jones if they could get away with it as well.

    That said they have retconned Little Ophan Annie, Uncle Buck, the Magnificent Seven, the Wild Wild West, The Equalizer and oh yeah “24″ has a black male lead now. No more Jack Bauer.

    Right now I’m just waiting for them to reboot 007 as a black man.

    It’s not to say there’s a lack of creative talent, the problem is they’re outsiders and relegated to making shorts put on Youtube or direct to dvd.

    .

  75. SWPL whites love other SWPL whites, though it seems to be an unspoken, unconscious thing. They will flock to Portland, Oregon to be with other whites of the same type, and then pat themselves on the back about how racially progressive they are. This is partly powered by a 50s/60s nostalgia. If they stay in the past, they can be forever fighting against injustice! Merging MLK day with Groundhog Day.

    I remember speaking to an SWPL American about Wellington, New Zealand. He was raving about how great it was – especially the McDonalds. He couldn’t articulate the reasons initially, but eventually it dawned on him that the people in the city, and the staff and customers in the McDonalds where all white, middle class, healthy people. Unlike perhaps his experience of inner city US McDonalds (blacks and underclass?). When he realised this, he stopped raving.

  76. @Tiny Duck
    Once again, clueless white people fail to recognize what was said in an article due to their white privilege getting in the way. But what else is new?

    Here's a similar article to this one that morons like you need to read: Nostalgia: a Sport for the Privileged: https://www.facebook.com/notes/racialicious-race-identity-and-pop-culture-in-a-colorstruck-world/nostalgia-a-sport-for-the-privileged/91784832286/


    Grayson Allen is a prime example https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/01/14/grayson-allen-tangles-with-a-louisville-player-and-gets-slapped-in-the-face/?utm_term=.c7fd645b00f1

    Why isn't he called a thug?

    You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with

    Tiny Duck, I have a serious question: Given the pervasiveness of racial privilege and supremacism among White people, and the anger, frustration and resentment this engenders in People of Color, don’t you agree that racial separation is the only feasible path forward. Clearly this would benefit both groups. The most strenuous and burdensome social engineering programs have been attempted since at least the Great Society programs initiated by LBJ over 50 years ago, and they have failed miserably. If you’re not a separatist, what exactly do you propose?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Sure, separation is the answer - the diverse people can have the planet Earth and whitey can have the other planets. If he's so smart, he can make it habitable like Matt Damon did.
    , @Tiny Duck
    white men continue to exist and so sepration is not currently possible
  77. @syonredux
    Sorry, Geoff Nelson, but this juxtaposition is just too tempting to pass up:

    Through a Los Angeles ruined by modernity, technology and commerce, Mia and Sebastian wander. The latter longs to open a “real” jazz club to save the genre; Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.
     
    And then we have Zadie Smith:

    Novelist Zadie Smith spoke recently of white nostalgia while receiving the Welt Literature Prize in Berlin. “Meanwhile the dream of time travel—for new presidents, literary journalists, and writers alike—is just that: a dream,” she said. “And one that only makes sense if the rights and privileges you are accorded currently were accorded to you back then, too.”
     
    Doing something strikingly similar when she was a girl:

    From the earliest age I was devoted to her. My teenage bedroom, for many years a shrine to the Golden Age of Hollywood, reserved a whole half-wall for her alone. Amid the pictures of Cary Grant, Jimmy Stewart, Donald O’Connor, Ava Gardner, and the rest, Ms Hepburn – imperious, regal and red-headed (although this last was often disguised in the publicity shots) – sat high up by the cornice of the ceiling, like a madonna looking over the lesser saints.
     
    https://www.theguardian.com/film/2003/jul/01/film.zadiesmith

    If anything, Zadie's veneration is even more extreme, what with its hierarchical aspects (Hepburn is "regal" and "imperious"). Heck, the commingling of pagan celebrity worship with Catholic symbolism (Hepburn, elevated above her Hollywood peers, is "like a madonna looking over the lesser saints") brings Camille Paglia to mind.....

    I skimmed Zadie Smith’s breakthrough novel “White Teeth.” I thought it was almost good, but pretty bad. But that may be because it seemed like something I might write, with lots of twins and other HBD tropes. My impression is that her career got jet-propelled early on, perhaps before she fully merited it (but she had shown potential), because the left liked her for being sort of black and the right liked her for being sort of conservative, kind of like how Obama got elected editor of the Harvard Law Review by the Federalist Society because they hated the white Critical Theory leftist running against him.

    She seems like a nice lady and I wish her well.

    • Replies: @Spotted Toad
    Smith is smart and well-read; I liked her essay about Facebook a lot, in which she agrees with Steve about Zuckerberg in various ways: http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2010/11/25/generation-why/

    The prize address that quote was drawn from is pretty dire, though.
    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2016/12/22/on-optimism-and-despair/
    , @Desiderius

    Obama got elected editor of the Harvard Law Review by the Federalist Society because they hated the white Critical Theory leftist running against him
     
    So instead they wound up with a white Critical Practice leftist.
    , @Cowboy Shaw
    White Teeth came out in 2000 which was real heady Peak New Labour time. She was a dream candidate for the next thing. Plus north west London was having its moment and Kilburn was perfectly just the sort of edgy place the Notting Hill / BBC crowd sort of thought about going one day, but never quite getting there.
  78. @syonredux
    RE: Time Travel as a White Privilege,

    Dunno. It's Awfully easy to imagine scenarios where being White would be problematic....like, say, in 17th Century Japan:

    On February 5, 1597, twenty-six Christians – six European Franciscan missionaries, three Japanese Jesuits and seventeen Japanese laymen including three young boys – were executed by crucifixion in Nagasaki. These individuals were raised on crosses and then pierced through with spears. While there were many more martyrs, the first martyrs came to be especially revered, the most celebrated of which was Paul Miki. The Martyrs of Japan were canonized by the Roman Catholic Church on June 8, 1862 by Blessed Pius IX,[18] and are listed on the calendar as Sts. Paul Miki and his Companions, commemorated on February 6, February 5, the date of their death, being the feast of Saint Agatha.
    Persecution continued sporadically, breaking out again in 1613 and 1630. On September 10, 1632, 55 Christians were martyred in Nagasaki in what became known as the Great Genna Martyrdom. At this time Catholicism was officially outlawed. The Church remained without clergy and theological teaching disintegrated until the arrival of Western missionaries in the 19th century.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi


    Really, I have a sneaking suspicion that SJWs simply can't imagine periods when non-Europeans were not in control.....

    Interesting detail which was conviniently forgotten – Portuguese enslaved Japs, this was one of reasons why shogun shut down portuguese colonization in japan.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Interesting detail which was conviniently forgotten – Portuguese enslaved Japs, this was one of reasons why shogun shut down portuguese colonization in japan.
     
    Slightly more complicated:

    By 1587, Toyotomi Hideyoshi had become alarmed, not because of too many converts but rather because the hegemon learned that Christian lords reportedly oversaw forced conversions of retainers and commoners, that they had garrisoned the city of Nagasaki, that they participated in the slave trade of other Japanese and, apparently offending Hideyoshi's Buddhist sentiments, that they allowed the slaughter of horses and oxen for food.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi
    , @syonredux
    More interesting details on the Japanese persecution of Christians:

    Local lords and daimyo were the first to withdraw their support, leaving the clergy and ordinary believers to face the consequences. We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning. This was “the Grand Martyrdom.” One English visitor “saw 55 martyred at Miyako at one time . . . and among them little children 5 or 6 years old burned in their mother’s arms, crying out: ‘Jesus receive our souls’. Many more are in prison who look hourly when they shall die, for very few turn pagans.” Executions were accompanied by extraordinary tortures and mutilations, which were so extreme that even later Catholic martyrologists shied from describing them in detail.
     

    Under lethal pressure, by the 1630s Christians were able to survive only in a few areas where they retained the sympathy of local lords. Even these refuges came under threat when Christians led the peasant rebellion in Shimabara, in western Kyushu, in 1637-38. This uprising was only suppressed after battles in which the government mobilized a hundred thousand men, and tens of thousands of Christians were among those massacred in the war and the ensuing repression. The outbreak was all the more terrifying to a society only just becoming accustomed to public order after long civil wars. Worse, the crisis pointed yet again to the strength of Christians along the southern coasts, regions that could easily be the targets of future naval assault: Christian enclaves could become a fifth column for foreign empires.
    The government decided that Christianity was a menace to national security that had to be utterly rooted out, and the draconian penal laws were fully enforced.
     
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/destroying-japanese-christianity/

    The need for public apostasy shaped the penalties inflicted upon Catholic clergy in Japan. Jesuits in particular were trained to expect persecution and martyrdom, and brave individuals could contemplate the threat of a speedy death, and the crown of martyrdom. Quite different was the treatment they received in the ana-tsurushi, the pit, a favored device of Nagasaki governor Takenaka Uneme:
    One grotesque example was the ana-tsurushi, the torment of the pit,
    The victim was hung from the cross beam of a gallows, head downward, into a pit five or six feet deep. The body was tightly bound in order to slow down the circulation of the blood. The holes were sealed off with planks about the victim’s loins. The pits were often partly filled with offal. There in those black holes many hung for as long as a week, exuding blood from mouth and nostrils, maddened by the fearful pressure on the brain, until death released them from almost unsupportable anguish.
    This became the favored means of punishment in the 1630s:
    In order to prevent a speedy death… by congestion, to prolong the torture and give more chance to recant – Takenaka wanted apostates rather than martyrs – often the victim’s temples were pierced. Some who had recanted under this torture later declared that neither the pain caused by burning with fire nor that of any other torture, deserved to be compared with the agony produced in this way.
    Magistrates proved adept in deploying psychological tactics, exploiting the ideological assumptions of the clergy themselves, and their boast of exercising fatherly care over their flocks. Courageous priests might be able themselves to withstand appalling physical torment, but still more disturbing was the threat that their native converts might suffer death or torture, unless the clergy conceded defeat.

     

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/denying-the-faith/

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) "Japan": rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.
     
  79. It seems obvious to modern leftists that black Americans couldn’t possibly look back to the 1950s with any nostalgia. But they’d be surprised if they actually knew or talked to any black people who lived through that period.

    Talk to an 80 year old black man in Detroit and he’s liable to tell you, “I graduated from high school in 1955, and got a job at the Ford plant. I made union wages, I bought a house and a car, my wife was able to stay home with the kids… no, life wasn’t perfect, but it was pretty good, and it seemed like everything was getting better. I only wish my grandkids could look forward to getting the kind of job I had.”

    No, that isn’t “Happy Days” or “Grease” nostalgia, but it is definitely nostalgia of a sort.

    But down South, of course, there’s absolutely NO nostalgia among blacks for a better past, right? Well, again, you might be surprised. No, no black Southerners reminisce about Bull Connor, Jim Crow or the Klan. But talk to an elderly black woman in a Southern ghetto, and she’s likely to tell you, “This USED to be a wonderful community. There didn’t used to be drugs or crime. I don’t know what happened.”

    In terms of civil rights, black Americans are infinitely better off than in the Fifties. But many good things WERE lost, and many black Americans mourn for those losses just as whites do. NO black Southerners want a return to segregation, but some DO recall their old segregated neighborhoods with fondness and pride, and wish those neighborhoods were equally pleasant places to live today.

  80. @Steve Sailer
    I skimmed Zadie Smith's breakthrough novel "White Teeth." I thought it was almost good, but pretty bad. But that may be because it seemed like something I might write, with lots of twins and other HBD tropes. My impression is that her career got jet-propelled early on, perhaps before she fully merited it (but she had shown potential), because the left liked her for being sort of black and the right liked her for being sort of conservative, kind of like how Obama got elected editor of the Harvard Law Review by the Federalist Society because they hated the white Critical Theory leftist running against him.

    She seems like a nice lady and I wish her well.

    Smith is smart and well-read; I liked her essay about Facebook a lot, in which she agrees with Steve about Zuckerberg in various ways: http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2010/11/25/generation-why/

    The prize address that quote was drawn from is pretty dire, though.

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/2016/12/22/on-optimism-and-despair/

  81. @Steve Sailer
    I skimmed Zadie Smith's breakthrough novel "White Teeth." I thought it was almost good, but pretty bad. But that may be because it seemed like something I might write, with lots of twins and other HBD tropes. My impression is that her career got jet-propelled early on, perhaps before she fully merited it (but she had shown potential), because the left liked her for being sort of black and the right liked her for being sort of conservative, kind of like how Obama got elected editor of the Harvard Law Review by the Federalist Society because they hated the white Critical Theory leftist running against him.

    She seems like a nice lady and I wish her well.

    Obama got elected editor of the Harvard Law Review by the Federalist Society because they hated the white Critical Theory leftist running against him

    So instead they wound up with a white Critical Practice leftist.

  82. Yeo, Wellington could be just about the most SWPL city on the planet.

  83. @Steve Sailer
    I skimmed Zadie Smith's breakthrough novel "White Teeth." I thought it was almost good, but pretty bad. But that may be because it seemed like something I might write, with lots of twins and other HBD tropes. My impression is that her career got jet-propelled early on, perhaps before she fully merited it (but she had shown potential), because the left liked her for being sort of black and the right liked her for being sort of conservative, kind of like how Obama got elected editor of the Harvard Law Review by the Federalist Society because they hated the white Critical Theory leftist running against him.

    She seems like a nice lady and I wish her well.

    White Teeth came out in 2000 which was real heady Peak New Labour time. She was a dream candidate for the next thing. Plus north west London was having its moment and Kilburn was perfectly just the sort of edgy place the Notting Hill / BBC crowd sort of thought about going one day, but never quite getting there.

  84. @Tiny Duck
    Once again, clueless white people fail to recognize what was said in an article due to their white privilege getting in the way. But what else is new?

    Here's a similar article to this one that morons like you need to read: Nostalgia: a Sport for the Privileged: https://www.facebook.com/notes/racialicious-race-identity-and-pop-culture-in-a-colorstruck-world/nostalgia-a-sport-for-the-privileged/91784832286/


    Grayson Allen is a prime example https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/01/14/grayson-allen-tangles-with-a-louisville-player-and-gets-slapped-in-the-face/?utm_term=.c7fd645b00f1

    Why isn't he called a thug?

    You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with

    Your trolling is improving, well done. You should also link to MillionDollarBonus on ZeroHedge.

  85. @syonredux

    Quite simply: The past represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.
     
    Whereas the future represents liberation for one group, a horror show for another.....

    Mia longs for Old Hollywood, a poster of Ingrid Bergman on her wall.
     
    Can't have that; too hideously White......

    only now the generational conflict isn’t between disaffected young people and their conservative parents, it’s between young people and their present. La La Land’s cultural language speaks in the vocabulary of loss.
     
    Yeah, I mean come on, using art to express a sense of loss....Talk about an alien concept:

    "By the rivers of Babylon, there we sat down, yea, we wept, when we remembered Zion.

    2 We hanged our harps upon the willows in the midst thereof.

    3 For there they that carried us away captive required of us a song; and they that wasted us required of us mirth, saying, Sing us one of the songs of Zion.

    4 How shall we sing the Lord's song in a strange land?

    5 If I forget thee, O Jerusalem, let my right hand forget her cunning.

    6 If I do not remember thee, let my tongue cleave to the roof of my mouth; if I prefer not Jerusalem above my chief joy."

    So where exactly does Chazelle send the viewer? The allusions begin with Rogers and Astaire, whom Chazelle first saw while studying film at Harvard.
     
    Dear God, Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers....What's next, Triumph of the Will?

    When Hollywood did traffic in nostalgia in the first part of the 20th century, it looked, famously, to the Civil War and Reconstruction, Birth of a Nation and Gone With the Wind being two of the most famous and, to put it extremely mildly, racially problematic films of the era.

     

    And don't get me started on Westerns like Fort Apache or Red River....Really, we need to make sure that people only watch these kinds of "problematic" films under properly controlled conditions:

    http://www.criticalcommons.org/Members/ccManager/clips/clockworkOrangeVidi.mp4/view

    As with so much of American cultural history, looking backwards with a romantic eye courts dangerous contemporary politics.
     
    Look, don't get the wrong idea; I'm not saying that it's bad when non-White people look backward with a romantic eye. I mean, it's totally OK for Arabs to wax nostalgic over the Caliphate. It's just bad when, you know, European people do it....

    Which brings us back to La La Land and its longing. What Gosling’s Seb and Stone’s Mia share is a commitment to the past—a place where, supposedly, dreamers dream their dreams awake. But which dreamers dreaming what dreams? Why do white Americans (in politics and film) often so wistfully return to the era before federally mandated desegregation, voting and civil rights? (Would La La Land ever have been made with two leading actors of color? Obviously not.)
     
    Well, I suppose that it could be done with two Black leads....You know, a romantic hymn to the indomitable spirit of Black America in an era of Nazi-esque oppression....If someone's interested, I'd be more than happy to do a treatment....Of course, I understand that I'll need a Black co-author....

    The film only functions as an ode to a lost era of white supremacy, and its viewers, consciously or unconsciously, participate in the delusion. The film’s politics of nostalgia and whiteness are inextricable.
     
    Look, let me spell it out for you:WE CAN'T ALLOW WHITE ANGLOS TO REMEMBER THAT THE COUNTRY USED TO BELONG TO THEM

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie? Or what of the historical record of housing discrimination, whereby 80 percent of 1940s Los Angeles real estate was off-limits to buyers or renters of color? …
     
    Again, remember, romanticized images of the past are reserved for POC. So, heavily fictionalized portraits of heroic Black women saving the Space Program in films like Hidden Figures are totally fine....

    People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.
     
    Again, unless it's the right kind of past,capisce? Somebody wants to do a film about how great Gandhi was, that's fine.

    The word “nostalgia” originates from a merging of the ancient Greek words “nostos” and “algos”—meaning “returning home” and “pain.” Modern application means “nostalgia” translates to home-sickness. Of course, bizarrely enough, the Trump voter and the La La Land viewer, however separate from one another they imagine themselves, often long for a past they never experienced. They feel homesickness for a home in which they never lived.
     
    See, we've gotta separate White people from any sense of connection to their past. They have to be deracinated, as it were.....

    Roots, connections, historical memory: those are reserved for the POC.

    People do not long for the past equally. Many do not long for it at all.

    I just don’t understand the distress with this. Not all people like animal documentaries, but this does not mean that animal documentaries shouldn’t be made for the people who do enjoy them.

    I’m fond of the past myself anyway. I mean, it had its issues. Perhaps I wouldn’t have done as well then, but regardless, isn’t that part of escapism? For an hour or two, to have everything go well and be happy?

  86. @SPMoore8
    The only reason we are inundated with "Unbearable Whiteness of Being ...." titles is due to Kundera's novel, and everyone who uses it thinks they are being clever, but it is already an old joke.

    You may expect the meme will dominate the field until Kundera writes his next novel about a frustrated gun collector dissatified with the action of his weapons: "The Unbearable Slackness of Triggers."

    Kundera wasn’t clever. He used the phrase “unbearable lightness…” – actually translated a very common expression in Czech (cross-language plagiarism is by far easiest) – but his deep thoughts were a collection of hackneyed nonsense and aging regret about his very active communist past in Prague.

    Kundera is despised in his home country. His books are seen as plagiarizing the local language and adding a dose of silly stereotypes to please his Western ‘intellectual’ audience. None of what he wrote rings true to anyone in the Czech Republic – he invented nonsense and he could had put it on the moon or in Timbuktu. He is a great example of elite alienation – in Kundera’s case he moved to Paris to handle it better as he got older. Some Hollywood hacks also end up on the French Riviera or Lake Como – same dynamic, same regret, same alienation.

    But the silly expression lives on…

  87. @Tiny Duck
    Once again, clueless white people fail to recognize what was said in an article due to their white privilege getting in the way. But what else is new?

    Here's a similar article to this one that morons like you need to read: Nostalgia: a Sport for the Privileged: https://www.facebook.com/notes/racialicious-race-identity-and-pop-culture-in-a-colorstruck-world/nostalgia-a-sport-for-the-privileged/91784832286/


    Grayson Allen is a prime example https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/01/14/grayson-allen-tangles-with-a-louisville-player-and-gets-slapped-in-the-face/?utm_term=.c7fd645b00f1

    Why isn't he called a thug?

    You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with

    “You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with.”

    Do White women need to be dealt with as well? After all 53 percent of them voted for Adolf Hitler on November 8 over the angel who was sent from the Gods, Crooked Cankles.

  88. @Jefferson
    " Time Travel as a White Privilege"

    Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown are White. So is Biff Tannen when he steals the DeLorean in Back To The Future Part 2.

    Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown. Biff of course would still be a White male, because we can no longer have Black villains in Hollywood movies as that would be extremely racist.

    The Blackened Back To The Future of course would have a Hip Hop soundtrack, no more Huey Lewis And The News.

    “Black to the Future,” perhaps?

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Black in Time:

    RIGHT ON! Into the time machine plunges Jomo, the black militant leader of BURN. “Revolution then” is his motto; he’s going to rearrange history so the blacks get a fair shake…but in another area of time, rabble-rousing white supremacist Billy Roy Whisk is also at work—fixing history so the slaves are never freed.
     
    http://www.tor.com/2016/03/18/race-riot-in-the-time-stream-going-black-in-time/
  89. What the relatively recent urge to whitewash (blackwash?) the past provokes is that the modern day progressive must feel on the edge of schizophrenia.

    On the one hand, the past is pure evil, and any attempt to point out pieces of it with anything short of condemnation is a thought-crime.

    Simultaneously, there is a need to argue that the 1950s were a time of union power, where the “working man” could earn a solid, middle-class living with limited fear of his rapacious boss because of the AFL-CIO.

    Anyone who notices the demographic shifts that started in the 1960s, plus the mass entry of women into the workforce (essentially doubling the number of job seekers, while not increasing the need for products in a congruent fashion) coincided almost perfectly with the peaking of real, inflation adjusted income (about 1974) and a steady erosion since will be shouted down.

  90. Nelson’s article (not unexpectedly) is context free. It does not mention the facts that the audience for American cinema comprises many different groups, and the movie business wants to make money. Therefore, different types of movies will be made to appeal to different audiences. There is a substantial audience for La La Land, and there is a substantial audience for diversity rich movies. So the movie industry produces both types.

  91. @snorlax

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie?
     
    From the Wikipedia article on the Zoot Suit Riots:

    Within weeks, Detroit was in the midst of the worst race riot in its history in which whites attacked African Americans and destroyed much of their neighborhood.
     
    Huh, that sounds like about exactly the opposite of what occurred.

    And indeed, compare the "Detroit race riot of 1943" page today to the same article as it appeared in 2010.

    As events — riots, the space program — pass from the memory of those now living, they're quickly retconned to serve the narrative. Fake history.

    And indeed, compare the “Detroit race riot of 1943″ page today to the same article as it appeared in 2010.

    That’s enlightening, thanks. The “new, improved” version reads like a propaganda piece seeking at every opportunity to slant things in a particular direction, whereas the older version reads as much more sticking to the bare facts without engaging in advocacy.

    In truth, the story seems to be one of racial conflict caused by mass immigration and its consequences.

  92. Brody at the New Yorker has to be one of worst reviewers out there – hilariously overwrought prose and totally bizarre conclusions (thought Attack of the Clones and Revenge of the Sith were the best Star Wars films of the entire series). I think the French New Wave fried his brain.

  93. @Jefferson
    " Time Travel as a White Privilege"

    Marty McFly and Dr. Emmett Brown are White. So is Biff Tannen when he steals the DeLorean in Back To The Future Part 2.

    Although knowing Hollywood they would Blackify a Back To The Future remake, casting Donald Glover as Marty McFly and Sanuel L. Jackson as Doc Brown. Biff of course would still be a White male, because we can no longer have Black villains in Hollywood movies as that would be extremely racist.

    The Blackened Back To The Future of course would have a Hip Hop soundtrack, no more Huey Lewis And The News.

    Come on, how did you leave Black to the Future untouched?

    And the Delorean would go to 1855 of course.

    • Replies: @The Millennial Falcon
    Ooh and John Brown instead of Doc Brown.
    , @DWB
    It would not be a Delorean.

    It would be a Buick Regal.
  94. @Brzjp
    Interesting detail which was conviniently forgotten - Portuguese enslaved Japs, this was one of reasons why shogun shut down portuguese colonization in japan.

    Interesting detail which was conviniently forgotten – Portuguese enslaved Japs, this was one of reasons why shogun shut down portuguese colonization in japan.

    Slightly more complicated:

    By 1587, Toyotomi Hideyoshi had become alarmed, not because of too many converts but rather because the hegemon learned that Christian lords reportedly oversaw forced conversions of retainers and commoners, that they had garrisoned the city of Nagasaki, that they participated in the slave trade of other Japanese and, apparently offending Hideyoshi’s Buddhist sentiments, that they allowed the slaughter of horses and oxen for food.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi

    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Did you get Snopes to fact check that article.

    Two notoriously unreliable authorities might be able to cancel each other out.
  95. @The Millennial Falcon
    Come on, how did you leave Black to the Future untouched?

    And the Delorean would go to 1855 of course.

    Ooh and John Brown instead of Doc Brown.

  96. @Anonymous
    Click on the Paste link which is second excerpt in Steve's post and there is a large pic of the two romantic white people sitting in a saloon with the jazz combo in the background.

    The look on the girl's face is classic. I don't care what the plot of the movie is or what her character is supposed to be feeling at that moment. I know that female look. Young women hate instrumental jazz. THEY HATE IT. "This place sucks. Why the fuck did you bring me here?"

    My guess is the actress was completely annoyed with the band in real life in real time right there on the film set and she used that in her acting.

    #JazzFansTooWhite?

  97. @Brzjp
    Interesting detail which was conviniently forgotten - Portuguese enslaved Japs, this was one of reasons why shogun shut down portuguese colonization in japan.

    More interesting details on the Japanese persecution of Christians:

    Local lords and daimyo were the first to withdraw their support, leaving the clergy and ordinary believers to face the consequences. We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning. This was “the Grand Martyrdom.” One English visitor “saw 55 martyred at Miyako at one time . . . and among them little children 5 or 6 years old burned in their mother’s arms, crying out: ‘Jesus receive our souls’. Many more are in prison who look hourly when they shall die, for very few turn pagans.” Executions were accompanied by extraordinary tortures and mutilations, which were so extreme that even later Catholic martyrologists shied from describing them in detail.

    Under lethal pressure, by the 1630s Christians were able to survive only in a few areas where they retained the sympathy of local lords. Even these refuges came under threat when Christians led the peasant rebellion in Shimabara, in western Kyushu, in 1637-38. This uprising was only suppressed after battles in which the government mobilized a hundred thousand men, and tens of thousands of Christians were among those massacred in the war and the ensuing repression. The outbreak was all the more terrifying to a society only just becoming accustomed to public order after long civil wars. Worse, the crisis pointed yet again to the strength of Christians along the southern coasts, regions that could easily be the targets of future naval assault: Christian enclaves could become a fifth column for foreign empires.
    The government decided that Christianity was a menace to national security that had to be utterly rooted out, and the draconian penal laws were fully enforced.

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/destroying-japanese-christianity/

    The need for public apostasy shaped the penalties inflicted upon Catholic clergy in Japan. Jesuits in particular were trained to expect persecution and martyrdom, and brave individuals could contemplate the threat of a speedy death, and the crown of martyrdom. Quite different was the treatment they received in the ana-tsurushi, the pit, a favored device of Nagasaki governor Takenaka Uneme:
    One grotesque example was the ana-tsurushi, the torment of the pit,
    The victim was hung from the cross beam of a gallows, head downward, into a pit five or six feet deep. The body was tightly bound in order to slow down the circulation of the blood. The holes were sealed off with planks about the victim’s loins. The pits were often partly filled with offal. There in those black holes many hung for as long as a week, exuding blood from mouth and nostrils, maddened by the fearful pressure on the brain, until death released them from almost unsupportable anguish.
    This became the favored means of punishment in the 1630s:
    In order to prevent a speedy death… by congestion, to prolong the torture and give more chance to recant – Takenaka wanted apostates rather than martyrs – often the victim’s temples were pierced. Some who had recanted under this torture later declared that neither the pain caused by burning with fire nor that of any other torture, deserved to be compared with the agony produced in this way.
    Magistrates proved adept in deploying psychological tactics, exploiting the ideological assumptions of the clergy themselves, and their boast of exercising fatherly care over their flocks. Courageous priests might be able themselves to withstand appalling physical torment, but still more disturbing was the threat that their native converts might suffer death or torture, unless the clergy conceded defeat.

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/denying-the-faith/

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) “Japan”: rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Looks like they have a proud tradition of resisting liberalizing influences and reducing the cancer as needed. If only liberal ambassadors now could meet as glorious as a fate.
    , @Jack D
    Read about the Rape of Nanking and some of the other stuff the Japanese did during WWII - the Japanese are not Nice People if no one is stopping them.

    The Japanese rulers realized that a Christianized Japan would mean the end of their rule and of Japanese civilization (just ask Montezuma) so they decided to get rid of it before it tore their civilization apart. You can argue with their methods but you can't argue with the results, which preserved Japanese autonomy for another 300 years. Not until the West developed nuclear weapons did Japan become a Western vassal state and even then they managed to maintain an unusual degree of autonomy for a vassal state.
    , @Peripatetic commenter
    Are you suggesting that they have shown us how to deal with the rapefugees invading Europe?
  98. @Tim Howells
    Tiny Duck, I have a serious question: Given the pervasiveness of racial privilege and supremacism among White people, and the anger, frustration and resentment this engenders in People of Color, don't you agree that racial separation is the only feasible path forward. Clearly this would benefit both groups. The most strenuous and burdensome social engineering programs have been attempted since at least the Great Society programs initiated by LBJ over 50 years ago, and they have failed miserably. If you're not a separatist, what exactly do you propose?

    Sure, separation is the answer – the diverse people can have the planet Earth and whitey can have the other planets. If he’s so smart, he can make it habitable like Matt Damon did.

    • Replies: @Tim Howells
    No need for science fiction. Just consider two dates:

    1) 1903 - First powered airplane flight at Kitty Hawk.
    2) 1969 - Neil Armstrong walks on the moon.

    Unfortunately by 1969 our focus had changed from rocket science to social engineering, and it was all downhill from there. Still these extraordinary achievements point to where our future can and should lead.
  99. @syonredux
    More interesting details on the Japanese persecution of Christians:

    Local lords and daimyo were the first to withdraw their support, leaving the clergy and ordinary believers to face the consequences. We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning. This was “the Grand Martyrdom.” One English visitor “saw 55 martyred at Miyako at one time . . . and among them little children 5 or 6 years old burned in their mother’s arms, crying out: ‘Jesus receive our souls’. Many more are in prison who look hourly when they shall die, for very few turn pagans.” Executions were accompanied by extraordinary tortures and mutilations, which were so extreme that even later Catholic martyrologists shied from describing them in detail.
     

    Under lethal pressure, by the 1630s Christians were able to survive only in a few areas where they retained the sympathy of local lords. Even these refuges came under threat when Christians led the peasant rebellion in Shimabara, in western Kyushu, in 1637-38. This uprising was only suppressed after battles in which the government mobilized a hundred thousand men, and tens of thousands of Christians were among those massacred in the war and the ensuing repression. The outbreak was all the more terrifying to a society only just becoming accustomed to public order after long civil wars. Worse, the crisis pointed yet again to the strength of Christians along the southern coasts, regions that could easily be the targets of future naval assault: Christian enclaves could become a fifth column for foreign empires.
    The government decided that Christianity was a menace to national security that had to be utterly rooted out, and the draconian penal laws were fully enforced.
     
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/destroying-japanese-christianity/

    The need for public apostasy shaped the penalties inflicted upon Catholic clergy in Japan. Jesuits in particular were trained to expect persecution and martyrdom, and brave individuals could contemplate the threat of a speedy death, and the crown of martyrdom. Quite different was the treatment they received in the ana-tsurushi, the pit, a favored device of Nagasaki governor Takenaka Uneme:
    One grotesque example was the ana-tsurushi, the torment of the pit,
    The victim was hung from the cross beam of a gallows, head downward, into a pit five or six feet deep. The body was tightly bound in order to slow down the circulation of the blood. The holes were sealed off with planks about the victim’s loins. The pits were often partly filled with offal. There in those black holes many hung for as long as a week, exuding blood from mouth and nostrils, maddened by the fearful pressure on the brain, until death released them from almost unsupportable anguish.
    This became the favored means of punishment in the 1630s:
    In order to prevent a speedy death… by congestion, to prolong the torture and give more chance to recant – Takenaka wanted apostates rather than martyrs – often the victim’s temples were pierced. Some who had recanted under this torture later declared that neither the pain caused by burning with fire nor that of any other torture, deserved to be compared with the agony produced in this way.
    Magistrates proved adept in deploying psychological tactics, exploiting the ideological assumptions of the clergy themselves, and their boast of exercising fatherly care over their flocks. Courageous priests might be able themselves to withstand appalling physical torment, but still more disturbing was the threat that their native converts might suffer death or torture, unless the clergy conceded defeat.

     

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/denying-the-faith/

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) "Japan": rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.
     

    Looks like they have a proud tradition of resisting liberalizing influences and reducing the cancer as needed. If only liberal ambassadors now could meet as glorious as a fate.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Looks like they have a proud tradition of resisting liberalizing influences and reducing the cancer as needed. If only liberal ambassadors now could meet as glorious as a fate.
     
    I've been having some fun with SJWs lately. You see, they're a tad conflicted over Martin Scorsese's Silence, which deals with the eradication of Catholicism in Japan. Naturally, they are quite defensive about the Japanese. The Japanese are, after all, POC. Hence, many of them will talk about how the Japanese had to do this, their culture was at stake, the Jesuits were foreign interlopers, etc. Then I step in and point out how those arguments could also be applied to the Spanish when they expelled the Jews and the Moors......
  100. @syonredux

    Interesting detail which was conviniently forgotten – Portuguese enslaved Japs, this was one of reasons why shogun shut down portuguese colonization in japan.
     
    Slightly more complicated:

    By 1587, Toyotomi Hideyoshi had become alarmed, not because of too many converts but rather because the hegemon learned that Christian lords reportedly oversaw forced conversions of retainers and commoners, that they had garrisoned the city of Nagasaki, that they participated in the slave trade of other Japanese and, apparently offending Hideyoshi's Buddhist sentiments, that they allowed the slaughter of horses and oxen for food.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_the_Catholic_Church_in_Japan#Toyotomi_Hideyoshi

    Did you get Snopes to fact check that article.

    Two notoriously unreliable authorities might be able to cancel each other out.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Did you get Snopes to fact check that article.

    Two notoriously unreliable authorities might be able to cancel each other out.
     
    If you spot any factual inaccuracies, feel free to point them out.
  101. @syonredux
    More interesting details on the Japanese persecution of Christians:

    Local lords and daimyo were the first to withdraw their support, leaving the clergy and ordinary believers to face the consequences. We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning. This was “the Grand Martyrdom.” One English visitor “saw 55 martyred at Miyako at one time . . . and among them little children 5 or 6 years old burned in their mother’s arms, crying out: ‘Jesus receive our souls’. Many more are in prison who look hourly when they shall die, for very few turn pagans.” Executions were accompanied by extraordinary tortures and mutilations, which were so extreme that even later Catholic martyrologists shied from describing them in detail.
     

    Under lethal pressure, by the 1630s Christians were able to survive only in a few areas where they retained the sympathy of local lords. Even these refuges came under threat when Christians led the peasant rebellion in Shimabara, in western Kyushu, in 1637-38. This uprising was only suppressed after battles in which the government mobilized a hundred thousand men, and tens of thousands of Christians were among those massacred in the war and the ensuing repression. The outbreak was all the more terrifying to a society only just becoming accustomed to public order after long civil wars. Worse, the crisis pointed yet again to the strength of Christians along the southern coasts, regions that could easily be the targets of future naval assault: Christian enclaves could become a fifth column for foreign empires.
    The government decided that Christianity was a menace to national security that had to be utterly rooted out, and the draconian penal laws were fully enforced.
     
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/destroying-japanese-christianity/

    The need for public apostasy shaped the penalties inflicted upon Catholic clergy in Japan. Jesuits in particular were trained to expect persecution and martyrdom, and brave individuals could contemplate the threat of a speedy death, and the crown of martyrdom. Quite different was the treatment they received in the ana-tsurushi, the pit, a favored device of Nagasaki governor Takenaka Uneme:
    One grotesque example was the ana-tsurushi, the torment of the pit,
    The victim was hung from the cross beam of a gallows, head downward, into a pit five or six feet deep. The body was tightly bound in order to slow down the circulation of the blood. The holes were sealed off with planks about the victim’s loins. The pits were often partly filled with offal. There in those black holes many hung for as long as a week, exuding blood from mouth and nostrils, maddened by the fearful pressure on the brain, until death released them from almost unsupportable anguish.
    This became the favored means of punishment in the 1630s:
    In order to prevent a speedy death… by congestion, to prolong the torture and give more chance to recant – Takenaka wanted apostates rather than martyrs – often the victim’s temples were pierced. Some who had recanted under this torture later declared that neither the pain caused by burning with fire nor that of any other torture, deserved to be compared with the agony produced in this way.
    Magistrates proved adept in deploying psychological tactics, exploiting the ideological assumptions of the clergy themselves, and their boast of exercising fatherly care over their flocks. Courageous priests might be able themselves to withstand appalling physical torment, but still more disturbing was the threat that their native converts might suffer death or torture, unless the clergy conceded defeat.

     

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/denying-the-faith/

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) "Japan": rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.
     

    Read about the Rape of Nanking and some of the other stuff the Japanese did during WWII – the Japanese are not Nice People if no one is stopping them.

    The Japanese rulers realized that a Christianized Japan would mean the end of their rule and of Japanese civilization (just ask Montezuma) so they decided to get rid of it before it tore their civilization apart. You can argue with their methods but you can’t argue with the results, which preserved Japanese autonomy for another 300 years. Not until the West developed nuclear weapons did Japan become a Western vassal state and even then they managed to maintain an unusual degree of autonomy for a vassal state.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    The Japanese rulers realized that a Christianized Japan would mean the end of their rule and of Japanese civilization (just ask Montezuma)
     
    Dunno. The factors at play in Mexico (Old World diseases introduced to Virgin soil, etc) were not present in Japan.I tend to doubt that the Iberian powers would have been able to take the place over.

    And I've seen scenarios where a Christianized Japan becomes a major power in the 17th and 18th centuries. Think the Meiji Restoration, only now the technological gap that the Japanese have to overcome is vastly smaller....

  102. If, like so many Black Americans, you’re forever fighting for your freedom instead of using it to accomplish something, you’ve a permanent excuse for having little or nothing to show for it.

  103. @Anonymous
    Click on the Paste link which is second excerpt in Steve's post and there is a large pic of the two romantic white people sitting in a saloon with the jazz combo in the background.

    The look on the girl's face is classic. I don't care what the plot of the movie is or what her character is supposed to be feeling at that moment. I know that female look. Young women hate instrumental jazz. THEY HATE IT. "This place sucks. Why the fuck did you bring me here?"

    My guess is the actress was completely annoyed with the band in real life in real time right there on the film set and she used that in her acting.

    I think this observation may be true of young women for all instrumental music. I still vividly recall a party in high school. A few of us guys, all musicians, put on “La Villa Strangiato” because another of us had never heard it (“What?! You hafta hear it!”).

    About thirty second into the song, every single one of the girls assumed an air of bewildered petulance, as if someone had farted and they couldn’t quite decide how to address it without being gauche. One of them, a pretty and popular cheerleader (but very bright, too; she took AP Calculus and was in the National Honor Society) finally demanded “Where are the words?!”

    It was now us guys’ turn to react as if someone had just farted.

  104. @Jack D
    Read about the Rape of Nanking and some of the other stuff the Japanese did during WWII - the Japanese are not Nice People if no one is stopping them.

    The Japanese rulers realized that a Christianized Japan would mean the end of their rule and of Japanese civilization (just ask Montezuma) so they decided to get rid of it before it tore their civilization apart. You can argue with their methods but you can't argue with the results, which preserved Japanese autonomy for another 300 years. Not until the West developed nuclear weapons did Japan become a Western vassal state and even then they managed to maintain an unusual degree of autonomy for a vassal state.

    The Japanese rulers realized that a Christianized Japan would mean the end of their rule and of Japanese civilization (just ask Montezuma)

    Dunno. The factors at play in Mexico (Old World diseases introduced to Virgin soil, etc) were not present in Japan.I tend to doubt that the Iberian powers would have been able to take the place over.

    And I’ve seen scenarios where a Christianized Japan becomes a major power in the 17th and 18th centuries. Think the Meiji Restoration, only now the technological gap that the Japanese have to overcome is vastly smaller….

    • Replies: @Jack D
    Those factors weren't present in the Philippines or Indonesia or Indochina but they all ended up as European colonies. The Portuguese would have considered it their sacred duty to make Japan a colony if they could.
  105. @Tim Howells
    Tiny Duck, I have a serious question: Given the pervasiveness of racial privilege and supremacism among White people, and the anger, frustration and resentment this engenders in People of Color, don't you agree that racial separation is the only feasible path forward. Clearly this would benefit both groups. The most strenuous and burdensome social engineering programs have been attempted since at least the Great Society programs initiated by LBJ over 50 years ago, and they have failed miserably. If you're not a separatist, what exactly do you propose?

    white men continue to exist and so sepration is not currently possible

  106. @DWB
    "Black to the Future," perhaps?

    Black in Time:

    RIGHT ON! Into the time machine plunges Jomo, the black militant leader of BURN. “Revolution then” is his motto; he’s going to rearrange history so the blacks get a fair shake…but in another area of time, rabble-rousing white supremacist Billy Roy Whisk is also at work—fixing history so the slaves are never freed.

    http://www.tor.com/2016/03/18/race-riot-in-the-time-stream-going-black-in-time/

  107. @Peripatetic commenter
    Did you get Snopes to fact check that article.

    Two notoriously unreliable authorities might be able to cancel each other out.

    Did you get Snopes to fact check that article.

    Two notoriously unreliable authorities might be able to cancel each other out.

    If you spot any factual inaccuracies, feel free to point them out.

  108. @Daniel Chieh
    Looks like they have a proud tradition of resisting liberalizing influences and reducing the cancer as needed. If only liberal ambassadors now could meet as glorious as a fate.

    Looks like they have a proud tradition of resisting liberalizing influences and reducing the cancer as needed. If only liberal ambassadors now could meet as glorious as a fate.

    I’ve been having some fun with SJWs lately. You see, they’re a tad conflicted over Martin Scorsese’s Silence, which deals with the eradication of Catholicism in Japan. Naturally, they are quite defensive about the Japanese. The Japanese are, after all, POC. Hence, many of them will talk about how the Japanese had to do this, their culture was at stake, the Jesuits were foreign interlopers, etc. Then I step in and point out how those arguments could also be applied to the Spanish when they expelled the Jews and the Moors……

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    Well, the fact is that the missionaries were yesterday's version of NGOs up to and including serving espionage purposes for foreign governments. For all practical purposes, modern government restrictions on NGOs serve the same purpose of resistance from Soros' little womyn and gender-nonspecific agents.
  109. • Replies: @Jefferson
    "The dream be badass and shi*."

    I had a dream muthaf**ka.
  110. @syonredux

    Looks like they have a proud tradition of resisting liberalizing influences and reducing the cancer as needed. If only liberal ambassadors now could meet as glorious as a fate.
     
    I've been having some fun with SJWs lately. You see, they're a tad conflicted over Martin Scorsese's Silence, which deals with the eradication of Catholicism in Japan. Naturally, they are quite defensive about the Japanese. The Japanese are, after all, POC. Hence, many of them will talk about how the Japanese had to do this, their culture was at stake, the Jesuits were foreign interlopers, etc. Then I step in and point out how those arguments could also be applied to the Spanish when they expelled the Jews and the Moors......

    Well, the fact is that the missionaries were yesterday’s version of NGOs up to and including serving espionage purposes for foreign governments. For all practical purposes, modern government restrictions on NGOs serve the same purpose of resistance from Soros’ little womyn and gender-nonspecific agents.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Well, the fact is that the missionaries were yesterday’s version of NGOs up to and including serving espionage purposes for foreign governments. For all practical purposes, modern government restrictions on NGOs serve the same purpose of resistance from Soros’ little womyn and gender-nonspecific agents.
     
    Remember, the overwhelming majority of the Christians who died were Japanese:

    We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning.
     

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) “Japan”: rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.
     
    I get a big kick out of watching SJWs defend that kind of slaughter....
  111. @The Millennial Falcon
    Come on, how did you leave Black to the Future untouched?

    And the Delorean would go to 1855 of course.

    It would not be a Delorean.

    It would be a Buick Regal.

  112. Apropos of [probably] nothing:

    When I was a kid (I’m old) nostalgia meant “homesickness” But by the late seventies, it came to mean “a longing for the past.” No one ever explained the reason for the change. I suppose the meaning evolved because we already had a single word to describe the former, but not the latter.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    See Susan J. Matt's 2011 book "Homesickness: An American History" for a full discussion of exactly that question. Short answer: it was discovered in the 1970s that you could sell people 1950s rock n roll stuff under the label "nostalgia," but the word "homesickness" wasn't good for business.

    Here's my review of her book:

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/homesickness-theres-a-reason-stand-and-delivers-escalante-returned-to-bolivia

    , @Jack D
    Nostalgia literally means "return home pain" but it's a (relatively) modern coinage derived from the German "heimweh" (heim as in home, weh as in "Oy veh"). It had nothing to do with a longing for the past, originally.
  113. @Daniel Chieh
    Well, the fact is that the missionaries were yesterday's version of NGOs up to and including serving espionage purposes for foreign governments. For all practical purposes, modern government restrictions on NGOs serve the same purpose of resistance from Soros' little womyn and gender-nonspecific agents.

    Well, the fact is that the missionaries were yesterday’s version of NGOs up to and including serving espionage purposes for foreign governments. For all practical purposes, modern government restrictions on NGOs serve the same purpose of resistance from Soros’ little womyn and gender-nonspecific agents.

    Remember, the overwhelming majority of the Christians who died were Japanese:

    We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning.

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) “Japan”: rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.

    I get a big kick out of watching SJWs defend that kind of slaughter….

    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter

    Remember, the overwhelming majority of the Christians who died were Japanese:
     
    Are you hinting that this should be the fate of SJWs?
  114. @Anon
    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2017/01/17/10-killed-29-wounded-in-mlk-day-weekend-shootings/

    The dream be badass and shi*.

    “The dream be badass and shi*.”

    I had a dream muthaf**ka.

    • Replies: @Anon
    If King had been born around 1985, that woulda been his line.

    He would have been a rapper. Smartin' Lootin' King. A dude with tattoos all over, gold on his teeth, and rap songs about he be the baddest mofo.
  115. Anon • Disclaimer says:

    “Demographically, [Damien] Chazelle’s fantasy Los Angeles is much like Woody Allen’s New York or Paris: no Mexicans, Koreans, Persians, or Russians, just good-looking white Americans and dignified old black jazz musicians. To a semi-French artist like Chazelle, America will always be culturally white and black, and the post-1965 newcomers don’t much matter.”

    This is interesting because the French, at least the cultural elites, do care about stuff from all over the world. French are crazy about cinema, which is seen as an international art-form. I’ve heard there is no better place to see films from all over the world than Paris.
    And this means films from Africa, Arabia, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and etc. Big part of French pride is they care about world cultures in the way that Americans don’t. Americans just impose Hollywood on all the world whereas French open their theaters to function as hubbub for all the films of the world.

    In contrast, US film culture is seen as ‘provincial’, even though Americans might argue that since America is a world unto itself, it doesn’t need to pay too much attention to the rest of the world(full of losers). After all, the ‘provincialism’ of an empire is different from provincialism of a small town. After all, the entire world looks to the imperial ‘provincialism’ as something to imitate.

    French still think in terms of culture. So, no matter how poor or loser-like a nation, it has value if it produces things of cultural value. In the US, the focus is on box office, success, the popularity thing. Things were somewhat different in the late 60s and early 70s when Hollywood was going through a major phase. It afforded Francophile American film-makers to try their own thing. It was when LAST TANGO IN PARIS was the talk of the town. It was set in France, directed by Italian, and starred the legendary American Brando. (Sure came long way from American In Paris).

    So,the French are interested in different cultures. But they seem to like the notion of ‘authenticity’. It’s no wonder the French have preferred Mizoguchi, Naruse, and Ozu over Kurosawa. They were seen as more authentically Japanese as Kurosawa seemed too ‘western’, even ‘American’. To be sure, the French can admire something for its stylistic authenticity even if it lacks cultural authenticity. Good example is ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, which played in one Paris theater for 6 yrs straight. It also stirred up a Duster craze in France. Even though an Italian Western isn’t authentic, Leone had a real personal vision.

    The French want what is authentic about America. And to them, what is most vital in American Culture is pop culture that is spontaneous, simple, direct, explosive, neo-barbaric, and/or amnesiac. America is the Year Zero of culture. This leads to both love/hate among the French. Americans are shallow stupid people cut off from the past. But it is precisely this rejection of the past that allows Americans to begin with blank slate and come up with something totally fantastic and new. And even though the American Emotion is rather childlike, simple, and raw, the expressions can still be genius through the craft of talented artists. BUT, since Americans are childlike or simple-minded, they are to be seen as something like idiot-savants who don’t really know what they are doing or know the full value of what they’ve created.
    (The French are sometimes right about this. Cahiers Du Cinema voted CARLITO’S WAY as the best film of the 90s, whereas American critics were mixed. While it may not be best of the decade, it is a tremendous movie.) So, it takes French intellectuals to fully flesh out what is so ‘genius’ about American stuff.

    It’s no wonder that the French generally prefer American genre films. They figure that Europeans are best at art films and personal films with real thought and intellect. In contrast, Americans are best at coming up with formula and working within them. And yet, there is a certain honesty in this simplicity and attention to popularity.
    This probably explains why the French were the first to hail Clint Eastwood as an ‘artist’. He seemed like a simple American director without pretensions. He was apple pie. Americans should leave the fancy gourmet to the French. Americans should stick to making honest apple pies and hamburgers. French are generally irritated when Americans try to make European-like films. They prefer Woody Allen making comedies, romances, and etc than stuff like INTERIORS or ANOTHER WOMAN.
    The French preferred Allen working in the US to Allen working in France.
    They prefer De Palma doing a horror or gangster flick than an ‘art film’.

    Though stage musicals existed before America, Hollywood did more than any film industry to create the modern movie musical. And the French have loved its directness and lack of pretension. The black component in American musical scene makes good sense to the French since American Pop Culture is seen as a Year Zero creation. Loss of the past, and explosion of the new. So, the combination of Afro-jivery + technology + style + sass = a very American art form.
    And because the main value of American Culture is simplicity and/or intensity, the French don’t much care about other aspects of American Culture. Frenchman will watch an authentic movie about Mexico made by Mexicans in Mexico, but the idea of Mexican-American seems meaningless to them. It’s neither Mexican nor American. An identity in a limbo-state.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    Yeah, it's kind of interesting to compare the Americans who have had a huge impact in France (Poe, Howard Hawks, William Faulkner) vs the ones who haven't (Henry James, F Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton).
    , @syonredux
    I've always enjoyed how Benjamin Franklin (very much an urbane man of the world) play-acted the role of a backwoodsman for the French. As near as I can tell, Franklin got a bit of a kick out of it.
  116. @I, Libertine
    Apropos of [probably] nothing:

    When I was a kid (I'm old) nostalgia meant "homesickness" But by the late seventies, it came to mean "a longing for the past." No one ever explained the reason for the change. I suppose the meaning evolved because we already had a single word to describe the former, but not the latter.

    See Susan J. Matt’s 2011 book “Homesickness: An American History” for a full discussion of exactly that question. Short answer: it was discovered in the 1970s that you could sell people 1950s rock n roll stuff under the label “nostalgia,” but the word “homesickness” wasn’t good for business.

    Here’s my review of her book:

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/homesickness-theres-a-reason-stand-and-delivers-escalante-returned-to-bolivia

  117. @Anon
    "Demographically, [Damien] Chazelle’s fantasy Los Angeles is much like Woody Allen’s New York or Paris: no Mexicans, Koreans, Persians, or Russians, just good-looking white Americans and dignified old black jazz musicians. To a semi-French artist like Chazelle, America will always be culturally white and black, and the post-1965 newcomers don’t much matter."

    This is interesting because the French, at least the cultural elites, do care about stuff from all over the world. French are crazy about cinema, which is seen as an international art-form. I've heard there is no better place to see films from all over the world than Paris.
    And this means films from Africa, Arabia, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and etc. Big part of French pride is they care about world cultures in the way that Americans don't. Americans just impose Hollywood on all the world whereas French open their theaters to function as hubbub for all the films of the world.

    In contrast, US film culture is seen as 'provincial', even though Americans might argue that since America is a world unto itself, it doesn't need to pay too much attention to the rest of the world(full of losers). After all, the 'provincialism' of an empire is different from provincialism of a small town. After all, the entire world looks to the imperial 'provincialism' as something to imitate.

    French still think in terms of culture. So, no matter how poor or loser-like a nation, it has value if it produces things of cultural value. In the US, the focus is on box office, success, the popularity thing. Things were somewhat different in the late 60s and early 70s when Hollywood was going through a major phase. It afforded Francophile American film-makers to try their own thing. It was when LAST TANGO IN PARIS was the talk of the town. It was set in France, directed by Italian, and starred the legendary American Brando. (Sure came long way from American In Paris).

    So,the French are interested in different cultures. But they seem to like the notion of 'authenticity'. It's no wonder the French have preferred Mizoguchi, Naruse, and Ozu over Kurosawa. They were seen as more authentically Japanese as Kurosawa seemed too 'western', even 'American'. To be sure, the French can admire something for its stylistic authenticity even if it lacks cultural authenticity. Good example is ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, which played in one Paris theater for 6 yrs straight. It also stirred up a Duster craze in France. Even though an Italian Western isn't authentic, Leone had a real personal vision.

    The French want what is authentic about America. And to them, what is most vital in American Culture is pop culture that is spontaneous, simple, direct, explosive, neo-barbaric, and/or amnesiac. America is the Year Zero of culture. This leads to both love/hate among the French. Americans are shallow stupid people cut off from the past. But it is precisely this rejection of the past that allows Americans to begin with blank slate and come up with something totally fantastic and new. And even though the American Emotion is rather childlike, simple, and raw, the expressions can still be genius through the craft of talented artists. BUT, since Americans are childlike or simple-minded, they are to be seen as something like idiot-savants who don't really know what they are doing or know the full value of what they've created.
    (The French are sometimes right about this. Cahiers Du Cinema voted CARLITO'S WAY as the best film of the 90s, whereas American critics were mixed. While it may not be best of the decade, it is a tremendous movie.) So, it takes French intellectuals to fully flesh out what is so 'genius' about American stuff.

    It's no wonder that the French generally prefer American genre films. They figure that Europeans are best at art films and personal films with real thought and intellect. In contrast, Americans are best at coming up with formula and working within them. And yet, there is a certain honesty in this simplicity and attention to popularity.
    This probably explains why the French were the first to hail Clint Eastwood as an 'artist'. He seemed like a simple American director without pretensions. He was apple pie. Americans should leave the fancy gourmet to the French. Americans should stick to making honest apple pies and hamburgers. French are generally irritated when Americans try to make European-like films. They prefer Woody Allen making comedies, romances, and etc than stuff like INTERIORS or ANOTHER WOMAN.
    The French preferred Allen working in the US to Allen working in France.
    They prefer De Palma doing a horror or gangster flick than an 'art film'.

    Though stage musicals existed before America, Hollywood did more than any film industry to create the modern movie musical. And the French have loved its directness and lack of pretension. The black component in American musical scene makes good sense to the French since American Pop Culture is seen as a Year Zero creation. Loss of the past, and explosion of the new. So, the combination of Afro-jivery + technology + style + sass = a very American art form.
    And because the main value of American Culture is simplicity and/or intensity, the French don't much care about other aspects of American Culture. Frenchman will watch an authentic movie about Mexico made by Mexicans in Mexico, but the idea of Mexican-American seems meaningless to them. It's neither Mexican nor American. An identity in a limbo-state.

    Yeah, it’s kind of interesting to compare the Americans who have had a huge impact in France (Poe, Howard Hawks, William Faulkner) vs the ones who haven’t (Henry James, F Scott Fitzgerald, Edith Wharton).

  118. @Anon
    "Demographically, [Damien] Chazelle’s fantasy Los Angeles is much like Woody Allen’s New York or Paris: no Mexicans, Koreans, Persians, or Russians, just good-looking white Americans and dignified old black jazz musicians. To a semi-French artist like Chazelle, America will always be culturally white and black, and the post-1965 newcomers don’t much matter."

    This is interesting because the French, at least the cultural elites, do care about stuff from all over the world. French are crazy about cinema, which is seen as an international art-form. I've heard there is no better place to see films from all over the world than Paris.
    And this means films from Africa, Arabia, Asia, Latin America, Eastern Europe, and etc. Big part of French pride is they care about world cultures in the way that Americans don't. Americans just impose Hollywood on all the world whereas French open their theaters to function as hubbub for all the films of the world.

    In contrast, US film culture is seen as 'provincial', even though Americans might argue that since America is a world unto itself, it doesn't need to pay too much attention to the rest of the world(full of losers). After all, the 'provincialism' of an empire is different from provincialism of a small town. After all, the entire world looks to the imperial 'provincialism' as something to imitate.

    French still think in terms of culture. So, no matter how poor or loser-like a nation, it has value if it produces things of cultural value. In the US, the focus is on box office, success, the popularity thing. Things were somewhat different in the late 60s and early 70s when Hollywood was going through a major phase. It afforded Francophile American film-makers to try their own thing. It was when LAST TANGO IN PARIS was the talk of the town. It was set in France, directed by Italian, and starred the legendary American Brando. (Sure came long way from American In Paris).

    So,the French are interested in different cultures. But they seem to like the notion of 'authenticity'. It's no wonder the French have preferred Mizoguchi, Naruse, and Ozu over Kurosawa. They were seen as more authentically Japanese as Kurosawa seemed too 'western', even 'American'. To be sure, the French can admire something for its stylistic authenticity even if it lacks cultural authenticity. Good example is ONCE UPON A TIME IN THE WEST, which played in one Paris theater for 6 yrs straight. It also stirred up a Duster craze in France. Even though an Italian Western isn't authentic, Leone had a real personal vision.

    The French want what is authentic about America. And to them, what is most vital in American Culture is pop culture that is spontaneous, simple, direct, explosive, neo-barbaric, and/or amnesiac. America is the Year Zero of culture. This leads to both love/hate among the French. Americans are shallow stupid people cut off from the past. But it is precisely this rejection of the past that allows Americans to begin with blank slate and come up with something totally fantastic and new. And even though the American Emotion is rather childlike, simple, and raw, the expressions can still be genius through the craft of talented artists. BUT, since Americans are childlike or simple-minded, they are to be seen as something like idiot-savants who don't really know what they are doing or know the full value of what they've created.
    (The French are sometimes right about this. Cahiers Du Cinema voted CARLITO'S WAY as the best film of the 90s, whereas American critics were mixed. While it may not be best of the decade, it is a tremendous movie.) So, it takes French intellectuals to fully flesh out what is so 'genius' about American stuff.

    It's no wonder that the French generally prefer American genre films. They figure that Europeans are best at art films and personal films with real thought and intellect. In contrast, Americans are best at coming up with formula and working within them. And yet, there is a certain honesty in this simplicity and attention to popularity.
    This probably explains why the French were the first to hail Clint Eastwood as an 'artist'. He seemed like a simple American director without pretensions. He was apple pie. Americans should leave the fancy gourmet to the French. Americans should stick to making honest apple pies and hamburgers. French are generally irritated when Americans try to make European-like films. They prefer Woody Allen making comedies, romances, and etc than stuff like INTERIORS or ANOTHER WOMAN.
    The French preferred Allen working in the US to Allen working in France.
    They prefer De Palma doing a horror or gangster flick than an 'art film'.

    Though stage musicals existed before America, Hollywood did more than any film industry to create the modern movie musical. And the French have loved its directness and lack of pretension. The black component in American musical scene makes good sense to the French since American Pop Culture is seen as a Year Zero creation. Loss of the past, and explosion of the new. So, the combination of Afro-jivery + technology + style + sass = a very American art form.
    And because the main value of American Culture is simplicity and/or intensity, the French don't much care about other aspects of American Culture. Frenchman will watch an authentic movie about Mexico made by Mexicans in Mexico, but the idea of Mexican-American seems meaningless to them. It's neither Mexican nor American. An identity in a limbo-state.

    I’ve always enjoyed how Benjamin Franklin (very much an urbane man of the world) play-acted the role of a backwoodsman for the French. As near as I can tell, Franklin got a bit of a kick out of it.

  119. @snorlax

    Where do LA’s Zoot Suit Riots of 1943, when thousands of white folks organized themselves into street gangs to assault people of color, fit in Chazelle’s reverie?
     
    From the Wikipedia article on the Zoot Suit Riots:

    Within weeks, Detroit was in the midst of the worst race riot in its history in which whites attacked African Americans and destroyed much of their neighborhood.
     
    Huh, that sounds like about exactly the opposite of what occurred.

    And indeed, compare the "Detroit race riot of 1943" page today to the same article as it appeared in 2010.

    As events — riots, the space program — pass from the memory of those now living, they're quickly retconned to serve the narrative. Fake history.

    I don’t know. As long as you know how to read that sort of article, it’s still very clear. It has this line:

    At the time, white commissions attributed the riot to black hoodlums.

    Sort of like the way that, at the time, white television reporters attributed the post-Katrina unpleasantness in New Orleans to black thugs.

    • Replies: @snorlax
    It, as you would expect, had the same bias then as now, but the bias to fact ratio was far lower than the new and improved version.

    Sort of like the way that, at the time, white television reporters attributed the post-Katrina unpleasantness in New Orleans to black thugs.
     
    Did they? I recall it being blamed on George Bush and "the kind of society that would allow this to happen."
  120. I decided long ago to never read an article that used the word “whiteness” and I’ve been the better for it.

  121. @syonredux
    More interesting details on the Japanese persecution of Christians:

    Local lords and daimyo were the first to withdraw their support, leaving the clergy and ordinary believers to face the consequences. We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning. This was “the Grand Martyrdom.” One English visitor “saw 55 martyred at Miyako at one time . . . and among them little children 5 or 6 years old burned in their mother’s arms, crying out: ‘Jesus receive our souls’. Many more are in prison who look hourly when they shall die, for very few turn pagans.” Executions were accompanied by extraordinary tortures and mutilations, which were so extreme that even later Catholic martyrologists shied from describing them in detail.
     

    Under lethal pressure, by the 1630s Christians were able to survive only in a few areas where they retained the sympathy of local lords. Even these refuges came under threat when Christians led the peasant rebellion in Shimabara, in western Kyushu, in 1637-38. This uprising was only suppressed after battles in which the government mobilized a hundred thousand men, and tens of thousands of Christians were among those massacred in the war and the ensuing repression. The outbreak was all the more terrifying to a society only just becoming accustomed to public order after long civil wars. Worse, the crisis pointed yet again to the strength of Christians along the southern coasts, regions that could easily be the targets of future naval assault: Christian enclaves could become a fifth column for foreign empires.
    The government decided that Christianity was a menace to national security that had to be utterly rooted out, and the draconian penal laws were fully enforced.
     
    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/destroying-japanese-christianity/

    The need for public apostasy shaped the penalties inflicted upon Catholic clergy in Japan. Jesuits in particular were trained to expect persecution and martyrdom, and brave individuals could contemplate the threat of a speedy death, and the crown of martyrdom. Quite different was the treatment they received in the ana-tsurushi, the pit, a favored device of Nagasaki governor Takenaka Uneme:
    One grotesque example was the ana-tsurushi, the torment of the pit,
    The victim was hung from the cross beam of a gallows, head downward, into a pit five or six feet deep. The body was tightly bound in order to slow down the circulation of the blood. The holes were sealed off with planks about the victim’s loins. The pits were often partly filled with offal. There in those black holes many hung for as long as a week, exuding blood from mouth and nostrils, maddened by the fearful pressure on the brain, until death released them from almost unsupportable anguish.
    This became the favored means of punishment in the 1630s:
    In order to prevent a speedy death… by congestion, to prolong the torture and give more chance to recant – Takenaka wanted apostates rather than martyrs – often the victim’s temples were pierced. Some who had recanted under this torture later declared that neither the pain caused by burning with fire nor that of any other torture, deserved to be compared with the agony produced in this way.
    Magistrates proved adept in deploying psychological tactics, exploiting the ideological assumptions of the clergy themselves, and their boast of exercising fatherly care over their flocks. Courageous priests might be able themselves to withstand appalling physical torment, but still more disturbing was the threat that their native converts might suffer death or torture, unless the clergy conceded defeat.

     

    http://www.patheos.com/blogs/anxiousbench/2014/02/denying-the-faith/

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) "Japan": rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.
     

    Are you suggesting that they have shown us how to deal with the rapefugees invading Europe?

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Are you suggesting that they have shown us how to deal with the rapefugees invading Europe?
     
    Oh, we wouldn't have to do anything that drastic. After all,the rapefugee problem only exists because we allow it.....
  122. @syonredux

    Well, the fact is that the missionaries were yesterday’s version of NGOs up to and including serving espionage purposes for foreign governments. For all practical purposes, modern government restrictions on NGOs serve the same purpose of resistance from Soros’ little womyn and gender-nonspecific agents.
     
    Remember, the overwhelming majority of the Christians who died were Japanese:

    We know the names of at least 1,200 who perished between 1614 and 1630, and one day in 1622, 52 Christians were executed in Nagasaki, by beheading and burning.
     

    Japan, Shimabara Rebellion (1638)

    Dict.Wars: All but 105 of the 37,000 Christian rebels killed.
    Britannica, 11th ed. (1911) “Japan”: rebel force of 20,000 fighting men and 17,000 women and children wiped out, except for 105 POWs.
     
    I get a big kick out of watching SJWs defend that kind of slaughter....

    Remember, the overwhelming majority of the Christians who died were Japanese:

    Are you hinting that this should be the fate of SJWs?

  123. @Peripatetic commenter
    Are you suggesting that they have shown us how to deal with the rapefugees invading Europe?

    Are you suggesting that they have shown us how to deal with the rapefugees invading Europe?

    Oh, we wouldn’t have to do anything that drastic. After all,the rapefugee problem only exists because we allow it…..

    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    I dunno, ana-tsurushi sounds like a great treatment for the "trans" mentally ill.
  124. @syonredux

    Are you suggesting that they have shown us how to deal with the rapefugees invading Europe?
     
    Oh, we wouldn't have to do anything that drastic. After all,the rapefugee problem only exists because we allow it.....

    I dunno, ana-tsurushi sounds like a great treatment for the “trans” mentally ill.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    I dunno, ana-tsurushi sounds like a great treatment for the “trans” mentally ill.
     
    I think that we should follow Dr Paul R. McHugh's advice:

    This interrelationship of cultural antinomianism and a psychiatric misplaced emphasis is seen at its grimmest in the practice known as sex-reassignment surgery. I happen to know about this because Johns Hopkins was one of the places in the United States where this practice was given its start. It was part of my intention, when I arrived in Baltimore in 1975, to help end it.
     

    It is not obvious how this patient's feeling that he is a woman trapped in a man's body differs from the feeling of a patient with anorexia nervosa that she is obese despite her emaciated, cachectic state. We don't do liposuction on anorexics. Why amputate the genitals of these poor men? Surely, the fault is in the mind not the member.
     
    http://www.tsroadmap.com/info/paul-mchugh-transsexual.html

    Don't allow the mentally ill to physicalize their insanity....
  125. @Daniel Chieh
    I dunno, ana-tsurushi sounds like a great treatment for the "trans" mentally ill.

    I dunno, ana-tsurushi sounds like a great treatment for the “trans” mentally ill.

    I think that we should follow Dr Paul R. McHugh’s advice:

    This interrelationship of cultural antinomianism and a psychiatric misplaced emphasis is seen at its grimmest in the practice known as sex-reassignment surgery. I happen to know about this because Johns Hopkins was one of the places in the United States where this practice was given its start. It was part of my intention, when I arrived in Baltimore in 1975, to help end it.

    It is not obvious how this patient’s feeling that he is a woman trapped in a man’s body differs from the feeling of a patient with anorexia nervosa that she is obese despite her emaciated, cachectic state. We don’t do liposuction on anorexics. Why amputate the genitals of these poor men? Surely, the fault is in the mind not the member.

    http://www.tsroadmap.com/info/paul-mchugh-transsexual.html

    Don’t allow the mentally ill to physicalize their insanity….

  126. @syonredux

    The Japanese rulers realized that a Christianized Japan would mean the end of their rule and of Japanese civilization (just ask Montezuma)
     
    Dunno. The factors at play in Mexico (Old World diseases introduced to Virgin soil, etc) were not present in Japan.I tend to doubt that the Iberian powers would have been able to take the place over.

    And I've seen scenarios where a Christianized Japan becomes a major power in the 17th and 18th centuries. Think the Meiji Restoration, only now the technological gap that the Japanese have to overcome is vastly smaller....

    Those factors weren’t present in the Philippines or Indonesia or Indochina but they all ended up as European colonies. The Portuguese would have considered it their sacred duty to make Japan a colony if they could.

    • Replies: @syonredux

    Those factors weren’t present in the Philippines or Indonesia or Indochina but they all ended up as European colonies. The Portuguese would have considered it their sacred duty to make Japan a colony if they could.
     
    Japan was a tougher nut to crack than any of those places. As I said, I sincerely doubt that the Iberians would have been able to conquer Japan, particularly if they kept-up with developments in gun tech:


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firearms_of_Japan
  127. @I, Libertine
    Apropos of [probably] nothing:

    When I was a kid (I'm old) nostalgia meant "homesickness" But by the late seventies, it came to mean "a longing for the past." No one ever explained the reason for the change. I suppose the meaning evolved because we already had a single word to describe the former, but not the latter.

    Nostalgia literally means “return home pain” but it’s a (relatively) modern coinage derived from the German “heimweh” (heim as in home, weh as in “Oy veh”). It had nothing to do with a longing for the past, originally.

  128. This essay Misses The Point about the supporters of Trump: They did not vote against black people, but against pious, white folks; people who beat us over the head with their own supposed moral superiority. And with their own special nostalgia; one in which they constantly fancy that they live.

    That’s right, nostalgia. People like this writer long to be Freedom Riders in the early 1960s. They want to be young again; growing up again in an America of civil rights marches; the Civil Rights Act; desegregation of restaurants and schools and businesses. Oh to live in a society with an entire race of striving, deserving (black) people sinned against rather than sinning; and another race of evil, selfish (white) people abusing them. This is a longing for a time of pre-determined moral clarity. But in the Liberal Movie, the good guys wear the black hats; not white hats.

  129. @Jefferson
    "The dream be badass and shi*."

    I had a dream muthaf**ka.

    If King had been born around 1985, that woulda been his line.

    He would have been a rapper. Smartin’ Lootin’ King. A dude with tattoos all over, gold on his teeth, and rap songs about he be the baddest mofo.

  130. @Jack D
    Those factors weren't present in the Philippines or Indonesia or Indochina but they all ended up as European colonies. The Portuguese would have considered it their sacred duty to make Japan a colony if they could.

    Those factors weren’t present in the Philippines or Indonesia or Indochina but they all ended up as European colonies. The Portuguese would have considered it their sacred duty to make Japan a colony if they could.

    Japan was a tougher nut to crack than any of those places. As I said, I sincerely doubt that the Iberians would have been able to conquer Japan, particularly if they kept-up with developments in gun tech:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Firearms_of_Japan

  131. @Bill
    I don't know. As long as you know how to read that sort of article, it's still very clear. It has this line:

    At the time, white commissions attributed the riot to black hoodlums.
     
    Sort of like the way that, at the time, white television reporters attributed the post-Katrina unpleasantness in New Orleans to black thugs.

    It, as you would expect, had the same bias then as now, but the bias to fact ratio was far lower than the new and improved version.

    Sort of like the way that, at the time, white television reporters attributed the post-Katrina unpleasantness in New Orleans to black thugs.

    Did they? I recall it being blamed on George Bush and “the kind of society that would allow this to happen.”

    • Replies: @Bill
    Sure, but they mentioned all the killing and raping and shooting at firemen and such. Reporters were not pleased that teh Negroes were shooting at the reporters as they flew around in helicopters. It took about a year, as I recall, for the bizarre whitewash articles claiming that the killing and raping and shooting didn't happen to arrive.
  132. @Jefferson
    "The question is, will white identity politics blossom"

    According to the Left Wing megaphone, Make America Great Again is White identity politics.

    According to the Left Wing megaphone, Make America Great Again is White identity politics.

    Well, it is — even Mitt Romney was. It’s just operating at about the same level of abstraction as FDR being Catholic identity politics. (Romney was around the abstraction level of Coolidge being black identity politics).

  133. @Jack D
    Sure, separation is the answer - the diverse people can have the planet Earth and whitey can have the other planets. If he's so smart, he can make it habitable like Matt Damon did.

    No need for science fiction. Just consider two dates:

    1) 1903 – First powered airplane flight at Kitty Hawk.
    2) 1969 – Neil Armstrong walks on the moon.

    Unfortunately by 1969 our focus had changed from rocket science to social engineering, and it was all downhill from there. Still these extraordinary achievements point to where our future can and should lead.

  134. @Tiny Duck
    Once again, clueless white people fail to recognize what was said in an article due to their white privilege getting in the way. But what else is new?

    Here's a similar article to this one that morons like you need to read: Nostalgia: a Sport for the Privileged: https://www.facebook.com/notes/racialicious-race-identity-and-pop-culture-in-a-colorstruck-world/nostalgia-a-sport-for-the-privileged/91784832286/


    Grayson Allen is a prime example https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/early-lead/wp/2017/01/14/grayson-allen-tangles-with-a-louisville-player-and-gets-slapped-in-the-face/?utm_term=.c7fd645b00f1

    Why isn't he called a thug?

    You people are nuts. People of Color all agree that white men and their deeds are the problem and need to be dealt with

    Tiny Duck-Alt Right straw poster keeping the fire stoked among the complacent backsliders still reveling in the Trump victory. Well done! The screen name helps too-it inspires the impulse to stomp on this Tiny Duck with a size 14 Caterpillar work boot, then submit a photo of the mess to the creator of the Roadkill Calendar.

  135. @Jefferson
    "The Unbearable Whiteness of la la Land"

    The unbearable Blackness of Barack Hussein Obama's attorney generals (Loretta Lynch and Eric Holder).

    100 percent of all attorney generals have been Black under the Obama administration, even though Blacks make up only 13 percent of The U.S population.

    100 percent of all attorney generals have been Black under the Obama administration, even though Blacks make up only 13 percent of The U.S population.

    Instructive; we are told over and over that we need this to counter past slights; but it doesn’t help, and things get worse.

  136. @snorlax
    It, as you would expect, had the same bias then as now, but the bias to fact ratio was far lower than the new and improved version.

    Sort of like the way that, at the time, white television reporters attributed the post-Katrina unpleasantness in New Orleans to black thugs.
     
    Did they? I recall it being blamed on George Bush and "the kind of society that would allow this to happen."

    Sure, but they mentioned all the killing and raping and shooting at firemen and such. Reporters were not pleased that teh Negroes were shooting at the reporters as they flew around in helicopters. It took about a year, as I recall, for the bizarre whitewash articles claiming that the killing and raping and shooting didn’t happen to arrive.

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