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The Ultimate United Airlines Post
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Commenter Twinkie wraps things up:

Let me summarize the reactions of this crowd in response to this incident.

Anti-capitalist: The airline is at fault. Typical greedy corporate behavior.

Economic libertarian: It’d have been a perfect auction market if the people involved had just behaved rationally – as they should… but don’t… but will one day… if I am in power… that is, if I felt like being in power… which I don’t… because I am too smart.

Social libertarian: The cops – those pigs! – are at fault. Beating up an old man and flaunting the compulsive power of the state, as usual. Down with the state!

White nationalist: The passenger is at fault. Typical Oriental invader behavior – throwing himself onto a hard object to extract compensation from what whites have built. Parasite!

Earnest Christian: If only everyone involved believed in Son of God, this wouldn’t have happened.

Nostaligc traditionalist: This didn’t have in the 1950′s. Everyone was polite and reasonable in the past. Even blacks.

HBD fanatic: This is all in the genes. When conflicting gene pools collide, that is, when Asian grinder genes (keep at it – keep sitting there – even when it doesn’t work!), white creativity genes (we’ll sell more tickets than there are seats! Hey, we invented the airplane anyway), and black violence/warrior genes (grab that obstinate passenger and bash his head!) smash into each other, the result is always negative. It’s all very scientific.

Eternal optimist: Fake news. 99% of air transport passengers are delivered to their destinations without receiving a head trauma.

Eternal pessimist: This is yet another example of the decline of civilization. We are all doomed. Doomed!

Conspiracy monger 1: Didn’t happen. This is just all a distraction to blind us to the conspiracy.

Conspiracy monger 2: Yup. Deep state wins again.

Smarter-than-the-rest: You are all wrong. Here is why.

Me: That reminds me why I’m glad I seldom get invited to fly anywhere.

I’d add:

Sides with Captain Bligh over Fletcher Christian: The captain must be obeyed!

 
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  1. HBD had me in stitches. Genius.

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  2. A good wrap up by Twinkie, but I get the idea he could have added a couple more points.

    Read More
  3. I’m surprised that no one here has mentioned that the officers who roughed up Dr. Dao were black.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Twinkie did.

    HBD fanatic: (…) black violence/warrior genes (grab that obstinate passenger and bash his head!)
     
    , @nobody, @Dave Pinsen
    Anyone mention that the CEO of United (Oscar Munoz) is Hispanic? Kind of funny when you put it all together. Immigrant Chinese (Vietnamese?) roughed up by black cops on behalf of a big corporation helmed by a Hispanic.
  4. He missed one, call it ’70′s political science:

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I’d like to hear of an incident where the cop said, “…nah.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe

    Just once, I’d like to hear of an incident where the cop said, “…nah.”
     
    Black Texas highway patrolman gave me a warning for driving 90 in a 55 when I was 18.

    discretion?

    , @TWS
    Happens every day. You don't see it because when it happens it is just a paragraph in his notebook and maybe one line in the blotter. Used to be HBO or handled by officer. Not sure if it happens as much as the old days but it does still happen everyday.
    , @Art Deco
    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system.

    More than judges or prosecutors? Doubtful...
    , @AKAHorace
    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I’d like to hear of an incident where the cop said, “…nah.”


    Perhaps when this happens it does not make the news.
    , @anon

    Just once, I’d like to hear of an incident where the cop said, “…nah.”
     
    Happens thousands of times every day - and when it does you wouldn't know about it, obviously.

    If they didn't the black percentage of people shot by cops would be 50% not 25% - it's 25% because they avoid policing black areas if they possibly can.

    On the other hand avoiding black areas means they have to spend their time hassling mostly law-abiding people over little stuff to show they're working.
  5. One of those is correct though :-)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Venator
    I think most of them are more or less correct.

    There is also the Robert Putnam/Charles Murray line of lacking social cohesion, and of course the Unabomber/Neo-Luddite solution: "Shoot them all down!"

    I mean, seriously - what's the point of air travel? What God hath Divided, by Dragons and Sea and Solitude, Man should not Unite[d].
  6. OT:

    Huffpo writer – “Could It Be Time To Deny White Men The Franchise?”

    “Shelley Garland is an activist and a feminist and is currently completing an MA degree in philosophy. When she’s not gagging at South Africa’s unique brand of rainbow politics, she’s working on ways to smash the patriarchy.”

    (Before you Google her pic, be warned – nsfw)

    Good. It’s indeed time for a ‘conversation’ about who should and shouldn’t be voting.

    ‘They know not what they do.’

    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.za/shelley-garland/could-it-be-time-to-deny-white-men-the-franchise_a_22036640/

    Read More
  7. Covers the spectrum. The Nostalgic Trad in me dreams that one there will arise an Adults Only airline with a dress code.
    Today’s encounters w// Feral Animalia make me think many passengers are long overdue for a serious ass kicking (or at least need a week long course in civilized behaviour, etiquette)

    Read More
  8. Brilliant!

    Although this list is perfect, I would add one for the trolls (Tiny Duck):

    “This is the beginning of the end for whites and their supremacist societies. When whites no longer hold positions of power, this kind of systematic violence against helpless minorities will end.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @JerryC
    Nice, but there should have been a shout out to Leonard Pitts.
  9. @el topo
    I'm surprised that no one here has mentioned that the officers who roughed up Dr. Dao were black.

    Twinkie did.

    HBD fanatic: (…) black violence/warrior genes (grab that obstinate passenger and bash his head!)

    Read More
  10. Assad must go!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stebbing Heuer
    Assad is yesterday's news. I think you'll find that the villain this week is Kim Jong-un, the only fat person in North Korea.

    Keep watching the news.
  11. I’m no white nationalist but they are spot on.

    That was a good read- thanks.

    Read More
  12. @Father O'Hara
    Assad must go!

    Assad is yesterday’s news. I think you’ll find that the villain this week is Kim Jong-un, the only fat person in North Korea.

    Keep watching the news.

    Read More
  13. Almost sixty years ago – after serving an excellent meal- a stewardess sat next to me for a not unusual chat. She sad that I should enjoy this particular flight (on a Super Constellation) because the next flight was to be on a 727. No time for graceful service.

    And now we have flight attendants. Little did she realize how bad it would actually get.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    While going through some old family papers, I stumbled across a letter that my grandfather wrote to my grandmother in March 1965. He marveled at the smoothness and the swiftness of his ride on a brand-new Eastern 727.

    When I was a kid, I had a lot of fun accompanying my mother on one-hour commuter flights on American Eagle ATR-42s and USAir Express de Havilland Dash 8s. (This was in the early '90s.)
    , @anonymous reply to OutWest
    wwebd (what would ernest borgnine do) said - " I knew a few of those old school stewardesses. Almost all of them had a good run, 3 or 4 or more full decades worth - remember, it was not that easy for any woman to get that kind of job back then, and to be hired as a stewardess signaled that one was likable and the kind of person who has, and had, and will have, lots of friends and admirers (if you are reading this from a distant culture, check out Apartment 3G, the long running newspaper comic strip detailing the lives of unmarried young women living in the eponymous Apartment 3G, or better yet, watch a few Doris Day movies and reflect a little on what the women who were not hired as extras might have lived through). Like I said, most of those mid-century stewardesses had a good run, and there are still a few who are still hanging around Sunbelt retirement villages or slow-paced military towns (like Norfolk and Virginia Beach), and cheerful in their old age. I am lucky enough to know a few. Reminiscing, I like to think about the women of the time who would never have been hired as stewardesses. Born 50 years later, their lives might have been different. Better? Worse? It is not hard to say, if you care about that sort of thing."
  14. @Skeptic
    One of those is correct though :-)

    I think most of them are more or less correct.

    There is also the Robert Putnam/Charles Murray line of lacking social cohesion, and of course the Unabomber/Neo-Luddite solution: “Shoot them all down!”

    I mean, seriously – what’s the point of air travel? What God hath Divided, by Dragons and Sea and Solitude, Man should not Unite[d].

    Read More
  15. Most excellent job, Twinkie.

    Thanks to the information automation supplied by the internet, this is a more recently emerged function of “news” coverage. Not to convey facts or even propaganda…

    …but to present a constantly reshaped set of narratives whose bare bones will lead a wide range of peopleclusters to click through, comment, retransmit, and thus add expanding pond-rings of attention/eyeballs ka-ching to the online publishers’ balance sheet.

    This also lets the publisher distract from other, more troubling-to-the-narrative, events that pose the disastrous possibility of everyone uniting with one reactive voice and having no argument whatever. That doesn’t get clicks, it causes extinction of the urge to pay attention. It also poses the danger of seeding badthink.

    So for instance, the Palm Sunday bombings of Copts were little covered.

    Instead, there was endless nishing and noshing about black rent-a-cops roughing up an uncooperative Asian airline passenger who has a long personal history of let’s just call it antisocial behavior.

    Add in the drumbeat that it was United Airlines, and you get the additional stick-it-to-the-corporations meme.

    Then you’ve got the quants in the big data consulting firm, who try to figure out which of the crowd slices can be monetarized most lucratively, and the behavioral and social psych types who have good instincts on what Vonnegut used to call putting stag beetles in a jar and shaking it till they fight.

    Takes something akin to Zen Stoic boot camp to learn to deprogram oneself from all that Triggering For Dollars. For the moment, it’s still in the ascendancy, on “both sides” of the “political spectrum.”

    Which IMO exists only as an illusion to further more conflict and thus profits.

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  16. @Flinders Petrie
    Brilliant!

    Although this list is perfect, I would add one for the trolls (Tiny Duck):

    "This is the beginning of the end for whites and their supremacist societies. When whites no longer hold positions of power, this kind of systematic violence against helpless minorities will end."

    Nice, but there should have been a shout out to Leonard Pitts.

    Read More
  17. Still waiting for the Vietnamese community to set up road blocks and torch their homes and businesses over this systemic use of excessive force by the Man.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    If Vietnamese had a memory as long your typical Muslim (cites events from over 1000 years ago) they'd also need to protest the Vietnam war. Why that was just yesterday!

    Overall, great post from Twinkie. I like the HBD version the most.
  18. There’s a way to guarantee the airline doesn’t ask you to leave your seat due to over booking: buy a first class ticket. If you are too important to respect the airline’s private property, you should be responsible enough to buy a seat up front.

    Beyond that, the airlines could escape these hiccups very cheaply: offer cash instead of vouchers. I would take $200 cash over $1000 in vouchers. I have never taken the airlines up on their offer for a voucher because it’s a scam. You have to use it within one year, and a lot of us don’t *want* to fly that much. Because it’s unpleasant. Tiny seats, people-of-Walmart seat mates, baggage gouging, rapey scan body imagers, Tsa incompetence, terrorism, etc.

    We are hip to the scam, abolish vouchers. Offer cash and a whole new world of agreeable
    compliance awaits the airlines.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hidden Cat
    fwiw, in the first couple of days of this story breaking a local news segment ran here (SF Bay Area) of a white business man also a United flight, he was seated in First Class, but had booked and paid earlier, RT ticket. He was told he needed to make room as well. He did refuse for a while, at some point some sort of police boarded and he was threatened with handcuffs. He did get off and managed to find out, he did not say how, that some sort of Premiere level traveler had arrived at the airport and purchased a FC ticket, cash... so, the way to accommodate the cash buyer was to unseat a FC passenger.

    I don't think that story got picked up national news, but I may have missed it.
    , @Triumph104
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jTejiwL-1vE
  19. The Occam’s razor viewpoint.

    This Sunday night flight attracted the lowest rung of several groups
    1. Passengers who had to be back at work in the morning ( Combining the amateurism of pleasure travelers with the stress of biz travelers)
    2.Low rated or low seniority staff forced to work Sunday nite
    3. Low rated or low seniority rent-a-cops for the same reason
    4. A Feeder, or 2 rate airline
    this was a case of a bunch of low probability bad people and events colliding because the Cops, the airlines, and the passengers were not sending their best.

    Read More
  20. A couple missing:

    East Asian male miscegenator: Can’t we all just get along? Btw all you guys are idiots, did you go to $IVY_LEAGUE_SCHOOL or serve in the military like I did? I didn’t think so.

    East Asian diasporalist: Internally: (If somehow Trump avoids invading North Korea, triggering proxy war with China and me winding up in an internment camp, the day of the rope is coming for you all, and the shame of the Opium Wars will be avenged.) Externally: Typical – blacks behaving badly.

    Site host: If these security guards had been Hispanic, it would never have gone down like this.

    Unreconstructed Frankfurt Schooler: Lemme go grab some popcorn…

    Alt-righter: These incompetent security guards ejected him from the aircraft when it was still on the ground.

    Read More
    • LOL: Autochthon
    • Replies: @3g4me
    Well done, spot on, and cleverly-placed shivs.
  21. Blacks: http://verysmartbrothas.com/the-chinese-doctor-dragged-off-a-united-airlines-flight-is-the-blackest-thing-that-ever-happened-this-week/

    East Asians: ??

    (Judging from a conversation with a Japanese martial arts guy, unruly bar customers get beat down and should be ashamed of themselves. I would guess the same principle holds in militaristic Korea. China … well, I’ve visited but couldn’t say. They seemed a bit anarchic for being confucians.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marty
    Yeah, those Japanese are really hard on people who act up.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=b1anM0Cnx_Y
  22. @el topo
    I'm surprised that no one here has mentioned that the officers who roughed up Dr. Dao were black.

    Anyone mention that the CEO of United (Oscar Munoz) is Hispanic? Kind of funny when you put it all together. Immigrant Chinese (Vietnamese?) roughed up by black cops on behalf of a big corporation helmed by a Hispanic.

    Read More
  23. But Munoz is now blameworthy, so he must be referred to as “a white Hispanic.”

    Read More
  24. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    You forgot the Chinese view: This was done by racist round eyes who hate southeast Asians.

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  25. @WGG
    There's a way to guarantee the airline doesn't ask you to leave your seat due to over booking: buy a first class ticket. If you are too important to respect the airline's private property, you should be responsible enough to buy a seat up front.

    Beyond that, the airlines could escape these hiccups very cheaply: offer cash instead of vouchers. I would take $200 cash over $1000 in vouchers. I have never taken the airlines up on their offer for a voucher because it's a scam. You have to use it within one year, and a lot of us don't *want* to fly that much. Because it's unpleasant. Tiny seats, people-of-Walmart seat mates, baggage gouging, rapey scan body imagers, Tsa incompetence, terrorism, etc.

    We are hip to the scam, abolish vouchers. Offer cash and a whole new world of agreeable
    compliance awaits the airlines.

    fwiw, in the first couple of days of this story breaking a local news segment ran here (SF Bay Area) of a white business man also a United flight, he was seated in First Class, but had booked and paid earlier, RT ticket. He was told he needed to make room as well. He did refuse for a while, at some point some sort of police boarded and he was threatened with handcuffs. He did get off and managed to find out, he did not say how, that some sort of Premiere level traveler had arrived at the airport and purchased a FC ticket, cash… so, the way to accommodate the cash buyer was to unseat a FC passenger.

    I don’t think that story got picked up national news, but I may have missed it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Triumph104

    Fearns needed to return early so he paid about $1,000 for a full-fare, first-class ticket to Los Angeles. He boarded the aircraft at Lihue Airport on the island of Kauai, took his seat and enjoyed a complimentary glass of orange juice while awaiting takeoff.

    Then, as Fearns tells it, a United employee rushed onto the aircraft and informed him that he had to get off the plane.

    ... “That’s when they told me they needed the seat for somebody more important who came at the last minute,” Fearns said. “They said they have a priority list and this other person was higher on the list than me.”

    Apparently United had some mechanical troubles with the aircraft scheduled to make the flight. So the carrier swapped out that plane with a slightly smaller one with fewer first-class seats.

    Suddenly it had more first-class passengers than it knew what to do with. So it turned to its “How to Screw Over Customers” handbook and determined that the one in higher standing — more miles flown, presumably — gets the seat and the other first-class passenger, even though he’s also a member of the frequent-flier program, gets the boot.

    “I understand you might bump people because a flight is full,” Fearns said. “But they didn’t say anything at the gate. I was already in the seat. And now they were telling me I had no choice. They said they’d put me in cuffs if they had to.”

    ... A United employee, responding to Fearns’ complaint that he shouldn’t have to miss the flight, compromised by downgrading him to economy class and placing him in the middle seat between a married couple who were in the midst of a nasty fight and refused to be seated next to each other.

    “They argued the whole way back,” Fearns recalled. “Nearly six hours. It was a lot of fun.”
     

    http://www.latimes.com/business/lazarus/la-fi-lazarus-united-low-priority-passenger-20170412-story.html
  26. One more attitude to the story is that of the cheerful cynic, illustrated by the character of Mr Bennet in Pride and Prejudice:

    “For what do we live, but to make sport for our neighbours, and laugh at them in our turn?”

    Read More
  27. @Mark Caplan
    Still waiting for the Vietnamese community to set up road blocks and torch their homes and businesses over this systemic use of excessive force by the Man.

    If Vietnamese had a memory as long your typical Muslim (cites events from over 1000 years ago) they’d also need to protest the Vietnam war. Why that was just yesterday!

    Overall, great post from Twinkie. I like the HBD version the most.

    Read More
  28. @mobi
    OT:

    Huffpo writer - "Could It Be Time To Deny White Men The Franchise?"

    "Shelley Garland is an activist and a feminist and is currently completing an MA degree in philosophy. When she’s not gagging at South Africa’s unique brand of rainbow politics, she’s working on ways to smash the patriarchy."

    (Before you Google her pic, be warned - nsfw)

    Good. It's indeed time for a 'conversation' about who should and shouldn't be voting.

    'They know not what they do.'

    http://www.huffingtonpost.co.za/shelley-garland/could-it-be-time-to-deny-white-men-the-franchise_a_22036640/

    Oh, I do hope that they try.

    Read More
  29. C’mon, Steve. Gold Box Twinkie’s original comment! Everybody likes their 15 seconds of Internet Fame.

    Read More
  30. @Pericles
    Blacks: http://verysmartbrothas.com/the-chinese-doctor-dragged-off-a-united-airlines-flight-is-the-blackest-thing-that-ever-happened-this-week/

    East Asians: ??

    (Judging from a conversation with a Japanese martial arts guy, unruly bar customers get beat down and should be ashamed of themselves. I would guess the same principle holds in militaristic Korea. China ... well, I've visited but couldn't say. They seemed a bit anarchic for being confucians.)

    Yeah, those Japanese are really hard on people who act up.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=b1anM0Cnx_Y

    Read More
    • Replies: @Inquiring Mind
    Great swarm tactics. Those police took on someone 3 times the size of any individual officer. No guns, no tasers, just a well-placed knee tackle by one officer followed by a quick pile-on. I'm impressed.

    This is almost on the level of the Vietnamese SWAT team pushing against a horizontal bamboo pole to create a kind of "artificial gravity" to allow one officer at a time to walk up the side of a wall.
  31. @Marty
    Yeah, those Japanese are really hard on people who act up.

    https://m.youtube.com/watch?v=b1anM0Cnx_Y

    Great swarm tactics. Those police took on someone 3 times the size of any individual officer. No guns, no tasers, just a well-placed knee tackle by one officer followed by a quick pile-on. I’m impressed.

    This is almost on the level of the Vietnamese SWAT team pushing against a horizontal bamboo pole to create a kind of “artificial gravity” to allow one officer at a time to walk up the side of a wall.

    Read More
  32. @OutWest
    Almost sixty years ago – after serving an excellent meal- a stewardess sat next to me for a not unusual chat. She sad that I should enjoy this particular flight (on a Super Constellation) because the next flight was to be on a 727. No time for graceful service.

    And now we have flight attendants. Little did she realize how bad it would actually get.

    While going through some old family papers, I stumbled across a letter that my grandfather wrote to my grandmother in March 1965. He marveled at the smoothness and the swiftness of his ride on a brand-new Eastern 727.

    When I was a kid, I had a lot of fun accompanying my mother on one-hour commuter flights on American Eagle ATR-42s and USAir Express de Havilland Dash 8s. (This was in the early ’90s.)

    Read More
  33. @OutWest
    Almost sixty years ago – after serving an excellent meal- a stewardess sat next to me for a not unusual chat. She sad that I should enjoy this particular flight (on a Super Constellation) because the next flight was to be on a 727. No time for graceful service.

    And now we have flight attendants. Little did she realize how bad it would actually get.

    wwebd (what would ernest borgnine do) said – ” I knew a few of those old school stewardesses. Almost all of them had a good run, 3 or 4 or more full decades worth – remember, it was not that easy for any woman to get that kind of job back then, and to be hired as a stewardess signaled that one was likable and the kind of person who has, and had, and will have, lots of friends and admirers (if you are reading this from a distant culture, check out Apartment 3G, the long running newspaper comic strip detailing the lives of unmarried young women living in the eponymous Apartment 3G, or better yet, watch a few Doris Day movies and reflect a little on what the women who were not hired as extras might have lived through). Like I said, most of those mid-century stewardesses had a good run, and there are still a few who are still hanging around Sunbelt retirement villages or slow-paced military towns (like Norfolk and Virginia Beach), and cheerful in their old age. I am lucky enough to know a few. Reminiscing, I like to think about the women of the time who would never have been hired as stewardesses. Born 50 years later, their lives might have been different. Better? Worse? It is not hard to say, if you care about that sort of thing.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous reply to OutWest
    And San Diego - not, perhaps, the Platonic ideal of where the stewardesses from back in the day envisioned themselves to be living in their 80s, but a town with lots going for it anyway, even now.
    , @AnotherDad

    ” I knew a few of those old school stewardesses. Almost all of them had a good run, 3 or 4 or more full decades worth
     
    Actually back in the day, it was understood that "stewardess" was a job a young woman could take for a few years, and have some "adventure", before meeting a suitable man--quite possibly on her plane--and settling down to married life. (It's actually a sub-optimal job a woman with a husband and a crappy job for a woman with a family, especially with little kids.) But sometime in the 70s with unionization and then feminism it became a "career".

    I've gotten over it, but i'm still mildly perplexed by the overall *unattractiveness* and ho-hum quality of the median American stewardess these days. I had a very nice 15-20 minute chat with a quite pleasant and at least moderately attractive 20-something Delta stew last year about her job--which my daughter has some interest in--life, dating, etc. But she's more the exception these days. These aren't low paying jobs and one would think some airline would try and hire some both pleasant *and* attractive young women. And find a way to provide and up and out or up and over--career paths. (The union I guess.)

    I fly Frontier routinely--price--and really was shocked at the appearance of a lot of their staff--stews, gate agents, etc. I guess just a reflection of the society we're in. And maybe being a flight attendant really isn't a very good job in our new multicultural society where you're trapped in a metal tube with 100+ the likes of Jerk Doc Dao.
  34. @anonymous reply to OutWest
    wwebd (what would ernest borgnine do) said - " I knew a few of those old school stewardesses. Almost all of them had a good run, 3 or 4 or more full decades worth - remember, it was not that easy for any woman to get that kind of job back then, and to be hired as a stewardess signaled that one was likable and the kind of person who has, and had, and will have, lots of friends and admirers (if you are reading this from a distant culture, check out Apartment 3G, the long running newspaper comic strip detailing the lives of unmarried young women living in the eponymous Apartment 3G, or better yet, watch a few Doris Day movies and reflect a little on what the women who were not hired as extras might have lived through). Like I said, most of those mid-century stewardesses had a good run, and there are still a few who are still hanging around Sunbelt retirement villages or slow-paced military towns (like Norfolk and Virginia Beach), and cheerful in their old age. I am lucky enough to know a few. Reminiscing, I like to think about the women of the time who would never have been hired as stewardesses. Born 50 years later, their lives might have been different. Better? Worse? It is not hard to say, if you care about that sort of thing."

    And San Diego – not, perhaps, the Platonic ideal of where the stewardesses from back in the day envisioned themselves to be living in their 80s, but a town with lots going for it anyway, even now.

    Read More
  35. The highlighted Twinkie comment is terrible.

    It’s not even true. Economic libertarians argue that the airline doesn’t have a legal or moral obligation to auction until they find a willing passenger. It’s their plane, it’s their flight, passengers sign their agreement when they buy a ticket, mistakes happen. The airline should offer bumped passengers compensation, and probably should raise it above a $800 voucher, maybe $800 in direct payment. The airline was obviously dumb. They shouldn’t have forced the passenger off with a cop. They won’t repeat that mistake. The customer shouldn’t have screamed like a maniac and caused a scene.

    And moderate white nationalists don’t need to inject race/ethnicity into this petty issue.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    And moderate white nationalists don’t need to inject race/ethnicity into this petty issue.
     
    The only reason there is any white nationalism to speak of is that the goodwhites convinced themselves awhile back that replacing regular whites with non-whites would eliminate this sort of nonsense.

    It's useful to point out the extent to which they were mistaken.
  36. When I heard the guy shrieking before any of the physical stuff happened I told my wife, “He’s a criminal.”

    She said, “No, he’s a doctor. The police are making him leave the plane.”

    I said, “Not what’s happening to him now, I don’t know if he’s breaking the law or not. it’s the way he’s reacting. The only people who act out like that are criminals. No impulse control, out of control volume etc are criminals. Guarantee it.”

    Two days later, low and behold he’s a criminal. I can still spot them a mile away. lol.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hidden Cat
    Agree... I sensed watching him on the vid (and RT ran a lot more video than on any US news I caught) that he is a certain type. I see it a lot, often older Chinese, both men and women who live in Chinatown (I am in San Francisc) and have NO interaction outside of Chinatown and their Chinatown friends - and family who pick them up usually in very expensive cars for a weekend or Sunday with the family, usually in an East Bay gated community. OR certain strata of the new(er) Chinese immigrants with or without money, curt, rude and brutish. The Chinese tourists come in with advice sheets of what NOT to do when visiting America. I don't think they read them... but who knows.

    The more I found out about him the more appalled I was. My guess, and that is all it is, Demetrio and the family will want to exert pressure now for the highest settlement they think they can get rather than let more of his background come out. Inevitably it will... The day after it happened the family released a statement that closed with them saying they would not be responding to media.

    That changed over night, pretty much.... That license was not suspended for 11 years for sloppy records. Pretty dirty stuff.
    , @Danindc
    I too know this guy was a scam artist immediately. All documented as well. It's nice having good instincts isn't it?
  37. @Hidden Cat
    fwiw, in the first couple of days of this story breaking a local news segment ran here (SF Bay Area) of a white business man also a United flight, he was seated in First Class, but had booked and paid earlier, RT ticket. He was told he needed to make room as well. He did refuse for a while, at some point some sort of police boarded and he was threatened with handcuffs. He did get off and managed to find out, he did not say how, that some sort of Premiere level traveler had arrived at the airport and purchased a FC ticket, cash... so, the way to accommodate the cash buyer was to unseat a FC passenger.

    I don't think that story got picked up national news, but I may have missed it.

    Fearns needed to return early so he paid about $1,000 for a full-fare, first-class ticket to Los Angeles. He boarded the aircraft at Lihue Airport on the island of Kauai, took his seat and enjoyed a complimentary glass of orange juice while awaiting takeoff.

    Then, as Fearns tells it, a United employee rushed onto the aircraft and informed him that he had to get off the plane.

    … “That’s when they told me they needed the seat for somebody more important who came at the last minute,” Fearns said. “They said they have a priority list and this other person was higher on the list than me.”

    Apparently United had some mechanical troubles with the aircraft scheduled to make the flight. So the carrier swapped out that plane with a slightly smaller one with fewer first-class seats.

    Suddenly it had more first-class passengers than it knew what to do with. So it turned to its “How to Screw Over Customers” handbook and determined that the one in higher standing — more miles flown, presumably — gets the seat and the other first-class passenger, even though he’s also a member of the frequent-flier program, gets the boot.

    “I understand you might bump people because a flight is full,” Fearns said. “But they didn’t say anything at the gate. I was already in the seat. And now they were telling me I had no choice. They said they’d put me in cuffs if they had to.”

    … A United employee, responding to Fearns’ complaint that he shouldn’t have to miss the flight, compromised by downgrading him to economy class and placing him in the middle seat between a married couple who were in the midst of a nasty fight and refused to be seated next to each other.

    “They argued the whole way back,” Fearns recalled. “Nearly six hours. It was a lot of fun.”

    http://www.latimes.com/business/lazarus/la-fi-lazarus-united-low-priority-passenger-20170412-story.html

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    • Replies: @Hidden Cat
    oh Thank you!... much more detail than in the edited segment on local news. It was his use of the word "handcuffs" that made me pop up and pay attention... ugh, flights from (and to) Hawai'i are long. I would hate what happened to him.....
  38. @WGG
    There's a way to guarantee the airline doesn't ask you to leave your seat due to over booking: buy a first class ticket. If you are too important to respect the airline's private property, you should be responsible enough to buy a seat up front.

    Beyond that, the airlines could escape these hiccups very cheaply: offer cash instead of vouchers. I would take $200 cash over $1000 in vouchers. I have never taken the airlines up on their offer for a voucher because it's a scam. You have to use it within one year, and a lot of us don't *want* to fly that much. Because it's unpleasant. Tiny seats, people-of-Walmart seat mates, baggage gouging, rapey scan body imagers, Tsa incompetence, terrorism, etc.

    We are hip to the scam, abolish vouchers. Offer cash and a whole new world of agreeable
    compliance awaits the airlines.

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  39. In other news:

    Middle-aged Canadian white guy stung by scorpion that fell from overhead bin on United flight on same day as the Great Event itself.

    “It felt like a wasp sting, but with a bigger surface area…I was pretty calm the whole time. I grew up on a farm and had all kinds of things happen to me.”

    “Linda Bell said her husband flies with United often and will continue to do so, noting the airline gave him a travel credit.”

    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/04/14/i-was-pretty-calm-the-whole-time-says-canadian-stung-by-scorpion-on-united-airlines-flight.html

    Goodness, what could be the difference? It’s a complete mystery.

    Twinkie? Anyone?

    Read More
    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Dang Scorpion didn't get the memo: sting only PoC. Maintaining narrative of persecuted minorites is of utmost importance.
  40. Like any large organization, The Chicago Police have some below average performers. They have to be put somewhere. They are assigned to the airports. It is an easy job, and it keeps them out of trouble. Cops with political connections work at the airports. That was the pre 9/11 thinking. Now everyone believes that police need to be better trained to work at the airports. Security experts are shocked how poorly trained the Chicago police are at the airports. This United incident is showing us that.

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  41. @Triumph104

    Fearns needed to return early so he paid about $1,000 for a full-fare, first-class ticket to Los Angeles. He boarded the aircraft at Lihue Airport on the island of Kauai, took his seat and enjoyed a complimentary glass of orange juice while awaiting takeoff.

    Then, as Fearns tells it, a United employee rushed onto the aircraft and informed him that he had to get off the plane.

    ... “That’s when they told me they needed the seat for somebody more important who came at the last minute,” Fearns said. “They said they have a priority list and this other person was higher on the list than me.”

    Apparently United had some mechanical troubles with the aircraft scheduled to make the flight. So the carrier swapped out that plane with a slightly smaller one with fewer first-class seats.

    Suddenly it had more first-class passengers than it knew what to do with. So it turned to its “How to Screw Over Customers” handbook and determined that the one in higher standing — more miles flown, presumably — gets the seat and the other first-class passenger, even though he’s also a member of the frequent-flier program, gets the boot.

    “I understand you might bump people because a flight is full,” Fearns said. “But they didn’t say anything at the gate. I was already in the seat. And now they were telling me I had no choice. They said they’d put me in cuffs if they had to.”

    ... A United employee, responding to Fearns’ complaint that he shouldn’t have to miss the flight, compromised by downgrading him to economy class and placing him in the middle seat between a married couple who were in the midst of a nasty fight and refused to be seated next to each other.

    “They argued the whole way back,” Fearns recalled. “Nearly six hours. It was a lot of fun.”
     

    http://www.latimes.com/business/lazarus/la-fi-lazarus-united-low-priority-passenger-20170412-story.html

    oh Thank you!… much more detail than in the edited segment on local news. It was his use of the word “handcuffs” that made me pop up and pay attention… ugh, flights from (and to) Hawai’i are long. I would hate what happened to him…..

    Read More
  42. @TWS
    When I heard the guy shrieking before any of the physical stuff happened I told my wife, "He's a criminal."

    She said, "No, he's a doctor. The police are making him leave the plane."

    I said, "Not what's happening to him now, I don't know if he's breaking the law or not. it's the way he's reacting. The only people who act out like that are criminals. No impulse control, out of control volume etc are criminals. Guarantee it."

    Two days later, low and behold he's a criminal. I can still spot them a mile away. lol.

    Agree… I sensed watching him on the vid (and RT ran a lot more video than on any US news I caught) that he is a certain type. I see it a lot, often older Chinese, both men and women who live in Chinatown (I am in San Francisc) and have NO interaction outside of Chinatown and their Chinatown friends – and family who pick them up usually in very expensive cars for a weekend or Sunday with the family, usually in an East Bay gated community. OR certain strata of the new(er) Chinese immigrants with or without money, curt, rude and brutish. The Chinese tourists come in with advice sheets of what NOT to do when visiting America. I don’t think they read them… but who knows.

    The more I found out about him the more appalled I was. My guess, and that is all it is, Demetrio and the family will want to exert pressure now for the highest settlement they think they can get rather than let more of his background come out. Inevitably it will… The day after it happened the family released a statement that closed with them saying they would not be responding to media.

    That changed over night, pretty much…. That license was not suspended for 11 years for sloppy records. Pretty dirty stuff.

    Read More
  43. @Massimo Heitor
    The highlighted Twinkie comment is terrible.

    It's not even true. Economic libertarians argue that the airline doesn't have a legal or moral obligation to auction until they find a willing passenger. It's their plane, it's their flight, passengers sign their agreement when they buy a ticket, mistakes happen. The airline should offer bumped passengers compensation, and probably should raise it above a $800 voucher, maybe $800 in direct payment. The airline was obviously dumb. They shouldn't have forced the passenger off with a cop. They won't repeat that mistake. The customer shouldn't have screamed like a maniac and caused a scene.

    And moderate white nationalists don't need to inject race/ethnicity into this petty issue.

    And moderate white nationalists don’t need to inject race/ethnicity into this petty issue.

    The only reason there is any white nationalism to speak of is that the goodwhites convinced themselves awhile back that replacing regular whites with non-whites would eliminate this sort of nonsense.

    It’s useful to point out the extent to which they were mistaken.

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  44. @Marty
    He missed one, call it '70's political science:

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I'd like to hear of an incident where the cop said, "...nah."

    Just once, I’d like to hear of an incident where the cop said, “…nah.”

    Black Texas highway patrolman gave me a warning for driving 90 in a 55 when I was 18.

    discretion?

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  45. It’s good to see the ol’ Twinkster back some months after declaring “I have no Sailer!” while going full kriyah.

    Read More
  46. @mobi
    In other news:

    Middle-aged Canadian white guy stung by scorpion that fell from overhead bin on United flight on same day as the Great Event itself.

    “It felt like a wasp sting, but with a bigger surface area...I was pretty calm the whole time. I grew up on a farm and had all kinds of things happen to me.”

    "Linda Bell said her husband flies with United often and will continue to do so, noting the airline gave him a travel credit."

    https://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2017/04/14/i-was-pretty-calm-the-whole-time-says-canadian-stung-by-scorpion-on-united-airlines-flight.html

    Goodness, what could be the difference? It's a complete mystery.

    Twinkie? Anyone?

    Dang Scorpion didn’t get the memo: sting only PoC. Maintaining narrative of persecuted minorites is of utmost importance.

    Read More
  47. @TWS
    When I heard the guy shrieking before any of the physical stuff happened I told my wife, "He's a criminal."

    She said, "No, he's a doctor. The police are making him leave the plane."

    I said, "Not what's happening to him now, I don't know if he's breaking the law or not. it's the way he's reacting. The only people who act out like that are criminals. No impulse control, out of control volume etc are criminals. Guarantee it."

    Two days later, low and behold he's a criminal. I can still spot them a mile away. lol.

    I too know this guy was a scam artist immediately. All documented as well. It’s nice having good instincts isn’t it?

    Read More
  48. @Marty
    He missed one, call it '70's political science:

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I'd like to hear of an incident where the cop said, "...nah."

    Happens every day. You don’t see it because when it happens it is just a paragraph in his notebook and maybe one line in the blotter. Used to be HBO or handled by officer. Not sure if it happens as much as the old days but it does still happen everyday.

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  49. @Marty
    He missed one, call it '70's political science:

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I'd like to hear of an incident where the cop said, "...nah."

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system.

    More than judges or prosecutors? Doubtful…

    Read More
  50. @Marty
    He missed one, call it '70's political science:

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I'd like to hear of an incident where the cop said, "...nah."

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I’d like to hear of an incident where the cop said, “…nah.”

    Perhaps when this happens it does not make the news.

    Read More
  51. There is also the sensible and cautious approach. You could take a stand on principle, and be within your rights, and legally correct. But then you take the risk of getting beaten up by those with a different point of view.

    Or you could have something embarrassing in your past that might be widely revealed if you make a scene and draw attention. (Like losing your medical license and becoming a convicted felon because you traded drugs for gay sex.)

    So the better part of valor is discretion. Maybe Shakespeare, that dead white guy, was really onto something.

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  52. Fun stuff, congrats to Twinkie.

    My smarter-than-thou take:

    Pessimist digerati: why are we talking about this? Our great dream of a borderless information and communications cornucopia doesn’t scale. The digital overmind is insane. Undo! Undo!

    Optimistic digerati, take 42: AI will solve this.

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  53. @Anonym
    A couple missing:

    East Asian male miscegenator: Can't we all just get along? Btw all you guys are idiots, did you go to $IVY_LEAGUE_SCHOOL or serve in the military like I did? I didn't think so.

    East Asian diasporalist: Internally: (If somehow Trump avoids invading North Korea, triggering proxy war with China and me winding up in an internment camp, the day of the rope is coming for you all, and the shame of the Opium Wars will be avenged.) Externally: Typical - blacks behaving badly.

    Site host: If these security guards had been Hispanic, it would never have gone down like this.

    Unreconstructed Frankfurt Schooler: Lemme go grab some popcorn...

    Alt-righter: These incompetent security guards ejected him from the aircraft when it was still on the ground.

    Well done, spot on, and cleverly-placed shivs.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    Well done, spot on, and cleverly-placed shivs.

    Thanks man, comments like this and the LOLs are the equivalent to slashdot +5 funny recognition. Especially nice considering this post languished in whim limbo for what seemed like several days. I guess I gotta get off my ass and donate again.

  54. @Olorin
    Most excellent job, Twinkie.

    Thanks to the information automation supplied by the internet, this is a more recently emerged function of "news" coverage. Not to convey facts or even propaganda...

    ...but to present a constantly reshaped set of narratives whose bare bones will lead a wide range of peopleclusters to click through, comment, retransmit, and thus add expanding pond-rings of attention/eyeballs ka-ching to the online publishers' balance sheet.

    This also lets the publisher distract from other, more troubling-to-the-narrative, events that pose the disastrous possibility of everyone uniting with one reactive voice and having no argument whatever. That doesn't get clicks, it causes extinction of the urge to pay attention. It also poses the danger of seeding badthink.

    So for instance, the Palm Sunday bombings of Copts were little covered.

    Instead, there was endless nishing and noshing about black rent-a-cops roughing up an uncooperative Asian airline passenger who has a long personal history of let's just call it antisocial behavior.

    Add in the drumbeat that it was United Airlines, and you get the additional stick-it-to-the-corporations meme.

    Then you've got the quants in the big data consulting firm, who try to figure out which of the crowd slices can be monetarized most lucratively, and the behavioral and social psych types who have good instincts on what Vonnegut used to call putting stag beetles in a jar and shaking it till they fight.

    Takes something akin to Zen Stoic boot camp to learn to deprogram oneself from all that Triggering For Dollars. For the moment, it's still in the ascendancy, on "both sides" of the "political spectrum."

    Which IMO exists only as an illusion to further more conflict and thus profits.

    Astute observations and analysis.

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  55. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Marty
    He missed one, call it '70's political science:

    Cops have more discretion than any other actor in the criminal justice system. Why is it that cops never seem to exercise that discretion? Instead, they reflexively obey any command from any institutional actor against any individual under any circumstance. Just once, I'd like to hear of an incident where the cop said, "...nah."

    Just once, I’d like to hear of an incident where the cop said, “…nah.”

    Happens thousands of times every day – and when it does you wouldn’t know about it, obviously.

    If they didn’t the black percentage of people shot by cops would be 50% not 25% – it’s 25% because they avoid policing black areas if they possibly can.

    On the other hand avoiding black areas means they have to spend their time hassling mostly law-abiding people over little stuff to show they’re working.

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  56. @3g4me
    Well done, spot on, and cleverly-placed shivs.

    Well done, spot on, and cleverly-placed shivs.

    Thanks man, comments like this and the LOLs are the equivalent to slashdot +5 funny recognition. Especially nice considering this post languished in whim limbo for what seemed like several days. I guess I gotta get off my ass and donate again.

    Read More
  57. Thank you for highlighting my attempt at levity. Here is a couple more:

    Chinese netizen: Those evil Americans beat him up, because he’s Chinese! Racists! What? He is not Chinese? Oh… He’s Vietnamese? Well, that’s different. Everyone knows the Vietnamese are uncivilized and troublesome. Jungle Asians.

    White nationalist 2: [Agreeing with white nationalist 1] That’s right. We must curtail mass invasion from Asia… Excuse me for a moment. My wife is back home. Ni Hao, honey. Did you get the kids from Mandarin school? There is a voicemail from your dad in Beijing… Sorry, I’m back. Where were we? Yes, that’s right. Down with mass immigration from Asia!

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  58. @anonymous reply to OutWest
    wwebd (what would ernest borgnine do) said - " I knew a few of those old school stewardesses. Almost all of them had a good run, 3 or 4 or more full decades worth - remember, it was not that easy for any woman to get that kind of job back then, and to be hired as a stewardess signaled that one was likable and the kind of person who has, and had, and will have, lots of friends and admirers (if you are reading this from a distant culture, check out Apartment 3G, the long running newspaper comic strip detailing the lives of unmarried young women living in the eponymous Apartment 3G, or better yet, watch a few Doris Day movies and reflect a little on what the women who were not hired as extras might have lived through). Like I said, most of those mid-century stewardesses had a good run, and there are still a few who are still hanging around Sunbelt retirement villages or slow-paced military towns (like Norfolk and Virginia Beach), and cheerful in their old age. I am lucky enough to know a few. Reminiscing, I like to think about the women of the time who would never have been hired as stewardesses. Born 50 years later, their lives might have been different. Better? Worse? It is not hard to say, if you care about that sort of thing."

    ” I knew a few of those old school stewardesses. Almost all of them had a good run, 3 or 4 or more full decades worth

    Actually back in the day, it was understood that “stewardess” was a job a young woman could take for a few years, and have some “adventure”, before meeting a suitable man–quite possibly on her plane–and settling down to married life. (It’s actually a sub-optimal job a woman with a husband and a crappy job for a woman with a family, especially with little kids.) But sometime in the 70s with unionization and then feminism it became a “career”.

    I’ve gotten over it, but i’m still mildly perplexed by the overall *unattractiveness* and ho-hum quality of the median American stewardess these days. I had a very nice 15-20 minute chat with a quite pleasant and at least moderately attractive 20-something Delta stew last year about her job–which my daughter has some interest in–life, dating, etc. But she’s more the exception these days. These aren’t low paying jobs and one would think some airline would try and hire some both pleasant *and* attractive young women. And find a way to provide and up and out or up and over–career paths. (The union I guess.)

    I fly Frontier routinely–price–and really was shocked at the appearance of a lot of their staff–stews, gate agents, etc. I guess just a reflection of the society we’re in. And maybe being a flight attendant really isn’t a very good job in our new multicultural society where you’re trapped in a metal tube with 100+ the likes of Jerk Doc Dao.

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