The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
The Ties That Friend
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the NYT:

How Connected Is Your Community to Everywhere Else in America?
By EMILY BADGER and QUOCTRUNG BUI SEPT. 19, 2018

America is often described as a place of great divides — between red and blue, big cities and rural towns, the coasts and the heartland. But our social lives are shaped by a much stronger force that ignores many of these lines: distance.

In the millions of ties on Facebook that connect relatives, co-workers, classmates and friends, Americans are far more likely to know people nearby than in distant communities that share their politics or mirror their demographics. The dominant picture in data analyzed by economists at Facebook, Harvard, Princeton and New York University is not that like-minded places are linked; rather, people in counties close to one another are.

Here’s the academic paper.

Even in the age of the internet, distance matters immensely in determining whom — and, as a result, what — we know.

So, what happens is that there aren’t all that many interesting findings of cross-country links. Here’s one: People in Cook County (Chicago), IL have a lot of Facebook ties to relatives in the Mississippi Delta, due to the Great Migration of Mississippi blacks up the Illinois Central Railroad to Chicago. (There also a Milwaukee-Mississippi connection.)

Screenshot 2018-09-19 22.11.27

A commenter with excellent eye-hand coordination got his cursor on tiny New York County (i.e., Manhattan):

Screenshot 2018-09-20 02.13.58

Lots of connections to Fr. Lauderdale, Rocky Mountain ski towns, midwestern college towns like Ann Arbor and Madison, plus Atlanta, Austin, LA, the Bay Area, and Seattle. A broad connection to the coastal Carolinas: I wonder whether that is people in Manhattan having come from there or going there?

A few other connections are that college towns are connected to each other and so are American Indians:

The Okies of Kern County, CA are connected to Sooners back home in Oklahoma.

Houston is connected to the new oil patch in North Dakota.

But mostly people are connected on Facebook to people in their general vicinity.

One perhaps unexpected finding is that state lines matter to Facebook friends.

Screenshot 2018-09-19 22.27.49

For example, if you pick out random counties in the middle of Iowa, Oklahoma, or Alabama, you can see the outlines of the states.

Screenshot 2018-09-19 22.28.16

There tends to be a sharp falloff in Facebook friends right across the state lines.

Screenshot 2018-09-19 22.28.37

I suspect this is tied to state colleges. People from Alabama are more likely to go to college in Alabama than in Georgia, Mississippi, Kentucky, or Florida. If you live just east of the Alabama-Georgia border, it costs something $100k less to go to the U. of Alabama than to the U. of Georgia.

So they keep up on Facebook with their friends in Alabama. Plus, people in Alabama pay a lot of attention to college football in the two big public colleges, U. of Alabama and Auburn.

- This could also be tied to state government.

- Another possibility is that, all else being equal, people are less likely to move across state lines, perhaps due to sports rooting rivalries. Interestingly, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is more tied to Green Bay, WI on Facebook than to the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, suggesting that ease of driving and possibly NFL rooting matters more than state government ties.

 
Hide 120 CommentsLeave a Comment
120 Comments to "The Ties That Friend"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Anonymous[317] • Disclaimer says:

    Be interesting to look at Kansas and Missouri, since everyone in Kansas is pretty much a Chiefs/Royals fan and either KU or K State, whereas Missouri splits out to Royals west, Cardinals east.

    Wichita has a small but vocal contingent of Broncos fans. I used to eat at a bar that catered to Broncos fans because they had a great deal on half pound burgers when I lived there, but I still had JO tags on my truck. I had to buy a Bronco jersey to be able to sit in peace and eat there. One day I forgot and left it on when coming into work. I narrowly avoided an ass whipping.

    As you can guess, I don’t give a shit about sportsball and don’t do Facebook. So there.

  2. Lot says:

    The Russian government’s anti-Ukraine Notpetya virus destroyed most of the computers of Demmark’s largest company, costing it a billion dollars.

    https://www.wired.com/story/notpetya-cyberattack-ukraine-russia-code-crashed-the-world/

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Anonymous
  3. anon[389] • Disclaimer says:

    Ski bums appear to be networked.

  4. Here’s one: People in Cook County (Chicago), IL have a lot of Facebook ties to relatives in the Mississippi Delta,

    Which is why they eat pickles with peppermint sticks protruding from them.

    Menominee County, Wisconsin

    This is an Indian reservation that became a county rather late, in the 1960s. It consists of one township. It’s also the least populated in the state.

    This treemap shows that Hillary carried the two most, and one least, populated counties in the state:

    https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/File:United_States_presidential_election_in_Wisconsin,_2016.svg

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  5. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT Antifa may have killed a critic of theirs by running his truck off the road; whether they did it or not, they are taking credit on social media and exulting about the death.

    http://www.victoriataft.com/police-investigate-antifa-involvement-in-death-of-portlands-leo-stratton-who-reported-on-terror-group/

  6. One perhaps unexpected finding is that state lines matter to Facebook friends.

    Even more so to Facebook football:

    Particularly striking is the NFC Central– only the Lions cede any of their state’s counties to rivals. (I suspect the Bears have regained some when the Rams moved back west.)

    Also notable are the Giants/Pats, Bills/Steelers, and Cowboys/Chiefs divisions. Oh, and Tennessee.

  7. anon[389] • Disclaimer says:

    Manhattan

    Had to share. Was a real hand-eye coordination challenge to get that.

    Many of the big urban areas on the eastern seaboard have connections to the Carolinas’ seaboard which I assume is analogous to the the Delta/Chicago.

  8. @anon

    Thanks. I tried to put the cursor on Manhattan but failed.

  9. anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    >Many of the big urban areas on the eastern seaboard have connections to the Carolinas’ seaboard

    Here is Essex Co, NJ (Newark), for instance. The belt goes all the way through Georgia to southeast Alabama. Don’t think it’s snowbirds over there, haha.

  10. Trevor H. says:

    The dominant picture in data analyzed by economists at Facebook, Harvard, Princeton and New York University …

    Those of us who have never had anything at all to do with Facebook? I guess we’ll remain forever a mystery to these geniuses.

  11. J1234 says:

    By EMILY BADGER and QUOCTRUNG BUI

    I hate to cop Dave Barry’s old shtick, but Quoctrung Badger would be a great name for a rock band.

  12. @anon

    It’s curious that Manhattan is so strongly connected to the Southwestern corner of Colorado, beyond the Rockies. I can understand the other spots in Colorado (ski resorts and Denver). I’ve been there. It’s a pretty remote part of the country, with almost no people.

    • Replies: @Jay
  13. El Dato says:
    @Lot

    Current connected software systems are like an antivaxxer dropped into Medieval Europe.

    Unpatched and impossible to patch.

    https://www.theregister.co.uk/2018/06/27/notpetya_anniversary/

    Once in a system, the code sought to encrypt files and destroyed master boot records, leaving infected Windows machines useless. The malware spread using the US National Security Agency’s leaked EternalBlue exploit, which was also abused by WannaCry months earlier.

    “Months earlier”

    • Replies: @kihowi
    , @Lot
  14. @Reg Cæsar

    So all those dark blue splotches in random parts of the U.S., like Nevada and southern Virginia are Dallas Cowboy counties? They really are America’s Team, or them and the Green Bay Packers.

    It’s striking how popular the Oakland Raiders remain in Southern California, even though moved back to Oakland in 1995. At an exhibition game in August in the L.A. Coliseum between the Raiders and the Los Angeles Rams, who moved to St. Louis in 1995 and then moved back 3 seasons ago to L.A., the reporter said Oakland Raider fans appeared to outnumber the hometeam Los Angeles Rams fans about 3 to 1. Chicanos love the Raiders even though they only spent about a dozen years in Los Angeles versus close to 50 for the Rams.

    I guess the Raiders are moving to Las Vegas in 2019 or 2020.

  15. Next up, a paper describing how people would rather talk to friends than complete strangers.

  16. Re: Manhattan and the Coastal Carolinas, I’m sure you’re right that some of it is South-to-North black migration, but a lot more of it is northerners (including lots of retirees) to cities like Charleston, SC, which has exploaded with migration-fueled population growth in the last decade or so:

    https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/south-carolina/articles/2017-12-25/census-carolinas-among-states-seeing-most-population-growth

    https://www.postandcourier.com/news/rapid-population-growth-reshapes-south-carolina-brings-challenges-and-opportunities/article_ce78d94e-e5d0-11e7-99d3-47d5c7ed7027.html

    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    , @slumber_j
    , @donut
  17. Mr. Blank says:
    @SonOfStrom

    I was about to make this same point. On the connections to Manhattan map, the blue splotch on the South Carolina coast is Charleston. The blue splotch on the Georgia coast is Savannah.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  18. Steve, as an HBD Mitten ex-pat I can confirm you are 100% correct about the UP, its feelings about Mitten government, and NFL rooting interests.

    You are also correct about Manhattan and its ties to Ann Arbor. There is even a dorm nicknamed, “Little Long Island,” and it is packed with plenty of our fellow white people from that region. I assume the situation is similar in Madison.

  19. slumber_j says:
    @SonOfStrom

    That’s right. I know a bunch of rich older people from Manhattan who’ve moved to Charleston–and a lot more who haven’t actually moved there but do maintain their primary residence there.

  20. @Steve Sailer

    When I was in Seattle (1981-1995), there was heavy 49ers rooting interest given that the Seahawks only dated back to 1976, but apparently that has subsided over time or maybe it still exists but as a secondary interest.

    In North Carolina today, there are still many Washington Redskins fans again given the Panthers only date back to 1993. That and the Panthers team colors are hideous.

    And wherever I have lived in the U.S. (West Coast, Northeast, Southeast), I’ve seen that the Raiders have a huge fanbase. The fans may be a little ghetto, but there are still a lot of them.

    • Replies: @SonOfStrom
  21. Military is naturally going to be the most connected to the nation as a whole. Despite having a population of about 11,000, Chatahoochee county in GA just might be the most interconnected place in the U.S. by virtue of being inhabited almost exclusively by folks at Fort Benning, with the brightest spots on the map being other isolated bases like Drum in upstate New York and Hood in central Texas. You can see other government geographical family trees like the NSA in Maryland with its sister facilities in Georgia, Texas, Colorado, and Hawaii or its feeder schools like the Navy in Florida, Air Force in Texas, or the Army in Arizona.

    It’s not limited to to government, either, Yuma county Arizona, despite being geographically closer to places like Orange and Riverside counties, is much more connected to Monterey over in Steinbeck country because of Big Ag conglomerates operating in both places.

  22. Gene says:

    As far as state lines go, another possible factor is state job and professional licensing. One may not be able to get a law/medical/engineering job as easily in an adjacent state.

    Also, would be interesting to look at the (suspect highly) connected areas with military bases. I moved 9 times in 20 years and have friends in over 40 states….

    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
  23. One reason for the appearance of distinctive state lines on this map may be the social links between school-aged kids and between their parents. Students very rarely cross state lines to attend a public school.

  24. Anonymous[374] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    The Russian government’s anti-Ukraine Notpetya virus destroyed most of the computers of Demmark’s largest company, costing it a billion dollars.

    How much did the Israeli virus cost Iran?

    • Agree: JMcG
    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Lot
  25. It is strange with all of the people who moved to San Diego from the Chicago area, that clicking on San Diego County doesn’t really light up the Chicago Area, or anywhere else in the Midwest for that matter. In general, Southern California seem pretty isolated in their friending. Las Vegas and Northwest Arizona are the only areas that come up in any way outside California for Los Angeles County for example. Interesting also, is that if you click on counties in the Rio Grande valley in Texas, counties in the Red River Valley of North Dakota and Minnesota come up. Lots of Mexican farm labor work in the potato fields in the Red River Valley.

  26. Another possibility is that, all else being equal, people are less likely to move across state lines, perhaps due to sports rooting rivalries. Interestingly, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is more tied to Green Bay, WI on Facebook than to the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, suggesting that ease of driving and possibly NFL rooting matters more than state government ties.

    Possibly, but the tuition premium at State Schools paid by out of State students versus residents is probably the dominant factor here.

    If you’re a middle class kid from Western Pennsylvania, absent significant scholarships and aid you’re going to Penn State and not Ohio State even if you always liked the Buckeyes.

  27. Color me skeptical..

    Why on the Manhattan map isn’t there a very dark blue patch in South Florida? Old Jews don’t Faceberg?

  28. @Reg Cæsar

    Big Chief Menominee and Hillary share heap big love of fire water; he with her!

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  29. cornbeef says:

    El Paso Co, Colorado colors most of the country a light shade of green. 50% of FB friends are from >500 miles away.

    Colorado Springs is home to USAFA, Schriever AFB, Peterson AFB, Cheyenne Mountain AFS and the big one, Fort Carson.

    Not only are there large transient military populations, but many military members from around the country who decide to settle in the area for various reasons.

    • Replies: @anonymous
  30. anon[850] • Disclaimer says:

    - Another possibility is that, all else being equal, people are less likely to move across state lines, perhaps due to sports rooting rivalries.

    I would add that at least in the Southern states people born and raised there feel a state loyalty that is more than just sports identity. It is a national/people’s identity. It means something to be from Arkansas or Louisiana. People may move away for school or business reasons, but the prospect of leaving your home state to live in Oregon is a big deal. You’re leaving your people.

  31. Mr. Anon says:

    OT: France needs immigrants. After all, without african migrants, who would sell cheap tourist trinkets?

    https://www.afp.com/en/news/205/french-police-seize-20-tonnes-miniature-eiffel-towers-doc-1989ez1

    • Replies: @U-Bahn
  32. Anon[204] • Disclaimer says:

    O/T

    How about…They have to go back…

    An MP for Rennes has proposed to bring over police officers from Morocco to help identify and deal with underage migrants who have formed criminal gangs operating in the French city.
    The proposal is being spearheaded by French MP for Ille-et-Vilaine Mustapha Laabid, a member of President Emmanuel Macron’s La République En Marche! (LREM/The Republic on the Move), who says the Moroccan police could greatly aid the work of local police forces, Ouest France reports.

    https://www.breitbart.com/london/2018/09/20/moroccan-police-proposed-help-deal-underage-migrant-criminals-french-city/

    This is outright colonialism, but when done by “brown people” it becomes OK.

    • Replies: @The Wild Geese Howard
  33. For the Manhattan sample, I assume that big dark blue patch due east of Idaho is the Jackson Hole area. Jiminy, it’s huge — why, one might almost think it’s as large as, say, Israel.

    Heeeey, waaait a minute…

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  34. Tyrion 2 says:

    OT but funny:

    The EU roundtable in Salzburg last night looked remarkably like a meeting of SPECTRE. pic.twitter.com/FW3mlmLgIx— Paul Embery (@PaulEmbery) September 20, 2018

  35. BenKenobi says:

    No-at-all OT, here’s a bunch of friends all tied together:

    13 year old Chinese girl raped & murdered by Syrian refugee in greater Vancouver area, Chinese people enraged and protest at court house. Woman in hijab throws coffee on nearby media scrum.

    https://www.spencerfernando.com/2018/09/15/video-woman-in-hijab-throws-coffee-on-canadians-protesting-murder-of-marrisa-shen/

    PS: a g**gle search for “marissa shen protest” and “marissa shen coffee” turned up only articles from the time of the original murder. duckduckgo immediately produced what I was looking for.
    *thinking emoticon*

    • Replies: @Anon
  36. ‘Another possibility is that, all else being equal, people are less likely to move across state lines, perhaps due to sports rooting rivalries…’

    For those of us who have lived in a state for several generations, there may also be an irrational connection — also known as ‘patriotism.’

    My family had lived in California since 1864. For various practical reasons, I finally moved up to Oregon — about one hundred miles north of the state line. Now, I was moving from the San Francsico Bay Area. I could have moved to — say — Alturas, Ca and it would have been physically about as far, and sociologically at least as big a change (Trump voters, helpful neighbors, everyone’s white).

    Nevertheless, I think I would have felt at ‘home’ in some sense that suddenly stopped being the case when I crossed the line into Oregon — even though as it happens, most people in Oregon these days seem to be from California anyway.

    Obviously, the difference is almost entirely mental; it’s a line on a map, that’s all. Nevertheless, the distinction exists. I am — or was — a Californian. Oregon is not California. It’s just that California has ceased to be California as well.

    • Replies: @Tim
  37. Anon[204] • Disclaimer says:

    o/t

    https://www.supplychaindive.com/news/warehouse-wages-rising-supply-chain-budgets/531529/

    As the labor shortage grows, are wages growing too?
    Labor issues are top of mind for facility managers in 2018 as the wage market corrects after years of stagnant pay.

  38. Jay says:
    @PiltdownMan

    It’s curious that Manhattan is so strongly connected to the Southwestern corner of Colorado, beyond the Rockies. I can understand the other spots in Colorado (ski resorts and Denver). I’ve been there. It’s a pretty remote part of the country, with almost no people.

    That is Durango. Formerly filled with salt-of-the-earth farmers and ranchers. Now overpriced 10 acre “ranches” and ski retreats for the wealthy.

    Funny how these wealthy lefties never want vacation homes in “diverse” areas.

    • Replies: @Buck
    , @PiltdownMan
  39. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:

    When I lived in R.I. I discovered the stereotype to be true — as all stereotypes are — that R. Islanders don’t like to drive out to Massachusetts, which borders most of R.I.’s populous areas, because they consider it “too far.” (Of course, when the sales tax is more favorable in Mass., this prejudice instantly vanishes.)

    I also noticed, of workers who commuted into R.I. for a job or school, that they tended only to associate with their homeboys & girls back in adjacent Conn./Mass. (taken together, possibly the redneckiest swathe of New England despite being fairly urban). I’m not sure if the reverse is true– a relatively high % of R.I. residents drive out of state to work

    • Replies: @snorlax
    , @Lot
    , @prosa123
  40. donut says:
    @SonOfStrom

    When I worked in Manhattan in the 90′s the majority of American Black people I met maintained ties with their families down that way . Many of them owned property and planned to retire there .

    • Replies: @SonOfStrom
  41. kihowi says:
    @El Dato

    Thanks for that. That would make a great low budget movie. There’s so many good scenes there.

    Deloitte guy: Do you sell laptops?

    Computer shop guy: Of course. What kind are you interested in?

    Deloitte guy: I’ll have all of them. (empties bag of money)

  42. IHTG says:

    And suddenly, Amy Chua:

  43. snorlax says:
    @Anonymous

    It’s the guidoiest region of NE, but IMO the redneckiest is New Hampshire, home to NE’s only NASCAR race.

  44. Anon[193] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I don’t always cuck , but when I do I also choose to cuck for islam. Especially Iran , the whitest of the muslims **so dreamy**.

  45. Anon[193] • Disclaimer says:
    @BenKenobi

    Hey how can you choose sides on this one?
    That hijabi no doubt hates Jews/Israel. She is a naturally allied with most of the commentariat here .

  46. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:

    OT – Linux is converged

    https://www.newyorker.com/science/elements/after-years-of-abusive-e-mails-the-creator-of-linux-steps-aside

    “steps aside” – hmm feels like I’ve heard this term before?

    https://www.techrepublic.com/article/the-linux-code-of-conduct-is-long-overdue/

    It finally happened. Linus Torvalds, the intrepid creator and leader of Linux kernel development, realized that in today’s world his attitude and behavior doesn’t fly in the face of an enlightened, progressive global population. Further, locker room talk and the sometimes cruel treatment of others simply cannot and will not be tolerated anymore.

    Not satire.

  47. @Anon

    It’s Macron’s France in the Current Year.

    Of course they will find new and innovative ways to surrender.

  48. Yeah. Football is really interesting.

    And it’s not fixed or anything.

  49. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I clicked on the UP counties on the NYT widget. They are closer to southern Michigan than the much closer northern Wisconsin counties. They are probably Packers Green on this map because the Lions were pretty bad circa 2014.

    I think a good adjustment for this map would be to overweight fans of teams with bad records the prior 5 years.

  50. @Lester Fewer

    Jerry Seinfeld and David Letterman are two prominent New Yorkers with large spreads out West.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  51. Lot says:
    @Anonymous

    As i recall it as carefully targeted to only affect softeare running centrifuges, and even then do so subtly so it would not be noticed.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  52. Lot says:
    @El Dato

    On the other hand, it was an accounting software autoupdate that allowed the initial infection.

    I use msconfig (and other methods) to stop all those autoupdaters from booting with the PC.

    Another reason to use Stevosphere Brave browser, ads are a major source of malware.

  53. Lot says:
    @Anonymous

    “redneckiest swathe of New England”

    No, that honor goes to rural Maine.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    , @Reg Cæsar
  54. @Lot

    As i recall it as carefully targeted to only affect softeare running centrifuges, and even then do so subtly so it would not be noticed.

    Yes, Stuxnet targeted a certain type of PLC controller (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stuxnet) and made them overspin the centrifuges. The Ruski virus targeted Windows machines.

    Part of Maersk’s problem was that they had machines running Windows 2000 which has been out of support for years.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  55. U-Bahn says:
    @Mr. Anon

    OT^2

    OT: France needs immigrants. After all, without african migrants, who would sell cheap tourist trinkets?

    https://www.theguardian.com/global-development/2018/sep/20/medieval-cholera-outbreak-exposes-zimbabwe-problems

  56. @Lot

    I do find it comforting to know rural Maine stands between me and the cultural Chernobyl that is New York City.

  57. gdpbull says:

    Only fools do fakebook.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  58. That Guy says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I noticed this same thing growing up in SW Ohio. It was mainly bengals country but probably 25 percent browns fans. No colts fans whatsoever despite the fact that Indy is a good bit closer than Cleveland. Same thing with the NBA. Cavs favs (not a lot it was pre Lebron) but never once heard anybody even mention the pacers.

    • Replies: @Mike Zwick
    , @Reg Cæsar
  59. @That Guy

    Lots of Colts fans in Central Illinois. There is a fervent and deep seated hatred of all things Chicago in Downstate Illinois and usually the Chicago Bears are left out of it, but not by all. There are also a lot of green Bay Packer fans all over Illinois. It is seen as a kind of act of rebellion to go against the grain and root for the Bears rival team. It is like they are trying to convey: “Look at me, I am so ironic, I am a Packer fan in Illinois! Get it?”

  60. @The Anti-Gnostic

    Jerry Seinfeld and David Letterman are two prominent New Yorkers with large spreads out West.

    Letterman is as “New Yorker” as Will Shortz and Cole Porter. In other words, a Hoosier.

    But the New Yorker with the biggest spread had to be Walter Hudson, who never left Hempstead.

    • Replies: @Stan Adams
  61. Anonymous[245] • Disclaimer says:

    Off topic… here’s a fun murder serial-killer mystery from England… well, only fun now that it’s solved. I love how they profiled a middle age white man with a grudge against women for the crimes.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/world/2018/09/20/after-three-years-hundreds-gruesome-deaths-britains-cat-killer-case-has-been-solved/

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  62. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Southern Virginia has big military bases. Lots of Texans serve in the military. Many probably end up being stationed and living there.

  63. @That Guy

    No colts fans whatsoever despite the fact that Indy is a good bit closer than Cleveland.

    The Colts are the new kids on the block. They were in Baltimore when loyalties were established.

    Likewise, the western edge of Wisconsin is about one-tenth as far from US Bank Stadium as from Lambeau, but it’s solidly Packer country. They were around for over 40 years before the upstart expansion team showed up.

    Cavs favs (not a lot it was pre Lebron) but never once heard anybody even mention the pacers.

    Other than San Antonio, the ABA teams never got any respect in their new league. (Though once the Nets moved to Brooklyn, their hats were all the rage in the Twin Cities, and no doubt elsewhere.) The Jazz might be considered an honorary ABA team, as the Stars were quite popular there, and they were gone only three years before SLC snagged another team.

  64. @Autochthon

    Big Chief Menominee and Hillary share heap big love of fire water; he with her!

    Besides Menominee, Wisconsin also has a Menomonie and a Menomonee Falls. It’s not only the Indians who drink.

  65. @Lot

    “redneckiest swathe of New England”

    No, that honor goes to rural Maine.

    A Southern writer who lives there now said her neighbors are just “hillbillies with different accents”.

    At least in Rhode Island, they can pronounce the letter L. It’s “Wode Island”, but in coastal Maine, it’s “Wockwand”. Weawwy. Totally Fudd.

  66. @gdpbull

    Only fools do fakebook.

    And NFL.

  67. anon[389] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    People like the Raiders because it gives them an excuse to dress-up as a bad guy. Get to feel DANGEROUS. Similar to those LARPing Disneyland motorcycle gang folks.

    Also happens with the Vikings a bit. But agree there is a strong latino aspect. I’ll spitball: their chicks are more into it. Apologies if that is stating the obvious..

  68. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT In further proof that there is nothing wierd going on, thete has been a mass shooting a day since the case against Brett Kavanaugh fell apart.

    https://www.nbcnews.com/news/us-news/shooting-reported-wisconsin-office-building-n911096

    http://time.com/5402052/maryland-harford-county-mass-shooting/

  69. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Jim Don Bob

    In fantasy America, the government actually realizes that this means that Microsoft’s “buy our latest product or else” shtick is a national security issue. I love these illiterates babbling about evil Russians because their entire understanding of the situation is ya push the button and the dog salivates, end of story. If Russians are so scary then what about all the smart Georgetown grads opening all the doors and windows for the Russians to walk through? Does this stuff matter or not?

  70. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:

    This article is from the NY Slimes. Therefore, like everything else in the Slimes it’s probably a mass of lies.

    Who believes the NYSlimes? Only brain washed liberals.

  71. David says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    The footnote is pretty funny: “*The New York Jets do not have a plurality of fans in any US county.”

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  72. J.Ross says: • Website

    OT Brett Kavanaugh strikes again!

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Cagey Beast
  73. @Desiderius

    Right, and Sullivan’s Island, Mount Pleasant, and half a dozen other beach front enclaves where coastal property can (for now) be found at a fraction of the price of comparable properties up north.

  74. I noticed that in and around where I live, Chester County, PA, part of the Philadelphia five-county area, the Delaware Valley Metropolitan area, and the I-95 corridor, connections seem to blur state lines more so than other places, especially in the interior of the country. I would be much more likely to be friends with someone from Voorhees, New Jersey than with someone from Carlisle, PA, for instance.

  75. @Steve in Greensboro

    Right, many folks in the southeast still have a historic rooting interest from growing up watching The Skins when they, with their DC (aka N. Va./S. Md.) location were the closest professional team that was somewhat “Southern” – they still retain some touches of that, like still having a fight song and band long after most teams had officially dropped that type of thing.

  76. Tim says:
    @Colin Wright

    In the DC, MD, VA area this odd sort of patriotism is very common. People from MD routinely talk about how strange and confusing it is to drive in VA, and people in VA say the same thing. . . . And, of course we both gang up on DC.

  77. @donut

    I’m sure that’s definitely part of it – I haven’t played with the tool enough to see how specific it can get but I’d be willing to bet that if you could drill down to the barrier island and more Gullah geeche areas of the coastal south the links would be historic family properties to the more diverse areas of NYC.

  78. Manhattan is also notably connected to the college towns of flagship State Us & elite private Us. One can pick out UMich, (Washtenow County residents are much more likely to be connected to the Big Apple than nearby Detroit) the “Research Triangle” in North Carolina, Penn State in State College, PA, Athens, GA, Austin, TX, Charlottesville, VA, Madison WI, the U of Illinois, and others. New York really is a horrible brain drain on flyover country!

    • Replies: @Anthony Wayne
  79. @Anthony Wayne

    Somehow I skimmed over this being mentioned in the post

  80. @Gene

    And to make things worse, moving across state lines means visiting the DMV.

  81. Anon[193] • Disclaimer says:
    @J.Ross

    What a liar !!!!!!!!

  82. jJay says:

    Do I have any friends now? Probably not. I had several solid friends when I was 11 and 12 yo, fewer when I was a teenager and young adult, but not so much since. There was peak friend time. Now I just have some acquaintances with common interests. I moved away from the town I grew up in, so that plays a part.

    The last male-male friendship I had was 20 years ago and that was a local barfly one. In case you haven’t noticed the Wymyn’s Auxiliary League, in cooperation with the police, has shut down most local watering holes. Mrs. jJay would think that’s for best, but she wouldn’t like me if I were the type to readily agreed with her.

    I’m digressing. To point, the excellent word ‘friend’ has been cheapened.

    • Replies: @gunner29
  83. @J.Ross

    I’d hide Kurt Eichenwald in my attic if it came down to that.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  84. Anon7 says:

    “Interestingly, the Upper Peninsula of Michigan is more tied to Green Bay, WI on Facebook than to the Lower Peninsula of Michigan, suggesting that ease of driving and possibly NFL rooting matters more than state government ties.”

    Not surprising. Starting from Houghton, Mi (home of Michigan Tech U), a pretty big town of 8,000 people, and driving to a bigger town, Green Bay Wi with 100,000 people, is a 200 mile drive. To get from Houghton to a Michigan town with 100,000 people is a 500 mile drive, and all you get is Flint. It’s almost twice as far to Ann Arbor and the UofM as it is to Madison and UW. It’s as far from Copper Harbor, Mi to Detroit as it is from Detroit to Washington, DC.

    The UP has less than 3% of Michigan’s population, and it’s mostly concentrated in a few counties. As far as driving is concerned, there was a recent John Sandford novel in which the bad guys escaped across the Wisconsin state line to the UP hoping to continue their crime spree. They kind of had to give up, though: they drove for hours and barely found a gas station.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  85. Con Moto says:

    No one from the upper peninsula of Michigan roots for anyone other than the Packers. I live roughly an hours drive from there for only 2 years and I figured that out. Culturally, the UP is northern Wisconsin.

    • Replies: @gunner29
  86. prosa123 says: • Website

    In the reasonably sized Connecticut city where I grew up a high percentage of the blacks were descended from people originally from Elizabeth City, North Carolina. Most of the Puerto Ricans were from the small town of Penuelas near Ponce.
    Italian-Americans were and still are the single biggest ethnic group, even today probably 20% of the total population. The vast majority of them can trace their ancestry back to early 20th Century immigrants from just two small towns, Pontelandolfo in Campania and Avigliano in Basilicata.

  87. @Buck

    I am a Colorado native and I only know one person in Telluride, a freelance journalist from New York, I kid you not…..lol

  88. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Cagey Beast

    An anon at 4chan speculated that if Eichenwald were in a room with Holocaust survivors, he would have to fight an urge to claim in total seriousness that he was also a Holocaust survivor.

    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
  89. Anon[395] • Disclaimer says:

    A retired Episcopal priest is facing deportation to his native England, and supporters are rallying to help him stay in the Alton area as a hearing in immigration court looms next week.

    https://www.stltoday.com/news/local/crime-and-courts/retired-episcopal-priest-who-served-in-alton-facing-deportation/article_85a9acd0-6b75-5238-a054-cc233d8d9296.html

    In 2005, Boase said he went to an Illinois Department of Motor Vehicles office to get a driver’s license using his British passport as proof of identification. When a supervisor asked if he wanted to register to vote, he thought he was allowed to do so — so he said yes.

    Wonder how many times this has happened, and how many Dems were elected on illegal votes.

  90. Anonymous[309] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    Of course it’s the foxes. It’s been obvious all along to anyone with eyes to see. Brits are in denial about this, especially the animal-huggers who campaigned to ban fox hunting last decade. Driving around London at night in the 1990s you used to see lots of cats but few foxes. Now you see lots of foxes but few cats. The idea that these two aggressive predators would get along in Disney-style harmony is completely delusional.

  91. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon7

    The big story out of the UP lately was concern about access to medical care as the median population ages.

  92. Anon[188] • Disclaimer says:

  93. @Reg Cæsar

    How is this even possible? I know alarmingly-obese people who eat like absolute pigs – as in, routinely scarfing down half-gallon boxes of ice cream smothered in Cool Whip – and they top out at 600 pounds or so.

    Even this guy peaked at 656:

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  94. Who cares? Facebook is for morons.

  95. prosa123 says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    I have never seen any statistics, but it’s a very reasonable guess that many Rhode Island residents work at the two huge Indian gambling casinos in Connecticut, Mohegan Sun and Foxwoods. Both are closer to Rhode Island than to the more populated parts of Connecticut.
    Anecdotally, I’ve also heard that there are some people living on the east end of Long Island who commute to casino jobs using the Orient Point-New London ferry, with free casino bus transfers at the New London dock. It’s something like $30 for a passenger round trip, but casino jobs certainly pay enough to make that worthwhile.

  96. @J.Ross

    I want to believe Kurt Eichenwald is pulling an enormous prank on us all. I like to think he’s the Andy Kaufman of the Trump years. Of course, Donald Trump is the Andy Kaufman of the Trump years so …

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  97. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Cagey Beast

    Prank? Is he “pranking” the guy currently on trial for having sent Eichenwald an animated gif? I hate long-distance diagnoses but it is not an opinion or hyperbole that Eichenwald is clearly insane. He’s like Zelig, he must be at the center no matter what the story is.

  98. @Jay

    Thank you. As commenter Buck, below, observes, it might be Telluride, which is about 50 miles closer to that dark-blue blotch on the map than Durango.

    Three decades ago, when I was living in Manhattan, I went on a long road trip in the backroads of Colorado and Utah, and came back to tell my colleagues that if I wanted to get away from it all and live a simple life, I would choose a tiny home outside Glenwood Springs, Colorado as my hideaway in retirement. I guess some New Yorkers actually acted that out.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  99. @Stan Adams

    How is this even possible? I know alarmingly-obese people who eat like absolute pigs – as in, routinely scarfing down half-gallon boxes of ice cream smothered in Cool Whip – and they top out at 600 pounds or so.

    1400 pounds seems to have been the all-time weight record.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_the_heaviest_people

  100. Lagertha says:

    As far as Springsteen, correct choice! Here is a man of great talent who turned his back on the “working guy”, the down & out HS cheerleader now working tables at the Stone Pony, after 45 years, the guys who lost their jobs at Bethlehem Steel, etc. I can listen to him, right now, because you posted it, but I have no more respect for Bruce…he’s just another Plutocrat! And, I should have seen the signs: he moved into my Jersey…bought the biggest mansion and basically, bulldozed it, and built another more, opulent house on top. Well, that house, and he is long gone. I am just disgusted that he has not ever, ever admitted that it is just plain, yucky for him to sing about “ties that bind” or “Down by the River” after he shat on the great working man and waitresses he sang about for 3 decades. He is the weirdest case of Trump Derangement I know.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    , @Anonymous
    , @JMcG
  101. @PiltdownMan

    I wanted to see Telluride, CO last year but it’s hard to get to. I did drive thru Durango and it’s very nice, but definitely not off the beaten path for tourists like me.

  102. gunner29 says:

    “redneckiest swathe of New England”

    No, that honor goes to rural Maine.

    30 years ago, when I was on the Left Coast, I was talking to a guy and could understand about 20% of what he was saying. It was some kind of english, that I could determine. But exactly where, no clue.

    My guess was Wales or some other armpit of england. So I axed him where he was from; Maine.

    There was a TV show about Maine loggers, and they spoke real english. So I can’t imagine where this gomer was from….(They don’t log in the cities; even in Maine)

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
    , @Reg Cæsar
  103. @David

    The footnote is pretty funny: “*The New York Jets do not have a plurality of fans in any US county.”

    US county. They didn’t include Canada’s many NFL fans. I’m sure the Jets could do well in Manitoba, sharing the name with the local NHL squad.

  104. The third-heaviest person ever recorded was also an illegal alien?

    Show me a 30-foot fence, and I’ll show you a 1,300-lb Mexican who’ll lean on and flatten it.

  105. gunner29 says:
    @jJay

    In case you haven’t noticed the Wymyn’s Auxiliary League, in cooperation with the police, has shut down most local watering holes. Mrs. jJay would think that’s for best, but she wouldn’t like me if I were the type to readily agreed with her.

    Your ‘femail’ doesn’t want you having any male friends. It figures that you having nobody outside of her gives her power over you; everything has to pass thru her.

    My ex tried that, I told her she should be a travel agent, since she was so good at arranging guilt trips.

    This was over me going to the mountains, with my neighbor and his two teenage sons, to ride our dirt bikes over the weekend. I told her on Wednesday we were going and she could join us. I bought her a nice trail bike for xmas, so she/it could join us. But she wanted to play games…

    After I divorced the b, I found out the married guys wives wouldn’t allow them to be around me….the womyn figured men were like womyn and trashed everybodies marriage. But we don’t. Guys understand if you trash his womyn, he’ll bail from you.

    • Replies: @jJay
  106. Lagertha says:
    @Lagertha

    He will be so ever, so ever haunted. He abandoned every person.populations he sang about – what a creep! I once admired him, now he is an amoral asshole.

  107. gunner29 says:
    @Con Moto

    No one from the upper peninsula of Michigan roots for anyone other than the Packers. I live roughly an hours drive from there for only 2 years and I figured that out. Culturally, the UP is northern Wisconsin.

    180 years ago there was a dispute between Michigan and Ohio over Toledo. Ohio got Toledo and Michigan got the UP as compensation.

    The UP should have been part of Wisconsin, but they weren’t a state yet, so no voice.

    One of my girlfriends went to the Northern Michigan University; the Nympho Nurse.

    I tried calling her one evening, took 2 hours to get an open line as there were only about 50 circuits across the Mackinaw Bridge to the LP.

    Anyway, NMU is all GB, all the time. They get old Packer uniforms; same color scheme.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  108. Anonymous[157] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lagertha

    My ancestors, uncles and cousins were South Chicago white Catholic ethnics, mill hunkies (actually Croatians, Slovaks, Czechs and Poles), steel mill, lime plant, brick plant, that sort of thing. None of them, so far as I ever ascertained, ever heard of Springsteen, or if they did wouldn’t admit it. Older ones preferred Myron Floren, younger ones shitkicker country or hard rock.

    The guy wouldn’t have lasted a week in the mill.

  109. @gunner29

    30 years ago, when I was on the Left Coast, I was talking to a guy and could understand about 20% of what he was saying. It was some kind of english, that I could determine. But exactly where, no clue.

  110. JMcG says:
    @Lagertha

    My teenage son has started to develop an appreciation for old Springsteen. I pointed out to him that the last time we were in Ireland, ol’ Bruce had chartered a jet to fly his daughter’s horse over for the Dublin Horse Show. I couldn’t care less what a man does with his money, but it’s ridiculous to be lectured to by a rich man in a poor man’s shirt.

  111. anonymous[246] • Disclaimer says:
    @cornbeef

    So true. The biggest city in El Paso county, Colorado Springs, has 11,000 restaurants, a languishing private sector, a burgeoning drug problem mostly around the military bases, and an entitled, grossly overpaid and self-indulgent class of retired, pensioned government workers. The struggling private sector is a consequence of pensioned “workers” who haven’t a clue how to participate in the real American economy.

    On the one hand these pensioners become addicts. Homeless. On every corner in Colorado Springs you’ll find a homeless vet with his dog panhandling aggressively. Scary dudes.

    On the other hand the privileged pensioners, who frequently dine out, run for political office as Republicans, mucking up state politics with their bureaucratic mentality.

    This is socialism’ s ground zero, in El Paso county. Winners and losers. Mentally ill and privileged. The supposedly “brave” and “America’s best and brightest” are paper pushers, defenders of the status quo … mere bureaucrats. They are the reason why Colorado has morphed from a libertarian paradise to one socialist-with-a-Republican-veneer.

  112. @Steve Sailer

    They really are America’s Team, or them and the Green Bay Packers.

    What would be more revealing would be the second most popular team in each county. The whole map might be Cowboys, Pats, and Pack.

  113. @gunner29

    180 years ago there was a dispute between Michigan and Ohio over Toledo. Ohio got Toledo and Michigan got the UP as compensation.

    The UP should have been part of Wisconsin, but they weren’t a state yet, so no voice.

    Michigan wasn’t a state yet, either. That’s why they lost. (The argument, not the “war”. There was one casualty, an animal.)

    Michigan is 50% larger than Wisconsin, but with the UP, it would be reversed. Michigan ranks 11th by area, Wisconsin 23rd. They are 8th (2010) or 10th (2017 estimate) and 20th, respectively, by population, and 17th and 24th by population density. So Wisconsin is still ahead of the game without the UP.

    19th-century Congresses thought it important that new states be roughly similar in size. You could do that around Lake Michigan by giving the UP’s Packer counties to Wisconsin. But almost nobody lives there, anyway. Were the entire UP a single city, it would be third in Wisconsin, just barely second in Michigan.

    The UP was the antebellum Alaska. So it was no big loss for Wisconsin.

  114. @jJay

    I like my wife.

    The Promise Keepers’ bumper sticker “I ♥ My Wife” would fit right next to “I Zip My Fly, Too.”

  115. @gunner29

    So I axed him where he was from; Maine.

    There was a TV show about Maine loggers, and they spoke real english.

    Maine has two distinct accents. The inland one is very close to New Hampshire’s, but a tad softer. Along the coast, it’s Elmer Fudd. I had Coast Guard shipmates who grew up five miles apart, and they had the same vocal division.

    (BTW, “English” is capitalized in real English.)

    My guess was Wales or some other armpit of england.

    Fireman Sam and his Welsh neighbours condemn your statement.

    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
  116. @Reg Cæsar

    The creeping Lerner Spectre facilitating the proximity of diversity is a nice touch.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The sources of America’s immigration problems—and a possible solution
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Hundreds of POWs may have been left to die in Vietnam, abandoned by their government—and our media.