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This month’s implosion of the Southern Poverty Law Center (last week, SPLC president Richard Cohen fired the SPLC’s legendary co-founder Morris Dees; on Friday, Cohen suddenly resigned) has been not unexpected by close observers of the SPLC for as long as a quarter of a century. So the meltdown’s potential causes, although still murky, seem overdetermined.

The SPLC’s finances have long struck outsiders as odd, although not necessarily crooked, but odd. So it wouldn’t be too surprising if financial matters somehow contributed to the suddenness of the purges.

An iSteve commenter looks through the Southern Poverty Law Center’s latest financial statement, doesn’t see any obvious red flags, but does suggest one of the more opaque areas that could use more detail.

I’m a CPA at a nonprofit which primarily does grantmaking (as opposed to running charitable programs directly); most of our assets are cash or publicly traded securities but we do have some alternative investments as well.

What’s most striking to me in looking through SPLC’s financials: of the $492 million in net assets, $412 million of that is valued based on Net Asset Value per share or equivalent (p. 13: “investments measured at net asset value”). In other words, the auditors had no way to independently confirm the value of those investments (if they had, the assets would be included in Level I or Level II) and relied on the account statements provided by the investment managers.

It’s far from certain that there’s anything amiss with the endowment, but it’s the biggest risk I can see.

Alternative investments are obviously more risky than stocks/bonds/ETFs/mutual funds; they’re less regulated, harder for the investor to understand, and inherently harder to audit because of their complexity. And of course valuation is harder to establish with illiquid assets.

For reasons like this, most of the smaller (say, <$10M in annual revenue) 501c3 organizations that I’m familiar with don’t have alternative investments at all.

Even compared to similarly-sized organizations, though, SPLC stands out.
First, that ratio of [alternative investments]/[net assets] that I mentioned is a mind-boggling 84%.

The comparable figure for Harvard (hedge fund with a university attached) is 75%; for the Heritage Foundation (close enough in revenue to SPLC, has its own substantial endowments) it’s 73%; for Institute for Justice (an actual public-interest law firm, albeit with half the staff costs of SPLC) it’s a measly 8%.

The second thing that stands out is that basically all (98%) of SPLC’s net assets don’t have donor restrictions. The comparable figures for Harvard, Heritage, and IJ are 24%, 78%, and 89% respectively; that SPLC’s is that high suggests that they aren’t dealing with many donors who are overly concerned about what their money is used for.

If, say, you want David Geffen to give your organization 9 figures, Mr. Geffen will likely demand a detailed agreement specifying that his name will appear in perpetuity on the building you will erect with his money in letters X feet tall and so forth and so on.

On the other hand, people just seem to give money to the SPLC willy-nilly on the assumption that they are Good. After all, the national media wouldn’t constantly be citing the SPLC as the unimpeachable arbiter of Hate vs. Love unless the SPLC was above suspicion, right?

Third, SPLC’s investment mix is particularly illiquid (see page 16). In the worst case interpretation, it could take them 2 months to liquidate, whereas Heritage (also see page 16) could redeem more than half of their alt investment in a day.

Summarizing all this,

1. SPLC has a huge endowment with a vague purpose that comprises the overwhelming majority.

2. The staff and board has been pushing the endowment’s growth, not the donors. (They’ve had a couple of bonanza fundraising years recently, but all of that cash could easily have been left in money market or index funds if someone wasn’t pushing the alternatives.)

3. Most of SPLC’s board and staff don’t have a background that suggests experience with alternative investments; they’re predominantly civil rights lawyers. Amazingly, they don’t even have a CFO; their highest accounting/finance person is “director of administrative services”. The notable exception to this is vice chair Bennett Grau (Goldman Sachs alum).

4. To conclude: if – and there’s no hard evidence of this – one or two members of their leadership wanted to leverage that huge endowment for personal gain at the organization’s expense, there wouldn’t be much to stop them.

Once again, this is not an accusation, just a suggestion for those looking into the SPLC as to one area that might be worth looking at.

Another possibility is that the old guard being purged may wind up looking pretty human compared to the new guard who want to get their hands on the SPLC’s half billion (assuming the SPLC really does have a half billion).

But, in general, isn’t it time for all organizations, such as Amazon, that have relied upon the SPLC’s good faith to renounce the SPLC and wipe the slate clean?

 
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  1. people just seem to give money to the SPLC willy-nilly on the assumption that they are Good

    Not 98% they don’t.

    That number is a huge red flag.

    • Agree: South Texas Guy
  2. Dan Hayes says:

    Bottom line from iSteve commentator: Seek and Ye Shall Find (or turn the forensic CPA attack dogs on the SPLC!).

  3. Wonder if there are some similarities with SPLC and Bernie Madoff. For instance, how both raised large amounts of money for various causes and people just took their word that that’s what their money was used for; similar audiences as the targets of said fundraising tactics, namely a certain NY/Northeastern ethnic that wanted to help out the “Good” and contribute to a positive spirit of altruism for the betterment of society, etc.

  4. Regardless the money thing, in my so far limited reading of the SPLC tea leaves, it looks to me like the women are taking over the leadership of another institution.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    , @AnotherDad
  5. Whiskey says: • Website

    I have a hard time believing that’s donor money as opposed to say cartel or 1MDB money, being laundered.

    That would explain the risky investment s.

  6. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:

    All the vague “inappropriate conduct” rumors are not terribly convincing. If there were something real and obvious along the lines of sex/racism, it would have already surfaced. It’s likely that there is more behind the sudden shake up. Probably money – something SPLC is desperately trying to keep a lid on.

  7. If one or two members of their leadership wanted to leverage that huge endowment for personal gain at the organization’s expense, there wouldn’t be much to stop them

    It sounds like SPLC has taken accounting lessons from Enron, which stashed losses in “off balance sheet” partnerships whose internal workings were entirely opaque.

    As with Enron, the SPLC’S “black box” investments are an invitation for fraud. They could involve entities that pay big consulting fees to SPLC insiders. Or that do business on sucker terms with yet other insider-controlled entities – such as lending money on the cheap or buying assets at inflated prices.

    There are a million ways to suck money out of an entity when you control both sides of the transaction.

    Everyone naturally wants to avoid unsubstantiated accusations. But a Bayesian probability analysis would suggest that if you have: (a) greedy people; (b) with easy access to a pile of other people’s money; who (c) believed they controlled the accounting and could never be caught . . . Well . . .

    Auditors are no doubt at this moment going over the SPLC’s opaque, illiquid “investments” with a fine-toothed comb. This is when the fun will begin.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @Forbes
  8. J.Ross says: • Website

    How can online advertising be real if the ads themselves are not?
    Remember back in 2016 when Google and Facebook were slammed for scamming ads (falsely claiming views), and then they miraculously recovered?
    https://www.buzzfeednews.com/article/craigsilverman/in-banner-video-ad-fraud

    Here’s how the scheme works. Julien sells a banner ad, which appears in the app and is visible to his users. Then, hidden from view behind that banner, fraudsters conceal autoplaying video ads that no human being actually sees, but which register as having been served and viewed. In this scenario, Julien gets paid for the small banner ad in his app that users see, but the fraudsters earn many times that amount by stuffing far more lucrative video ads behind the banner. Ultimately, it’s the brands whose ads were shown in hidden video players that lose money to those running the scheme.

    • Replies: @Lugash
    , @BigDickNick
  9. Wilkey says:

    How much of this is related to the fact that the SPLC, by virtue of being a censor for Facebook, Google, etc., now suddenly has a big fat target on its back thanks to legitimate political organizations it has designated as “hate groups”?

    It’s been pretty clear for a decade or two, at least, that the SPLC was using it’s saintlhood status on the Left to viciously attack groups it merely disagreed with on political grounds. When all that meant was a “hate” designation it didn’t necessarily mean all that much. As a gatekeeper for Facebook suddenly it does. And that gives people increased incentive to take them out.

  10. J.Ross says: • Website

    The various losses Democrats have faced recently might be a time to reflect on what they might do differently.
    Or they could issue a comic book in which Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez is a professional wrestler and Mike Pence is Norman Bates.
    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/207573308
    https://postimg.cc/BLttVBmc
    https://postimg.cc/SJLQVPyb

  11. tsotha says:

    On the other hand, people just seem to give money to the SPLC willy-nilly on the assumption that they are Good. After all, the national media wouldn’t constantly be citing the SPLC as the unimpeachable arbiter of Hate vs. Love unless the SPLC was above suspicion, right?

    It’s a shakedown racket. Tech giants, the media, colleges, and even the FBI were uncritically using the SPLC’s “hate groups” list to apply various sanctions. You did not want your group on that list. I don’t think it’s any coincidence fundraising expanded along with the definition of “hate group”. This is the same racket perfected by Jesse Jackson’s Rainbow Push Coalition, which would find something racist about your corporation unless you paid them to go away.

  12. Mr. Anon says:

    This month’s implosion of the Southern Poverty Law Center (last week, SPLC president Richard Cohen fired the SPLC’s legendary co-founder Morris Dees; on Friday, Cohen suddenly resigned)…..

    They’re legal director, Rhonda Brownstein, resigned too.

    https://www.montgomeryadvertiser.com/story/news/2019/03/22/southern-poverty-law-center-legal-director-rhonda-brownstein-resigns/3245281002/

    Trotsky’s real name was Bronshtein. A distant relation, perhaps?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  13. Mr. Anon says:

    On the other hand, people just seem to give money to the SPLC willy-nilly on the assumption that they are Good.

    Or they give money to the SPLC because it attacks people that they want attacked.

    • Replies: @Lurker
  14. unit472 says:

    I have no insight into SPLC finances but note Dees and Cohen had been there forever. Most financial scams ( Enron, World Com, Theranos etc) can’t go on decade after decade.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  15. Franz says:

    When all that meant was a “hate” designation it didn’t necessarily mean all that much. As a gatekeeper for Facebook suddenly it does. And that gives people increased incentive to take them out.

    Yes,

    They called attention to themselves, and it might play merry hob with all “not-for-profit” NGOs and do-gooder groups who do nothing but keep themselves legally flush for years without paying what their victims often have no choice but to pay: taxes.

    Groups such as the SPLC, ADL and all of their little imitators are bringing us lowly taxpayers to question just what societal needs these organizations are filling. Beyond lining their own pockets and spying on law abiding citizens, perhaps for a foreign power.

    The prophetic voice of Sam Francis, now long dead alas, was one of the earliest to point out just that: These people are doing what would be illegal if the government was doing it. A proper housecleaning has been in order for decades.

    If enough fury builds up, we may see nobody but churches who run observable soup kitchens and shelters getting any sort of deduction at all. Maybe it should have been that way all along.

  16. The Nevada corporation, The Southern Poverty Law Center, has the three key people from the Alabama corporation, Southern Poverty Law Center, as it’s only members: Richard Cohen, Pres, Alan Howard, Chm of the Bd, and Teenie Hutchinson, Sec/Treas. Between them, they have complete control over both entities.

    Nevada has virtually no corporate oversight. If you want to skirt regulations, or launder money, or hide campaign contributions, Nevada is the place to be. I’ll bet they are about to bolt.

    How does one go about alerting the authorities to this possibility?

  17. Insert video for Steve Miller’s “Take The Money And Run”.

  18. Anon[190] • Disclaimer says:

    I sense a change in how the mainstream media is covering the SPLC with respect to the reliability of its hate ratings. I suspect that we might not be seeing so many news articles in the future that uncritically say, “Blah blah, classified as a white supremacist by the Southern Poverty Research Center.” I’m not sure it will be much of an improvement: They’ll probably just go back to the passive voice, or attributions to “some observers.”

    But still, in Graf 6 of the Cohen story the Los Angeles Times mentions criticism of the SPLC’s over-demonization of only slightly fringy rightists:

    “Under Cohen’s watch, the center had also received frequent criticism for its aggressive fundraising tactics and for its depiction of some right-wing figures as extremists.”

  19. El Dato says:

    OT supershort listicle at RT:

    Thought crime science: Case studies in becoming an enemy of liberal orthodoxy

    Namechecks:

    > Lisa Littman and ‘rapid onset gender dysphoria’
    > James Watson alleges link between race and IQ
    > Larry Summers and female aptitude

  20. El Dato says:
    @Craig Nelsen

    How does one go about alerting the authorities to this possibility?

    Write a letter to your congresscritter?

    • Replies: @fitzGetty
  21. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    “Wonder if there are some similarities with SPLC and Bernie Madoff ….”

    Ding, ding, ding, ding! You win the prize!

    The best way to disguise a Ponzi Scheme is to call it a hedge fund. Doing it with donations, which people expect to be dissipated through good works, instead of investments, which people expect to be eventually returned with returns, is even better.

    • Replies: @Bubba
  22. @Chris from Gresham

    “…. it looks to me like the women are taking over the leadership of another institution.”

    Based on the pics I’ve seen, it looks like it is becoming a MOC. The Old Guard is taking the money and running.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  23. George says:

    Off Topic murky finances story: Schoharie Limousine crash

    Records reveal mysterious life of FBI informant Shahed Hussain

    Fun titbits like this: a building inspector for the town of Wilton, was asked during a 2011 deposition in the civil case Hussain brought against the water authority if Hussain ever tried to “intimidate” him during his visits to the motel by saying he was working for the FBI.

    https://www.timesunion.com/news/article/Who-is-FBI-informant-Shahed-Hussain-13351511.php

    America’s Corruption Is a National Security Threat

    Donald Trump is one symptom of a wider problem that’s making the United States weaker on the international stage.

    https://foreignpolicy.com/2019/03/19/americas-corruption-problem-is-a-national-security-threat/

    The author couldn’t resist bringing Trump into it, even though Trump is the least corrupt President in my lifetime, not that lack of corruption has achieved much.

    • Replies: @Ibound1
  24. But, in general, isn’t it time for all organizations, such as Amazon, that have relied upon the SPLC’s good faith to renounce the SPLC and wipe the slate clean?

    If they were honest, yes. But they aren’t. Like I noted in an earlier post George Clooney* gave the SPLC $1 million. He’s not particularly smart, but he’s not dumb either. He (and many other big pocketed donors) knew his money was going to go towards an organization that was going to whip up on the right wing in this country.

    *BTW. Screw Clooney. The guy loves to talk about the crap jobs he had when he was young, but he had a helluva safety net. His dad was a big time regional broadcaster (he later worked at Turner Classic Movies), and his aunt was Rosemary Clooney, and he lived with her when he moved out to LA. I don’t hold using family connections against him, but I do hold him accountable for using the whole ‘starving artist’ thing against him.

  25. @unit472

    No, but it helps if you have the same people in place decade after decade.

    Think Bernie Madoff. He, and his long-serving staff, operated a mathematically obvious fraud in the heart of supposedly flinty-eyed, hard-nosed, sharp-penciled, “watchdog” journalist-heavy Manhattan for four and half decades involving billions of dollars.

    By contrast, whatever the SPLC are doing—assuming they are doing anything untoward—is with a mere half billion in … Montgomery Alabama, oh, and maybe the Cayman Islands.

    • Replies: @CJ
  26. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Would be something if some of the endowment ended up in a Madoff or Buddy Fletcher type of fund.

    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
  27. “just a suggestion for those looking into the SPLC as to one area that might be worth looking at.”

    Don’t get your hopes up. The person “looking into the SPLC” is Obama-crony Tina Tchen, whose background is not financial but as a legal-fixer for powerful (and corrupt) Illinois Democrats.

    As reported here, Tina Tchen recently conspired with Cook County State’s Attorney Kim “Crimesha” Foxx to try to get the Jussie Smollett hate hoax either validated as a crime or suppressed prior to exposure as a hoax via the corrupted FBI.

    Tchen’s job is not to expose corruption at the SPLC. Her job is hide what can be hidden and salvage the rest, keeping any specially important people out of unfortunate headlines. The fix is already in.

    • Agree: Cortes, Bubba, Kratoklastes
  28. Alternative Investments is a term that usually refers to hedge funds. Investors in them typically pay fees of up to 2% of net asset value per year, plus 20% of gains. SPLC management by placing over $400 million would enormously enrich the fund managers receiving the funds. Look at the growth of the SPLC portfolio to get an idea of how much. The point for investigation: what are the relationships between the alternative investment managers, and SPLC management. Were the fund managers paying SPLC managers anything, or otherwise rewarding them for placement of the charitable foundation’s money? If so, questions could be raised as whether the SPLC tax exemption should be revoked, and its donors be denied any charitable deduction.

  29. If this was Reservoir Dog, Mr Dees and Mr Cohen would be tip-toeing into their getaway car, after having hearing the police were on the way. They’ve had their generous share of the SPLCs money over the years. Now their underlings might get some heat from the law.

  30. Trevor H. says:

    The comparable figures for Harvard, Heritage, and IJ are 24%, 78%, and 89% respectively

    IJ has his own nonprofit now? I’ve really gotta start being nicer to that guy.

  31. Trevor H. says:

    If, say, you want David Geffen to give your organization 9 figures, Mr. Geffen will likely demand a detailed agreement specifying that his name will appear in perpetuity on the building you will erect with his money in letters X feet tall and so forth and so on.

    “Look upon my works, ye mighty, and despair!”

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  32. Anonymous[261] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr. Anon

    You know some serious [email protected] is going down when all of these top people are getting purged. The ones who either no one liked or were most directly culpable are being canned, the others are being allowed to resign. That an organization with this amount of cash and filled to the gills with lawyers is having to get rid of these top people instead of shield them means it was so serious that it could put a major, possibly permanent dent in the organization if it didn’t happen. The organization may still end up getting a black eye this way but likely will be much better off than it would be had it retained it’s leadership and let the organization take the hit.

  33. KL says:

    Note (a) on page 19 excludes most assets from liquid Level 1 or Level 2 designation, and describes the Net Asset Value as a “practical expedient”. It is opaque.

  34. kihowi says:

    I’m a financial ignoramus, but why isn’t there any legislation that charities can’t hoard money like that? Would make sense. Let’s say only a certain percentage of their revenue or only enough to weather one or two particularly bad years?

  35. Bubba says:
    @The Alarmist

    Just typed in “Hedge Fund start” and got page after page of how to start your own hedge fund/Ponzi Scheme. I found this one to be amusing:

    “How to Start a Hedge Fund … and Buy that House with the Pool and the Pond”

    They all remind me of the old joke by Steve Martin, “How do you make a million dollars and not pay taxes? First, make a million dollars. Then tell the IRS, “I forgot.” “

  36. @Anonymous

    People are certainly phrasing their critiques of the SPLC carefully, making sure not to trod on any sensitive toes, unlike what the SPLCers do, naming individuals as Scarlet-A racists for nebulous reasons 50 years after the Civil Rights Act of 1964 was passed.

    They do this at a time when all real evidence—including the election of a two-term Black POTUS—suggests that racism is no longer one of America’s biggest problems. Maybe, that is the reason for the SPLC’s hysterical ranting about racism. Without a real avalanche of racism, there is no raison de être for the Southern Povery Law Center, no reason for them to collect millions of dollars per year or to dominate so many MSM and C-SPAN hours.

  37. Anon[190] • Disclaimer says:
    @Craig Nelsen

    Not sure why they’re coming up in Nevada, but they also show as a current domestic nonprofit corporation in the business entity search at the Alabama secretary of state website.

    “Domestic” in this context means originally incorporated in Alabama, not a “foreign” Nevada corporation with a business domicile or nexus in Alabama.

    Dees and others are listed as incorporators.

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
  38. Mr. Anon says:
    @Craig Nelsen

    How does one go about alerting the authorities to this possibility?

    The authorities? You mean like the FBI?

    https://www.washingtontimes.com/news/2018/jul/30/fbi-southern-poverty-law-center-partnership-alarms/

  39. carol says:

    Investments measured at net asset value

    Oh, I don’t understand. Stocks, mutual funds and ETFs would be “measured at net asset value” wouldn’t they?

    Or is this language just too vague?

    • Replies: @Kratoklastes
  40. Another possibility is that the old guard being purged may wind up looking pretty human compared to the new guard who want to get their hands on the SPLC’s half billion (assuming the SPLC really does have a half billion).

    Indeed.

    The SPLC has half a billion, guarded by two old guys with experience in direct-mail marketing, and without a team of financial experts to help them.

    Even if the new guard is acting with the best of motives, they may end up being displaced themselves by crooks who want to steal the money.

    4. To conclude: if – and there’s no hard evidence of this – one or two members of their leadership wanted to leverage that huge endowment for personal gain at the organization’s expense, there wouldn’t be much to stop them.

    It is also possible that there has been no abuse for personal gain, but “alternative investments” were made unwisely and have left a black hole in the balance sheet. The SPLC would have been an easy target for con men, because it was an unsophisticated investor with a huge fund at its disposal.

  41. dvorak says:

    Another possibility is that the old guard being purged may wind up looking pretty human compared to the new guard who want to get their hands on the SPLC’s half billion (assuming the SPLC really does have a half billion).

    Exactly. Never assume that bad things can’t get worse.

    What if SPLC continued to use their endowment for evil, but now did it efficiently and relentlessly, like a Koch?

  42. Ibound1 says:
    @George

    The US, as it “de-Anglo-Saxonizes”, becomes increasingly corrupt, inefficient and shoddy. Our population already believes electricity, water, and safe engineering are things are brought to them by “right”, not by hard working intelligent engineers. They have a “right” to safe water in Flynt and a “right” to electricity in Gary. People like AOC literally have no idea where electricity comes from beyond the level of magic. If we do not right this, we are headed for a not so pleasant decline.

  43. A lady from the Philadelphia Inquirer’s editorial board was picked up in the Seattle Times this morning citing the SPLC saying “the U.S. had more hate groups last year than at any time in the last two decades.” I guess she didn’t get the memo. https://www.seattletimes.com/opinion/america-the-hatemonger/

    She also cites the ADL’s stat of increasing “white supremacist propaganda incidents.” I hadn’t heard that one before! There is probably a limitless supply of “propaganda incidents,” if you look hard enough. Have they really gone back to bar bathrooms in the 80s to count swastikas scratches in stalls?

  44. Neoconned says:

    This is pure speculation on my part but what if whiskey and other commenters here are right andüzz it is a giant money laundering op?

    The ADL was raided in the 1990s by the FB8I and top secret fbi documents were found in the ADL offices….obviously they were somewm.associatedwith a mossad intelligence op.

    Maybe it’s a joint CIA and mossad money laundering op? A way of washing foreign gun running money or something d

  45. if – and there’s no hard evidence of this – one or two members of their leadership wanted to leverage that huge endowment “

    If they wanted this for political reasons one would need only to connect Tchen with Obama. The Clinton machine is being replaced by hope and change.

  46. “Another possibility is that the old guard being purged may wind up looking pretty human compared to the new guard who want to get their hands on the SPLC’s half billion…”

    Two things suggest that the “new guard” will be Negroes and women. First, all the internal complaints are not about corruption but rather racial and sexual discrimination (Translation: Unqualified minorities are not getting promoted into the lucrative upper echelons where the money flows free and the living is easy.). Second, the uber-corrupt race-warrior, Tina Tchen, is being imported from her latest fixer operation in Chicago to manage an internal investigation of the $PLC.

    The end result is likely to be an exodus of White males from the $PLC and their replacement by a congeries of unqualified Negroes and Women. Prior experience suggests that, whatever may currently be the case, increasing levels of financial corruption and mismanagement will then become the defining characteristic of the new $PLC

  47. Luke Lea says:

    Maybe it’s like Sadam’s atom bomb? Designed to intimidate, though does not actually exist.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  48. @The Alarmist

    Based on the pics I’ve seen, it looks like it is becoming a MOC. The Old Guard is taking the money and running.

    Whatever that means appears to be scrubbed from Wikipedia:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOChttps://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/MOC

  49. @Luke Lea

    Maybe it’s like Sadam’s atom bomb? Designed to intimidate, though does not actually exist.

    Like Hitler’s.

    Or, for that matter, Reagan’s SDI. It was never built, but worked like a charm. The ideal government program!

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  50. @Reg Cæsar

    And from Urban Dictionary as well:

    https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=MOC

    My Own Creation, Member of Congress, make-out city, men of color, marriage of convenience, monster of cock? (The last one fits Morris.)

    “Moment of confusion” looks the likeliest. But I’m too cynical to accept that. Someone knows what he’s doing.

  51. @Dave Pinsen

    Couldn’t have happened to a nicer bunch of donors!

  52. SPLC Implodes: President And Legal Director Resign Amid Sexual Misconduct Scandal

    The Southern Poverty Law Center – the “vicious left-wing attack dog” used by the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Google and Amazon to identify “hate groups” – is unraveling.

    A week after co-founder Morris Dees was ousted over sexual misconduct claims – with two dozen employees signing a letter of concern over “allegations of mistreatment, sexual harassment, gender discrimination, and racism,” the head of the SPLC, Richard Cohen, as well as the organization’s legal director, Rhonda Brownstein, resigned on Friday.

    Wait. Surely they all did due diligence.

    Why would the likes of Facebook, Twitter, Google and Amazon be comfortable with a company that has issues with sexual misconduct, gender discrimination and racism?

    Oh, yeah. Forget I asked.

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
  53. …want to get their hands on the SPLC’s half billion (assuming the SPLC really does have a half billion).

    Make that a billion. I’ve always assumed they have at least as much more hidden in overseas accounts.

    Keep an eye on which of them leaves the country.

    • Replies: @George
  54. Lugash says:
    @J.Ross

    It’s not real. Here’s journalist Marcus di Paola lamenting the fact that Google, Twitter and Facebook aren’t doing anything to stop military age black males from beefing online and shooting each other. He misses the obvious that there’s no way some gangbanger’s YT video would get 43000 legitimate views. There’s other bonus iSteve material(CIA, ChiTown Corruption) as well.

  55. George says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “Keep an eye on which of them leaves the country.” To which country?

    “Make that a billion. ” What happens to the $1 B? Who will be the trustee? If I were The Republicans/Trump I would suggest that with SPLC’s mission now complete the decent thing to do would be to distribute the $ to historically Black colleges in the South (or something else Southern Black). If the SPLC get’s less comical management they might be able to turn that billion into a political force.

  56. @J.Ross

    People build whole huge businesses off of paid search so its obviously real to a large degree or businesses whose whole business model is predicated on it being real could not exist.

  57. @Reg Cæsar

    The USSR has its own SDL project. The leaders thought it would work and threw tons of money at it. I used to know a scientist who had worked on the Soviet project. The scientists knew it was a scam, but they liked the money flowing their way. They didn’t spend a lot of money on it, but it was a nice jobs program for research physicists and the line.

    So of course when Reagan said he was going to throw a ton of money at it, the Russians freaked. The Apollo project was only a few years in the past. They knew the US had far more resources.

    This was like a hand of poker where both sides pretend to have 5 of a kind, and neither side realizes that without wild cards 5 of a kind doesn’t exist. Both sides thought the Russians had 5 jacks while the Americans had 5 aces.

    To be fair, the Russians truly believed Reagan wanted peace. PBS once did a show about the negotiations between the US and USSR, and one of the lead Russian negotiators called Reagan “the last romantic”.

    I was not Reagan’s biggest fan by a long shot. However, due to a weird combination of his gullibility, the Russians’ gullibility, Reagan’s genuine desire for a better and more peaceful world, Gorbachev’s desire for a better and more peaceful world, and some great salesmanship on both sides, one of the greatest foreign policy achievements in history came about.

  58. Lurker says:
    @Mr. Anon

    As the old saying goes – its probably a bit of both.

  59. @Paleo Liberal

    Reagan saw through the contradiction in traditional anti-Communism: they can’t run a fruit stand, but they’ll take over the world. How someone who couldn’t run a fruit stand could do so was a question no one asked.

    It’s similar to discovering hypocrisy– don’t expose it, leverage it.

  60. Lurker says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    For a bit of perspective on the Current Year – we should also remember that the Goodthinkers of the 1980s believed that Reagan was a maniac itching to blow up the entire world.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @Paleo Liberal
  61. Speaking of hypocrisy, a vegan guruess has been exposed eating fish for medical reasons. Her following went after her in a way nobody ever did with SPLC:

    Vegan influencer caught eating fish shocked her fans are outraged: ‘I never expected this reaction’

  62. @Lurker

    For a bit of perspective on the Current Year – we should also remember that the Goodthinkers of the 1980s believed that Reagan was a maniac itching to blow up the entire world.

    Just like the “anti-Semitic” Trump moving the embassy.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  63. @Lurker

    And he leveraged that. He got to play good cop and bad cop at the same time.

    There is a famous quote from the first time Reagan dined with Andrei Gromyko, the Soviet Foreign Minister. Reagan had been quoted as saying liberals were suprised he wasn’t a barbarian who ate his young. When he sat next to Gromyko, the Foreign Minister pointed to his plate and said “we don’t eat our young either, Mr. President”.

  64. OT
    Has the latest Elfwick tweet too over the top?

    All Kiwis, *men* and women, invited to wear a headscarf on Friday

    The Headscarf for Harmony movement will take place on Friday and everyone’s encouraged to take part

    *Men* and women are encouraged to take part

    Photos can be shared on social media using the hashtag #headscarfforharmony.

    #HeadScarfForHarmony

    It’s confusing because 90% of the #HeadScarfforHarmony tweets are white people bashing the idea

  65. @Reg Cæsar

    Lots of truth in that.

    The anti-Communist movement in the US got a bad reputation from that sort of illogical thinking. In fact, many of the anti-Communists used the irrational thinking of the movement for their own political or monetary gain.

    Unfortunately, there is a tendency for people on one side of the political spectrum to take irrational ideas in order to piss off the other side. So some on the right over emphasized the extent to which a few Communists had infiltrated labor unions and the Democratic Party, while ignoring the extent to which the labor unions and Democrats were purging the Reds. After all, it was Democratic presidents who got us into Korea, Vietnam and the Cold War.

    In reaction, some on the left over emphasized the overreaction of right wingers to completely discredit anyone against Communism. Their reaction to the John Birchers was to pretend the threat did not exist.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Art Deco
    , @Art Deco
  66. @Reg Cæsar

    This is why I get so annoyed at my fellow leftists for over exaggerating the dangers of the right wing. Crying wolf can backfire.

    Reagan was supposedly a dangerous fascist, but he didn’t end our civil liberties or get us into any wars.

    Bush II was supposedly a fascist, and did get us into wars, but didn’t round up people of color or Muslims and didn’t suspend our civil rights.

    If those men are fascist, what about Trump who truly has some authoritarian tendencies? Well, then he is a Nazi! We can tell by the way he gives power to Kushner and Ivanka and bends over backwards to Israel.

    When a genuine fascist runs, people will no longer be scared.

    Want proof?

    Right wingers spent decades smearing anyone on the left as a Communist or Socialist. I mean Obama, who put bank lackey Biden as his VP? Or Clinton, who was in the pocket of Wal Mart? After a few decades of that, young voters are no longer scared of Social Democrats like Sanders or even a genuine Socialist like AOC.

  67. Forbes says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    The problem with an Enron analogy is the “off balance sheet” losses, as characterized, were disclosed in the Notes to the Financial Statements (which are integral to the Financial Statements). An accounting item described as “off balance sheet” means it is explained in the Notes. That the Notes were 23 pages (or thereabouts) is a hurdle so-called financial journalists never overcome. Hell, most investors don’t even look at them–they take the word of illiterate and math & accounting-phobic English or journalism majors to explain things.

    Among Enron’s major challenges was their accounting policy regarding revenue recognition, and their debt load. When Notes raise more questions than answers–that’s a red flag. That greedy people ignore red flags until it is too late is a condition of modern life.

    Whatever SPLC’s “inappropriate conduct” consisted, time will tell. That a pile of money is at the center of it, is probably the least contentious assumption.

  68. In a weird way, it reminds me of Apple when Steve Jobs was in charge. Lefties, including journos, would talk about Jobs in hushed tones as if he were above reproach, and each new product was celebrated as almost a religious revelation. The Simpsons made fun of this:

    Now, however, with homosexual Tim Cook running the show, Apple has been receding into “just another tech company, and not a very good one” territory.

    Anyway, the SPLC seems to be built on the same “great man” ideology. Morris Dees created this universe of marketing that not only bamboozled people, but kept them in religious thrall to him and prevented him from questioning him.

    Good hucksters are good.

  69. @Paleo Liberal

    Obama and Hillary would do whatever their donors told them to do. Hillary because she wanted that green, and Obama because he wanted to get it over with so he could go golfing.

  70. @Paleo Liberal

    Crying wolf has already backfired, and yet you Lefties keep doing it. Literally, Bill Maher apologized for crying wolf about Bush 43, McCain, and Romney while in the middle of crying wolf about Trump:

    “I know I cried wolf before guys, but this time, I’m super-cereal!”

    Laughable.

  71. The SPLC is the world’s most powerful banana republic.

  72. Art Deco says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    So some on the right over emphasized the extent to which a few Communists had infiltrated labor unions and the Democratic Party, while ignoring the extent to which the labor unions and Democrats were purging the Reds. After all, it was Democratic presidents who got us into Korea, Vietnam and the Cold War.

    No, it wasn’t exaggerated. Communists and people working with them controlled 12 trade unions and in addition the political action committee of the CIO. Henry Wallace was the preferred VP candidate of the unions at the 1944 Democratic convention. See the memoirs of Michael Straight. One campaign event after another in 1948 was stage-managed by cadres. Wallace himself admitted in 1952 that he’d been wrong about a menu of policy questions. (Admissions of a sort you don’t hear anymore). It was in 1949 that Arthur Goldberg was able to ring-master the expulsion of the red-haze unions.

    As for government positions, there was a three-digit population of Soviet agents in the federal government at the time, including four subcabinet officers.

  73. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Charities are one of the best ways corrupt people can hide their corruption. Hedge funds are less useful.

    The Madoff thing was destined to run out sooner than the SPLC’s racket. Madoff was raising money specifically for his donors; the SPLC never said it was raising money, just “fighting hate”. On other words, Bernie’s donors expected a tangible ROI, while the SPLC’s donors only expected PR stunts.

  74. Art Deco says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    After all, it was Democratic presidents who got us into Korea, Vietnam and the Cold War.

    The Cold War was a reality. There was no alternate reality to which to repair. South Korea was attacked by North Korea.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  75. @Art Deco

    Agreed. The level of gaslighting on communist infiltration in our government is one of the Left’s greatest tricks in the 20th Century. We literally went from a nation rightfully believing commies hid under every rock to, within 20 years, scoffing at anyone who made such a factual assertion.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  76. @Paleo Liberal

    Those accusations have long been meaningless to anyone outside media or scrub politics. For everyday folks, “Communist” and “socialism” are synonymous with loser and failure.

  77. Art Deco says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Their reaction to the John Birchers was to pretend the threat did not exist.

    Ellen Schrecker and Noam Chomsky haven’t been ‘reacting’ to the John Birch Society.

  78. @Reg Cæsar

    Google MOG, then substitute C as in Charity.

  79. Meanwhile, real women are fighting back against faux, non-vagina-possessing women in matters relating to which change rooms they should use:

    HS Student Files Civil Rights Complaint After Being ‘Violated’ by Transgender

  80. Cry havoc and let loose the auditors of war!

  81. Well, we see that most reported hate crimes are hoaxes and conservatives aren’t really taking control of your life and womb, so who needs the SPLC. With that in mind, I think I have found the source for funding Reparations…the SPLC’s half billion nest egg. Whack it up among the ancestors of American slaves that’s fine with me. Going to buy me a weave and nail salon attached to a spinner rim shop. Spend more on glass blocks for my first floor windows and roll up gates for my doors .

  82. J.Ross says: • Website

    Current Grauniad headline:
    “If you focus on control, you have lost the battle:” how to win back your kids.
    Is it talking about Macron clearing the way to massacre yellow vests? Is it talking about New Zealand’s attempts to imprison people for having seen a video? Is it talking about old line Democrats fumbling the newcomers? Is it talking about the SPLC guaranteeing youth interest in Nazism with their aggressive policies?

  83. J.Ross says: • Website
    @R.G. Camara

    A corollary to that is lack of discussion about the Cambridge Five. A Brooke Breathed punchline has Steve Dallas demanding to know how Opus can sleep knowing that there are communists in the Italian parliament. That doesn’t sound as hysterical when you know that Soviet agents almost took over our most important European ally without anybody knowing.

  84. To the commenter I quoted in this post:

    Charlotte Allen of the Washington Examiner would like to email with you.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  85. @Reg Cæsar

    I read it as “Minority Owned Company”.

    Though this case might be more of a Minority Pwned Company.

  86. @Reg Cæsar

    As too many examples in history show, conquering something and successfully operating that same thing are two different skill sets. The latter is much less common than the former. The corollary is that just because you know someone is incapable of managing their winnings doesn’t mean they are not still a threat to you.

  87. Under the suspicious circumstances and given the large amount of donor money held, the Alabama Attorney General should ask for a court order placing the SPLC in receivership to assure funds are safeguarded.

  88. @J.Ross

    The Cambridge Five deserve to better known in this country as well, because they were wealthy, privileged scions. This has continued to this day, with the sons and daughters of wealth and privilege in our nation espousing far-Left views.

    I’m much more suspicious of a Kennedy or a Gates or Zuckerberg or Biden or a Clinton or Obama or McCain child being a traitor to this country than some no-name guy who builds his business up and then gets into power.

    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @J.Ross
  89. gcochran says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Yeah – how could someone that couldn’t run a fruit stand beat the Wehrmacht?

  90. @Anonymous

    Let me just jump in here and say, too, that the turmoil could be at least partially the result of four, or some combination of the four, separate major lawsuits they have currently against them from the Center for Immigration Studies, Gavin McInnes, Baltimore attorney Glen Allen, and me.

    While I know Glen, Gavin, and CIS’ Mark Krikorian personally, I don’t believe any of the other three know each other. So it is pretty remarkable that all four suits were filed within three months of each other, starting with mine, filed on November 13, 2018, and ending with Gavin’s, filed February 4, 2019.

    In my suit, I specifically raise the issue of their Nevada shadow corporation and other financial irregularities as a reason the individuals I name as defendants should remain as targets in the suit. As discovery looms, there is a good chance that concern over what might be uncovered is the real reason the rats are abandoning the ship.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  91. J.Ross says: • Website
    @R.G. Camara

    You get kind of an implied acknowledgment of this in the late 80s Michael Caine film The Whistle-Blower.

  92. J.Ross says: • Website
    @gcochran

    Infinite seconds chances and the United States as its supplier, plus the Wehrmacht failing to properly exploit local allies and pinning everything on an unnecessary symbolic contest.

  93. @Trevor H.

    David Geffen already did it: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Geffen_Hall

    ” In 2015, the hall was renamed David Geffen Hall after Geffen donated $100 million to the Lincoln Center.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  94. @Craig Nelsen

    That would be great. Hopefully will encourage others to fight back.

  95. @Paleo Liberal

    Nobody in the USA thought SDI would work but everyone was ready to reclassify their work as SDI related to get on the gravy train.

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  96. @Jim Don Bob

    They had to pay the family of the guy who paid to put his name on the building back in the 60s something like $15 million to have it changed to Geffen’s name.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  97. @Steve Sailer

    Right. It was originally Avery Fischer Hall after AF gave $10.5 million in the early 70s. I think they gave his family about double that to buy back the naming rights.

  98. Perhaps unrelated, but one way that dodgy-as-fuck motherfuckers use to claim high reported net worth, is buying small stakes in one another’s businesses at astronomical valuations.

    Let’s say I have a small business whose performance is not particularly spectacular, but for some reason I am desperately keen to be able to call myself a millionaire[1].

    Well, if I have a like-minded friend with a similar business, we can buy 3-5% of the equity in each others’ businesses at a valuation sufficient to make the rest of the equity “worth” an arbitrary amount.

    Done right (and not over-done), that sort of chicanery has long been used to give equity valuations enough of a ‘bump’ to enable small business owners to get access to lines of credit and other unsecured loans.

    Post-GFC most people assume that it would be harder to get that sort of thing past a prudent lending officer, but it seems like standards in small-business lending are about the same as they ever were.

    It’s fraudulent, of course. On the plus side, so long as the debt obtained is used to fund genuine attempts to expand the business, by and large it doesn’t result in losses for the lender. It can be a crucial step in getting the small businesses to scale, and to help it become a medium-sized business.

    Scale increases the odds of survival significantly: small businesses have a ~60% 4-year survival rate[2]; medium-sized businesses have a survival rate of 75% (which is the same as for large businesses – those employing more than 200 people).

    But inevitably the business starts being used as the founders’ lifestyle fund, and debt is raised in order to buy shit to impress the founders’ social circle… art, cars, boats, college places for their dull-witted offspring, etc.

    This is one of a set of mechanisms used to ‘goose’ the millionaire-ness of insecure dickheads; it also helps explain why someone can go from being notionally worth tens of millions of dollars, to being bankrupt – with almost no obvious catalysing event.

    [1] It’s unclear why I personally would want to call myself a millionaire when I am in fact a multi-trillionaire (lol HAIL KEK), the proof of which appears below (this item sits on my desk at all times, to show what government always does to money)

    [2] ‘Survival rate‘ in this context means the proportion of each business size category that remains operational – it excludes businesses that move from one category to another.

  99. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi

    Right. Their much-vaunted mission is even murkier than their finances. What big teeth you have, Grandma. Divide and conquer . . . and prosper.

  100. @carol

    Stocks, mutual funds and ETFs would be “measured at net asset value” wouldn’t they?

    Generally not – exchange-traded stocks and ETFs can readily be valued at market prices, and mutual funds are generally valued at a unit price that is based on “LCM” (lower of cost and market) accounting. Morningstar and similar entities furnish unit prices for a bewildering number of mutual funds.

    Property Trusts (exchange-traded or otherwise) are the only thing I would expect to see valued at NAV – and then only if they did not have any intangibles (goodwill etc) in their balance sheet.

    NAV per share is a particularly dodgy metric when a company has overpaid for acquisitions (and has hence accumulated a large ‘goodwill’ number in its balance sheet) or has otherwise finagled accounting rules in order to goose the asset side of its balance sheet.

    NTA (Net Tangible Assets) per share is a more useful metric: it excludes intangibles.

    NTA is still finagle-able because the liquidation value of ‘hard’ assets – machinery, plant & equipment, vehicles, office furniture etc – is often significantly lower than the carrying value of those things. As a nice example: what is the liquidation value of corporate signage? (It’s zero, usually).

    (Disclosure: I used to rate mutual funds for a living, including ‘alternative investment’ funds and venture capital funds. Later, I was head of Equity Research at the largest independent stock-rating firm in my country).

  101. @Jim Don Bob

    I was offered a job in SDI work once. The principal researcher was a former professor of mine. She didn’t think SDI would work, but she appreciated the funding for her laser research

  102. @Anon

    Let me just jump in here and say, too, that the turmoil could be at least partially the result of four, or some combination of the four, separate major lawsuits they have currently against them from the Center for Immigration Studies, Gavin McInnes, Baltimore attorney Glen Allen, and me.

    While I know Glen, Gavin, and CIS’ Mark Krikorian personally, I don’t believe any of the other three know each other. So it is pretty remarkable that all four suits were filed within three months of each other, starting with mine, filed on November 13, 2018, and ending with Gavin’s, filed February 4, 2019.

    In my suit, I specifically raise the issue of their Nevada shadow corporation and other financial irregularities as a reason the individuals I name as defendants should remain as targets in the suit.
    It’s important to remember that the non-profit incorporated in Alabama in 1971 by Dees, Joe Levin, and figurehead Julian Bond is Southern Poverty Law Center, Inc. A completely different entity was incorporated in Nevada in 1995 called The Southern Poverty Law Center, Inc.

    As discovery looms, there is a good chance that concern over what might be uncovered is the real reason the rats are abandoning the ship.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  103. @Paleo Liberal

    When a genuine fascist runs, people will no longer be scared.

    The closest thing we’ve seen to a “genuine fascist” in this country has been Lyndon LaRouche. We weren’t scared, but entertained. Unintentional comedy. If course, following Will Rogers’s advice, he called it “antifascism”.

    Fascism is to the left of nearly all Republicans today, so it’s unlikely to show up in that party. And be touted as “moderation” when it does. Look at Bloomberg– not fascist, but quite authoritarian.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  104. @Craig Nelsen

    It’s important to remember that the non-profit incorporated in Alabama in 1971 by Dees, Joe Levin, and figurehead Julian Bond is Southern Poverty Law Center, Inc. A completely different entity was incorporated in Nevada in 1995 called The Southern Poverty Law Center, Inc.

    So everything they say is a lie, including and and the.

    • Replies: @Craig Nelsen
  105. @gcochran

    Yeah – how could someone that couldn’t run a fruit stand beat the Wehrmacht?

    Home court advantage, and sheer numbers. Didn’t work in Afghanistan!

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  106. @Peripatetic Commenter

    It’s important to remember there have been no specific allegations of misconduct. And of the 36 reviews by current or former employees for the SPLC on glassdoor.com, half are negative. Among those, Richard Cohen is mentioned by name several times, as is a “female in upper management”, but the name Morris Dees doesn’t come up. There are lots of mentions of the “toxic” workplace environment, but nothing about sexual harassment. The “lack of diversity at the top” is mentioned frequently, but nothing about racist behavior.

    It’s all in a filing I made last Friday just before Cohen resigned in my lawsuit against them:

    https://www.craignelsen.com/nelsen_v_splc/2019-03-21-motion_dismiss_Morris_Dees_upon_showing.pdf

  107. @J.Ross

    It’s amazing how far down the memory hole these episodes have been sent. There are movies about the Red Brigades in Italy, but the only one I can think of starred a much younger Sharon Stone and one of the brat packers. Also, take a movie like ‘Ninotchka,’ a good film which would likely be more famous if the commies weren’t the bad guys.

    Although it’s run by lefties, to their credit, PBS has over the years produced and aired at least several documentaries on high-level commie spies in the west (e.g. Cambridge Five, American scientists and politicos outed by Venona intercepts, Alger Hiss, etc.).

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  108. @Chris from Gresham

    Regardless the money thing, in my so far limited reading of the SPLC tea leaves, it looks to me like the women are taking over the leadership of another institution.

    This would be great if the SPLC were say the enemy’s jet fighter or missile producer. Women are great at crank turning process stuff–bureaucracy, schedules, meetings–but not so great at engineering and producing things. (Non-domestic things.)

    However, the SPLC’s business is simply lists of people to hate and women are pretty good at that.

    We really need the SPLC to go black. Conservatives and nationalists should be continually saying what an outrage it is to have a “civil rights” organization called “The Southern Poverty Law Center” not be run by Southern African Americans who have been the victims of so much racism and the origin of the civil rights movement.

    Get that done and any money Dees and the Jews didn’t steal … not an issue. Mission accomplished!

  109. @Reg Cæsar

    Whatever.

    That particular field has reversed polarity several times already but far as I can tell you’ve lost your bearings.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  110. CJ says:
    @Almost Missouri

    “Think Bernie Madoff. He, and his long-serving staff, operated a mathematically obvious fraud in the heart of supposedly flinty-eyed, hard-nosed, sharp-penciled, “watchdog” journalist-heavy Manhattan for four and half decades involving billions of dollars.”

    True. Also true — none of the big-time Wall Street “investment banks” ever invested a dollar in Madoff’s operation. Here’s a list of those who did:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_investors_in_Bernard_L._Madoff_Investment_Securities

    Note the absence of Citibank, J.P. Morgan, Chase, Goldman Sachs, Morgan Stanley, Bear Stearns (gone now but operating during forty-plus years of Madoff without investing with him).

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  111. Anonymous[270] • Disclaimer says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Afghanistan was the same as Vietnam: lack of political will and opposition at home.

  112. J.Ross says: • Website
    @South Texas Guy

    Alan Moore’s Watchmen has an editorial cartoon in a nationalist/anti-government newspaper, showing the good guys hobbled by playing by the rules while the public enemies they fight don’t need to bother. That’s exactly what happened with Hiss. The FBI had him and was interviewing him, and Hiss picked up on how tenuous their case was given normal criminal law and not how spies should be dealt with. He invited them to call out anything serious if they had it as he got up, walked out of the room, and down the hall. A PBS doc I have forgotten the name of has an interview subject describe Hiss’s relief when he heard the elevator door close without any interruptions from the FBI.

  113. J.Ross says: • Website
    @AnotherDad

    There’s a new movie out about the T-34 (this is also its title), I have not seen it yet but I’ve heard consistently good things about it. The last T-34 movie was the good but uneven White Tiger.

  114. @Desiderius

    All fascists believe in the income tax.

  115. WGBerger says: • Website

    Dees pretended ignorance of anything by saying he spends little time at the SPLC office. This from a guy getting $375K a year for a few hours of work each week.

    The ones I am curious about are Mark Potok, former senior fellow at the SPLC served as the editor-in-chief of the SPLC’s award-winning, quarterly journal, the Intelligence Report
    and Heidi Beirich – https://cis.org/Kammer/SPLCs-Heidi-Beirich-Character-Assassin-Under-Banner-Peace-Respect-and-Understanding

  116. @CJ

    If you are suggesting that the big banks were aware of what Madoff was doing, you may be right. OTOH, I think Madoff avoided pitching his services to them because his scam relied on having unsophisticated “investors”, and he didn’t want someone’s due diligence to expose his scheme.

    My disparaging comments referred to journalists and regulators who pride themselves on their putative excellence in protecting the public.

    By contrast, the provincial Montgomery Advertiser did a good job exposing Dees and the SPLC a couple of decades ago, but it turned out that if the arbiters of truth in NYC don’t want to hear it, your exposé won’t matter.

  117. Anon[108] • Disclaimer says:

    As a fairly recent follower of the blog, Steve, I wish you had advice regarding how to read this stuff without getting dispirited. I don’t know how you do it.

    Perhaps leaving this and other comments will help?

    I tell myself I need to be amused or maybe even productively mad, but….

    –Anon in Arkansas

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  118. @Anon

    You may have come in during a bout of unusual pessimism here. (Not saying that there isn’t much to be pessimistic about.) OTOH, if you look back at comments on the eve of the 2016 election, while there were some optimists, there was also a cold realization that if the Dems captured the White House for another eight years, we—as a people and perhaps individually—were going to be hunted down and exterminated forthwith. To give an extreme analogy, the mood was a little like the last minutes in the British trenches before going over the top at the Somme: men shaking hands and bidding one another adieu perhaps forever, knowing the next hours would be decisive, personally and nationally, and that the odds weren’t good.

    The understandable euphoria of Trump’s upset victory lasted, despite Trump’s evident disinclination to execute his campaign platform, until these last few months when it became impossible to ignore his lack of real accomplishment. While his (and our) enemies have been energized by being “The Resistance”, we’ve been demoralized by expending so much energy to attain the trappings of power without getting any of the substance.

    Once everyone gets over the Phantom Savior Syndrome of the Trump victory, we will get back to fostering the rise of nationalism worldwide and picking out the motive absurdities of the Left, tasks which Trump’s campaign, if not his victory, have surely helped.

  119. @Reg Cæsar

    I need to clarify. I should not have stated with certainty that the Nevada corp and the Alabama corp are two separate entities. What I was looking at was the SPLC’s registration as a charity soliciting funds in Nevada. What threw me was the listing of a registered agent in Carson City, Nevada, which is itself a Delaware corporation.

    What remains true is the slight variation in the name, despite the requirement by Nevada–stressed on the form–that it match *exactly* the name as the IRS has it. The IRS site does not produce any results for a search on The Southern Poverty Law Center, Inc. And, I know for a fact that that is a common way to hide financial activity. Nevertheless, I overshot and need to go back and make the corrections both here and in documents filed in the lawsuit.

    I will say it’s odd the SPLC didn’t challenge me on this. I first made the allegation in a Feb 11 motion, to which the SPLC replied on Feb 21 without challenging it. Very odd. And now, not only has Morris Dees been ousted, but Richard Cohen has resigned, as has number four in the organization, Rhonda Brownstein, as has the Chairman of the Board, Alan Howard.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  120. Jack D says:
    @Craig Nelsen

    I looked it up – THE SOUTHERN POVERTY LAW CENTER INC. (an Alabama non-profit corp) is registered in Nevada as a “foreign corporation”. Foreign meaning foreign to that state, not foreign as in overseas. If a corporation “does business” (e.g. has an office) in another state, it is supposed to file such a registration. This is very common.

    The name in Alabama is the same, including the “The”.

    http://arc-sos.state.al.us/cgi/corpdetail.mbr/detail?corp=813903&page=name&file=&type=ALL&status=ALL&place=ALL&city=

    If this is your whole basis for the lawsuit, it’s not much of a lawsuit.

    The only question that I have is what sort of “business” does SPLC have in Nevada? In most cases you register only when you have a physical presence (an office) in that state.

  121. @Jack D

    No, it is an exceedingly minor part of the lawsuit. Actually, it’s not part of the suit at all. I brought it up only in the argument against a motion they had made to release the individual defendants from the suit, and even then, it was only a small part of my argument.

  122. @Jack D

    Right. A 501(c)(3) is supposed to register with each state it solicits donations in. I think this is a pre-Internet rule. When I had a 501(c)(3), I did register in a couple of states–Florida and New York, if memory serves–but it was such as hassle that I stopped. No one seemed to care. I suppose if you are the size of the SPLC it matters.

    However, I did a quick read through the charities part of the Nevada SoS and didn’t see anything about requiring an out-of-state 501c)(3) to have a registered agent. I’ve only known that to be a requirement in order to form a new corporation. The SPLC has one in Carson City, which is why it threw me.

    In any case, it has no bearing on my case, so I’m not going to spend any more time on it. I filed a motion to strike since I was at the courthouse anyway filing a motion for a preliminary injunction to prevent the SPLC from moving any more assets off-shore, and to prohibit the individuals from leaving the country until this suit is settled.

    Btw, Steve, you are officially a footnote in history–at least the history of the US District Court for the Western District of Missouri

    https://www.craignelsen.com/nelsen_v_splc/2019-03-25-motion_injunction_freeze_assets.pdf

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