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The Southern Poverty Law Center, a Fundraising Organization, Raised a Lot of Funds During the First Year of Trump Derangement Syndrome
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The SPLC’s 2016 fiscal year started November 1, 2016 and ended October 31, 2017 and it was a doozy. Gifts, grants, contributions, and membership fees jumped from a healthy $50 million in the year leading up to Trump’s election to almost $133 million in the 12 months of the Trump Era.

Screenshot 2018-04-22 16.04.13

As usual, Morris Dees’ minions can’t figure out what to spend all their lucre on, so it mostly piles up in the SPLCs increasingly swollen endowment, which grew 37% in one year from $328 million to almost $450 million:

Screenshot 2018-04-22 16.19.43

I don’t exactly know why the SPLC piles up such a vast endowment rather than spending it down. Presumably, there aren’t many well-heeled Klansmen left to fight (if there ever were many). Mostly, I suspect Morris just likes raising money. It’s what he does.

 
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  1. So I guess Morris “Seligman” Dees won’t be going hungry this winter.

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    • Replies: @Luke Lea
    "So I guess Morris “Seligman” Dees won’t be going hungry this winter."

    I don't believe Morris is Ashkenazi Jewish if that is what you are implying. His Daddy was an Alabama sharecropper or something like that.

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  2. Retracting its hatey-hate backlist costs a lot of money.

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  3. This is why the only good government is a very small government.

    Otherwise, tons of entities make money just by pretending to hate something they secretly, grudgingly love (on account of how much wealth it makes them).

    The SPLC loves Trump.
    Jesse Jackson wants blacks to remain as angry as possible.
    Michael Savage and Pamela Gellar benefited from 9/11.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rod1963
    The SPLC has nothing to do with the government's size. It's a private org with a lot of pull because of who it's members are.

    Even without Trump the SPLC would be laughing all the way to the bank given that liberal Jews bankrolling it hate whites and Western civ and want both dead and gone. And ANYTHING whites do to slow down the process is seen as hate.

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  4. Nothing better than an affinity scam.

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  5. hey morris I suggest you secretly fund the KKK and other groups,that way you could point and sputter ,even more money would come in ,the media would love it, let’s call it the cycle of strife! Pure gold I tell you.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    hey morris I suggest you secretly fund the KKK and other groups,that way you could point and sputter ,even more money would come in ,the media would love it, let’s call it the cycle of strife! Pure gold I tell you.
     
    Why bother? When you factor in all the members who are either paid informants or FBI infiltrators, the KKK is practically an arm of the government.....
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  6. The Charlottesville events saved the SPLC, which was actually taking much criticism from the Left after the election for its chicken-little scaremongering.

    But then those TV scenes of long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews scared the hell out of everyone and put everything right again.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    The Charlottesville events ... long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews ....
     
    Did this happen? Is there video of it? Link/embed?

    Living outside the U.S. I can't say I followed this that closely, but mostly what I read was that "tiki torches" were used, which the SPLC and the ADL certified were definitely a Nazi/KKK dog whistle, not to mention cultural appropriation from Polynesians in the same way that mini sombreros at taco bars are a Mexican cultural approriation.
    , @Anonymous
    All I can dig up are claims that at Charlottesville there were chants of "Jews will not replace us," but I cannot find any videos of it. The phrase associated with the anti-immigration side is "You will not replace us." This derives from a translation of a saying from French anti-immigration activists. Could someone have misheard "Jews" for "You" in that phrase? I'm sure there were many anti-Jewish skeptics there, you didn't need a ticket and photo ID, and undoubtedly some antisemites, and maybe as an inprovisation someone said at some point "Jews will not replace us." It doesn't make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.

    My provisional conclusion is four Pinocchios for your claim that Charlottesville's main thrust or major sub-thrust was antisemitic, with "long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews."
    , @Olorin

    those TV scenes of long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews
     
    Sauce or it dint happen.
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  7. @Thomm
    This is why the only good government is a very small government.

    Otherwise, tons of entities make money just by pretending to hate something they secretly, grudgingly love (on account of how much wealth it makes them).

    The SPLC loves Trump.
    Jesse Jackson wants blacks to remain as angry as possible.
    Michael Savage and Pamela Gellar benefited from 9/11.

    The SPLC has nothing to do with the government’s size. It’s a private org with a lot of pull because of who it’s members are.

    Even without Trump the SPLC would be laughing all the way to the bank given that liberal Jews bankrolling it hate whites and Western civ and want both dead and gone. And ANYTHING whites do to slow down the process is seen as hate.

    Read More
    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Thomm

    The SPLC has nothing to do with the government’s size. It’s a private org with a lot of pull because of who it’s members are.
     
    If most of the Federal Government was not highly sympathetic to it, it would not have gotten this far.

    Is there an anti-SJW equivalent that is nearly as prosperous?
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  8. SPLC is not required to spend any of its endowment because it’s classified as a public charity under I.R.C. section 509(a)(2). Public charities are theoretically responsive to the public because the public gives them money, and therefore they’re under no legal stricture to actually spend their money for charity.

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  9. Pretty good gig for the fund manager. Can’t imagine Dees is much for oversight, and the money just keeps pouring in. That’s better than some university gigs.

    I’m sure Dees takes home a nice cut himself, too.

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  10. I especially like the part about how that con artist Dees went a knockin’ into his young step daughter’s room. A moral exemplar indeed…inDees…

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  11. I imagine Morris and his minions live a quite unique and lavish lifestyle, whether they are ostentatious about it, or not. After all, they be special.

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  12. @JohnnyWalker123
    So I guess Morris "Seligman" Dees won't be going hungry this winter.

    “So I guess Morris “Seligman” Dees won’t be going hungry this winter.”

    I don’t believe Morris is Ashkenazi Jewish if that is what you are implying. His Daddy was an Alabama sharecropper or something like that.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Dees was born in 1936 in Shorter, Alabama, the son of Annie Ruth (Frazer) and Morris Seligman Dees, Sr., tenant cotton farmers.[2][5] His family was Baptist.[6] His father was named "Morris Seligman" after a Jewish friend of Dees's grandfather.[7] After graduating magna cum laude from the University of Alabama School of Law in 1960,[8] he returned to Montgomery, Alabama and opened a law office.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Dees
    , @bjondo
    How does Dees act? What does Dees support? Now you know what he is.
    , @meh

    I don’t believe Morris is Ashkenazi Jewish if that is what you are implying. His Daddy was an Alabama sharecropper or something like that.
     
    He used "quotation marks", not (((echoes))).

    Morris Dees is not a Jew, he just larps as one for fundraising purposes - implies it without actually making the claim.

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  13. @Rod1963
    The SPLC has nothing to do with the government's size. It's a private org with a lot of pull because of who it's members are.

    Even without Trump the SPLC would be laughing all the way to the bank given that liberal Jews bankrolling it hate whites and Western civ and want both dead and gone. And ANYTHING whites do to slow down the process is seen as hate.

    The SPLC has nothing to do with the government’s size. It’s a private org with a lot of pull because of who it’s members are.

    If most of the Federal Government was not highly sympathetic to it, it would not have gotten this far.

    Is there an anti-SJW equivalent that is nearly as prosperous?

    Read More
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  14. I think it is time for the alienation of church wealth.

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    • Replies: @Flip
    We need a Martin Luther and a Henry VIII.
    , @AndrewR
    Agreed. I support, at least in theory, the expropriation of that half billion to use for non-anti-white purposes.
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  15. Interesting.

    Fear of the left drives up gun sales and increases donations to the NRA.

    Fear of the right increases donations to SPLC.

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  16. @tyrone
    hey morris I suggest you secretly fund the KKK and other groups,that way you could point and sputter ,even more money would come in ,the media would love it, let's call it the cycle of strife! Pure gold I tell you.

    hey morris I suggest you secretly fund the KKK and other groups,that way you could point and sputter ,even more money would come in ,the media would love it, let’s call it the cycle of strife! Pure gold I tell you.

    Why bother? When you factor in all the members who are either paid informants or FBI infiltrators, the KKK is practically an arm of the government…..

    Read More
    • Replies: @Svigor
    Especially in light of the fact that the fed is always the guy looking to buy dynamite...
    , @Kyle
    Concerning the murder of viola liuzzo...

    "Within 24 hours after Liuzzo's assassination by the Ku Klux Klan and the FBI's informant Gary Thomas Rowe, J. Edgar Hoover began a smear campaign to the press, to subordinate FBI agents and to select politicians, claiming the cut marks from the car's shattered window were "puncture marks in her arm indicating recent use of a hypodermic needle; she was sitting very, very close to that negro in the car; that it has the appearance of a necking party."[19]

    While attempting to obscure the fact that an FBI informant was in the car, and to ensure that the FBI was not held responsible for permitting their informant to participate in violent acts, without FBI surveillance or backup, the FBI was concerned that they might be held accountable for their informant's (Rowe) role in the death. Rowe had been an informant for the FBI since 1960. The FBI was aware that Rowe had participated in acts of violence during Ku Klux Klan activities. On the day of Liuzzo's death, prior to the shooting, Rowe called his FBI contact and notified him that Rowe and other Klansman were travelling to Montgomery, and that violence was planned.[20]

    Autopsy testing in 1965 showed no traces of drugs in Liuzzo's system, and that she had not had sex recently at the time of death. The FBI's role in the smear campaign was uncovered in 1978 when Liuzzo's children obtained case documents from the FBI under the Freedom of Information Act.[21][22]"
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viola_Liuzzo
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  17. @Luke Lea
    "So I guess Morris “Seligman” Dees won’t be going hungry this winter."

    I don't believe Morris is Ashkenazi Jewish if that is what you are implying. His Daddy was an Alabama sharecropper or something like that.

    Dees was born in 1936 in Shorter, Alabama, the son of Annie Ruth (Frazer) and Morris Seligman Dees, Sr., tenant cotton farmers.[2][5] His family was Baptist.[6] His father was named “Morris Seligman” after a Jewish friend of Dees’s grandfather.[7] After graduating magna cum laude from the University of Alabama School of Law in 1960,[8] he returned to Montgomery, Alabama and opened a law office.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Dees

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    MS Dees was not Jewish, yet devoted his life to imitating a certain conception of Jewishness, and arguably beat them at their own games.
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  18. To be fair, this works in reverse for gun manufacturers.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Yes, but most of the money does not go to the old line manufacturers like S&W, Colt, Remington, Winchester, et al. It goes to the little hole in the wall guys who buy a couple of Haas CNC centers, have a couple of broach bars made to do the mag wells, and turn out AR-15s in industrial parks in Kansas. The biggies are too stupid and slow moving to profit.

    And the longstanding "Ammo Shortage" all through the Obama years was because the manufacturers refused to put any capital back into the business to build new tooling or expand on the grounds that it could all end any minute. It pretty much has, now, after they have saturated the market and wore down their tooling to a nub.
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  19. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    The kind of people who own the media also fund SPLC. So, it’s like someone talking to himself.

    Imagine if Mormons ran the media and gave most funds to a certain organization, and then, the media sought advice from that organization.

    US needs to an ethnic disclaimer on so many facets of power.

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  20. One of the prime lessons of the Trump Campaign is that by having a private war chest, it allowed him to bypass the donors and to a lesser extent, the media which made it possible for him to run on immigration. Had he not had this ace up his sleeve, the press and the other Republican candidates would have simply black balled him. Instead, his competitors had to sit there and keep their mouths shut while he talked about what America wanted to hear. The reverse was true with the media; they were forced to cover him not wanting to be the ones left out of the coverage frenzy.

    The SPLC has a similar strategy. They suck all the money and oxygen out of the available (((anti-white))) donors on the left leaving their competitors picking up the crumbs. The SPLC has monopolized fund raising the same way Standard Oil monopolized the oil industry. They sell a very consistent product which is always anti-white, anti-conservative, anti-goy, anti-Republican, and anti-male. People who give them money know that every penny, minus Morris Dee’s take, will go towards attacking people who look like me. This is why they only go after “hate crimes” on the right. If they attacked targets on the left, their funding would dry up.

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    • Replies: @Twodees Partain
    More accurately, the people who give them money don't really understand that the money isn't going to be spent to oppose anyone the donors want to oppose. SPLC has long been criticized for stacking money and not spending it on any of the causes they claim to be collecting for.

    For decades they've used that front of providing legal aid to poor people, but they've never done much of that. The name is a great con in itself.
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  21. Anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    The Charlottesville events saved the SPLC, which was actually taking much criticism from the Left after the election for its chicken-little scaremongering.

    But then those TV scenes of long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews scared the hell out of everyone and put everything right again.

    The Charlottesville events … long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews ….

    Did this happen? Is there video of it? Link/embed?

    Living outside the U.S. I can’t say I followed this that closely, but mostly what I read was that “tiki torches” were used, which the SPLC and the ADL certified were definitely a Nazi/KKK dog whistle, not to mention cultural appropriation from Polynesians in the same way that mini sombreros at taco bars are a Mexican cultural approriation.

    Read More
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  22. People give money to charities because the theme of the charity appeals to them, not because it is capable of doing anything about the problem it purports to address. How can Mothers Against Drunk Driving actually do anything about drunk driving? Does it have to spend money battling the pro-drunk driving lobby? I read that in animal loving England, among the handful of charities that got the most contributions were the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and Guide Dogs for the Blind. A news report states: “The RSPCA and Guide Dogs for the Blind Association have more than £230m in the bank between them, BBC Radio 4′s Today programme discovered. Guide Dogs for the Blind’s reserves gather £7m a year in interest, nearly a fifth of its annual income, or a third of its staffing costs. ”

    Whether or not they need that much money is not the point; both tug the emotional strings that make old ladies want to bequeath them their estates.

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    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    There's a Chicago-based organization, the " * Anti-Vivisectionist *" that does exactly the same thing. They will literally contact an individual to get them to contribute $1 because that's the hook. There are many, MANY "Cat Ladies" to suck off of. Amazingly enough, they would get animal doctors to contribute and the Cat's Meow was to have someone leave them in their will. Their literature would feature all sorts of cute cats and dogs because that is irresistible to their target base.

    Yes, I am saying the organization is run by Evil Geniuses whose sole function is to line the pockets of the organization and it's employees.
    , @Twinkie

    Whether or not they need that much money is not the point; both tug the emotional strings that make old ladies want to bequeath them their estates.
     
    I’m very active in charitable endeavors and I can tell you that most charities (and “political” groups - issue advicacy, for example)* are financial self-perpetuation machines, which, by their very nature, are NOT designed to solve the problems that butter their bread. Ask for quantifiable metrics and you’ll get the deer caught in headlight looks... all the while the execs are collecting hefty six-figure salaries plus all kinds of perks.

    Exceptions would be outfits that focus on actual legislative works/lobbying. They have to produce results to get their money, whether non-profit or for-profit.

    And, yes, old folks are the prime target for fundraising because they are more likely to give (parents with young children are the dead zone for fundraisers for obvious reasons, except maybe for top universities targeting high net worth parents).

    *This goes for the political right, not just the left.
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  23. Speaking of the KKK, good job, Georgia:

    Police use anti-KKK law to arrest people protesting neo-Nazis

    That is a long way to go to avoid admitting that leftists are now the perpetrators of the kind of violence these laws were passed to curtail.

    Sort of like anti-lynching laws, which were also instituted throughout the south after the War of Northern Aggression; violators are now almost exclusively blacks engaged in mob violence.

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    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    There are, or should be, no "anti-KKK laws". I bet there's no mention of KKK in the law.

    There are presumably laws against doing certain things, and presumably the people arrested have broken those laws.
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  24. @syonredux

    hey morris I suggest you secretly fund the KKK and other groups,that way you could point and sputter ,even more money would come in ,the media would love it, let’s call it the cycle of strife! Pure gold I tell you.
     
    Why bother? When you factor in all the members who are either paid informants or FBI infiltrators, the KKK is practically an arm of the government.....

    Especially in light of the fact that the fed is always the guy looking to buy dynamite…

    Read More
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  25. Hey, Sessions should appoint a special prosecutor to investigate the SPLC. That will erase their endowment in a few years.

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    • Replies: @donut
    If Trumps Attorney General were to go after the SPLC their endowment would probably double .
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  26. @Harry Baldwin
    People give money to charities because the theme of the charity appeals to them, not because it is capable of doing anything about the problem it purports to address. How can Mothers Against Drunk Driving actually do anything about drunk driving? Does it have to spend money battling the pro-drunk driving lobby? I read that in animal loving England, among the handful of charities that got the most contributions were the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and Guide Dogs for the Blind. A news report states: "The RSPCA and Guide Dogs for the Blind Association have more than £230m in the bank between them, BBC Radio 4's Today programme discovered. Guide Dogs for the Blind's reserves gather £7m a year in interest, nearly a fifth of its annual income, or a third of its staffing costs. "

    Whether or not they need that much money is not the point; both tug the emotional strings that make old ladies want to bequeath them their estates.

    There’s a Chicago-based organization, the ” * Anti-Vivisectionist *” that does exactly the same thing. They will literally contact an individual to get them to contribute $1 because that’s the hook. There are many, MANY “Cat Ladies” to suck off of. Amazingly enough, they would get animal doctors to contribute and the Cat’s Meow was to have someone leave them in their will. Their literature would feature all sorts of cute cats and dogs because that is irresistible to their target base.

    Yes, I am saying the organization is run by Evil Geniuses whose sole function is to line the pockets of the organization and it’s employees.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    PETA is the same way. They have euthanized more animals than all the other pet organizations put together but they have great optics for the people who have no real experience with animals, farming or hunting. The feral cat loving organizations are also masters of this game.

    Books have been written showing how PETA has wormed its way into the hearts and bank accounts of millions of "animal lovers", even though they have been exposed time and time and time again as a bunch of mountebanks and their policies actually very destructive in many cases. (If they succeed in shutting down African safari hunting, African elephants and rhinos are sure goners from the wild and lions' range will be greatly reduced. Leopards, stealthy as they are, probably will survive but cheetahs, though not hunted, might not survive the habitat loss.)
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  27. @Luke Lea
    "So I guess Morris “Seligman” Dees won’t be going hungry this winter."

    I don't believe Morris is Ashkenazi Jewish if that is what you are implying. His Daddy was an Alabama sharecropper or something like that.

    How does Dees act? What does Dees support? Now you know what he is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Svigor
    I don't think Dees is Jewish. At least, not by blood. He says he isn't, Jews don't claim him (IME), and he doesn't look Jewish. Crypto-Jews are a real thing but there's not a whole lot of need for Jewish crypsis in the USA today; on the contrary, you gain Diversity Pokemon Points.

    Now, if you were saying he's a vile leftist creep, I agree.
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  28. My follower is probably sick of me pointing out there’s a “Trump ecosystem”, in the same way that Apple, MS, FB, Java (OK, scratch that one), browsers, etc. have created ecosystems where others can offer products. Like FB games.

    Trump has been great for SPLC, CNN, CAP, MSNBC, Fox, Daily Beast… on down the line. His zings don’t hurt, they help. When he smears MaggieNYT, he *helps* her. Those who habed her didn’t change their minds, those who didn’t habe her will have an even higher impression of her.

    It’s all like WWE which, in case you didn’t know, has Trump in their Hall of Fame.

    The patriotic response is to oppose that. So far I haven’t seen any MAGA or Resist doing that.

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  29. @Harry Baldwin
    People give money to charities because the theme of the charity appeals to them, not because it is capable of doing anything about the problem it purports to address. How can Mothers Against Drunk Driving actually do anything about drunk driving? Does it have to spend money battling the pro-drunk driving lobby? I read that in animal loving England, among the handful of charities that got the most contributions were the Royal Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals and Guide Dogs for the Blind. A news report states: "The RSPCA and Guide Dogs for the Blind Association have more than £230m in the bank between them, BBC Radio 4's Today programme discovered. Guide Dogs for the Blind's reserves gather £7m a year in interest, nearly a fifth of its annual income, or a third of its staffing costs. "

    Whether or not they need that much money is not the point; both tug the emotional strings that make old ladies want to bequeath them their estates.

    Whether or not they need that much money is not the point; both tug the emotional strings that make old ladies want to bequeath them their estates.

    I’m very active in charitable endeavors and I can tell you that most charities (and “political” groups – issue advicacy, for example)* are financial self-perpetuation machines, which, by their very nature, are NOT designed to solve the problems that butter their bread. Ask for quantifiable metrics and you’ll get the deer caught in headlight looks… all the while the execs are collecting hefty six-figure salaries plus all kinds of perks.

    Exceptions would be outfits that focus on actual legislative works/lobbying. They have to produce results to get their money, whether non-profit or for-profit.

    And, yes, old folks are the prime target for fundraising because they are more likely to give (parents with young children are the dead zone for fundraisers for obvious reasons, except maybe for top universities targeting high net worth parents).

    *This goes for the political right, not just the left.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    By federal and many state laws, charities and foundations use 89% of their funds for salaries and expenses and only 11% for the purpose of the charity or foundation

    That’s why I never never give a dime.

    If you need a job though, just think up some SJW cause, find $500 or so to incorporate and hire a commission fundraiser. Even if the fundraiser demands 50% of the take, it’s a good deal.

    You can have the foundation buy you a company car, cell phone, computers etc.
    Buy new office furniture computers and printers every year. Sell the old ones and keep the cash.

    Got kids, relatives and friends who need work? Have them form a janitor or tech support or whatever company and hire that company to do (or not do the work)

    A major reason the middle class pays such high income and property taxes is that the wealthy avoid taxes by donating to all these charities.

    If the charity deduction were abolished, all the billions the wealthy give to the charities would be made in taxes.

    And middle class taxes would go way way down. And there would be lots more tax money for needed government services.

    You can even set up tax deductible educational scholarship foundations . Then you and your friends and relatives can pay each other’s kids private school and college tuitions. But get a big tax deduction equal to the tuition.

    , @res

    I’m very active in charitable endeavors and I can tell you that most charities (and “political” groups – issue advicacy, for example)* are financial self-perpetuation machines, which, by their very nature, are NOT designed to solve the problems that butter their bread.
     
    I am curious why the former is true if you believe the latter? Have you managed to find some good exceptions to that "most"? Any other thoughts to offer?
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  30. @Prof. Woland
    One of the prime lessons of the Trump Campaign is that by having a private war chest, it allowed him to bypass the donors and to a lesser extent, the media which made it possible for him to run on immigration. Had he not had this ace up his sleeve, the press and the other Republican candidates would have simply black balled him. Instead, his competitors had to sit there and keep their mouths shut while he talked about what America wanted to hear. The reverse was true with the media; they were forced to cover him not wanting to be the ones left out of the coverage frenzy.

    The SPLC has a similar strategy. They suck all the money and oxygen out of the available (((anti-white))) donors on the left leaving their competitors picking up the crumbs. The SPLC has monopolized fund raising the same way Standard Oil monopolized the oil industry. They sell a very consistent product which is always anti-white, anti-conservative, anti-goy, anti-Republican, and anti-male. People who give them money know that every penny, minus Morris Dee's take, will go towards attacking people who look like me. This is why they only go after "hate crimes" on the right. If they attacked targets on the left, their funding would dry up.

    More accurately, the people who give them money don’t really understand that the money isn’t going to be spent to oppose anyone the donors want to oppose. SPLC has long been criticized for stacking money and not spending it on any of the causes they claim to be collecting for.

    For decades they’ve used that front of providing legal aid to poor people, but they’ve never done much of that. The name is a great con in itself.

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  31. @Luke Lea
    "So I guess Morris “Seligman” Dees won’t be going hungry this winter."

    I don't believe Morris is Ashkenazi Jewish if that is what you are implying. His Daddy was an Alabama sharecropper or something like that.

    I don’t believe Morris is Ashkenazi Jewish if that is what you are implying. His Daddy was an Alabama sharecropper or something like that.

    He used “quotation marks”, not (((echoes))).

    Morris Dees is not a Jew, he just larps as one for fundraising purposes – implies it without actually making the claim.

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    • Agree: DCThrowback
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  32. OT: http://amp.nymag.com/daily/intelligencer/2018/04/can-americas-two-tribes-learn-to-live-together.html?__twitter_impression=true

    The somewhat self aware reviewer seems to get that Amy Chua makes good points regarding the tension between goodwhites and Deploreables, and then immediately kills the idea that she comprehends the scope of the problem when she claims Hamilton is a way to reconcile the two sides.

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  33. @George
    I think it is time for the alienation of church wealth.

    We need a Martin Luther and a Henry VIII.

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  34. So what happens to all that money after he’s gone?

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  35. @syonredux

    hey morris I suggest you secretly fund the KKK and other groups,that way you could point and sputter ,even more money would come in ,the media would love it, let’s call it the cycle of strife! Pure gold I tell you.
     
    Why bother? When you factor in all the members who are either paid informants or FBI infiltrators, the KKK is practically an arm of the government.....

    Concerning the murder of viola liuzzo…

    “Within 24 hours after Liuzzo’s assassination by the Ku Klux Klan and the FBI’s informant Gary Thomas Rowe, J. Edgar Hoover began a smear campaign to the press, to subordinate FBI agents and to select politicians, claiming the cut marks from the car’s shattered window were “puncture marks in her arm indicating recent use of a hypodermic needle; she was sitting very, very close to that negro in the car; that it has the appearance of a necking party.”[19]

    While attempting to obscure the fact that an FBI informant was in the car, and to ensure that the FBI was not held responsible for permitting their informant to participate in violent acts, without FBI surveillance or backup, the FBI was concerned that they might be held accountable for their informant’s (Rowe) role in the death. Rowe had been an informant for the FBI since 1960. The FBI was aware that Rowe had participated in acts of violence during Ku Klux Klan activities. On the day of Liuzzo’s death, prior to the shooting, Rowe called his FBI contact and notified him that Rowe and other Klansman were travelling to Montgomery, and that violence was planned.[20]

    Autopsy testing in 1965 showed no traces of drugs in Liuzzo’s system, and that she had not had sex recently at the time of death. The FBI’s role in the smear campaign was uncovered in 1978 when Liuzzo’s children obtained case documents from the FBI under the Freedom of Information Act.[21][22]”

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Viola_Liuzzo

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  36. Anon[304] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: the DNC is suing Trump, WikiLeaks, and the Russians, et al.

    I don’t think the DNC intends to win the lawsuit. It’s intended to be a roundabout way to fundraise. I don’t think there’s a legal limit on what you can donate to someone’s lawsuit the way there is when you’re donating to someone’s congressional campaign.

    The DNC expects a judge to throw it all out of court, but by then the DNC will have a lot of money donated to them to finance the lawsuit by the ever-indignant, which it intends to keep for its candidates running in 2018. The DNC is broke, so this lawsuit is a waste of resources unless the DNC thinks it’ll make a mint out of it.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Right you are .

    The American communist party started those legal defense funds. They made a fortune raising money supposedly for the Sacco Vanzetti and Scottsboro Boys trials.

    None of the money of course went to the defense attorneys. There were 6 Scottsboro Boys defendants The commies had 8 Mothers of the Scottsboro 6 running around the country’s begging for money to defend their sons. They were awfully well spoken and educated for starving old south black sharecroppers.

    It’s been going on as a leftist fundraising tactic since the 1920s
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  37. @bjondo
    How does Dees act? What does Dees support? Now you know what he is.

    I don’t think Dees is Jewish. At least, not by blood. He says he isn’t, Jews don’t claim him (IME), and he doesn’t look Jewish. Crypto-Jews are a real thing but there’s not a whole lot of need for Jewish crypsis in the USA today; on the contrary, you gain Diversity Pokemon Points.

    Now, if you were saying he’s a vile leftist creep, I agree.

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    • Replies: @bjondo
    Absolutely a creep.
    Maybe not Jew via momma, papa, other kin down the line.
    His actions are enough for me to consider him to be Jew.
    Same with Bolton. Don't know what he really is but his actions that I see are so Jew that I consider him to be Jew.
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  38. O/T

    Sportsball subversion in Hong Kong

    http://www.bbc.com/news/world-asia-china-43470709

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  39. Anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous
    The Charlottesville events saved the SPLC, which was actually taking much criticism from the Left after the election for its chicken-little scaremongering.

    But then those TV scenes of long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews scared the hell out of everyone and put everything right again.

    All I can dig up are claims that at Charlottesville there were chants of “Jews will not replace us,” but I cannot find any videos of it. The phrase associated with the anti-immigration side is “You will not replace us.” This derives from a translation of a saying from French anti-immigration activists. Could someone have misheard “Jews” for “You” in that phrase? I’m sure there were many anti-Jewish skeptics there, you didn’t need a ticket and photo ID, and undoubtedly some antisemites, and maybe as an inprovisation someone said at some point “Jews will not replace us.” It doesn’t make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.

    My provisional conclusion is four Pinocchios for your claim that Charlottesville’s main thrust or major sub-thrust was antisemitic, with “long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews.”

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.

    It doesn’t make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.
     
    This is a confusion of meaning relating to the variability of the verb "replace"; it can mean "to take something's place" or "to put something into something else's place" — when I replace an ink cartridge in my printer, I don't squeeze myself down into the machine, do I?

    So the statement makes sense if you interpret it in the second sense, with Jews driving our displacement by other peoples: "Jews will not replace us [with Hispanics, etc.]"
    , @Svigor
    Yeah I consider that story an anti-White canard and a Semitic blood-libel until I see proof.

    It doesn’t make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.
     
    Lol, I think the idea is that Jews are the ones doing the replacing, not the ones being swapped in for Whites.

    I feel obligated to point out that not wanting to have Jews replace us is no worse than not wanting "you" to replace us.
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  40. Thank goodness nonprofits are mostly incompetent and just vehicles for well connected people to ingratiate themselves. 100mil could do a lot of good in the right hands, and bad I guess..

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  41. @Anonymous
    All I can dig up are claims that at Charlottesville there were chants of "Jews will not replace us," but I cannot find any videos of it. The phrase associated with the anti-immigration side is "You will not replace us." This derives from a translation of a saying from French anti-immigration activists. Could someone have misheard "Jews" for "You" in that phrase? I'm sure there were many anti-Jewish skeptics there, you didn't need a ticket and photo ID, and undoubtedly some antisemites, and maybe as an inprovisation someone said at some point "Jews will not replace us." It doesn't make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.

    My provisional conclusion is four Pinocchios for your claim that Charlottesville's main thrust or major sub-thrust was antisemitic, with "long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews."

    It doesn’t make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.

    This is a confusion of meaning relating to the variability of the verb “replace”; it can mean “to take something’s place” or “to put something into something else’s place” — when I replace an ink cartridge in my printer, I don’t squeeze myself down into the machine, do I?

    So the statement makes sense if you interpret it in the second sense, with Jews driving our displacement by other peoples: “Jews will not replace us [with Hispanics, etc.]“

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    • Replies: @Mishra
    Peter Beinart’s Forward article:

    “Replace you? Where, behind the counter at Wendy’s? We’re successful, industrious, upper-middle class. You’re the dregs of society. Replace you? Don’t kid yourselves. When it comes to America’s class hierarchy, we replaced you and your kind long ago.”
     
    You know Beinart was dying to say "upper class" rather than "upper-middle class" but knew that might look bad to the goyim.

    http://www.gilad.co.uk/writings/2017/8/24/american-society-isnt-a-zoo-and-white-people-arent-monkeys

    Incidentally, the first photos and videos were published in Britain's Daily Mail and showed a fairly normal-looking group of white males. By the next day the MSM focused exclusively upon a few freakish outliers which better supported the Narrative.

    , @Anonymous
    Yes, you're right, the meaning could be replace us with yourselves, or with others. In the latter sense the agents would be the so-called elites, and I suppose to some the elites may seem to be mostly Jewish. But I'd still like to see video where "columns" of people were chanting "Jews will not replace us," or anything else explicitly mentioning Jews at Charlottesville, instead of just the odd smart-ass. But even a video of the odd smart-ass would be a start.

    Remember when Trump spoke of thousands of people celebrating 9/11 on rooftops, and he backtracked to an article about a barbeque of a dozen people who probably weren't celebrating 9/11? And then in his denial he supposedly mocked the writer of that article? And then that became a claim in the media and by his opponents that in general and repeatedly Trump "mocked the disabled"?

    These stories start with kernels of truth or non-truths, and then grow. I think the Charlottesville columns/Jews thing is bogus. That's all. I think that the people exagerating and passing on the stories, urban legend-style, would say, when confronted with the lack of evidence, "Who cares, fake but true."

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  42. @Kevin C.

    It doesn’t make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.
     
    This is a confusion of meaning relating to the variability of the verb "replace"; it can mean "to take something's place" or "to put something into something else's place" — when I replace an ink cartridge in my printer, I don't squeeze myself down into the machine, do I?

    So the statement makes sense if you interpret it in the second sense, with Jews driving our displacement by other peoples: "Jews will not replace us [with Hispanics, etc.]"

    Peter Beinart’s Forward article:

    “Replace you? Where, behind the counter at Wendy’s? We’re successful, industrious, upper-middle class. You’re the dregs of society. Replace you? Don’t kid yourselves. When it comes to America’s class hierarchy, we replaced you and your kind long ago.”

    You know Beinart was dying to say “upper class” rather than “upper-middle class” but knew that might look bad to the goyim.

    http://www.gilad.co.uk/writings/2017/8/24/american-society-isnt-a-zoo-and-white-people-arent-monkeys

    Incidentally, the first photos and videos were published in Britain’s Daily Mail and showed a fairly normal-looking group of white males. By the next day the MSM focused exclusively upon a few freakish outliers which better supported the Narrative.

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    • Replies: @Berty
    Beinart hasn't been politically relevant to anyone since the aughts.
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  43. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Psuedonymic
    To be fair, this works in reverse for gun manufacturers.

    Yes, but most of the money does not go to the old line manufacturers like S&W, Colt, Remington, Winchester, et al. It goes to the little hole in the wall guys who buy a couple of Haas CNC centers, have a couple of broach bars made to do the mag wells, and turn out AR-15s in industrial parks in Kansas. The biggies are too stupid and slow moving to profit.

    And the longstanding “Ammo Shortage” all through the Obama years was because the manufacturers refused to put any capital back into the business to build new tooling or expand on the grounds that it could all end any minute. It pretty much has, now, after they have saturated the market and wore down their tooling to a nub.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Yes, a lot of the old school gun manufacturers have shot themselves in the crotch and ended up bought out by "Freedom Group".

    Colt bankrupted itself relying on its M4 contract with the US Army until it lost it. Remington ignored QC problems until it bankrupted itself and by thinking that what people wanted was a pistol in multiple calibers that only needed a single holster.
    , @27 year old
    The big time gun manufacturers, I bet, are effectively run by corporate liberal type people who are themselves anti-gun. They'd rather leave money on the table. And plus, at that level, doesnt most of their revenue come from selling to governments? They have an interest in not rocking the boat.
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  44. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Joe Stalin
    There's a Chicago-based organization, the " * Anti-Vivisectionist *" that does exactly the same thing. They will literally contact an individual to get them to contribute $1 because that's the hook. There are many, MANY "Cat Ladies" to suck off of. Amazingly enough, they would get animal doctors to contribute and the Cat's Meow was to have someone leave them in their will. Their literature would feature all sorts of cute cats and dogs because that is irresistible to their target base.

    Yes, I am saying the organization is run by Evil Geniuses whose sole function is to line the pockets of the organization and it's employees.

    PETA is the same way. They have euthanized more animals than all the other pet organizations put together but they have great optics for the people who have no real experience with animals, farming or hunting. The feral cat loving organizations are also masters of this game.

    Books have been written showing how PETA has wormed its way into the hearts and bank accounts of millions of “animal lovers”, even though they have been exposed time and time and time again as a bunch of mountebanks and their policies actually very destructive in many cases. (If they succeed in shutting down African safari hunting, African elephants and rhinos are sure goners from the wild and lions’ range will be greatly reduced. Leopards, stealthy as they are, probably will survive but cheetahs, though not hunted, might not survive the habitat loss.)

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  45. @Anonymous
    Yes, but most of the money does not go to the old line manufacturers like S&W, Colt, Remington, Winchester, et al. It goes to the little hole in the wall guys who buy a couple of Haas CNC centers, have a couple of broach bars made to do the mag wells, and turn out AR-15s in industrial parks in Kansas. The biggies are too stupid and slow moving to profit.

    And the longstanding "Ammo Shortage" all through the Obama years was because the manufacturers refused to put any capital back into the business to build new tooling or expand on the grounds that it could all end any minute. It pretty much has, now, after they have saturated the market and wore down their tooling to a nub.

    Yes, a lot of the old school gun manufacturers have shot themselves in the crotch and ended up bought out by “Freedom Group”.

    Colt bankrupted itself relying on its M4 contract with the US Army until it lost it. Remington ignored QC problems until it bankrupted itself and by thinking that what people wanted was a pistol in multiple calibers that only needed a single holster.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Multi caliber guns are a thing in Europe because you only get a license for one or two guns at a time. Over here, except for the single shot TC Comtender/Encore, not so much. Americans like owning ten rifles and ten pistols. It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.
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  46. @Mishra
    Peter Beinart’s Forward article:

    “Replace you? Where, behind the counter at Wendy’s? We’re successful, industrious, upper-middle class. You’re the dregs of society. Replace you? Don’t kid yourselves. When it comes to America’s class hierarchy, we replaced you and your kind long ago.”
     
    You know Beinart was dying to say "upper class" rather than "upper-middle class" but knew that might look bad to the goyim.

    http://www.gilad.co.uk/writings/2017/8/24/american-society-isnt-a-zoo-and-white-people-arent-monkeys

    Incidentally, the first photos and videos were published in Britain's Daily Mail and showed a fairly normal-looking group of white males. By the next day the MSM focused exclusively upon a few freakish outliers which better supported the Narrative.

    Beinart hasn’t been politically relevant to anyone since the aughts.

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  47. Anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kevin C.

    It doesn’t make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.
     
    This is a confusion of meaning relating to the variability of the verb "replace"; it can mean "to take something's place" or "to put something into something else's place" — when I replace an ink cartridge in my printer, I don't squeeze myself down into the machine, do I?

    So the statement makes sense if you interpret it in the second sense, with Jews driving our displacement by other peoples: "Jews will not replace us [with Hispanics, etc.]"

    Yes, you’re right, the meaning could be replace us with yourselves, or with others. In the latter sense the agents would be the so-called elites, and I suppose to some the elites may seem to be mostly Jewish. But I’d still like to see video where “columns” of people were chanting “Jews will not replace us,” or anything else explicitly mentioning Jews at Charlottesville, instead of just the odd smart-ass. But even a video of the odd smart-ass would be a start.

    Remember when Trump spoke of thousands of people celebrating 9/11 on rooftops, and he backtracked to an article about a barbeque of a dozen people who probably weren’t celebrating 9/11? And then in his denial he supposedly mocked the writer of that article? And then that became a claim in the media and by his opponents that in general and repeatedly Trump “mocked the disabled”?

    These stories start with kernels of truth or non-truths, and then grow. I think the Charlottesville columns/Jews thing is bogus. That’s all. I think that the people exagerating and passing on the stories, urban legend-style, would say, when confronted with the lack of evidence, “Who cares, fake but true.”

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  48. @JimB
    Hey, Sessions should appoint a special prosecutor to investigate the SPLC. That will erase their endowment in a few years.

    If Trumps Attorney General were to go after the SPLC their endowment would probably double .

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  49. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Twinkie

    Whether or not they need that much money is not the point; both tug the emotional strings that make old ladies want to bequeath them their estates.
     
    I’m very active in charitable endeavors and I can tell you that most charities (and “political” groups - issue advicacy, for example)* are financial self-perpetuation machines, which, by their very nature, are NOT designed to solve the problems that butter their bread. Ask for quantifiable metrics and you’ll get the deer caught in headlight looks... all the while the execs are collecting hefty six-figure salaries plus all kinds of perks.

    Exceptions would be outfits that focus on actual legislative works/lobbying. They have to produce results to get their money, whether non-profit or for-profit.

    And, yes, old folks are the prime target for fundraising because they are more likely to give (parents with young children are the dead zone for fundraisers for obvious reasons, except maybe for top universities targeting high net worth parents).

    *This goes for the political right, not just the left.

    By federal and many state laws, charities and foundations use 89% of their funds for salaries and expenses and only 11% for the purpose of the charity or foundation

    That’s why I never never give a dime.

    If you need a job though, just think up some SJW cause, find $500 or so to incorporate and hire a commission fundraiser. Even if the fundraiser demands 50% of the take, it’s a good deal.

    You can have the foundation buy you a company car, cell phone, computers etc.
    Buy new office furniture computers and printers every year. Sell the old ones and keep the cash.

    Got kids, relatives and friends who need work? Have them form a janitor or tech support or whatever company and hire that company to do (or not do the work)

    A major reason the middle class pays such high income and property taxes is that the wealthy avoid taxes by donating to all these charities.

    If the charity deduction were abolished, all the billions the wealthy give to the charities would be made in taxes.

    And middle class taxes would go way way down. And there would be lots more tax money for needed government services.

    You can even set up tax deductible educational scholarship foundations . Then you and your friends and relatives can pay each other’s kids private school and college tuitions. But get a big tax deduction equal to the tuition.

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  50. @Svigor
    Speaking of the KKK, good job, Georgia:

    Police use anti-KKK law to arrest people protesting neo-Nazis

    That is a long way to go to avoid admitting that leftists are now the perpetrators of the kind of violence these laws were passed to curtail.

    Sort of like anti-lynching laws, which were also instituted throughout the south after the War of Northern Aggression; violators are now almost exclusively blacks engaged in mob violence.

    There are, or should be, no “anti-KKK laws”. I bet there’s no mention of KKK in the law.

    There are presumably laws against doing certain things, and presumably the people arrested have broken those laws.

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    • Replies: @Svigor
    Precisely.
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  51. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon
    OT: the DNC is suing Trump, WikiLeaks, and the Russians, et al.

    I don't think the DNC intends to win the lawsuit. It's intended to be a roundabout way to fundraise. I don't think there's a legal limit on what you can donate to someone's lawsuit the way there is when you're donating to someone's congressional campaign.

    The DNC expects a judge to throw it all out of court, but by then the DNC will have a lot of money donated to them to finance the lawsuit by the ever-indignant, which it intends to keep for its candidates running in 2018. The DNC is broke, so this lawsuit is a waste of resources unless the DNC thinks it'll make a mint out of it.

    Right you are .

    The American communist party started those legal defense funds. They made a fortune raising money supposedly for the Sacco Vanzetti and Scottsboro Boys trials.

    None of the money of course went to the defense attorneys. There were 6 Scottsboro Boys defendants The commies had 8 Mothers of the Scottsboro 6 running around the country’s begging for money to defend their sons. They were awfully well spoken and educated for starving old south black sharecroppers.

    It’s been going on as a leftist fundraising tactic since the 1920s

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    • Replies: @Pericles
    Seems like a useful tactic to copy down and keep around for a rainy day.
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  52. Anonymous[132] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack Hanson
    Yes, a lot of the old school gun manufacturers have shot themselves in the crotch and ended up bought out by "Freedom Group".

    Colt bankrupted itself relying on its M4 contract with the US Army until it lost it. Remington ignored QC problems until it bankrupted itself and by thinking that what people wanted was a pistol in multiple calibers that only needed a single holster.

    Multi caliber guns are a thing in Europe because you only get a license for one or two guns at a time. Over here, except for the single shot TC Comtender/Encore, not so much. Americans like owning ten rifles and ten pistols. It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Now that I've gotten old I'm selling off some guns and I have to amend your claim a bit. Some good guns go up in value, others do not. I have an S&W M&P .45 that I wanted to sell on commission. The gun store owner told me it wouldn't move unless he listed it at about half of what I'd paid for it 10 years ago. I have an early 1960s Marlin 92A .22 lever action; he told me no one's interested in those and it wasn't worth selling.

    I'll grant that telling your wife that guns always go up in value is a good tactic when she catches you bringing home yet another one.

    , @Jack Hanson
    Well it wasn't a multi caliber pistol Remington developed. Two different caliber pistols, but you could use the same holster on them.

    Yeah. That was their big innovation.
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  53. It would be a shame if some of the thousand or so organizations listed by the SPLC as “hate groups” launched a lawsuit against it, claiming the listing was false, damaging and malicious. Who knows how much of that $450 million could be lost in punitive damages?

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    • Replies: @Kevin C.

    Who knows how much of that $450 million could be lost in punitive damages?
     
    Very little, given both the kind of numbers and quality of lawyers the SPLC would have in such suits, and the nature and biases of most of our courts and judges.
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  54. @Anon
    Right you are .

    The American communist party started those legal defense funds. They made a fortune raising money supposedly for the Sacco Vanzetti and Scottsboro Boys trials.

    None of the money of course went to the defense attorneys. There were 6 Scottsboro Boys defendants The commies had 8 Mothers of the Scottsboro 6 running around the country’s begging for money to defend their sons. They were awfully well spoken and educated for starving old south black sharecroppers.

    It’s been going on as a leftist fundraising tactic since the 1920s

    Seems like a useful tactic to copy down and keep around for a rainy day.

    Read More
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  55. @George
    I think it is time for the alienation of church wealth.

    Agreed. I support, at least in theory, the expropriation of that half billion to use for non-anti-white purposes.

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  56. It’s Jewish paranoia. The walls are out to get them.

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  57. > As usual, Morris Dees’ minions can’t figure out what to spend all their lucre on, so it mostly piles up

    What’s to spend it on? They don’t really do anything requiring money – running shelters for homeless black people or whatever. Maybe they hire lawyers occasionally to combat various terrible injustices, but aside from that what do they actually do? Write letters to congress? Run a website?

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  58. @Anonymous
    Multi caliber guns are a thing in Europe because you only get a license for one or two guns at a time. Over here, except for the single shot TC Comtender/Encore, not so much. Americans like owning ten rifles and ten pistols. It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Now that I’ve gotten old I’m selling off some guns and I have to amend your claim a bit. Some good guns go up in value, others do not. I have an S&W M&P .45 that I wanted to sell on commission. The gun store owner told me it wouldn’t move unless he listed it at about half of what I’d paid for it 10 years ago. I have an early 1960s Marlin 92A .22 lever action; he told me no one’s interested in those and it wasn’t worth selling.

    I’ll grant that telling your wife that guns always go up in value is a good tactic when she catches you bringing home yet another one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Svigor

    It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Now that I’ve gotten old I’m selling off some guns and I have to amend your claim a bit. Some good guns go up in value, others do not. I have an S&W M&P .45 that I wanted to sell on commission. The gun store owner told me it wouldn’t move unless he listed it at about half of what I’d paid for it 10 years ago. I have an early 1960s Marlin 92A .22 lever action; he told me no one’s interested in those and it wasn’t worth selling.

    I’ll grant that telling your wife that guns always go up in value is a good tactic when she catches you bringing home yet another one.

     

    I'd get a second opinion on all of that. Brick and mortar retail space costs money; you may be able to get that Marlin sold. But yes, gun prices do tend to fluctuate - 2008 was an Obama year, and gun prices were sky-high in many Obama years, so yeah you probably bought during a peak and are trying to sell in a valley. You can get your money back next time there's a strong peak.
    , @Twinkie

    Some good guns go up in value, others do not.
     
    As someone with a very large gun collection, I can confirm this. The kinds of guns that do not go up in value are relatively "cheap" guns that were mass produced with little collectible appeal or otherwise have been surpassed in quality by modern guns. In other words, "nothing special." These guns will most certainly LOSE value over time, akin to used cars.

    The types of guns that DO go up in value are those guns of older (more hand-fitted) manufacture in excellent conditions that are no longer produced or imported. For example, pre-number S&W revolvers command a hefty premium these days, especially the more rare calibers such as 32 S&W Long (e.g. S&W K-32). People who watch "The Walking Dead" might be aware that Colt Pythons now command stratospheric prices. Or something like Walther PPK in 32 ACP, the importation of which was prohibited in 1968. Other example include guns such as the early H&K carbine imports (e.g. HK33), Swiss-made Sig P210, and lately going up in price are Russian-made semi-auto AK variants.

    At the extreme end of this rarity are legally registered machine guns. Those have gone up in value dramatically.
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  59. @Svigor
    I don't think Dees is Jewish. At least, not by blood. He says he isn't, Jews don't claim him (IME), and he doesn't look Jewish. Crypto-Jews are a real thing but there's not a whole lot of need for Jewish crypsis in the USA today; on the contrary, you gain Diversity Pokemon Points.

    Now, if you were saying he's a vile leftist creep, I agree.

    Absolutely a creep.
    Maybe not Jew via momma, papa, other kin down the line.
    His actions are enough for me to consider him to be Jew.
    Same with Bolton. Don’t know what he really is but his actions that I see are so Jew that I consider him to be Jew.

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  60. @Anonymous
    Yes, but most of the money does not go to the old line manufacturers like S&W, Colt, Remington, Winchester, et al. It goes to the little hole in the wall guys who buy a couple of Haas CNC centers, have a couple of broach bars made to do the mag wells, and turn out AR-15s in industrial parks in Kansas. The biggies are too stupid and slow moving to profit.

    And the longstanding "Ammo Shortage" all through the Obama years was because the manufacturers refused to put any capital back into the business to build new tooling or expand on the grounds that it could all end any minute. It pretty much has, now, after they have saturated the market and wore down their tooling to a nub.

    The big time gun manufacturers, I bet, are effectively run by corporate liberal type people who are themselves anti-gun. They’d rather leave money on the table. And plus, at that level, doesnt most of their revenue come from selling to governments? They have an interest in not rocking the boat.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Eh. The government is an unreliable teat, as Colt found out. Gun owners also have rather long memories. Until recently many gun owners wouldn't buy Ruger because of the then owner's support of the AWB (which conveniently exempted all of Ruger's long rifles).
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  61. @Anonymous
    All I can dig up are claims that at Charlottesville there were chants of "Jews will not replace us," but I cannot find any videos of it. The phrase associated with the anti-immigration side is "You will not replace us." This derives from a translation of a saying from French anti-immigration activists. Could someone have misheard "Jews" for "You" in that phrase? I'm sure there were many anti-Jewish skeptics there, you didn't need a ticket and photo ID, and undoubtedly some antisemites, and maybe as an inprovisation someone said at some point "Jews will not replace us." It doesn't make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.

    My provisional conclusion is four Pinocchios for your claim that Charlottesville's main thrust or major sub-thrust was antisemitic, with "long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews."

    Yeah I consider that story an anti-White canard and a Semitic blood-libel until I see proof.

    It doesn’t make much sense, since the phrase refers to numbers, and not even antisemites think Jews will be a majority in any conceivable future.

    Lol, I think the idea is that Jews are the ones doing the replacing, not the ones being swapped in for Whites.

    I feel obligated to point out that not wanting to have Jews replace us is no worse than not wanting “you” to replace us.

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  62. @Enochian
    It would be a shame if some of the thousand or so organizations listed by the SPLC as "hate groups" launched a lawsuit against it, claiming the listing was false, damaging and malicious. Who knows how much of that $450 million could be lost in punitive damages?

    Who knows how much of that $450 million could be lost in punitive damages?

    Very little, given both the kind of numbers and quality of lawyers the SPLC would have in such suits, and the nature and biases of most of our courts and judges.

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  63. @Harry Baldwin
    It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Now that I've gotten old I'm selling off some guns and I have to amend your claim a bit. Some good guns go up in value, others do not. I have an S&W M&P .45 that I wanted to sell on commission. The gun store owner told me it wouldn't move unless he listed it at about half of what I'd paid for it 10 years ago. I have an early 1960s Marlin 92A .22 lever action; he told me no one's interested in those and it wasn't worth selling.

    I'll grant that telling your wife that guns always go up in value is a good tactic when she catches you bringing home yet another one.

    It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Now that I’ve gotten old I’m selling off some guns and I have to amend your claim a bit. Some good guns go up in value, others do not. I have an S&W M&P .45 that I wanted to sell on commission. The gun store owner told me it wouldn’t move unless he listed it at about half of what I’d paid for it 10 years ago. I have an early 1960s Marlin 92A .22 lever action; he told me no one’s interested in those and it wasn’t worth selling.

    I’ll grant that telling your wife that guns always go up in value is a good tactic when she catches you bringing home yet another one.

    I’d get a second opinion on all of that. Brick and mortar retail space costs money; you may be able to get that Marlin sold. But yes, gun prices do tend to fluctuate – 2008 was an Obama year, and gun prices were sky-high in many Obama years, so yeah you probably bought during a peak and are trying to sell in a valley. You can get your money back next time there’s a strong peak.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    I know a guy who sold a SCAR and an M4 post Sandy Hook and put a down payment on a house that appraised for 200k+.
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  64. By second opinion I mean check a couple gun forums. You may have better luck posting “WTS” on a few forums and looking for a face to face sale, or selling via a gun site.

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  65. @YetAnotherAnon
    There are, or should be, no "anti-KKK laws". I bet there's no mention of KKK in the law.

    There are presumably laws against doing certain things, and presumably the people arrested have broken those laws.

    Precisely.

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  66. @Anonymous
    The Charlottesville events saved the SPLC, which was actually taking much criticism from the Left after the election for its chicken-little scaremongering.

    But then those TV scenes of long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews scared the hell out of everyone and put everything right again.

    those TV scenes of long columns of Nazis chanting hatred of Jews

    Sauce or it dint happen.

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  67. @Anonymous
    Multi caliber guns are a thing in Europe because you only get a license for one or two guns at a time. Over here, except for the single shot TC Comtender/Encore, not so much. Americans like owning ten rifles and ten pistols. It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Well it wasn’t a multi caliber pistol Remington developed. Two different caliber pistols, but you could use the same holster on them.

    Yeah. That was their big innovation.

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  68. @Twinkie

    Whether or not they need that much money is not the point; both tug the emotional strings that make old ladies want to bequeath them their estates.
     
    I’m very active in charitable endeavors and I can tell you that most charities (and “political” groups - issue advicacy, for example)* are financial self-perpetuation machines, which, by their very nature, are NOT designed to solve the problems that butter their bread. Ask for quantifiable metrics and you’ll get the deer caught in headlight looks... all the while the execs are collecting hefty six-figure salaries plus all kinds of perks.

    Exceptions would be outfits that focus on actual legislative works/lobbying. They have to produce results to get their money, whether non-profit or for-profit.

    And, yes, old folks are the prime target for fundraising because they are more likely to give (parents with young children are the dead zone for fundraisers for obvious reasons, except maybe for top universities targeting high net worth parents).

    *This goes for the political right, not just the left.

    I’m very active in charitable endeavors and I can tell you that most charities (and “political” groups – issue advicacy, for example)* are financial self-perpetuation machines, which, by their very nature, are NOT designed to solve the problems that butter their bread.

    I am curious why the former is true if you believe the latter? Have you managed to find some good exceptions to that “most”? Any other thoughts to offer?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I am curious why the former is true if you believe the latter? Have you managed to find some good exceptions to that “most”? Any other thoughts to offer?
     
    My wife and I give to our Catholic diocese, which has the reputation of being the most orthodox in the United States. We also give to a local shelter/aid group for women who elect not to have abortions. As well, we give to our parish-based mission that repairs and builds homes for the poor. For the last group, our older children and I also contribute our time and labor. Both the women's aid group and the home building mission are almost entirely staffed by volunteers and almost all the money collected go to the actual charitable work.

    You can be very active in charity and make sure that the time and money go to the truly needed by keeping it local and/or participating in running/operating the charity.
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  69. @Svigor

    It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Now that I’ve gotten old I’m selling off some guns and I have to amend your claim a bit. Some good guns go up in value, others do not. I have an S&W M&P .45 that I wanted to sell on commission. The gun store owner told me it wouldn’t move unless he listed it at about half of what I’d paid for it 10 years ago. I have an early 1960s Marlin 92A .22 lever action; he told me no one’s interested in those and it wasn’t worth selling.

    I’ll grant that telling your wife that guns always go up in value is a good tactic when she catches you bringing home yet another one.

     

    I'd get a second opinion on all of that. Brick and mortar retail space costs money; you may be able to get that Marlin sold. But yes, gun prices do tend to fluctuate - 2008 was an Obama year, and gun prices were sky-high in many Obama years, so yeah you probably bought during a peak and are trying to sell in a valley. You can get your money back next time there's a strong peak.

    I know a guy who sold a SCAR and an M4 post Sandy Hook and put a down payment on a house that appraised for 200k+.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I know a guy who sold a SCAR and an M4 post Sandy Hook and put a down payment on a house that appraised for 200k+.
     
    There are always guys who buy up lots of inexpensive AR-15 lowers during the Republican years and then unload them during panic-buying of the Democratic years.
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  70. @27 year old
    The big time gun manufacturers, I bet, are effectively run by corporate liberal type people who are themselves anti-gun. They'd rather leave money on the table. And plus, at that level, doesnt most of their revenue come from selling to governments? They have an interest in not rocking the boat.

    Eh. The government is an unreliable teat, as Colt found out. Gun owners also have rather long memories. Until recently many gun owners wouldn’t buy Ruger because of the then owner’s support of the AWB (which conveniently exempted all of Ruger’s long rifles).

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  71. @syonredux

    Dees was born in 1936 in Shorter, Alabama, the son of Annie Ruth (Frazer) and Morris Seligman Dees, Sr., tenant cotton farmers.[2][5] His family was Baptist.[6] His father was named "Morris Seligman" after a Jewish friend of Dees's grandfather.[7] After graduating magna cum laude from the University of Alabama School of Law in 1960,[8] he returned to Montgomery, Alabama and opened a law office.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Morris_Dees

    MS Dees was not Jewish, yet devoted his life to imitating a certain conception of Jewishness, and arguably beat them at their own games.

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  72. One reason the SPLC may not be spending money is that the money may not be there.

    When were its accounts last audited? Who is the auditor?

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  73. @res

    I’m very active in charitable endeavors and I can tell you that most charities (and “political” groups – issue advicacy, for example)* are financial self-perpetuation machines, which, by their very nature, are NOT designed to solve the problems that butter their bread.
     
    I am curious why the former is true if you believe the latter? Have you managed to find some good exceptions to that "most"? Any other thoughts to offer?

    I am curious why the former is true if you believe the latter? Have you managed to find some good exceptions to that “most”? Any other thoughts to offer?

    My wife and I give to our Catholic diocese, which has the reputation of being the most orthodox in the United States. We also give to a local shelter/aid group for women who elect not to have abortions. As well, we give to our parish-based mission that repairs and builds homes for the poor. For the last group, our older children and I also contribute our time and labor. Both the women’s aid group and the home building mission are almost entirely staffed by volunteers and almost all the money collected go to the actual charitable work.

    You can be very active in charity and make sure that the time and money go to the truly needed by keeping it local and/or participating in running/operating the charity.

    Read More
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  74. @Harry Baldwin
    It’s like a savings account: good guns in good shape go up in value.

    Now that I've gotten old I'm selling off some guns and I have to amend your claim a bit. Some good guns go up in value, others do not. I have an S&W M&P .45 that I wanted to sell on commission. The gun store owner told me it wouldn't move unless he listed it at about half of what I'd paid for it 10 years ago. I have an early 1960s Marlin 92A .22 lever action; he told me no one's interested in those and it wasn't worth selling.

    I'll grant that telling your wife that guns always go up in value is a good tactic when she catches you bringing home yet another one.

    Some good guns go up in value, others do not.

    As someone with a very large gun collection, I can confirm this. The kinds of guns that do not go up in value are relatively “cheap” guns that were mass produced with little collectible appeal or otherwise have been surpassed in quality by modern guns. In other words, “nothing special.” These guns will most certainly LOSE value over time, akin to used cars.

    The types of guns that DO go up in value are those guns of older (more hand-fitted) manufacture in excellent conditions that are no longer produced or imported. For example, pre-number S&W revolvers command a hefty premium these days, especially the more rare calibers such as 32 S&W Long (e.g. S&W K-32). People who watch “The Walking Dead” might be aware that Colt Pythons now command stratospheric prices. Or something like Walther PPK in 32 ACP, the importation of which was prohibited in 1968. Other example include guns such as the early H&K carbine imports (e.g. HK33), Swiss-made Sig P210, and lately going up in price are Russian-made semi-auto AK variants.

    At the extreme end of this rarity are legally registered machine guns. Those have gone up in value dramatically.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    You have stated the issue correctly. For example, a S&W Shield will not go up in value as long as they keep making them, especially as an improved second-generation model has been introduced. Unless there are undesirable modifications in that second-generation model, there is now no reason to buy the original model.
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  75. @Jack Hanson
    I know a guy who sold a SCAR and an M4 post Sandy Hook and put a down payment on a house that appraised for 200k+.

    I know a guy who sold a SCAR and an M4 post Sandy Hook and put a down payment on a house that appraised for 200k+.

    There are always guys who buy up lots of inexpensive AR-15 lowers during the Republican years and then unload them during panic-buying of the Democratic years.

    Read More
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  76. @Twinkie

    Some good guns go up in value, others do not.
     
    As someone with a very large gun collection, I can confirm this. The kinds of guns that do not go up in value are relatively "cheap" guns that were mass produced with little collectible appeal or otherwise have been surpassed in quality by modern guns. In other words, "nothing special." These guns will most certainly LOSE value over time, akin to used cars.

    The types of guns that DO go up in value are those guns of older (more hand-fitted) manufacture in excellent conditions that are no longer produced or imported. For example, pre-number S&W revolvers command a hefty premium these days, especially the more rare calibers such as 32 S&W Long (e.g. S&W K-32). People who watch "The Walking Dead" might be aware that Colt Pythons now command stratospheric prices. Or something like Walther PPK in 32 ACP, the importation of which was prohibited in 1968. Other example include guns such as the early H&K carbine imports (e.g. HK33), Swiss-made Sig P210, and lately going up in price are Russian-made semi-auto AK variants.

    At the extreme end of this rarity are legally registered machine guns. Those have gone up in value dramatically.

    You have stated the issue correctly. For example, a S&W Shield will not go up in value as long as they keep making them, especially as an improved second-generation model has been introduced. Unless there are undesirable modifications in that second-generation model, there is now no reason to buy the original model.

    Read More
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