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Is Putin Pushing Muslim Refugees to Destroy Europe? Meme Spreads from Soros to McCain

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Recently, George Soros asserted that Vladimir Putin was attempting to undermine the European Union with Muslim refugees:

Soros: Putin Trying to Destroy EU with Muslim Migrants, So EU Must Invite in More Muslim Migrants (Or Something)

Now that meme seems to be spreading through the ranks of Respectable Codgers. From The Independent:

Vladimir Putin ‘making refugee crisis worse to undermine Europe’

… The intensified air campaign follows accusations from Senator John McCain, chairman of the US Senate armed services committee, that Russian President Vladimir Putin was intentionally stoking the refugee crisis in order to undermine the European project. …

Speaking on the final day of the annual Munich security conference Mr McCain accused Moscow of using its aerial campaign in Syria to add to the flow of people feeling the Middle East.

“He [Mr Putin] wants to exacerbate the refugee crisis and use it as a weapon to divide the transatlantic alliance and undermine the European project,” he said, “His appetite is growing with the eating”.

Similarly, NYT columnist Roger Cohen writes:

Will Merkel Pay for Doing the Right Thing?

… In Russia, [Dr. Merkel] needs President Vladimir Putin’s cooperation, but a core element of his strategy is the undermining of a united Europe; the refugee flow from Syria achieves just that.

It would seem that if the Putin is really trying to destroy Europe with his Muslim migrant infiltrators, then Soros, McCain, and Cohen should be demanding that Merkel fight back against Putin’s dastardly plot by … not letting so many Muslims in.

As you’ll recall, the migrant crisis went into overdrive on August 25, 2015 when the German government sent out a tweet saying, in effect, that they wouldn’t obey E.U. rules on migrants anymore. So the German could now send out another tweet saying something to the effect of, “We’re going back to obeying our pledge to the rest of the E.U., so … never mind.”

But rather than have Germany go to all that trouble of thwarting Putin’s plan by expending 140 characters, Soros, McCain, and Cohen seem to want the U.S. to risk World War III with Russia.

I guess I just don’t understand the foolproof logic of Invite the World / Invade the World.

 

193 Comments to "Is Putin Pushing Muslim Refugees to Destroy Europe? Meme Spreads from Soros to McCain"

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  1. This talk of risking a World War III is silly and makes you look hysterical. There wasn’t a World War III during the actual Cold War, why would there be one now?

    • Agree: snorlax
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  2. Senile dementia?

  3. More from the same Roger Cohen piece. This pablum is for the hi-IQ liberal NY Times crowd. Do they still fall for these silly arguments?

    So why did this customarily prudent chancellor do it? Because she is a German, and to be German is to carry a special responsibility for those terrorized in their homeland and forced into flight. Because she once lived in a country, East Germany, that shot people who tried to cross its border. Because a united Europe ushered Germany from its darkest hour to prosperity, and she is not about to let the European Union pitch into mayhem on her watch — as it would with more than a million ragged refugees adrift. And, yes, because she has a heart.

    http://www.nytimes.com/2016/02/15/opinion/how-america-was-lost.html?_r=0

    Some sludge from Paul Krugman on the next Supreme Court appointment where he paints Democrats as non-partisan, rules obeying angels and Republicans as selfish devils.

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  4. This seems to have been invented as propaganda line when the Russian intervention started, no matter how absurd the logic is. I really think recent events have caused some people to completely lose it, just imagine Trump wins the Presidency. Actually it is more a case of accusing others of what you yourself is doing.

    Seems to be some push back. A surprising article by economist Jeffrey Sachs on the CIA, Syria and Hilary.

    http://www.huffingtonpost.com/jeffrey-sachs/hillary-clinton-and-the-s_b_9231190.html?utm_hp_ref=yahoo&ir=Yahoo

  5. My knowledge of Cold War history is by no means perfect, but I recall no instance of a NATO aircraft or surface-to-air missile shooting down a Soviet aircraft and acknowledging explicitly that’s what happened. Yes, I know that Russian and American pilots occasionally fought in Korea, but both sides were careful to keep it under wraps to avoid escalation. And U.S. reconnaisance planes overflew Russia and probed their air defenses, but it was generally unacknowledged. I suspect that the Soviets did something similar but it too was kept unofficial. Here, we have NATO and Russian aircraft operating in the same airspace with the possibility of shooting at each other. It isn’t hard to see how things could escalate quickly, particularly with hotheads like McCain in policy-making roles and advocating “no-fly zones.” And over Syria??? What are the strategic interests of the United States in Syria?

    Add to that, the fact that NATO has expanded into both eastern Europe (a move George Kennan called a “strategic blunder of epic proportions”) and the Baltic (absolutely indefensible) and some American policy makers want it to expand into Ukraine–right on Russia’s doorstep. How did the U.S. react to Russian missiles in Cuba? The Cold War damn near got hot!

    It pains me as an American to say this, but, on the whole, Putin and Russia have been very restrained in their reaction to what can only be considered American provocations. Cooler heads need to take control in the West.

    The notion that Putin is somehow driving the flow of rapefugees into western Europe is either delusional or another accusation put forth to justify additional provocative action on the part of the U.S. and the West. This will not end well.

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  6. The idea that Putin is using and aggravating the refugee crisis to undermine the EU in order to get the sanctions repealed is pretty commonly held among Eastern Europeans who don’t like Putin. My Moldovan friend has been saying this loudly since last summer. (And from Putin’s point of view it would make a lot of sense). Soros just picked up on it. Soros seems to be only person though who manages to simultaneously holds that theory, while being opposed to stopping the migrants. That is a hell of a trick.

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  7. This just gets stranger and stranger. Six months ago or so, migrants were the answer to Germany’s declining demographics and Angela Merkel suspended ordinary refugee procedures to permit these economic assets to get to Germany quicker. Now the entire affair is a dastardly plot by the evil Vladimir Putin to undermine the European Union by sending more of these economic assets their way, including people from Mali and Ethiopia and Somalia because the Russian Air Force is bombing Bamako and Addis Ababa and, oh, wait a minute, I guess it isn’t.

    Those whom the gods would destroy, they first make go mad!

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  8. It’s the old marketing ploy, as illustrated by the Keystone beer ads accusing their competitors of bitter beer.

    Europeans may want to have an eye to Russia as a potential New Europe – a place for them to migrate to en mass as the climate in Europe becomes more & more inhospitable.

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  9. When you do not know or care about the sequence of events, there is no limit to the stupidity of the theories you can come up with. Always a worthwhile tip for historians. Application to the current problem: start of the “refugee” crisis in Europe – summer 2015. Start of the Russian air campaign in Syria: end of September 2015.

  10. Saudi Arabia and Turkey are using the refugees to get influence in the West with absolute certainity, Russia most likely not. Following Russian ideas there would have been no civil war in Syria, and thus no refugees in the first place.

  11. says:
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    The other problem with the theory – apart from the one you mention that the people pushing it want the same thing they say Putin is doing – is most of the refugees either aren’t refugees at all or aren’t from Syria.

    This is just the people behind the attempted destruction of Europeans trying to get a second bite of the cherry by leveraging the chaos they’ve caused into propaganda for the war they want against Russia.

    I think the risk of WWIII is substantial c. 30% but at the moment the dial is pointing away – mainly because of how badly the US is playing its hand (because it’s not being played for the benefit of the US as a nation but for the agenda of various oligarchic factions).

  12. says:
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    We need to bomb the hell out of Russia. I’ve met done Russians and they are racist as hell.

  13. I suspect Trump is the least likely of all candidates on either the GOP or Dem side, to get the US and the rest of NATO embroiled in any kind of war with Russia or indeed China.

    There is also this UK Speccie piece, which no doubt applies just as much in the US of A – ROD LIDDLE I want to see President Trump – if only because of who he’d annoy.

  14. There’s evidence that Scalia’s death may have been due to foul play.

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  15. Scalia found with pillow over his head.

    Hmmm………………

    http://nypost.com/2016/02/15/scalia-found-dead-with-pillow-over-his-head-ranch-owner/

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  16. It’s definitely to the advantage of Putin and Assad to have impoverished Sunna migrating to Europe. In other words, Europe is being Marielitized.

    Of course, since migration can never be a bad thing (as natural as the albatrosses and wildebeests!), the old codgers have to engage in this pretzel logic to explain their discomfiture.

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  17. People who have forgotten the logic of the Cold War, where staying out of a no shit shooting fight with the Soviet Union was really job one of American foreign policy, both civil and military?

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  18. http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/worldnews/middleeast/syria/12125968/Russian-bombs-damage-British-funded-bakery-designed-to-help-18000-Syrians.html

    The Russians blew up a bakery that Britain had donated to the displaced people in Syria. Assad blames the West for the Arab spring. If he can get away with it Assad will force out almost all educated Sunnis such as the ones in Aleppo, and be left with the backward Sunni tribes of the West . I think keeping Assad in power will require forcing out much of the population.

    Putin’s objective is simply to prop up Assad, but Assad may raise the stakes by allowing ISIS to move into former FSA rebel areas. That could mean a general war under cover of which Israel can kick out the West Bank Palestinians.

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  19. The New York Times reported on Feb. 2., that Obama plans to increase the deployment of heavy weapons, vehicles, and other military equipment to its NATO allies in Central and Eastern Europe.

    The Islamic army is already in place in Europe. All they need is the weapons. Obama will supply them just as he did with ISIS by arming Iraq.

    Works every time.

  20. Soros seems to be only person though who manages to simultaneously holds that theory, while being opposed to stopping the migrants. That is a hell of a trick

    In other words, it’s not the decision he disagrees with, just that it was made by the wrong individual, i.e., not him.

  21. Leftist conservative [AKA "GOD ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    our world is created by propaganda….we swim in a sea of propaganda….we breathe it….drink it…eat it…every particle of our consciousness is shaped by it…

    the only thing that can break this media-controlled flow of propaganda is technology….social media, phone apps, and small websites are slowly eating into the media hold on the flow of ideas…The Trump phenomenon is a manifestation of a weakening media position in the flow of ideas…

    yet the power of the media megaphone is still there to a great extent….that megaphone can still push even this sort of nonsense into a life of its own…incredible as that may seem….why? Because mankind is innately vulnerable to a flow of information from the top of society.

  22. It’s a sad state of affairs when an 85-year-old knave and a 79-year-old fool (or madman) can influence any county’s policies.

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  23. Well a depopulated Syria provides a handy place to transfer all those troublesome Palestinians and Europe picks up the bill.

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  24. Let me see if I understand the American logic in Syria. Assad is a bad, bad man, and must go. (The question as to whether he is actually worse than KSA never really seems to come up.) In Syria, rebels bad (ISIS) and good (everyone who is not explicitly ISIS, even if they are al-Qaeda) are trying to over throw Assad, with US, Turkish and Saudi assistance. When, at the invitation of a legitimate government, with a seat at the UN and everything (although headed by a bad, bad man who must go), the Russians intervene to assist the recognized and legitimate government, it’s the Russian’s fault.

    Is that, some bitter side commentary aside, a fair statement of the situation?

    And if so, then is the solution that Russia should step aside and let US funded jihadists overthrow a secular government?

    Would that solve everything, and make everything in Syria hunky-dory, and make all the refugees decided that Northern Europe was a nice place to visit but they wouldn’t want to live there?

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  25. Leftist conservative [AKA "GOD ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ"]
    says:
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    more evidence of a coordinated campaign:

    http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2016/02/14/john-kerry-says-migrants-pose-near-existential-threat-to-europe-months-after-obama-mocked-gop-opponents-of-syrian-refugees-to-u-s/

    now that they have a scapegoat (putin), they can shift the establishment depiction of the migrants themselves.

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  26. A few months ago, the European MSM were singing Merkel’s praise, calling her a ‘visionary stateswoman’ for scrapping the Dublin Treaty and opening the floodgates to all those refugees from Turkey. But after the ‘rapefugee’ scandal, once her decision was revealed to be incredibly unpopular, they are having to change the narrative and go into blame-Russia mode. Very predictable.

  27. Best explanation I’ve ever seen, but not reassuring.

  28. Russians are Europeans and have no desire to see the rest of Europe turn into an appendage of the ME. Of course strategically they have enough problems with failed states to their south, they don’t need such problems on their western border as well. Watching the difference in coverage between the Russia Today and the BBC et al. when it comes to the migrant crisis is a real eye opener.

  29. says:
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    Jeffrey Sachs has a devastating piece in he HuffoPo on Hillary and the Syrian bloodbath, which Sachs shows she is partly (largely) responsible for:
    Hillary Clinton and the Syrian Bloodbath

    http://m.huffpost.com/us/entry/hillary-clinton-and-the-s_b_9231190.html

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  30. In 1913, a clown like you published a best selling book proving that WW I could not possibly happen….he may have gotten the Nobel Prize….

  31. Because this time the Babyboomers are in charge, that’s why.

  32. Interesting how Eastern Europe has to choose between the West, offering prosperity, the rule of law and hordes of immigrants. And Russia, offering gangster crime, a traditional way of life and secure borders.

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  33. In a sane polity, John McCain would never have been heard from again after not winning a single primary in 2000. He is purely a creature of the national media and whatever flakey, rigged politics gets him elected in Arizona. Same for the intensely unlikeable Lindsey Graham.

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  34. the Russians intervene to assist the recognized and legitimate government, it’s the Russian’s fault.

    What is legitimate about a government which has never held an election? Why accept Russia meddling in Syria? Their military has no business being there. Assad has aligned his “legitimate government” with Iran. Iran has killed American soldiers, thru proxies and likely directly.

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  35. Implying it could be beneficial to risk a shooting war with Russia makes you look extremely foolish.

  36. I count McCain winning seven primaries in 2000.

  37. 1/ Its nice to see an Unz.com columnist ridicule a conspiracy theory. There really is a first time for everything. But cui bono, cui bono!

    Granted this conspiracy theory is anti-Putin but still.

    2/ Can’t anybody here see the bright side? You’d think people here would be happy with evidence that Soros may be going senile.

  38. says:
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    I’m beginning to think that one of the characteristics that defines liberals is a faulty reality checker. They really do seem to have a ton of mental problems dealing with any shred of data that contradicts a previously held belief.

  39. I agree that he shouldn’t have been heard from again after 2000, but he did win seven primaries. McCain carried Arizona, Michigan and most of New England.

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  40. Wait, wasn’t there some other non-EU country, potentially threatened by the rise of a united Europe to challenge its lone global superpower status, that caused many times as much bloodshed and instability in that region as Russsia has so far?

  41. US policy is to bomb Syria. Exactly whom it is to bomb, and why, are secondary considerations, as long as it gets to bomb Syria. Bombs away!

  42. My view is simple on this matter. The Western European politicians argued more or less free immigration before the European Union was formed. The definition who can apply for refugee status has constantly expanded. Many Western European countries have gone so far that they define refugees as someone who is “fleeing” from poverty or a prison sentence. In the same time all Western European member states refuse to enforce their own laws.

    To keep the flow of migrants/asylum seekers the Western European politicians they have made it possible for asylum-seekers to go to court if their application is denied. Illegal immigrants are encouraged to stay with the help of government providing them welfare. The Schengen agreement has made it possible for migrants/refugees to travel freely within the union. Immigrants tend to seek asylum in different countries. If they are rejected by one country they seek asylum in another. Scandinavia, Netherlands and Germany have gone so far that they give asylum to people who already have a permanent residency in other countries.

    Naturally, different migrant seek asylum in different countries depending on language, culture and financial opportunities. After the 2007-2009 financial crisis migrants living in legally in Southern Europe and France suddenly became “refugees” again and simply applied for asylum in Northern Europe. It is not Russia which causes the massive influx of migrants. Most of these migrants are not Syrians or Iraqis. What the “refugees” have in common is that they come from third world countries and want to make a better life for themselves and their families. It is the European Union who allows them to come.

    The European Union could easily enforce border controls just like Australia but there is no will to do so in Brussels, Paris, London, Stockholm, Berlin, Vienna or Amsterdam. Eastern Europe has a different opinion on the matter. Their elites and their people were behind the iron curtain and never adopted notion of multiculturalism and open borders. Naturally, the conflict between Eastern Europe and Western Europe is steadily increasing.

    Eastern Europe joined the European Union because they wanted to improve their economies. They didn’t join the European Union to be a part of a deeply ideological internationalist project. I do not see how Russia and Turkey can be blamed for the influx of migrants when the borders have been open since the 1960s. The only difference is that there are more asylum-seekers now than before. Consequently, it does not hit all of Europe but rather countries who have an open door policy such as Germany, Netherlands, United Kingdom, Austria and the Scandinavian nations. George Soros just continues his constantly Russia bashing. It is really nothing more. When the winter is over the massive immigration will continue.

    It would be my guess that the elites of the Western world will alter their politics. The Davos liberals are very worried about the West turning into National-Conservatism and Nationalism and reject international liberalism. Merkel and CDU are under heavy pressure from the general population. Alternative for Germany (AfD) is running around 12 points in the polls and CDU is down from 40+ points to around 30 points. Although Merkel and CDU can continue to run the country after the 2017 federal election they will deal AfD.

    The experience from Denmark, Netherlands, Austria, Sweden, Norway and the rest of Europe is that the European establishment is horrible when it comes to defending their own positions in debates when challenged by National-Conservatives, Nationalists, Libertarians, Paleo-Conservatives and others on the right. If Donald Trump wins the presidential election then things can change rapidly all over the West.

  43. Soros’ point is not illogical if you see the “migrants” the way the left sees them — as genuine refugees who deserve our sympathy.

    Imagine you ran a hospital and Pernicious Putin spread a serious disease that struck all the cute toddlers in your city. Your hospital would be overwhelmed but turning away desperately sick children wouldn’t strike you as an appropriate policy.

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  44. How perverse that in the wake of Putin’s success with Syria — retaking Aleppo from ISIS and re-establishing the government — those who fomented the chaos would now seek to blame Russia for “taking advantage.” Far from taking advantage, Russia, in destroying ISIS is mitigating the refugee crisis. Soros, as neocon and “humanitarian” extraordinaire, encourages the U.S.-led bombing of stable Syria, promotes the influx of refugees, opportunists, and jihadis to Europe via OSF, then offloads blame onto Putin. A truly breathtaking act of hubris and hypocrisy.

    And the neocon-aligned in congress are taking their cues from him? Says very little of the McCains out there.

    You know the only positive from this fingerpointing is that it reflects a ground change of European opinion toward “refugees,” from the masses on up. No more welcome mats. Soros is disavowing his own project and focusing blame elsewhere. Let’s hope his transference is recognized as such and repudiated.

  45. says:
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    Imagine you ran a hospital and Pernicious Putin spread a serious disease that struck all the cute toddlers in your city. Your hospital would be overwhelmed but you wouldn’t consider turning away desperately sick children.

    So, this Saudi, Turk, CIA, Arab Spring, and Israel operation to overthrow Assad for the past 5 years had nothing to with the refugee problem. It was Putin, who stepped in 17 weeks ago to stop a secular country from being overrun by Islamists. Okay, I think I get it. [making Trump condescending expression].

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  46. says:
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    Right you are, Steve.

    As I never tire of pointing out – a fact which seems to be forlonly lost in the welter of waffle, blather, obfuscation and general hot air nonsense, there is essentially one and only one crucial aspect to acknowledge in this whole so-called ‘migrant’ crisis/circus, namely that the genesis of this crisis/circus is the INSISTENCE that the EU imposes on its member states of obeying that ridiculous, downright deranged and dumb 1951 Geneva Refugee Convention and in particular the ill-starred 1968 amendment to that trash treaty, that extended its provisions to non-Europeans, ie non whites.

    THAT is the only point worth noting about this crisis/circus.

    As the Sex Pistols might put it ‘Never Mind The Bollocks’, in particular the imputed to Putin bollocks.

  47. The real problem is that people have come to perceive ISIS as a terrorist insurgency force. Really, most of ISIS is composed of “moderate Muslims” (why else would our “moderate Muslim” allies relinquish their weapons to ISIS) and I am sure that the U.S. could identify one or two “bad Muslims” (with help from our “moderate Muslim” friends) to shoot, and then we could ask everyone to roll over and leave our “moderate Muslims” in charge of Syria and portions of Iraq.

    This way, we can defeat the evil Russians and Assad, and defeat Islamic terrorism through work with “moderate Muslims”. Such a solution would seem to be the most palatable to our neo-conservative friends I would imagine. Further, I bet with sufficient military support, our “moderate Muslim” allies would be more than happy to take care of the Kurds and the Shia, leading to a three way victory for freedom and justice. At least until the following week, when some not-so-moderate elements emerged among our former friends (but by then we would have pushed the Russian sphere of influence out of the Middle East and weakened Iran).

  48. Have they? The post-Iraq War logic seems to be even more restrictive than the Cold War logic was. Now it’s all about staying out of any ground war. I guess I’m really not seeing what some of you guys are seeing here. So the CIA sends some anti-tank rockets to Syrian rebels. You call that warmongering? This is piddling stuff.

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  49. Stephen Richter said: What is legitimate about a government which has never held an election? Why accept Russia meddling in Syria? Their military has no business being there. Assad has aligned his “legitimate government” with Iran. Iran has killed American soldiers, thru proxies and likely directly.

    Hunsdon said: Seriatem

    1. What is legitimate about a government that has never held an election?

    Recognized by the United Nations is a decent enough place to start. Shall we ask the Saudis? Oh, and a quick couple of seconds on the ol’ search engine (plug “Syrian elections” into your search engine of choice) says, “Hmm, Syria has had elections.”

    2. Why accept Russian meddling in Syria?

    Why not? Is Russian meddling somehow more objectionable than the meddling done by other states, great or small?

    3. Assad has aligned his “legitimate government” with Iran.

    So?

    4. Iran has killed American soldiers, thru proxies and likely directly.

    To say that Iran has killed American soldiers, and thus we cannot work with them, while we are simultaneously working to support offshoots of al-Qaeda, is chutzpah beyond chutzpah.

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  50. I’ve appreciated your comments before, but I cannot grasp your POV here. Why on earth would you ignore the U.S. bombing campaigns which enabled Islamic State to expand in Syria, creating the refugee crisis? To say nothing of the genesis of Islamic State in chaotic Iraq, another U.S. neocon failure.

    Russia is a very recent entrant, and in fact a force for stability in Syria. How does the analogy where Russia kills infants (or whatever) make any sense? That bad actor would best be described as the U.S. intervention or the Islamic State commandos. Russia, really? Is this knee-jerk ism?

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  51. says:
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    Notice how different people all seem to be reading from the same script, all pushing the same talking points at the same time as if it were coordinated by central propaganda headquarters. All part of the long running campaign whereby Putin is a gangster ‘thug’ who has stolen trillions and trillions of rubles and has a love child but yet is secretly gay. Anyone demurring from the party line was quickly denounced as being a ‘paid Putin stooge’ in an attempt to squelch independent thought. This is an attempt to turn things around and point the finger of blame elsewhere. Perhaps someone should have told our genius planners that war creates refugees and displaced persons and that they end up going somewhere. Our noble NATO ally Erdogan appears to have weaponized this group, using it for blackmail and to apply pressure. One thing is certain and that is we’re being lied to 24/7.

  52. All the rapists were brought in by Putin and all the nice migrants with economy-boosting start-up plans were brought in by Merkel.

  53. I don’t understand.

    Are you saying Steve is being hysterical for risking WW III? He doesn’t say anything like that in his post.

    Or are you saying reducing migration would risk WW III? That would be a pretty weird claim.

  54. In the long view, Europe will eventually be Russified and re-Christianized by Russia, and it will be Russia and her proxies that expel the Muslims from Europe. Soros and McCain have it exactly backwards.

  55. Correct.

    There’s been a fundamental shift on immigration. These articles simple assume as obvious that the migrants are a very bad thing, capable of destroying Europe. A complete 180 from the “immigrants are great!” rhetoric of only 6 months ago, with nary a mention of the shift.

  56. Goodthinkers who now comprehend the dangers of mass immigration can use this as cover to come out against mass immigration. Blame Putin, who is bad, bad, bad, which makes opposition to mass immigration good, good, good.

  57. says:
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    http://europeanpost.co/former-war-crimes-prosecutor-del-ponte-says-russian-air-strikes-in-syria-is-good-thing/

    Former war crimes prosecutor Del Ponte says Russian air strikes in Syria is ‘good thing’

    “Overall, I think the Russian intervention is a good thing, because finally someone is attacking these terrorist groups,” Del Ponte told Swiss public broadcaster RTS, listing the Islamic State group and Al-Nusra among the groups targeted. (AFP)

    Carla Del Ponte is a a member of the UN Commission of Inquiry on Syria and former war crime prosecutor United Nations international criminal law tribunals.

    Pope Francis Sees Putin as ‘Only Man’ to Defend Christians Around the World

    http://sputniknews.com/politics/20160209/1034451116/pope-francis-putin-christians.html#ixzz40G2FoKu3

  58. says:
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    The Independent is just a rag owned by Lebedev. It can’t be considered respectable any more. Of the British newspapers, it is of course by far the most an organ for agitation by the globalist class.

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  59. says:
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    “Foul play” could be a euphemism for AEA.

  60. The leftist elite don’t see have sympathy for refugees or poor colored people in third world countries. They are just bricks in a political game to advance a political agenda. Soros positions is not logic. Soros positions;

    Position 1: Open borders to third world countries – it is good for Europe
    Position 2: Open borders to Europe is negative and it is Russians who ought to blame for it.

    Not to use it as evidence but the most outrageous racists I have met has been liberals/socialists. I doubt Soros cares for refugees.

  61. Most of the civilian leadership of the West is preoccupied with issues of diversity & LGBT. The predominant foreign policy goals of the Obama admin are spreading gay rights & gender equality.

    The civilian leadership of the West’s adversaries is to either supplant the West or diminish its influence.

    The West has the military and economic advantage so in the near term everything should be ok. In the long term though it will lose since it no longer has the will or culture to effectively maintain its status.

  62. That prosperity and rule of law business may not last long–import a third world population, get a third world country.

  63. When will George Soros and John McCain simply die off?

    My main hope with these “let’s restart the Cold War with the Russians so we have a White European enemy and can bring back the good times of the Reagan 1980s” – my main hope is that these folks are really, really old, it seems no one under the age of 60 wants to do this.

    Can some folks on the ground in South Carolina explain to us if younger folks affiliated with Bob Jones University or folks part of the huge military establishment in SC – do any of these younger folks support want to do the John McInsane Neo Con “Let’s fight the Russians”?

    Don’t they know that it is now legal and the norm to celebrate Christmas in St. Petersberg Russia?

    What the $*#*@ hell is wrong with South Carolina?

  64. It’s also recognized by any and all honest news sources that I trust that 4 out of 5 Muslim migrants to Europe in 2015 were not from Syria.

    The whole “War Refugees” is propaganda – it’s simply a Camp of the Saints (Jean Respail) mass Muslim male migration invasion by young Arab/Pakistani/Afghan men. Why is it happening? Same reason tens of thousands, hundreds of thousands of Indian, Pakistanies migrated to England after World War II, same reason millions of Mexicans, Central Americdan Amer Indian/Mestizos migrated to the United States.

    Liberals and Leftists in the 1980s tried to blame the migration on Reagan’s support for the Contras, US backing oppressive Right Wing governments.

  65. Refugees are both a floor wax and a dessert topping. So if you call within the next 24 hours, we’ll double your order of Syrian “professionals” and throw in a lifetime supply of Afghan goatherds at no additional cost. But remember: This is a limited time offer, so act now!

  66. http://www.vdare.com/articles/is-population-transfer-the-solution-to-the-palestinian-problem-and-some-others

    Consider the following scenario. Assad boosts ISIS and ISIS takes over Jordan; Israel fights ISIS and kicks out the West Bank Palestinians into Jordan. Organised Jewish groups would justify the transfers. Europeans might start to toy with the idea of their own population transfers.

  67. Thank you for the correction. I was recalling things from the perspective of Bush’s Super Tuesday sweep.

  68. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    “…This talk of risking a World War III is silly and makes you look hysterical…”

    Someone hasn’t been keeping up on the news or the pronouncements of the diplomatic players. “Risking WWIII” has become a crescendo in the last week or so, including at the foreign and defense minister level:

    “Road To World War III: Turkish Army Enters Syria After Second Day Of Shelling As Saudi Warplanes Arrive”, ZeroHedge, Tyler Durden, 02/14/2016.

    “Russia warns of ‘new world war’ starting in Syria”, The Telegraph, Richard Spencer, 12 Feb 2016.

    “World War III inches closer as Turkey says it may enter Syrian conflict”, The Washington Times, L. Todd Wood, February 7, 2016.

    “Risk of GLOBAL WAR as Saudi Arabia, Turkey – and Ukraine – wade into Syria: SECURITY experts fear a clash of historic foes in the “overcrowded” Syrian War will trigger World War 3.”, Daily Star, David Trayner, 6th February 2016.

    Troubles in the Balkans surely couldn’t have much effect on the major world powers, eh?

    • Replies:
  69. Same for the intensely unlikeable Lindsey Graham.

    When Donald Trump is the most likable member of your candidate pool, that says something.

  70. …turning away desperately sick children wouldn’t strike you as an appropriate policy.

    The problem here is that those in positions to influence events have learned to cast things as a humanitarian crisis, complete with front page pictures of kids in distress; whether it is a real crisis or not.

    And even if it is a real crisis, there is a point where sentimentality needs to end, lest the loss becomes total.

  71. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Broken link. Correction:

    “World War III inches closer as Turkey says it may enter Syrian conflict”, The Washington Times, L. Todd Wood, February 7, 2016:

    “…Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan hinted Turkey could enter the war on the side of the anti-Assad forces who Russia has been primarily targeting. …

    …The Syrian government made major gains against the Sunni opposition in recent weeks as the Syrian city of Aleppo looked to fall from the opposition’s control. …

    …Late last week, Saudi Arabia stated it could send ground troops into the fight to support Sunni forces. Now other Gulf states seem to be following suit. …

    …The Syrian civil war is now becoming a confusing, full-fledged, proxy war…”

    Is it to be the Balkans, 1914; Spain, 1936; or ?

  72. Well, that solves everything.

  73. George Soros is simply unable to get over his butthurt about Putin’s government banning activities of his so-called “Open Society” foundation in Russian territory, thus throwing his Subvert Russia project off track. The REAL fault lies with those media cretins who keep giving a large bullhorn to this criminal geriatric fartbag and his malevolent ravings.

  74. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Gasp! Did you just allude to the L word?

  75. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Not to mention another state whose name begins with an I that has also killed American soldiers.

    Well, OK, they were sailors. I guess that is different.

  76. It was a very interesting piece with the ring of much truth.

    He gives this very questionable assertion with no reasoning:

    “And Israeli right-wingers are naïve, and deeply ignorant of history, to regard Iran as their implacable foe, especially when that mistaken view pushes Israel to side with Sunni jihadists.”

    I would like to know just why Israeli right-wingers, or Israel anybodies, would not regard Iran as an implacable foe. I’m not saying the US has to allow Israel to set US foreign policy. Israel has its reasons for wanting to get rid of the Assad government, but probably would have basically left the situation alone if the US had not gotten involved.

  77. And recall about 20 weeks ago George Soros was on record as saying the EU would have to take in a million refugees per year for the foreseeable future. Well one would think the foreseeable future would have included a six month window. I guess not.

    I suppose it’s a good sign that Soros and his friends are even acknowledging migrants are not an absolute good. Maybe this might mean they are listening to the people and will acquiesce. But there is also the political bank shot aspect to look at.

    Putin was and is public enemy number one for Soros and the globalists. Putin and Russia have actually seen their popularity rise since their Syrian intervention. You even have a leading presidential candidate, Trump, expressing support for Russia’s role in disrupting ISIS.

    Sanctions will probably be ending since they have been hurting EU farmers and others who are not fixated on Russian politics. What better way to get Putin and Russia back into the dog house then to blame them for the migrant crisis.

    If successful Soros and friends in one stroke can dump the blowback resulting from their cherished goal of demographically changing Europe onto their number one enemy which would put him back into the world’s doghouse.

  78. The reason why there are so many homeless Syrians is that the Assad regime dropped barrel bombs in their neighborhoods, which destroyed their residences: http://graphics8.nytimes.com/newsgraphics/2015/02/11/syria-damage/182fd1c2db4749fa254683d8f5910651cca25d84/images/lead-photo-1050.jpg

    Just about half of all Syrians lost their homes in the war. Of course, the ones getting bombed and homeless are the Sunnis. It’s the Sunnis who have been fighting hard against his regime.

    Frankly, I don’t think Assad has any problem with blowing up Sunni neighborhoods. If they flee Syria and reside in Turkey or Europe, then that’s one less problem for him and one more problem for the countries which have been trying to destroy him.

    So did Putin engineer the refugee crisis? Of course not, but I’m willing to bet that Assad and his security chiefs don’t have any objections to Sunnis getting out of Syria.

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  79. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    “A mini world war rages in the fields of Aleppo”, The Washington Post, Liz Sly, February 14, 2016:

    “…Russian warplanes are bombing from the sky. Iraqi and Lebanese militias aided by Iranian advisers are advancing on the ground. An assortment of Syrian rebels backed by the United States, Turkey, Saudi Arabia and Qatar are fighting to hold them back. Kurdish forces allied both to Washington and Moscow are taking advantage of the chaos to extend Kurdish territories. The Islamic State has snatched a couple of small villages, while all the focus was on the other groups….

    …Turkey joined in over the weekend, firing artillery across its border at Kurdish positions for a second day …

    …Russian Prime Minister Dmitri Medvedev warned of the risks… saying that the world had already descended into “a new Cold War.” …

    …Although Syria’s army is claiming the victories, rebels, military experts and videos by the fighters themselves say almost all of the advances are being made by the Lebanese Hezbollah movement, the Iraqi Badr Brigade, Harakat al-Nujaba and other Iraqi Shiite militias that are sponsored by Iran. …

    …Vice President Biden telephoned Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu on Saturday to urge Turkey to halt its shelling. He emphasized “the imperative for de-escalation in the area,” …

    …Within hours of the appeals, the Kurds seized another northern Aleppo village, Ain Daqna, and Turkey resumed its bombardment. …”

    It appears the Syrian Army’s main player is their 4th Mechanized Division that has received maybe 16 or so modernish Russian T-90 tanks that are mostly impervious to the anti-tank missiles that the rebels have. With this armour spearhead and Russian close air-support the sizeable Iranian-backed militias (and the Syrian National Defense Force, the now more-or-less integrated Syrian reserve/militia) can prevail.

  80. McCain made these comments at the Munich Security Conference. This, from thier website,

    MSC

    is the membership of their advisory council:

    Chairman of the Advisory Council:
    Wolfgang Büchele, Chief Executive Officer, Linde AG, Munich, and Chairman of the North Africa Middle East Initiative of German Business (NMI)

    Members of the Advisory Council:

    Paul Achleitner, Chairman of the Supervisory Board, Deutsche Bank AG, Frankfurt a.M.

    Prince Turki Al Faisal bin Abdulaziz Al Saud, Chairman, King Faisal Center for Research and Islamic Studies, Riyadh

    Oliver Bäte, Chairman of the Board of Management, Allianz SE, Munich

    Carl Bildt, Former Prime Minister and former Minister of Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of Sweden, Stockholm

    Nikolaus von Bomhard, Chairman of the Board, Munich Re, Munich

    Thomas Enders, Chief Executive Officer, Airbus Group, Leiden

    Herman O. Gref, Chairman of the Board and Chief Executive Officer, Sberbank RF, Moscow

    Jane Harman, Director, President and Chief Executive Officer, Woodrow Wilson International Center for Scholars, Washington, D.C.

    Frank Haun, Chief Executive Officer, Krauss-Maffei Wegmann GmbH & Co. KG, Munich

    Anne Lauvergeon, Chairman and Chief Executive Officer of A.L.P. S.A.; Member of the Board of Directors of EADS, Paris

    Frank Mastiaux, Chief Executive Officer, EnBW Energie Baden-Württemberg-AG, Karlsruhe

    Javier Solana, Former Secretary General of NATO; former High Representative of the European Union for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy; President, ESADE Center, Madrid

    George Soros, Founder and Chairman, Open Society Foundations; Chairman, Soros Fund Management LLC, New York, NY

    James G. Stavridis, Admiral (ret.); former NATO Supreme Allied Commander Europe; Dean of the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, Tufts University, Medford, MA

    Edmund Stoiber, Former Minister-President of the Free State of Bavaria, Munich

    So McCain’s aping of Soros’ line is not that surprising. Let’s face it, it’s not as if McCain is very smart – he’s just parroting what his wealthy patrons are saying.

    Note that this list includes, among a small who’s-who of finance executives and security-racket lifers, former Congresswoman Jane Harman:

    Jane Harman

    Here’s a snippet from her wiki-bio:

    “In 2009, it was revealed NSA wiretaps reportedly intercepted a 2005 phone call between Harman and an agent of the Israeli government, in which Harman allegedly agreed to lobby the Justice Department to reduce or drop criminal charges against two employees of AIPAC in exchange for increased support for Harman’s campaign to chair the House Intelligence Committee.[13] The NSA transcripts reportedly recorded Harman ending the phone call after saying, “this conversation doesn’t exist.”[14] It was reported that Alberto Gonzales, Attorney General at the time of the phone call, blocked Justice Department lawyers from continuing the investigation into Harman (in spite of the alleged crime) because the Bush administration “needed Jane” to support their warrantless wiretapping program, which was soon to be revealed to the public by the New York Times.[15]”

    So, she’s clearly the sort of person to whom you want to rely on for advice on “security”.

  81. It’s no secret that the Neo-Cons in the GOP and Democratic party are still jonesing for a war with Russia or that Soros is a major supporter of Muslim immigration into the West along with most Jewish big shots.

    And Soros would say just about anything to help the process along. He also wants to give cover to traitors like Merkel and Hollande for their bungling.

    That said, Obama had high hopes that the Ukrainian situation would give the U.S. a excuse to put the U.S. Army in Kiev so they could rumble with Putin. Putin didn’t play their game.

    Nor did Putin play their game when a U.S. proxy (Turkey) shot down their fighter plane.

    Still despite the noises that Soros is making, our military and government wheels are still preparing for war with Russia as best they can by forward deploying military units in the Baltics and Poland.

    • Replies:
  82. “Soros’ point is not illogical if you see the “migrants” the way the left sees them — as genuine refugees who deserve our sympathy.”

    The left doesn’t see them that way. The left sees them as a battering ram for knocking down the gates of Europe.

    • Replies:
  83. From that Cohen piece:

    “Because she once lived in a country, East Germany, that shot people who tried to cross its border.”

    That’s pretty disingenuous. I think the direction is kind of important here; East Germany shot people trying to leave.

  84. The logic seems similar to the logic behind the push to reform campus sex rules, where the “solution” to a claimed epidemic of rape is to make it easier to give rapists a slap-on-the-hand expulsion.

    Meanwhile, the people who want to bring in real police, real courts, and send rapists to actual prison for a million years are condemned as “pro-rape.”

  85. Either Turkey, the Saudis, the Gulf nations, and ISIS will run the Eastern Med, or Putin and Iran. Better Putin and Iran. Putin while no angel, is relatively sane and better Russia and Putin in charge than say, Erdogan allied with ISIS to create a neo-Ottoman Caliphate.

    It has been the policy of Britain and France since arguably the early 1800s, during the Bourbon Restoration, to block Russian control of the Eastern Med in favor of propping up the Turks. That seems continuing, ruinously, long after any sane rationale in favor of the policy.

    There are legitimate grievances with Putin: attempting to restore a mini-Me USSR in the Baltics, Poland, Eastern Europe; unhelpfulness with oil, etc. But the choices are either ISIS/Erdogan or Putin. And Putin is the best choice of the only two.

    Simple as that.

    A rapid, and total Assad Victory is the best chance at reducing SYRIAN refugees, by ENDING THE WAR. People in Syria are fleeing WAR, not Assad or ISIS. And as an aside, there is only ASSAD OR ISIS. That is who is fighting. The “Free Syrian Army” is just the Al-Qaeda branch of ISIS, the people who don’t post videos of beheadings and setting on fire (rest assured they do it, they are as sadistically oriented as the rest of their compatriots). Assad is pretty awful, too. But he is far less awful than ISIS or the other jihadis fighting him. Ordinary secular democratic Muslims don’t fight against Assad. The only ten that existed all left for Europe two years ago.

    ENDING THE WAR RAPIDLY is the best way to reduce the Syrian, as opposed to Afghan, Pakistani, Egyptian, Libyan, Chadian, Nigerian, etc. refugees. People used to know this stuff, before they got obsessed with keeping wars going to produce shuttle diplomacy. And posture and be “important.”

    • Replies:
  86. There’s a lot of debate on alt-right sites about whether Putin is good or bad. But to Soros and his kind, what matters is that he’s outside their control. Even if he expressed approved opinions on matters that concern them, there would be no guarantee that he’d continue to do so. He seems motivated by what he perceives as being good for his own country, and that’s what they hate.

  87. “What is legitimate about a government which has never held an election?”

    What is necessarily legitimate about a government that has?

    “Why accept Russia meddling in Syria?”

    Why should Russia accept America meddling in Afghanistan?

    “Their military has no business being there.”

    The US military has no business being almost anywhere where it now is.

    “Assad has aligned his “legitimate government” with Iran.”

    The U.S. has aligned with Saudi Arabia, a country that sponsors and promotes Wahabiist Islam
    throughout the world, including in America. Including in american prisons.

    “Iran has killed American soldiers, thru proxies and likely directly.”

    America has killed Iranian civilians:

    Flight 655

    To say nothing of the many Iranians killed and tortured by the CIA-trained-and-supported SAVAK during the Shah’s regime.

  88. This is nothing short of hilarious and it needs to be compared to the Establishment Forced Meme that “Fighting ISIS is playing into their hands, it’s exactly what ISIS wants, those brilliant bastards!” Compare Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau koanning that if we kill our enemies, they win.
    You can have politicians who dig the pre-Hemingway and Henry Miller boastfully educated English, and you can have unconvincing monosyllabic hayseed act, but both of those types have an old-fashioned concern with being understood by at least part of the constituency.
    Today’s politicians have no constituency.
    They have wealthy patrons to whom they are as loyal and solicitious as any House Medici liveried attendant.
    But they regard the public with undisguised contempt like never before, as does the mainstream media.
    Look at the German politicians and media dealing with the rapefugees with arm’s-length theorizing (to defend oneself from surrounding? That makes no sense, even in theory; German politicians generally have doctorates; therefore they must not have given it any thought), unapologetic Government Censorship of any story negative towards refugees, and recently, the German prosecutor struggling to correct simple media lying out of whole cloth about about how the Taharrush, an understood and widely demonstrated phenomenon, only involved three refugees. Apparently the rest were white Germans who inexplicably woke up thinking they were Egyptians.
    They hate us. They hate us and they want us to die violently. More and more of us are aware of their simple murderous hate for our racist breathing.
    Trump can avert the coming civil war. This establishment is out of ideas.

  89. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Another angle on refugees and Syria.

    What’s the second largest force behind the Lebanese Hezbollah fighting for the Syrian government side and taking casualities accordingly? Apparently it’s Afghan Shite militias, many from the ethnic Hazara minority (who likely descend from one of Ghengis Khan’s armies). Many of these Afghans were apparently refugees in Iran.

    “Iran ‘foreign legion’ leans on Afghan Shia in Syria war: Some 20,000 Afghan Shia fighters said to be fighting alongside Iran to help save government of Syrian President Assad.”, Aljazeera, Hashmatallah Moslih, 22 Jan 2016:

    “…Iran is recruiting Afghan Shia fighters in their tens of thousands to step up the Islamic Republic’s efforts in the Syrian war, offering them salaries to join the fight to save the government of President Bashar al-Assad. …

    …there are some 20,000 fighters in the Fatemiyon division, which is made up of both naturalised Afghans who lived in Iran and those who have travelled from Afghanistan. …

    …said… “…most of its fighters are already trained in Afghanistan and those that have no training get trained in Afghanistan, and enter into Syria through Iraq or Lebanon.” …

    …the FSA estimates that there are at least 2,000 Shia Afghan fighters currently in active battles in Syria, with most engaged in the city of Aleppo. …

    ..some Afghans find it lucrative to be sent to Syria to fight and make good amount of money – between $500 to $1000…

    …The creation of an Afghan Shia division in the Iranian Revolutionary Guards structure is not new, and dates back to the Iran-Iraq war during the 1980s…”

    “Syria’s Other Foreign Fighters: Iran’s Afghan and Pakistani Mercenaries”, The National Interest, Ari Heistein and James West, November 20, 2015:

    “…The liwa’ fatimiyun (Fatimiyun Brigade) is composed exclusively of Afghans and fights under the auspices of Hezbollah Afghanistan. According to an Iranian news source, the number of Afghans fighting for the Assad regime is between 10,000 and 20,000…

    …There is no doubt that Afghans have paid a heavy price in the fighting, as 700 Afghans are thought to have been killed in action around Aleppo and Deraa alone…”

    …“Some are coerced to fight, others promised residency papers for their family, and a small salary. It demonstrates Iran’s exploitation of Afghan Shiite refugees.” …”

    “Iran coerces Afghans to fight in Syria, says report”, FRANCE 24 Observers, Leela JACINTO, 2016-01-29:

    “Iran’s powerful Revolutionary Guards has been recruiting Afghans, some by coercion, to fight in militias supporting President Bashar al-Assad’s regime in Syria

    …Home to more than three million Afghan migrants, Iran has a checkered record on its treatment of displaced Afghans…

    …If his cousins took up the offer, Ahmad told FRANCE 24’s Observers, the IRG would pay them 1.5 million toman [around 430 euros or $585] per month and provide six-month residency permits for all their family members. If they stayed on to fight in Syria for more than six months, their families were promised long-term residency permits. …one of the most important factors motivating my relatives’ decision to go to Syria…

    …Iran has not just offered Afghan refugees and migrants incentives to fight in Syria, but several said they were threatened with deportation back to Afghanistan unless they did,” …

    …some of these Afghan men and boys fled Iran for Europe.” …”

    Liwa Fatemiyoun:

    “…also known as the Fatemiyoun Brigade and Fatemiyoun Division, is an Afghan Shia militia formed in 2014 to fight the Syrian opposition… It currently numbers 20,000 strong…”

    …As of June 2015, 700 members of the group are believed to have been killed in combat… mostly being Shiite Afghans from the economically poor Hazaras minority. Some of Fatemiyoun members have been captured by the Islamic Front…”

  90. this is actually something I do not understand. Very few people actually plan to flee from Europe right now. When will this great refugee wave from Europe start? Or will it even start?

  91. What evidence is that? I didn’t hear him mention any evidence.

    Is there anything that Alex Jones does not consider to be a conspriacy?

  92. Pretend fighting the Russians is so much more fun than Arabs because they have all these cool weapons and can actually defend themselves. Whereas fighting Arabs is more like trying to restrain your retarded kid brother during one of his violent outbursts.

  93. Sign ideas for Germany. The gate of Plato’s Academy in Athens is said to have
    borne the inscription, ‘You are not allowed to enter here,
    unless you know geometry.’

  94. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    War, Peace, and Refugees:

    “Afghan refugees in Iran being sent to fight and die for Assad in Syria”, The Guardian, Saeed Kamali Dehghan, 5 November 2015:

    “…Iran is recruiting Afghan refugees to fight in Syria, promising a monthly salary and residence permits in exchange…

    …The Fatemioun military division of Afghan refugees… is now the second largest foreign military contingent fighting in support of Bashar al-Assad, the Syrian president, after the Lebanese militia Hezbollah.

    …Iran is also accepting Afghans below the age of 18 provided they have written permission from their parents, the Guardian has learned. At least one 16-year-old Iran-based Afghan refugee was killed in Syria earlier this autumn …

    …On an autumn morning… some 50 Afghans were queuing at the mosque… to put their name on the list. The requirements are simple: those interested have to prove they are Afghan, and singles or minors must have parental consent. …

    …“Every week, I could see around 10 to 15 young men being brought back for burial in Mashhad….”

    “Syria’s Mercenaries: The Afghans Fighting Assad’s War”, DER SPIEGEL, Christoph Reuter, May 11, 2015:

    “…His war only lasted from one dawn to the next… Syrian city of Aleppo… farmer from Afghanistan, was still cowering on the second floor of the house he was supposed to defend to the death. That, at least, is what his Iranian officer had ordered him to do. …

    How, though, did he get to this war-torn city far away from his village in the mountains of Afghanistan? All he had wanted was an Iranian residence permit, he says… His four magazines had been empty for hours. …

    no ethnic group is represented on all of the regime’s fronts to the degree that the Afghan Hazara are. …most of them don’t come completely of their own free will….

    …Up to 2 million Hazara live in Iran, most of them as illegal immigrants. It is an inexhaustible reservoir of the desperate…

    …”They are racist in Iran. They don’t want us only because we are Afghans. Hardly any of us received refugee papers.” …

    …The other Afghans in his cell also agreed to trade in the rest of their sentences for two months of service in Syria. They were promised a monthly salary of 2 million toman, the equivalent of $700. …

    …there were raids and I was one of 150 illegal immigrants arrested. All of us were Hazara. …promised us money and residence permits if we would voluntarily go to Syria. But they said ‘we’re sending you there no matter what.’ Everybody signed up.”

    …Two rebel commanders who likewise took part in the battle, but on the other side, say that the Afghans were like machines. “They are incredibly tenacious, run faster than we do and keep shooting even after they have been surrounded. But as soon as they lose radio contact with headquarters, they panic.” …”It made absolutely no sense for them to keep fighting. But they didn’t surrender. So we blew up the entire building.” …”

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  95. “That said, Obama had high hopes that the Ukrainian situation would give the U.S. a excuse to put the U.S. Army in Kiev so they could rumble with Putin. Putin didn’t play their game.”

    I never got the sense that Obama was all that keen on a lot of this foreign adventuring. Clearly, a lot of people in his administration are, a lot of people in the military/foreign affairs/intelligence establishment are, and a lot of Democratic party backers are. But Obama doesn’t seem that enthusiastic. It’s one of the few half-way good things I can say about him.

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  96. Great insight. It’s always important to understand the leftist mindset, or else our arguments against it could be ineffectual.

  97. The recent speech at the Munich Security Conference by the Russian Prime Minister is worth reading in its entirety:
    Speech by Dmitry Medvedev at MSC 2016

    ….
    Speaking bluntly, we are rapidly rolling into a period of a new cold war. Russia has been presented as well-nigh the biggest threat to NATO, or to Europe, America and other countries (and Mr Stoltenberg has just demonstrated that). They show frightening films about Russians starting a nuclear war. I am sometimes confused: is this 2016 or 1962?
    ….
    The ongoing migration crisis is rapidly acquiring the features of a humanitarian catastrophe, at least in some parts of Europe. Social problems are growing too, along with mutual intolerance and xenophobia. Not to mention the fact that hundreds and thousands of extremists enter Europe under the guise of being refugees. Other migrants are people of an absolutely different culture who only want to receive monetary benefits without doing anything to earn them. This poses a very real danger to the common economic space. The next targets will be the cultural space and even the European identity. We watch with regret how invaluable mechanisms, which Russia also needs, are being destroyed. I am referring to the actual collapse of the Schengen zone.

    But can we unite in order to stand up against the challenges I mentioned above? Yes, I am confident that we can. Yesterday we witnessed a perfect example in the area of religion. Patriarch Kirill of Moscow and All Russia and Pope of the Catholic Church Francis met in Cuba following hundreds of years when the two churches did not communicate.
    ….
    Ladies and gentlemen,

    The current architecture of European security, which was built on the ruins of World War II, allowed us to avoid global conflicts for more than 70 years. The reason for this was that this architecture was built on principles that were clear to everyone at that time, primarily the undeniable value of human life. We paid a high price for these values. But our shared tragedy forced us to rise above our political and ideological differences in the name of peace. It’s true that this security system has its issues and that it sometimes malfunctions. But do we need one more, third global tragedy to understand that what we need is cooperation rather than confrontation?

    I’d like to quote from John F. Kennedy, who used very simple but the most appropriate words, “Domestic policy can only defeat us; foreign policy can kill us.”

    http://www.voltairenet.org/article190255.html

  98. OT: Scientific America is at it again with an article titled: Race Is a Social Construct, Scientists Argue.

    It’s the usual BS, saying that “race” is too crude a term for genetic research, i.e. yes, there are genetically different population groups but “race” is an icky word. However, to me at least, here’s the money passage of the story:

    “The researchers also acknowledged that there are a few areas where race as a construct might still be useful in scientific research: as a political and social, but not biological, variable.

    “While we argue phasing out racial terminology in the biological sciences, we also acknowledge that using race as a political or social category to study racism, although filled with lots of challenges, remains necessary given our need to understand how structural inequities and discrimination produce health disparities between groups,” Yudell said.”

    Talk about having your cake and eating it too. Basically, you stupid rednecks must purge the terms black, white and Asian from your vocabularies, but we – the great and the good – will still keep those terms around to use to discriminate against you. You got to love these people. O’Brien was a piker compared to these guys.

    Oh, and here’s another choice quote. The scientists are talking about what terms to use to replace black and white. Check this out:

    “So what other variables could be used if the racial concept is thrown out? … distinctions like “African Americans” or “European Americans” might still work as a proxy to suggest where a person’s major ancestry originated.”

    So, pretty much the same thing just under a not-even new label.

    I notice that you can’t comment on the story. Too bad. It’d be fun.

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  99. Lyov Myshkin [AKA "Nicholas White"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    There’s also a tacit admission that millions of Muslims are actually a threat to the European project in there.

    Funny, I thought that’s what evil racists think?

  100. I know of many leftists who honestly believe what International Jew described.

  101. I don’t know if this has been discussed here at Unz.com but it looks like something that’d be of interest to people here:

    Who is twitter-luring refugees to Germany?
    by Andrey Fomin

    This study adds to the preceding. It shows that the current wave of migration to Europe is organized to direct human crowds to Germany.

    http://www.voltairenet.org/article188774.html

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  102. This is the fallacy of a .300 hitter in a slump and betting on him making a comeback ‘because he’s due’. If you were not alive during the hottest of the cold war you don’t get how close it was a couple times. Over issues just like this.

    There are ways for us to fight a proxy war with Russia. We’ve forgotten how and where the ‘red lines’ are. Putin remembers. He handled the Syrian shoot downs masterfully. Yet we blundered through the aftermath and are now pushing a huge ‘war games’ in the region.

    Can’t happen? Wars happen all the time. We keep pushing them. It’s going to heat up and if we wind up fighting openly on the side of ISIS in this you know we’re in the wrong. We’ve been on the wrong side of this from day one. Yet you cannot imagine us making worse mistakes?

  103. Those articles are being hysterical too: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/saudi-arabia-and-turkey-rolling-back-on-rhetoric-to-send-troops-into-syria-a6875156.html

  104. The Western Left is animated by nothing more than hatred of the West. Russia just cluster bombed an entire area of a city in Syria. Nary a peep from liberals but an errant US bomb strikes a hospital and it’s the worst thing ever a war crime!

  105. This is the globalist crowd projecting. Soros, NYT, Merkel et al are just putting their own dirty plans on their closest boogieman. They keep throwing crap at him hoping it will stick.

  106. Are you now willing to call the Iraq War a mistake? How do you feel about Trump doing so?

  107. Forgot the link.

    http://www.scientificamerican.com/article/race-is-a-social-construct-scientists-argue/

  108. The situation is still fluid but one can foresee new de-facto borders in the area. A new Syria, probably a little smaller but still controlled by Assad or the Alawites, including the most important economic parts of the country. As much as the Turks will hate this, a very real Kurdistan is likely to come about. I think the Russians kinda like the idea of having ally on the Turks southern border where if ?Erogan steps out line, they can make life rough for him.

    ISIS may actually get there little country out of this, but it will be governing the who cares zone of the region. All sides are tired fighting and new borders are likely to coalesce. It doesn’t doesn’t mean the hate and fighting won’t continue for the foreseeable future but the conflict may tone to smaller raids and skirmish around the new borders not major offensives.

    If some margin of stability occurs, and if Putin really is a strategic thinker, he can call the Soro’s bluff and loudly & repeatedly proclaim that the refugees can now return Syria to help rebuild the country. Make sure all of Merkels opponents hear it, to put one more nail in her coffin, hey Angela it’s safe for them to go back, why aren’t they?

  109. There are people who *want* WWIII, or at least are willing to risk it to get what they want (which is mastery over Russia, and over tge whole world for that matter) is the point. Whether or not it happens is another story. It might be more likely now, I think, when it’s been long enough since Hiroshima and Nagasaki, there’s no Red Army occupying Western Europe, and the U.S. thinks of itself as the sole superpower.

  110. Like you, one of the few things that I respect about Barack Obama is that I believe that he senses that these foreign wars are Tar Babies. He may vaguely recall a Democratic Administration (LBJ) that had an ambitious domestic agenda (I didn’t like it, but I’ll bet Barack Obama did) wrecked by a foreign war.

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  111. I’m sure Scalia’s death was from natural causes , he was , what? 79 ? But my first thought on hearing about it was along these lines .

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  112. Why would you give any credence to a MSM outlet in the UK but be rightly skeptical of some BS from a US media outlet ? I’m just going to take a wild guess here and say that the only thing the Syrians need from the US and EU to make bread is for us to stop raining bombs on them at the behest of our Jew masters .

  113. says:
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    Just about half of all Syrians lost their homes in the war. Of course, the ones getting bombed and homeless are the Sunnis. It’s the Sunnis who have been fighting hard against his regime.

    Frankly, I don’t think Assad has any problem with blowing up Sunni neighborhoods. If they flee Syria and reside in Turkey or Europe, then that’s one less problem for him and one more problem for the countries which have been trying to destroy him.

    So did Putin engineer the refugee crisis? Of course not, but I’m willing to bet that Assad and his security chiefs don’t have any objections to Sunnis getting out of Syria.

    And prior to these barrel bombs being used, the Saudis, Turks, CIA, et al., were fostering a jihad against the legitimately elected president of a sovereign country.

    Regarding the facile understanding that this is a Sunni v. Shia issue, I’d like to point out that the majority of the SAA are Sunni, as are some of the top SAA commanders (e.g., General Fahd Jassem al-Freij, current Commander-in-Chief of the Army and the Armed Forces, a Sunni).
    The Grand Mufti of Syria, Ahmed Badreddin Hassoun, is an ally of Assad and is a Sunni.

    The only real divide is between the higher consanguinity, higher religious zealotry, and lower intelligence of the jihadist rebels and the less consanguinity, less religious zealotry, and higher intelligence of those who are aligned with Assad.

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  114. I first noticed that Scientific American had jumped the shark about 20 years ago, what with their articles becoming increasingly political and increasingly devoid of critical thinking. I specifically remember from that era an article in praise of Enron and touting the “risk -free economy”—yes, in Scientific American of all places! I stuck it out for another two years or so, but eventually declined to renew my subscription when they became embarrassingly futuristic and psychologically materialistic in the run-up to Y2K. It very much affected me that a magazine I had erstwhile looked upon as the very guardian of truth could be so nakedly, amateurishly, pathetically wrong.

    Live and learn, I guess.

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  115. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"]
    says:
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    Those bastards. They dropped barrel bombs!

    Why, that’s worse than NBC weapons!!!!!!!!!! (was that enough apostrophes?) (Nuclear, Biological and Chemical for those who want to know.)

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  116. says:
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    Yes, but the huge numbers of Chechens, Paki-Brits, Gulfies, et al., fighting in the ranks of the rebels and ISIS doesn’t warrant a long article from Der Speigel, because it’s not news.

  117. says:
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    “…Those articles are being hysterical too: http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/middle-east/saudi-arabia-and-turkey-rolling-back-on-rhetoric-to-send-troops-into-syria-a6875156.html…”

    I’m not sure they are that different in degree. Lots of muckety-mucks have been throwing “WWIII” around, probably to try to get cooler heads to prevail. The bottom of this article doesn’t seem all that different:

    “Saudi Arabia and Turkey rolling back on rhetoric to send troops into Syria: Officials say they will wait to see if a planned ceasefire transpires and for a sign-off from the US-led coalition.”, Independent, Loveday Morris (for real?), 15 February 2016:

    “…said Sunday that Saudi Arabia was “very serious” about sending ground troops into Syria, but will first wait … a pause in hostilities agreed by the United States and Russia transpires…

    …Saudi Foreign Minister… “The timing is not up to us,” he said. …

    …An array of rebel groups backed by the United States, Turkey and Saudi Arabia have been losing ground. …

    …(Saudi Foreign Minister)… “Time is running out,” he said. “We are waiting for the peace process to end. We believe it will fail and when it does the situation will be completely different.”

    …He said Saudi Arabia and Turkey are largely “on the same page”…

    ….according to the state-run Anadolu Agency. “There is no thought of Turkish soldiers entering Syria.”

    That statement jarred with the Saudi diplomat’s comments. He said Saudi officials discussed the possibility of sending troops with Turkish Prime Minister Ahmet Davutoglu, during a recent three-day visit to Saudi Arabia.

    “Turkey isn’t against the ground troops, but they want to say ‘we gave the peace process a chance’,” he said.

    He said a force would only consist of special forces, and the size of it is still being planned.

    Yilmaz confirmed that a decision had been reached for Saudi Arabia to send four F-16 fighter jets to Turkey’s Incirlik air base.

    “The Kingdom’s deployment of aircraft to the Incirlik air base in Turkey is part of this campaign,” …:

    While I’d like to be optimistic that it will all work out roses, it might be a prudent time for many to be checking the ammo…

  118. I spent 10 days in Syria in the 70′s . That was when the old man was in charge . I only interacted with Syrians . From what I saw of them they were a happy and prosperous people who didn’t seem too concerned about Assad’s dictatorship . I’m aware that doesn’t make me an expert on the current situation but I bet that they all long for the old days .

    Check out Syriangirl on Youtube for a different take from the NYT and the UK media .

    At least I’ve been there as well as Saudi , Kuwait , Jordan , Egypt , Abu Dhabi and Dubai , Oman , Persia , Pakistan and Bahrain . I liked the Arabs in their own countries , they were friendly and as hospitable as you could ask . I would like them all to stay there and lead happy and prosperous lives as I would like us to stay the f**k out of their business .

  119. There wasn’t a World War III during the actual Cold War, why would there be one now?

    During the Cold War the US was run by people who were at least moderately sane. Now it’s run by neocons. There is no overlap between neocons and sane people.

  120. I don’t see a problem . The “desperately sick children” are only future breeders . “nits make lice “.

  121. What’s legitimate about our government and it’s rigged elections ?

  122. So if it is just piddling stuff, why send any weapons at all?

  123. Syria has never had any real elections though. An Arab friend of mine once told me that the ballot in Syria would have one check box on it with the word YES next to it. Everyone was required to vote and check that box.

  124. Leftist conservative [AKA "GOD ✓ᵛᵉʳᶦᶠᶦᵉᵈ"]
    says:
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    Who is twitter-luring refugees to Germany?
    by Andrey Fomin
    This study adds to the preceding. It shows that the current wave of migration to Europe is organized to direct human crowds to Germany.

    http://www.voltairenet.org/article188774.html

    fascinating link, and if true, it supports something I have been saying for years–the establishment that controls the govt’s of the West really really want as many immigrants as they can get, and in order to induce people to migrate to the developed nations, the establishment is funding various nonprofits etc to communicate with the third world, undeveloped nations, etc, to tell potential migrants that they are wanted in the West, and that they are welcomed in the West.

    Here is an idea–start a nonprofit devoted to communicating with the undeveloped nations, via Twitter, the internet, etc, to tell them that they are not welcome in the West and that Western citizens will treat them badly, etc. Then ask for donations for regular citizens of the developed nations.

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  125. The ECB and the EU countries are facing a catastrophic debt overhang problem, exacerbated by inadequate demand in the real (non-financial) economy. Their native populations are shrinking and that causes a lot of problems for welfare states that need a viable tax base to survive and pay bills.

    One way that they can address those issues is by inviting new ‘consumers’, with their costs paid via fiat money. Those measures are an indication of the desperation in Frankfurt, Berlin, Paris, Rome and various other Euro centers.

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  126. Scalia was less than one month from his 80th birthday. He was very overweight not healthy looking at all. No surprise that such a man dies in his sleep.

  127. I’m with you on this.

  128. That’s pretty much my impression as well.

  129. Like it or not, barrel bombs are a major reason why there are so many Muslims migrating into Europe. (And if you tell me that the migrants aren’t all Syrian, then the Syrian crisis is what gives the Afghans, Iraqis, Pakistanis, whoever, an excuse to sneak in and claim they’re Syrian, all conveniently without any proof that they are Syrian.)

    So sure, to respond to your trolling, I think that millions of Muslims pouring into Europe is worse than someone using a chemical weapon, so barrel bombs are worse.

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  130. “The only real divide is between the higher consanguinity, higher religious zealotry, and lower intelligence of the jihadist rebels and the less consanguinity, less religious zealotry, and higher intelligence of those who are aligned with Assad.”

    Wait, so are you trying to tell me that Assad WANTS to keep them all in Syria? Or wouldn’t he prefer to bomb out their neighborhoods and have the Turks, CIA, Europeans, etc. etc. deal with them?

  131. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    Oh no. Now we are being told that roofs will rot in the fields if we do not import people to deal with them!

  132. This reminds me of Robert Stack in “Airplane!”

    George Soros: Putin is trying to destroy us by flooding us with Muslims.

    Listener: Then shouldn’t we foil his plot by keeping all the Muslims out?

    George Soros: No… that’s just what he’ll be EXPECTING us to do.

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  133. says:
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    “Yes, but the huge numbers of Chechens, Paki-Brits, Gulfies, et al., fighting in the ranks of the rebels and ISIS doesn’t warrant a long article from Der Speigel, because it’s not news.”

    I don’t follow Der Speigel in particular and I don’t carry water for them, but I don’t think you will have any problems finding long stories that relate to Chechens fighting for ISIS, etc.. Have you looked? Heck, pics of that red-bearded Chechen ISIS field leader were all over the internet for awhile. It’s been a hard story to miss.

    “The Terror Strategist: Secret Files Reveal the Structure of Islamic State”, Der Spiegel, Christoph Reuter, April 18, 2015:

    “…An Iraqi officer planned Islamic State’s takeover in Syria and SPIEGEL has been given exclusive access to his papers. They portray an organization that, while seemingly driven by religious fanaticism, is actually coldly calculating. …

    …SPIEGEL has gained exclusive access to the 31 pages, some consisting of several pages pasted together. …

    …months of research undertaken by SPIEGEL in Syria, as well as other newly discovered records, exclusive to SPIEGEL, show that Haji Bakr’s instructions were carried out meticulously. …

    …When Iraqi national Haji Bakr traveled to Syria as part of a tiny advance party in late 2012, he had a seemingly absurd plan: IS would capture as much territory as possible in Syria. Then, using Syria as a beachhead, it would invade Iraq. …

    …The former colonel in the intelligence service of Saddam Hussein’s air defense force had been secretly pulling the strings at IS for years. …

    …The group recruited followers under the pretense of opening a Dawah office, an Islamic missionary center…

    …Bakr was merely modifying what he had learned in the past: Saddam Hussein’s omnipresent security apparatus, in which no one, not even generals in the intelligence service, could be certain they weren’t being spied on. …He believed that fanatical religious convictions alone were not enough to achieve victory. But he did believe that the faith of others could be exploited. …

    …They decided to gather together all the foreign radicals who had been coming to the region since the summer of 2012. Students from Saudi Arabia, office workers from Tunisia and school dropouts from Europe with no military experience were to form an army with battle-tested Chechens and Uzbeks. It would be located in Syria under Iraqi command.

    …Very few of them were from Iraq. Newcomers received two months of training and were drilled to be unconditionally obedient… fall 2013, IS books listed 2,650 foreign fighters in the Province of Aleppo alone. Tunisians represented a third of the total, followed by Saudi Arabians, Turks, Egyptians and, in smaller numbers, Chechens, Europeans and Indonesians. …

    …But when IS henchmen brutally tortured a well-liked rebel leader and doctor…
    Syrian brigades — both secular and parts of the radical Nusra Front — joined together to do battle with Islamic State. By attacking IS everywhere at the same time, they were able to rob the Islamists of their tactical advantage… within weeks, IS was pushed out of large regions of northern Syria.

    …As the West’s attention is primarily focused on the possibility of terrorist attacks, a different scenario has been underestimated: the approaching intra-Muslim war between Shiites and Sunnis.”

    “Ex-US Intelligence Chief on Islamic State’s Rise: ‘We Were Too Dumb’”, Der Spiegel, Interview Conducted By Matthias Gebauer and Holger Stark, November 29, 2015:

    “…the Islamic State is very hands-on when it comes to parts of the military, but it’s a very flat, networked organization. Inside Syria and Iraq in the Levant area, my belief is that he has a couple of subordinates who are responsible for military operations, logistical, financial, etc.; they represent a combination of Egyptians, Saudis, Chechens or a Dagestanis, Americans and Europeans. …

    …they have actually broken Raqqa down into international zones because of language barriers. They have put interpreters in place in those international zones in order to communicate and get their messages around. For example, the Australians alone have about 200 people.”

    “Interview with an Islamic State Recruiter: ‘Democracy Is For Infidels’”, Interview Conducted by Hasnain Kazim, October 28, 2014:

    “…Abu Sattar recruits fighters for the terrorist militia Islamic State in Turkey. Radical Islamists travel to Turkey from all over the world to join the “holy war” in Iraq or Syria and Abu Sattar examines their motives and the depth of their religious beliefs.

    …Contrary to some reports, he emphasizes that no training takes place on Turkish soil. Men with battlefield experience, such as those who fought in places like Chechnya or Afghanistan, are particularly highly valued.”

    “The Jihad Cult: Why Young Germans Are Answering Call to Holy War”, By SPIEGEL Staff, November 28, 2014:

    “….”Murat K., the German lion, a lion for Allah, who has only thing in mind: to protect and defend the honor of the prophet.”… This is a new approach, with demonstrators chanting slogans, throwing stones and rocking police cars. …

    …David G. was 19 when died in 2014, while fighting for IS somewhere in Syria. He was 16 when he converted to Islam… David was pale, blonde and unable to grow a beard. He looked like an exchange student. …

    …Kreshnik, 20, stands accused of being a member of a foreign terrorist organization, and of preparing to commit a serious and seditious act of violence.

    It is the first trial in Germany against a member of IS. Kreshnik, who once played soccer in a Jewish club in Frankfurt, began to change when he went to a new school and made new friends. They introduced him to Islam…

    …Kreshnik was at the back of the group during his first major battle. To the Arabs and the Chechens, this boy from Europe wasn’t worth much, he later told his sister in a chat. … Kreshnik couldn’t speak Arabic. …

    …And what does he think of the German military’s mission in Afghanistan, the judge asks? How does he feel about journalists being beheaded? Why did he refuse to perform his military service in Germany?

    “I don’t know,” he says, which is something he says often, and shrugs his shoulders. …

    …The court doesn’t believe him…”

    Abu Omar al-Shishani:

    “…”Abu Omar the Chechen”) or Omar al-Shishani, is a Georgian Kist jihadist who currently serves as a commander for the Islamic State in Syria, and a former sergeant in the Georgian Army…

    …a veteran of the 2008 Russo-Georgian War… served in various command positions with Islamist militant groups fighting in the Syrian civil war…

    …As of late 2013, he was the ISIL amir (leader) for northern Syria and was located in and around Aleppo Province. He was also in charge of fighters from Chechnya and elsewhere in the Caucasus… considered “one of the most influential military leaders of the Syrian opposition forces”…

    …grew up in… the Pankisi Gorge was a major transit point for rebels participating in the Second Chechen War, and it was there that Batirashvili reportedly came into contact with the Chechen rebels moving into Russia…

    …a young Batirashvili secretly helped Chechen militants into Russia and sometimes joined them on missions against Russian troops…”

    If you squint just right it almost looks kind of like one big smear of the same war.

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  134. “So the CIA sends some anti-tank rockets to Syrian rebels. You call that warmongering? This is piddling stuff.”

    They wanted to do a lot more. Remember the warmongering regarding Syria in the late summer / fall of 2013? It elicited a massive call and write-in campaign which persuaded a lot of Congressman – even hawks – not to bother supporting military action in Syria.

  135. Well said.

  136. For the latter half of the Cold War, from the mid-sixties to 1989, Russia and China were at odds with one another. They even fought each other in the late sixties over some border dispute. And the Russians wanted to launch a pre-emptive nuclear strike against China in the early 1970s.

    Today, however, Russia and China are rather more chummy, and they both seem to have reasons (well-founded or not) to dislike us. That is, in some ways, a more dangerous situation.

  137. I sleep with a pillow over my head sometimes. It blocks the light and keeps my head warm. I also live in the upper temperate zone, keep the thermostat at 60 and sleep with a loaded .45.

  138. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"]
    says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    So if they had been able to source real bombs from Russia, China, Iran, America they wouldn’t have been so bad?

    I suspect you are not tall enough for this ride.

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  139. Russia has and will continue to have military interests in Syria. Syria allows Russia to have an ally in the Middle East and a friendly port of call to project power throughout the Mediterranean. Russia’s only warm water ports flow into the Mediterranean. Without that they can be boxed in for half the year.

    Syria is pivotal to Russian influence in the Middle East and their national security. Denying that is tantamount to denying we have a national interest in allying ourselves with Egypt.

    One must remember any gain to our security is a loss to Russian security. In the case of Syria we can gain no tangible benefit by the collapse of the state. Russia stands a lot to lose and will gamble more to guard against that loss. The same is true with our incursions into Eastern Europe and the Baltic States.

    Also, as the refugee crisis, the problems of our Saudi “allies” and the metastasis of ISIS demonstrate, we have great interests in a stable secular Middle East. If Russia wants to spend lives and treasure to help secure that vision, then so be it.

    Try to understand the balance of power as a balance and you will better understand how foreign policy should be conducted. Try to comprehend that there are more players than the US in the world and that the US has a limit on its power.

  140. Putin is a tactician, not a strategist. I doubt he sat down and thought, “If I go into Syria, refugees will flood Europe and break it apart.”

    What I think is way more likely is that once he went in to Syria to protect Assad and maintain his power in the region and even expand it, he saw that the increase in refugees had an effect on Europe. If this is the case, you would likely see a bit of change in actions by Russia to increase the effect. That would mean instead of going directly after the rebels, some attacks on civilians would be helpful. Of course you can’t attack citizens without any backlash. So I guess it isnt surprising to see that Russia is in fact doing this exact thing. More recently attacking schools and hospitals. And at the same time, he makes very weak claims that the attacks originate from US and Turkish forces. This is a very good indicator that this is exactly what Putin is doing.

    The main problem with this article is its premise that this is wrong because if it were true, Europe would be best off not allowing the refugees in. This is illogical thinking at best. This neither fixes the problem or stops it from happening. All it does is punish the innocent. In fact, the proper method to stop the acts by Putin is two fold. Remove his benefit of creating the refugees by welcoming them openly. If they are accepted, there is no fear of their destroying the EU. This is a short term solution of course and everyone needs to be aware of that. That is why the second step is even more important. That is to clearly show evidence of what Russia is doing in Syria so that he looses all support in the world. Both steps are necessary, yet Obama seems to hesitate to actually ever put out solid evidence of what Putin is up to. He thinks he can fix it behind closed doors. Three years of failure should show him that this doesnt work.

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  141. What struck me about the article was the dishonesty. Everyone in the room understood what they were doing, yet they did it anyway.

    It was an article for reporters to quote to refute people, well, like us. Someone who doesn’t really understand what the scientists are saying would assume that they were claiming that there are no genetic differences among the various races (population groups) but that’s not at all what the scientists were saying. It’s as though they were speaking in code with the object being to confuse people.

    Look, it’s one thing for scientists to be nerds who have a hard time communicating to regular folk; it’s another to purposely obfuscate the facts to keep their jobs and to stay on the right side the current zeitgeist.

    We truly live in a Soviet-like world, except that even there, everyone knew what the real situation was. Granted, we don’t have the sickening violence, but we also don’t have the comfort of everyone winking at each other to show we all know what’s really going on. Our situation is much closer to final scene in the movie The Invasion of the Body Snatchers (the 70s version).

    I have two kids, and, yet, I’m not scared for the whole system to collapse. Is it better for them to be one of the pod-people or to be Sutherland at the end? Hell no. Bring on the turbulence. I’d rather my kids fight than succumb.

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  142. …Very few of them were from Iraq. Newcomers received two months of training and were drilled to be unconditionally obedient…

    Vibrant Chechnian immigrants. Doing the jobs Iraqis won’t do.

  143. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    “…Remove his benefit of creating the refugees by welcoming them openly. If they are accepted, there is no fear of their destroying the EU. This is a short term solution of course and everyone needs to be aware of that.”

    The problem with this argument is that it treats “the refugees” as a fixed group that can be accepted once and then everything is over. The happy ending. But since the majority of the refugees are not even from Syria, there is no evidence that the number of refugees will ever diminish. Modern history (such as all those boats always trying to reach Australia or the boats from Africa to Italy) suggests otherwise. It’s like saying that in 1985 the US was going to legalize all Mexican illegals and then the problem was over and did not have to be addressed again.

    Instead of solving the problem, this suggestion contributes to a larger problem, a Europe that can’t so No, even when No is necessary and when not saying No is evil.

  144. We truly live in a Soviet-like world, except that even there, everyone knew what the real situation was. Granted, we don’t have the sickening violence, but we also don’t have the comfort of everyone winking at each other to show we all know what’s really going on.

    Well said, sir. That’s the long and the short of it right there.

    The Bolshevik version was the Bloody Soviet; we live in the Unbloody Soviet, but the underlying styles are the same. They had the Gulag Archipelago; we have the Gulag Casino. Here the tyranny is enforced by carpet-bombing us with political correctness and threatening us with the kangaroo-court social ostracism that comes from violating its edicts, rather than the liquidation of whole classes of peoples. Some may say this is progress—we have a kinder, gentler Soviet in hand. I think not.

    Interestingly, it was the KGB and its ancestor organizations who learned most effectively how to navigate through this nonsense. Although they were the official enforcers of Soviet state power, they also were faced with the task of protecting Russia from its very real enemies both foreign and domestic (which meant that they had to live in the real world and couldn’t be “true believers”), and they also acted to surrepticiously curb the excesses of the Soviet state when it threatened to get out of hand. A good KGB officer had to be a master courtier, an expert in tactics, diplomacy, and realpolitik. This is why Vladimir Putin is so good at what he does.

  145. >>What is legitimate about a government which has never held an election?

    Because we know that elections and majority rule in Arab countries certainly bring about peace, prosperity, respect for women and religious and ethnic minorities.

  146. This reminds me of Robert Stack in “Airplane!”

    George Soros: Putin is trying to destroy us by flooding us with Muslims.

    Listener: Then shouldn’t we foil his plot by keeping all the Muslims out?

    George Soros: No… that’s just what he’ll be EXPECTING us to do.

    The same joke appears repeatedly, but very badly done, in Zoolander 2 which I saw last night.

    Two hours of my life I’ll never get back.

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  147. The fact that most Americans can’t see/understand what you’ve pointed out is just mind blowing.

    In my opinion, most folks remember all of one or two words from the international portion of the nightly news, thus they just remember “Putin = bad” and that’s it. Crazy.

  148. The iSteve comments section has attained Zoolander 2 levels of eptitude.

  149. Part one: Love the immigrant, and all will be well!
    Part two: Make Russia the bogeyman!

    Dude, you’re so 2015.

  150. What is the “rule of law” in the West that you speak of? You mean the one that only applies to those who don’t have the cash to buy their way out of the problem? And prosperity? Have you been watching what’s happening to the average income? Sure it’s higher in the US but it’s heading down.

  151. I think the Assad regime would be willing to gas them, if Lavrov hadn’t given them a “no-no.”

  152. says:
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    “…Yes, I know that Russian and American pilots occasionally fought in Korea…

    Nothing occasional about it, as it turns out. For much of the war most of the Mig-15 pilots were Soviet, though as you point out everyone involved went to lengths to pretend it wasn’t so:

    Soviet Air Intervention:

    “…Frustrated by the quality and shortage of Chinese pilots, in April 1951, Stalin took the decision to involve Soviet airforce pilots in the war, flying under the markings of the Chinese People’s Liberation Army Air Force (PLAAF) or North Korean Peoples’ Army Air Force (KPAAF)…”

    64th Fighter Aviation Corps:

    “…On 11 October 1950, Stalin agreed to send Soviet Air Forces Mikoyan-Gurevich MiG-15 fighters to provided air cover for the Chinese Communist People’s Volunteer Army units then moving into North Korea…

    …On 1 November, the Soviet MiG-15s began defensive patrols over the Yalu River.

    …During the Korean War, the corps flew 64,000 sorties and conducted 1,872 air battles. According to the inflated official totals of the corps, 1,250 UN Forces aircraft were shot down, 1,100 by MiGs and 150 by antiaircraft artillery. The corps lost 335 aircraft, killing 120 pilots and 68 antiaircraft gunners.

    …The corps was composed of 26,000 personnel in 1952. On 1 November of the same year, 321 aircraft were in the combat units.

    …The participation of the Soviet Union in the Korean War was kept secret, and pilots were forbidden to approach the front line or fly over the sea.

    …Despite all the secrecy, United Nations pilots were aware of the Soviet presence.”

  153. And if we had stayed out from the beginning Assad would have wiped the floor with the “rebels” in about three months and all the bombing and killing would have ended 3 years ago.

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  154. Yes, Obama took a lot of flak when he went back on his “line in the sand” threat and the Turks staged that false flag gas attack to force him into the war. He was savaged by the papers and all the neocons. Somebody like McCain would have had the CIA show the Turks how to do a proper false flag job.

  155. Are you quite sure?

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  156. He was on a hunting trip. He was an active guy not some wheel-chair bound guy sucking oxygen all day long. I have no information and assume he did die of natural causes but he was in far better shape than most people who die in the middle of the night. Of course, sudden cardiac arrest or ventricular fibrillation can happen to even very young people.

    I don’t think he had an implantable cardo-defibrillator or even a pacemaker so it is strange for a guy with his insurance situation to have a sudden quick death.

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  157. Or they could do like the Japanese and depend on technology and appeal to the people to make a sacrifice to maintain their culture and identity.

  158. Last spring, Assad lost Palmyra to ISIS. Last summer, Assad admitted that his army was effectively out of manpower.

    Come on, do you really think that the Russians are just sitting in planes? They believe in “no boots on the ground” about as strictly as we do. No, the Russian army is demolishing the Sunni rebels in western Syria. Inshallah, they will move into ISIS once all the western rebels are dead.

    And for what it’s worth, Assad unleased ISIS. He let ISIS’ predecessor organizations into Iraq through his country. He opened up his jails and let the jihadis out, so that if the West intervened, then a Salafi state would arise in his place. As such, the West was discouraged from intervening too strongly. And right now, the Russians are eliminating the non-ISIS rebels, and will only move onto ISIS once the rebels Washington likes are dead and gone.

    • Agree: Sean
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  159. not a strategist.

    Get with the program, Putin has an evil plan to disband NATO that he is already executing, that I suppose we in America need to oppose. One of Hannity’s stand ins was plugging that story. I didn’t listen, mostly because if it was real and Putin succeeded, that would be another reason to like the guy.

  160. There wasn’t much fight in the “moderate rebels” until we managed to get Al Qaeda involved and pretended they were the real rebels. Obviously, I wasn’t there on the ground but just like in Libya where Qaddafi was winning until the French and NATO got involved I suspect the Syrian Army would have made short work of the opposition without our involvement. I doubt the Saudi’s would have been involved if they didn’t have our skirts to hide behind.

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  161. “He was on a hunting trip. He was an active guy not some wheel-chair bound guy sucking oxygen all day long. I have no information and assume he did die of natural causes but he was in far better shape than most people who die in the middle of the night.”

    All it takes is one heavy meal.

  162. Do you pay any attention to time lines at all? When did all the shooting start? What does “last spring” have to do with the start of the war? You sound like Hannity still using the fact that Saddam gassed the Kurds (probably really Iranians) in 1988 as justification for attacking Iraq even though the first Gulf war had already ended and we had weapons inspectors in Iraq for years who couldn’t find anything.

    Assad unleashed ISIS? Now that is some good dope. ISIS is the CIA and has been since the beginning. There were maybe 10 “moderate” rebels in the whole war.

    Why should I care who the Russians are killing? Assad was the best option in Syria and we screwed everything up.

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  163. The point is that your claim that Assad would have mopped up the rebels in a few months is exceedingly questionable, given the poor performance of the Syrian army throughout the war. The Russian military is now doing the work.

    “Assad unleashed ISIS? Now that is some good dope. ISIS is the CIA and has been since the beginning.”

    It’s common knowledge that Assad released prisons full of jihadis in 2011. Read “ISIS: Inside the Army of Terror,” by Michael Weiss and Hassan Hassan, “ISIS: The State of Terror,”
    by Jessica Stern and J. M. Berger, etc. etc.

    The idea that the CIA created and ran ISIS is just ridiculous. I know that a lot of people on Unz.com are FSB sockpuppets, but give me a break. Feel free to preach to the choir but don’t waste my time.

    “Why should I care who the Russians are killing? Assad was the best option in Syria and we screwed everything up.”

    If you mean to tell me that Assad is terrible but better than ISIS, al-Nusra, etc., then I will agree. But let’s not be like New Deal Democrats and call Assad “Uncle Joe.” He helped fan the flames of jihadism in Syria to make it a choice between him or jihadis. Again, I’ll agree that Assad isn’t as bad as ISIS, just as I’ll agree that come June 1941, it made sense to help out the Soviets to defeat the Nazis. But just as the Soviets were what helped the Nazis be such a menace (Molotov-Ribbentrop Pact), Assad is what made ISIS what it is.

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  164. Assad turned out to be more vicious than he looked.

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  165. Assad turned out to be more vicious than he looked.

    In the middle east if you have someone like the prime minister of Sweden – that is not going to work. If you want order and stability then Assad is the right man for the job.

  166. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    “The Independent is just a rag owned by Lebedev. “

    Soon to be an ex-rag as it is closing the newspapers in 6 weeks. Print sales down from 400,000 to 28,000 a day.

    It’ll remain as a web site.

  167. You know, it is within the realm of possibility that someone can come to a different geopolitical conclusion than you without that necessarily meaning that they are an FSB sockpuppet. Nice ad hominem, though.

  168. says:
         Show CommentNext New Comment

    I suspect the Syrian Army would have made short work of the opposition without our involvement.

    None of the rebel groups own ammunition or arms manufacturing factories. They’ve been supplied all along by their benefactors. I thought AQ was responsible for 9-11 and that we were at war with them but somehow now we’re in league with them. All rather strange isn’t it?

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  169. Its Assad’s neighbouring Arab states that hate him, and they would never have stayed out. He is threatening them with ISSIS and he’d be a fool not to. Hard times make hard people.

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  170. The idea that the CIA created and ran ISIS is just ridiculous.

    I’ll bite. How is it ridiculous?

    It looks plausible to me. The US has a long-term strategy of allying itself with Sunni Islamic extremism. Our best buddies in the Gulf are hotbeds and global promoters of that ideology. We have used jihadi nutbags repeatedly in pursuit of our middle eastern foreign policy goals. We are using them right now in Syria. None of this is even controversial as far as I can see.

    Furthermore, *somebody* with money and logistical resources is behind ISIS. Are you just claiming that the CIA outsourced handling ISIS to Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and Qatar? Or are you claiming that ISIS has slipped the leash and we are no longer trying to run them?

  171. The war has been back and forth. The rebels fighting Assad have obviously had extensive outside support from the US and its allies. Turkey, right now, is going ape shit because the Russians and Iranians have cut off the main body of the rebels from those supply lines.

    I think Mark’s point is that, absent this US support, Assad would have won long ago. Saying “Assad was losing right before the Russians and Iranians intervened” (which I think is basically true) isn’t really responsive to his argument.

  172. He helped fan the flames of jihadism in Syria to make it a choice between him or jihadis.

    Assad and his father were both as secular as one could be in that area given the circumstances. Maybe you forgot that Assad was one of our allies when we started the Afghanistan war. The idea that he would start something so the people would come running to him when he was already in complete charge of the government is something you would only see in a movie and not in real life.

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  173. Assad’s neighbors are pussies that only got involved because they convinced the US to do so. Without the US they would be too scared of moving on Assad to do anything. They wouldn’t even be arming the rebels and invite an attack by Syria.

  174. Notice after all these years and all these hearings about Benghazi that we still don’t know what was going on there, why were a bunch of guys with CIA connections screwing around in an unnecessary “consulate” in some third world country? All we got was minutia about “standing down”, “‘where were the forces to repel the attack”, and who said what and when.

  175. Exactly. We go back and forth between saying that Sunni Islamic extremists are our best buddies and allies and that they are the spawn of Satan who must be immediately, totally, and violently scrubbed from the face of the Earth.

    Even that isn’t quite right. Somehow we are both at war with EastAsia and allied with EastAsia simultaneously. The neocons are just completely drunk on power and indifferent to even trying to kinda sorta make sense.

  176. But I can never understand why Obama pushed the Afghanistan “surge.” It accomplished nothing and he should have known it would accomplish nothing. Three-quarters of our troops killed in Afghnistan died under Obama. Can he explain what difference their sacrifice made?

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  177. The idea that he would start something so the people would come running to him when he was already in complete charge of the government is something you would only see in a movie and not in real life.

    I think the argument is that once the rebellion started it was in Assad’s interests for the outside world to see it as a choice between Sunni religious fanatics and him. Given the tendency of political movements in the region to be led or eventually taken over by jihadists it was also quite plausible so having ISIS go full chimpout helped Assad push his own narrative. Prior to ISIS success the conflict was portrayed in much of the world media – whether fairly or not – as a majority population rebelling against a privileged minority sect clinging to power.

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  178. Your assessment of the Afghanistan situation is spot-on. My own interpretation is that Obama knows that Afghanistan is hopeless and that the Taliban will be back within one month after the U.S. withdraws. He doesn’t want that to happen on his watch. Moreover, if I recall correctly from the 2008 campaign, the Iraq war was the bad war, while the Afghan War was the good war–it gave Democrats the rhetorical ability to be agains the Taliban et al, but to oppose the Iraq war. Since it was the good war, they don’t want to lose it, although that’s clearly what’s going to happen–the only issue is when. The casualties in Afghanistan, to Obama’s way of thinking are regrettable, but acceptable losses.

  179. Yeah, except none of what you said makes sense. Why does Assad care what the outside world think? But suppose he did. Why would anybody weaken themselves by using their own resources to create a significant opposition force? You might blow up a hospital or behead a journalist or two in some false flag operation but you don’t fund an entire opposition army.

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  180. I guess my “Pernicious Putin” muddied the water here. No, I didn’t intend this as comment about Putin at all. I was just trying to explain leftist thinking.

    I should have said “Dr. Evil”!

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  181. From that article:

    race is understood to be a useful tool to elucidate human genetic diversity, but on the other hand, race is also understood to be a poorly defined marker of that diversity

    Wuh??

  182. Why does Assad care what the outside world think?

    When Obama announced his red line Assad was all over every TV network in the West and beyond arguing his case. Obviously he thought public opinion, particularly in countries that were threatening to bomb him, was important.

    Why would anybody weaken themselves by using their own resources to create a significant opposition force? You might blow up a hospital or behead a journalist or two in some false flag operation but you don’t fund an entire opposition army.

    There’s a difference between releasing some ISIS fighters and letting them loose in parts of the country that aren’t vital to his survival and creating “an entire opposition army” that could expect to defeat him.

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  183. I wished for a delete button about 10 minutes after posting, heh. A little tone-deaf there!

  184. When Obama announced his red line Assad was all over every TV network in the West and beyond arguing his case. Obviously he thought public opinion, particularly in countries that were threatening to bomb him, was important.

    You are mixing up the context here. Why does Assad care if the world thinks he is a bad guy is different than appealing to the world that the US is planning an illegal attack (based on a false flag operation) on a sovereign state who has not threatened the US.

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  185. You are mixing up the context here. Why does Assad care if the world thinks he is a bad guy is different than appealing to the world that the US is planning an illegal attack (based on a false flag operation) on a sovereign state who has not threatened the US.

    It was you that asked the question about Assad and world opinion. That I answered it in a way you could not respond is not my concern. “Illegal attack” and “false flag” stuff and whether a country is a threat to the US are all irrelevant to the discussion at hand . Maybe you are too emotionally invested in Arab Muslim affairs to discuss the region rationally?

    Personally speaking I don’t give a stuff who comes out on top in Syria. I’d prefer the Christians to be safe but I’m not going to lose sleep about them. All I care about is whether or not we north Europeans – generously including the New World diaspora despite suspicions of Mongrelism – are now being manipulated by Asiatic Russians, like we have previously been manipulated by Asiatic Jews, Asiatic Muslims, and other less honest races into siding with them in their local concerns.

  186. says:
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    “…Assad was one of our allies when we started the Afghanistan war. …”

    It’s easy to forget that Syria was one of the members of the Coalition on our side who fought the first Gulf War (Desert Storm):

    Gulf War:

    “…Baker traveled to Syria to discuss its role in the crisis with its President Hafez Assad. Assad had a deep personal enmity towards Saddam, which was defined by the fact that “Saddam had been trying to kill him [Assad] for years”. Harboring this animosity and being impressed with Baker’s diplomatic initiative to visit Damascus (relations had been severed since the 1983 bombing of U.S. Marine barracks in Beirut), Assad agreed to pledge up to 100,000 Syrian troops to the coalition effort. This was a vital step in ensuring Arab states were represented in the coalition.

    Coalition of the Gulf War

  187. says:
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    Checkered history. It appears the Syrians were the 6th largest force participating in the US led Desert Shield and Desert Storm:

    Syrian Armed Forces:

    “…the dispatch of the 9th Armoured Division to Saudi Arabia in 1990–91, ahead of the Gulf War against Iraq. The 9th Armoured Division served as the Arab Joint Forces Command North reserve and saw little action…

    …Syria’s force numbered ~20,000 in strength (the 6th largest contingent) and their involvement was justified domestically as an effort to defend Saudi Arabia. Syria’s initial involvement in Operation Desert Shield also rolled into the Allied Operation Desert Storm as Syrian forces did participate in helping dislodge and drive Iraqi forces out of Kuwait City. Total losses sustained were 2 dead and 1 wounded. There were indications the Syrian government had been prepared to double its force to 40,000…”

    “AFTER THE WAR; Syria Plans to Double Gulf Force”, JUDITH MILLER, The New York Times, March 27, 1991:

    “…Syria is planning to double its 20,000-member military contingent in the gulf as part of efforts by Arab nations opposing Iraq…

    …Syrian troops entered Kuwait and helped drive Iraqi occupiers from Kuwait City… …two… killed… by mines in Kuwait…

    …many people… were opposed to… the decision to side with the Americans against President Saddam Hussein of Iraq. …

    …Many Syrians… were stunned by what they saw as Mr. Assad’s decision to back a new and unlikely set of allies. …

    …Syrians, like many Arabs, were stunned by the swift and decisive victory by the allied coaliton over Iraqi forces. …

    …many of the Syrian public’s concerns about the country’s stance have abated…

    …”They’re not exactly feeling smug,” one diplomat said. “But at least the anxiety has mostly evaporated.” …”

    I see it’s all very clear.

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