The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 iSteve BlogTeasers
The President's Deepest Emotions on Africa vs. Europe
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
Africa over Europe, with Libya as the plug

Africa over Europe, with Libya as the plug: you can’t fight gravity!

As you’ll recall, the 2011 destruction of the internationally recognized Libyan government by United States airpower in effect pulled the plug that had been bottling up 1.1 billion Africans from draining into Europe. Col. Gaddafi had contracted with Italian PM Silvio Berlusconi to limit transit through Libya of sub-Saharan Africans. But the murder-by-sodomy of Col. Kaffafee by roving bands backed by the U.S. military removed that impediment to the current mass migration.

With a demographic inundation of Europe by Muslims, Africans, and Muslim Africans looming (absent clear-eyed pro-European leadership), it’s worth listening to what a key international player — the President of the United States — has told us in his own words about his deepest feelings regarding Europe and Africa.

Thus, this passage from Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance by Barack Obama may be of historical rather than just literary interest:

I FLEW OUT OF HEATHROW Airport under stormy skies. A group of young British men dressed in ill-fitting blazers filled the back of the plane, and one of them–a pale, gangly youth, still troubled with acne-took the seat beside me. He read over the emergency instructions twice with great concentration, and once we were airborne, he turned to ask where I was headed. I told him I was traveling to Nairobi to visit my family.

“Nairobi’s a beautiful place, I hear. Wouldn’t mind stopping off there one of these days. Going to Johannesburg, I am.” He explained that as part of a degree program in geology, the British government had arranged for him and his classmates to work with South African mining companies for a year. “Seems like they have a shortage of trained people there, so if we’re lucky they’ll take us on for a permanent spot. Best chance we have for a decent wage, I reckon–unless you’re willing to freeze out on some bleeding North Sea oil rig. Not for me, thank you.” I mentioned that if given the chance, a lot of black South Africans might be interested in getting such training.

“Well, I’d imagine you’re right about that,” he said. “Don’t much agree with the race policy there. A shame, that.” He thought for a moment. “But then the rest of Africa’s falling apart now, isn’t it? Least from what I can tell. The blacks in South Africa aren’t starving to death like they do in some of these Godforsaken countries. Don’t envy them, mind you, but compared to some poor bugger in Ethiopia–”

A stewardess came down the aisle with headphones for rent, and the young man pulled out his wallet. “’Course, I try and stay out of politics, you know. Figure it’s none of my business. Same thing back home–everybody on the dole, the old men in Parliament talking the same old rubbish. Best thing to do is mind your own little corner of the world, that’s what I say.” He found the outlet for the headphones and slipped them over his ears.

“Wake me up when they bring the food, will you,” he said before reclining his seat for a nap.

I pulled out a book from my carry-on bag and tried to read. It was a portrait of several African countries written by a Western journalist who’d spent a decade in Africa; an old Africa hand, he would be called, someone who apparently prided himself on the balanced assessment. The book’s first few chapters discussed the history of colonialism at some length: the manipulation of tribal hatreds and the caprice of colonial boundaries, the displacements, the detentions, the indignities large and small. The early heroism of independence figures like Kenyatta and Nkrumah was duly noted, their later drift toward despotism attributed at least in part to various Cold War machinations.

But by the book’s third chapter, images from the present had begun to outstrip the past. Famine, disease, the coups and countercoups led by illiterate young men wielding AK-47s like shepherd sticks–if Africa had a history, the writer seemed to say, the scale of current suffering had rendered such history meaningless.

Poor buggers. Godforsaken countries.

I set the book down, feeling a familiar anger flush through me, an anger all the more maddening for its lack of a clear target. Beside me the young Brit was snoring softly now, his glasses askew on his fin-shaped nose. Was I angry at him? I wondered. Was it his fault that, for all my education, all the theories in my possession, I had had no ready answers to the questions he’d posed? How much could I blame him for wanting to better his lot? Maybe I was just angry because of his easy familiarity with me, his assumption that I, as an American, even a black American, might naturally share in his dim view of Africa; an assumption that in his world at least marked a progress of sorts, but that for me only underscored my own uneasy status: a Westerner not entirely at home in the West, an African on his way to a land full of strangers.

I’d been feeling this way all through my stay in Europe–edgy, defensive, hesitant with strangers. I hadn’t planned it that way. I had thought of the layover there as nothing more than a whimsical detour, an opportunity to visit places I had never been before. For three weeks I had traveled alone, down one side of the continent and up the other, by bus and by train mostly, a guidebook in hand. I took tea by the Thames and watched children chase each other through the chestnut groves of Luxembourg Garden. I crossed the Plaza Mejor at high noon, with its De Chirico shadows and sparrows swirling across cobalt skies; and watched night fall over the Palatine, waiting for the first stars to appear, listening to the wind and its whispers of mortality.

And by the end of the first week or so, I realized that I’d made a mistake. It wasn’t that Europe wasn’t beautiful; everything was just as I’d imagined it. It just wasn’t mine. I felt as if I were living out someone else’s romance; the incompleteness of my own history stood between me and the sites I saw like a hard pane of glass. I began to suspect that my European stop was just one more means of delay, one more attempt to avoid coming to terms with the Old Man. Stripped of language, stripped of work and routine–stripped even of the racial obsessions to which I’d become so accustomed and which I had taken (perversely) as a sign of my own maturation–I had been forced to look inside myself and had found only a great emptiness there.

Would this trip to Kenya finally fill that emptiness?

Has anyone ever asked the President if the main result of his Libya policy, the current Camp of the Saints in the Mediterranean, strikes him as a bug … or as a feature?

 
    []
  1. You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    First time I've actually read an excerpt from the book, despite Steve posting from it several times in the past. I'm surprised by how good the writing is. Wasn't it ghostwritten by Bill Ayers though?
    , @Clyde
    You really think teleprompter Obama has (had) it in him to write a 404 page book? Bill Ayers wrote 70-100% of Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. Proven to my satisfaction by Jack Cashill who spent a few years decoding the true authorship. He had the book digitized to aid him in word and phrase searches and finding correspondences with Ayer's own books.
    , @Clifford Brown
    The CIA always gets the best ghost writers. Say what you will about Yalies, but they are a literary bunch.

    I am partial to The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one
     
    .

    Now wait just a second… are you putting him in the same class as Theodore Roosevelt? Or Thomas Jefferson? They weren't ghosted, either. Some folks think Lincoln could write, as well. It's been decades since I read Reagan's book-length essay on abortion (and I may be confusing some of it with Ron Paul's similar tome), but I remember being impressed with it.
    , @5371
    You're kidding, right? It's flatulent self-regarding drivel. And his attempt to render the Brit's conversation would be embarrassing from a fourteen year old.
    , @Dave M.
    There is no way Obama wrote that. Read anything he wrote before either of "his" books were written and you can tell that is someone else's prose. He is a lie and a fraud. On a side note, when I first visited Europe, I did not feel I belonged either and that in no way surprised me. I am an American and grew up in the U.S., why would I feel at home in Europe - especially France?
    , @Pat Casey
    Good to regard Hugh Kenner's maxim: we are always blind to the styles of our time. Who knows what the future will say, but I suspect past generations would read that passage and above all note a deceptive ability to accidentally dramatize self-delusion. How could someone so aware of their emotions be so unaware of their assumptions? Is he serious? That's a main reason DeQuincy's Confessions of an Opium Eater is so well done---he wrote striking realism because he could write above his emotions about his self-delusion. He always knew what his assumptions were, and states upfront that the book was only worth writing because his abiding interest was philosophy. The fundamental point about Obama's writing is that the clarity of his prose actually obfuscates the direction of his thought.
    , @Marat
    Just not buying that he wrote all of it. Some? Sure. Creative direction? Sure. Possibly even final edit? Sure. But do you really think Obama wouldn't want his vanity project to turn out as polished as his midnight blue suits?
    , @J1234

    .... one of the best writer-presidents America has had....
     
    You forgot to factor in the black activist magnifier effect. Obama is being relatively honest in these passages about (among other things) his resentment towards whites for being, well...just white. Finding emotional honesty and thoughtful introspection among black activist authors is kind of like finding a Rolls Royce in a used car lot in Cleveland ; it seems a lot more extraordinary than it would had you discovered it in the places where it's usually found. You wouldn't bat an eye if saw it driving around Beverly Hills. Hence, the magnifier.
    , @flyingtiger
    You should thank Bill Ayers for this sea yarn.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/the-presidents-deepest-emotions-on-african-vs-europe/#comment-1110192
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. Busby says:

    Politics aside, Bill Ayers is a good writer.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Priss Factor
    "Politics aside, Bill Ayers is a good writer."

    Style strikes me as Huey Newton rewritten by Mister Rogers.

    https://screen.yahoo.com/mr-robinsons-neighborhood-000000373.html
  3. Has anyone ever asked the President if that result were a bug — or a feature — of his policy?

    If asked, would you expect him to tell the truth?

    Read More
    • Replies: @duderino
    The thing with Obama is that I never know whether his words are related to his thoughts or are an artistic creation of what he wants us to think he thinks. Thinking back to his 08 comments about being a Rorschach test, the guy knows that there's a purposeful gap between his public image and self identity.

    I tend to believe the stories of him being a college Marxist. (You didn't build that!) I would think he'd rather redistribute money to Africa than relocate them, but who knows? Unless he's changed, I can't see him believing chaos in Africa is inevitable without white leadership. From a Marxist worldview, there must be some oppression keeping them down.
  4. Brits don’t actually speak the way Obama records here. It’s a fair attempt, granted, but the idioms are lifted from movies and TV shows and probably a generation out of date (assuming the incident is set in the 1980s). (Hopefully your British readers can back me up on this.)

    I suspect the geological student on the plane comes from the same place as the racist girlfriend – Obama’s fertile imagination.

    Thanks, Steve, for reading Obama’s book so the rest of us don’t have to.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    Those were my thoughts also after reading that excerpt. There's no way that Obama had that conversation with a British man. I doubt this is even a composite, like the girlfriend allegedly was, I'm thinking it's made up out of whole cloth.
    , @AshTon
    The "pale, gangly youth" talks like a middle-aged Graham Greene character from the 1950s. For a taste of this absurdity, American readers can imagine listening to a modern teen speaking like a hardboiled Sam Spade in perfect sentences.
    , @e
    Agreed--I don't believe much of what he says or what he has written or what he has professed to have written.
    , @Bill Jones
    I agree, As an Englishmen- and they are the only "Brits" qualified to comment, the language struck me as false. Perhaps his racist girlfriend is shacked up with his uncle who liberated Auschwitz.
    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/44/2008/05/obamas-uncle-and-the-liberatio.html
    , @Anonymous
    Funny, I inferred as much myself while reading. Like most things involving Obama, truth takes a back seat to the narrative.
    , @jimmyriddle
    There's good chance the kid was a graduate of the Royal School of Mines - part of Imperial College. And that dialogue seems reasonably like an RSM oik from the '80s.
  5. wren says:

    So Europe is an empty vacuum waiting for nature to fill it up with z-bamas?

    And even Brad Pitt is too late?

    Read More
  6. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:
    @Busby
    Politics aside, Bill Ayers is a good writer.

    “Politics aside, Bill Ayers is a good writer.”

    Style strikes me as Huey Newton rewritten by Mister Rogers.

    https://screen.yahoo.com/mr-robinsons-neighborhood-000000373.html

    Read More
  7. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    First time I’ve actually read an excerpt from the book, despite Steve posting from it several times in the past. I’m surprised by how good the writing is. Wasn’t it ghostwritten by Bill Ayers though?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitri Helios
    Umm, no. It would seem like that, if you were limited to reading Breitbart and American Thinker. There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be "joking" when he made the "claim."
  8. Pat Casey says:

    I once read a story, which may have only been a story, about The French Academy, founded for the establishment of French literature, which at one point had passed over for patronage Moliere, but later erected a special statue of him in its central plaza, and the statue bore the inscription: “Nothing is wanting to his glory; but he is wanting to ours.” Of course the emblematic thing about that statue is that you don’t know if the inscription was a joke or not, because we’re talking about the French.

    Thinking of that somehow makes me sad to see France the way it is today, humbled by a would-be Muslim terrorist on a train, beholden to three Americans heroes, and suffering under an avalanche of foreigners. I don’t see the French too haughty today, and I find myself wanting to see the French be proudly French.

    I wish there was something more discriminating than the pendulum.

    Read More
  9. @Anonymous
    First time I've actually read an excerpt from the book, despite Steve posting from it several times in the past. I'm surprised by how good the writing is. Wasn't it ghostwritten by Bill Ayers though?

    Umm, no. It would seem like that, if you were limited to reading Breitbart and American Thinker. There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be “joking” when he made the “claim.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be “joking” when he made the “claim.”"

    Yeah, because it's normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it's really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend's/colleague's book.

  10. Barnard says:
    @Richard of Melbourne
    Brits don't actually speak the way Obama records here. It's a fair attempt, granted, but the idioms are lifted from movies and TV shows and probably a generation out of date (assuming the incident is set in the 1980s). (Hopefully your British readers can back me up on this.)

    I suspect the geological student on the plane comes from the same place as the racist girlfriend - Obama's fertile imagination.

    Thanks, Steve, for reading Obama's book so the rest of us don't have to.

    Those were my thoughts also after reading that excerpt. There’s no way that Obama had that conversation with a British man. I doubt this is even a composite, like the girlfriend allegedly was, I’m thinking it’s made up out of whole cloth.

    Read More
  11. AshTon says:
    @Richard of Melbourne
    Brits don't actually speak the way Obama records here. It's a fair attempt, granted, but the idioms are lifted from movies and TV shows and probably a generation out of date (assuming the incident is set in the 1980s). (Hopefully your British readers can back me up on this.)

    I suspect the geological student on the plane comes from the same place as the racist girlfriend - Obama's fertile imagination.

    Thanks, Steve, for reading Obama's book so the rest of us don't have to.

    The “pale, gangly youth” talks like a middle-aged Graham Greene character from the 1950s. For a taste of this absurdity, American readers can imagine listening to a modern teen speaking like a hardboiled Sam Spade in perfect sentences.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I read a bunch of Graham Greene novels in the 1970s. He was big. He was a leftist Catholic. Obama was working for some kind of quasi-Catholic leftist organization in Chicago, so people like Father Pfleger were likely big on Greene.

    You don't hear much about him anymore the way you hear about Orwell and Waugh, but he was quite good. I read the first 50 pages of Greene's "The Power and the Glory" in 2004 and was impressed. (I didn't finish

    , @Steve Sailer
    I read a bunch of Graham Greene novels in the 1970s. He was big. He was a leftist Catholic. Obama was working for some kind of quasi-Catholic leftist organization in Chicago, so people like, say, Father Pfleger were likely big on Greene, although Greene hardly needed a personal introduction: he was big in the papers in the 1980s as a friend of Castro and the like.

    You don't hear much about Greene anymore the way you hear about Orwell and Waugh, but he was quite good. I read the first 50 pages of Greene's "The Power and the Glory" in 2004 and was impressed. (I didn't finish it, but that was my fault not Greene's.)

  12. Clyde says:
    @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    You really think teleprompter Obama has (had) it in him to write a 404 page book? Bill Ayers wrote 70-100% of Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. Proven to my satisfaction by Jack Cashill who spent a few years decoding the true authorship. He had the book digitized to aid him in word and phrase searches and finding correspondences with Ayer’s own books.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    He could have bought the Kindle version for $9.99 and saved himself a couple of years.
  13. Danindc says:

    Chance that Obama had that run in with pimple faced British teen?? I’d say 14% tops.

    Read More
  14. Can anybody speculate as to the real reason behind the Libya war?

    Read More
    • Replies: @cipher
    JW123,

    A middle east in total disarray prevents the formation of an alliance of states hostile to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the other little gulf sheikdoms along the Arabian coast.

    Not to mention the fact that chaos offers opportunities for profit and consolidation of power.
    , @Dennis Dale
    Hillary wanted to wage a successful war to campaign on. Like W supposedly told someone, you can't be remembered as a great president without winning a war. She saw the chance to get it done ahead of time. Why Obama assented to it is the question I have.
    , @Anonymous
    I don't know, but it's probably the same reason the Carter administration sided with the Ayatollahs against the Shah.
    , @AnAnon
    To destabilize the region. Same reason we went into Iraq, same reason we demanded Egypt be turned over to the muslim brotherhood, same reason we want Assad gone.
    , @Anonymous
    There was a book published recently called "Toppling Qaddafi" by Christopher Chivvis of the Rand Institute, which is non-partisan and is one of the premier foreign policy and national security think tanks and has close ties to the military.

    From a review:

    https://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/a-c6d6-Book-review-Toppling-Qaddafi-Libya-And-The-Limits-Of-Liberal-Intervention-by-Christopher-Chivvis

    Chivvis reiterates the official justification for war — that Gadaffi was engaged in a deadly crackdown on peaceful demonstrators calling for “democracy.”

    Interestingly, he is unable to introduce any new or convincing evidence, instead relying on various reports that appeared in the mainstream press at the time and which have since been comprehensively discredited, some examples being “evidence of systematic rape by regime militias” and the prevalence of “mercenaries from Africa and eastern Europe.”

    As for the real reasons for going to war, little is said of the West’s enduring distrust of Gadaffi. In spite of eight years of rapprochement and somewhat improved relations, the US remained decidedly uneasy about Libya’s resource nationalism, its increasing orientation towards China and Russia and its efforts towards African political, economic and military integration.

    However, Chivvis suggests that one motive for intervention was that, were the uprising to fail, it “could reverse a democratic surge expected to be in the US interest in the long haul.” In other words, the West had every expectation of being able to turn the Arab spring to its own advantage.

    Meanwhile the barbaric bombing campaign, going far beyond what was authorised by UN security council resolution 1970, “was no doubt intended to demonstrate US capabilities to other regional powers such as Iran and Syria.”

    Chivvis details the close tactical collaboration between the rebels and Nato, without which the overthrow of the Gadaffi government would not have been possible. “The thuwwar (rebels) could never have won by themselves. Without Nato’s intervention, their uprising would most likely have been snuffed out by Qaddafi’s assault on Benghazi,” he states. He admits too that there was direct military assistance on the ground, something strenuously denied at the time, with special forces “fighting alongside [the rebels] as they took Tripoli and tracked down Qaddafi afterward.”

    The sordid details, including a description of Nato’s involvement in the capture and murder of a sovereign nation’s head of state, reads an awful lot more like a war of regime change than the imposition of a no-fly zone.

    Was it all worth it? Most Libyans would answer in the negative, given that their country is now on the verge of a full-scale civil war. But as far as Chivvis is concerned the war has been a success.

    Libya, he asserts, should remain an “antidote” to the sense of helplessness and cynicism about US power setting in after the deeply trying experiences of Iraq and Afghanistan and this is a “good thing.”

    Thus Libya is a boon for Nato in the geostrategic context of the Project For A New American Century, the US’s desperate attempt to maintain its hegemony and prevent the emergence of a multipolar world order.

    This is a strategy of “divide and ruin” — violating national sovereignty, creating civil wars and removing states that refuse to play ball, all in the interests of creating an unstable global political environment that only the Western powers have the military weight to control.
     
    , @Jack D
    Must be the Joos.
    , @Bill B.
    Bernard-Henri Lévy. Samantha Power.

    Sarkozy, a key figure, was egged on by the absurd charlatan BHL.

    BHL has Intello long hair and habitually lets us admire his 'sexy' chest hair.

    The New Yorker‘s Jon Lee Anderson asked him why Libya:

    “Why? I don’t know!” he said. “Of course, it was human rights, for a massacre to be prevented, and blah blah blah—but I also wanted them to see a Jew defending the liberators against a dictatorship, to show fraternity. I wanted the Muslims to see that a Frenchman—a Westerner and a Jew—could be on their side.”

    The Irish comedienne Samantha Power jumped on the R2P bandwagon to boost her career and wrote a crap, empty book about it Problem from Hell that sold well. She persuaded Obama to go all in.

    (R2P was described by its proponents like former Oz foreign minister Gareth Evans as a genius new concept to rival the Treaty of Westphalia but was really just a badge that progressives and neocon types could pin on before doing whatever they felt like.)
  15. cipher says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Can anybody speculate as to the real reason behind the Libya war?

    JW123,

    A middle east in total disarray prevents the formation of an alliance of states hostile to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the other little gulf sheikdoms along the Arabian coast.

    Not to mention the fact that chaos offers opportunities for profit and consolidation of power.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    A middle east in total disarray prevents the formation of an alliance of states hostile to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the other little gulf sheikdoms

    More importantly, the destruction of strong, independent states eliminates possible challenges to Israel from a conventional military and sophisticated weaponry (including biological) and a source of funds and weaponry to non-state actors.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    If you go back 30 years ago, when the Middle East was in much less disarray, no such alliance formed then either. I don't think it explains current policy.
  16. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Am I alone in reading the (admittedly vivid) part re: crossing the Spanish plaza then flashing back to Roy Batty’s death speech from Blade Runner? Now I see why sentimental souls can’t get enough of this guy’s image

    Read More
  17. Adar. says:

    The poor American negro surely found a lot of money to bum around Europe for an extended period. Far better than what I ever did in my life.

    Read More
  18. Dennis Dale says: • Website

    Isn’t that bit about European civilization and how it “wasn’t mine” lifted from Baldwin? I’ve read the Obama book and I’ve never read any Baldwin, but I remember an excerpt of his I saw somewhere that says much the same thing only Baldwin, despite his inherent bitterness (I imagine as a gay black man born long before the sexual revolution he actually understood what it means to be alienated from one’s surroundings, but I digress), makes peace with it, whereas O, ever mindful to craft the image of himself bearing his alienation like a cross, almost disdains it. This despite the fact he’s half white! It could be his, but he rejects it to later rhapsodize about grandma’s hut in Kenya and the barbershop back in Chicago (though he never managed to spend much time in either, I notice). What a dick. What a profound…dick.

    And how does Obama’s obsession with blood inheritance square with the left’s environmental blank-slatism and race as social construct tenets? Raised in a white culture and enjoying all its benefits, it seems to me all he has to hang his selected identity on are his African features. Did they ever hamper him beyond the profound indignity of someone asking to touch his hair once?

    Read More
    • Replies: @silviosilver

    This despite the fact he’s half white! It could be his, but he rejects it to later rhapsodize about grandma’s hut in Kenya and the barbershop back in Chicago (though he never managed to spend much time in either, I notice). What a dick. What a profound…dick.
     
    It 'could' be his, but that is far easier said than done. Race is a chasm that few manage to cross, so I don't blame him for falling short - or being unwilling to try. I like neither Obama himself nor his race, but in this I find him faultless. Not at all a dick.
    , @Pericles
    Has anyone here ever touched or asked to touch a black man or woman's hair, or seen or heard anyone of their acquaintance do the same? I haven't.
  19. Adar. says:

    “Politics aside, Bill Ayers is a good writer.”

    “Style strikes me as Huey Newton rewritten by Mister Rogers.”

    Has anyone ever done a literary forensics of these black militants from the 1960 era to see how much of their stuff was ghost written for them?

    Cleaver, Jackson, Newton. Etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Former Darfur
    Has anyone ever done a literary forensics of these black militants from the 1960 era to see how much of their stuff was ghost written for them?

    Wow, what a great question.

    I vaguely remember a few vague attempts having been made at a little of that but I don't think there is any readily available comprehensive analysis.

    I remember reading "Pimp" by Iceberg Slim and thinking, really, is this a 170 IQ black man as the author claims who has mastered pimping to later realize how horrible it is and having turned away from it? Perhaps, perhaps not.

    A good counter-reference or "sanity check" as engineer Robert Pease would have said, is a contemporaneous Holloway House title I read as a kid, and still have, called "Honolulu Madam", allegedly the autobiography of a former Hawaii prostitute and madam named "Iolana Mitsuko" (Holloway House being the publisher of the Iceberg Slim oeuvre). It is basically-upon a rereading now, by my fiftysomething self- a racial exposition on the situation of native and Japanese people in 1940s-1950s Hawaii interspersed with stilted sex scenes almost certainly written by a man trying (and not terribly well succeeding) to write as a woman. It does not have the ring of being written by someone with "Mitsuko's" alleged educational background. It would be interesting to have a forensic analyst compare and contrast it to Beck's writing and also to see if there was any such real person in Hawaii by the name of "Iolana Mitsuko". It claims to be an autobiography, and does not state that the author's name or any others in the book are pseudonyms, which would be understandable but I would think should be stated clearly.

    Certainly, we know that most material allegedly written by Martin Luther King was either heavily plagiarized or heavily redacted, edited, and reworked by King's handlers. Whether this is also true of a few, most, or all of the black militant writers of the 1950s and 1960s is something I have no idea of, not having heavily read their work. As the OP says it bears some study.

    I do know, however, that most white militant/white nationalist/white 'supremacist' writings are in fact written by their alleged authors, and in most cases I can pretty well spot whether something was written, say, by Revilo Oliver (key giveaway is the vocabulary and use of British English spellings in many cases), by William Pierce, by Kevin Strom, or by George Lincoln Rockwell. I can generally also identify writings by "Kurt Saxon" (pseudonym of survivalist writer who intersected with both Pierce's National Alliance and Anton LaVey's Church of Satan), by Eric Thomson (National Socialist and inventor of the term "ZOG"), by Harold Covington und so weiter. All are (highly) idiosyncratic writers with a certain vocabulary and style.

    Also in previous jobs, I had to read a lot of work reports and statements written by, primarily, underclass or working-underclass black employees and again generally certain elements stand out, even on those where spelling, punctuation and general idiomatic style do not transgress normal usage.

    A pretty good guess is that here is an enormously productive field but one which is a certain quagmire of career quicksand for anyone who approaches it, so that it is left alone not because no one suspects something is not right here but rather because people versed in the art know full well that it is indeed not right and that it is career cyanide to get involved with it.
  20. Dennis Dale says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Can anybody speculate as to the real reason behind the Libya war?

    Hillary wanted to wage a successful war to campaign on. Like W supposedly told someone, you can’t be remembered as a great president without winning a war. She saw the chance to get it done ahead of time. Why Obama assented to it is the question I have.

    Read More
    • Replies: @DCThrowback
    I disagree.

    1.) COL Kathafee was going to take gold only for his oil payments, not petrodollars. Bankster elites don't like competition for their fiat currency. (http://bit.ly/1EGEOa6)

    2.) COL Gaddafi beat down muslim extremists. The current admin and the deep state both believe muslim extremists to be useful cudgels against other countries in the region, not radicals who should be crushed by those who favor law and order in their own countries.

    3.) COL Qadaffy stopped illegal inflitraitors from flooding Europe. The US Deep State now sees an advantage to those same people infiltrating Europe.

    4.) COL Quathafee didn't want his country being used as a way point for the CIA to arm Al-Qaeda in its fight against Syria so Qatar can build an LNG pipeline through Syria. The Saudis also want a friendly puppet installed to spite the Iranians and the Qataris. He was removed, and the arms flowed freely. The same forces we armed are the same ones we are now technically fighting. Which makes us, in theory, aligned with the Syrians. Which we definitely are not, since we support the Saudis. And the Qataris. Even though they fund the radicals. Whom we are fighting. Phew.

    , @Busby
    I remember this quote being attributed to Billy Jeff.
  21. […] Sailer posts an extended quotation from The Organizer that, more than anything I’ve heard the latter say or […]

    Read More
  22. Wilkey says:

    “Has anyone ever asked the President if the main result of his Libya policy, the current Camp of the Saints in the Mediterranean, strikes him as a bug…or as a feature?”

    If you have to ask then you already know the answer.

    We are living at a decision point that is every bit as consequential, if not more so, as any in the last century. Western culture has voted for hedonism, self-righteousness, and for demographic and cultural suicide – the result of an ideology in which so many are brainwashed that is every bit as fanatical as communism, nazism, or the worst religion.

    Read More
    • Replies: @rod1963
    Nice summation of what has happened in the West.
  23. @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    The CIA always gets the best ghost writers. Say what you will about Yalies, but they are a literary bunch.

    I am partial to The Personal Memoirs of Ulysses S. Grant.

    Read More
  24. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Can anybody speculate as to the real reason behind the Libya war?

    I don’t know, but it’s probably the same reason the Carter administration sided with the Ayatollahs against the Shah.

    Read More
  25. matt says:

    Obviously, we should have elected John McCain in 2008. For McCain, you see, having no particular emotional or ancestral ties to the African continent, would therefore never have bombed Libya. Not in a million years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    There's a difference between a theoretical McCain administration's war designs & what it could actually pull off during a Reid-Pelosi Congress. Another obstacle would be the anti-war "movement"/media fad, a supposed force of nature that evaporated once the polished Benneton boy was in charge. Consistently the whiteliberal synthetic romance with Blackus Aurelius has not only shielded generic R2P nitwits of the Susan Power/Sam Rice stripe, it's also created or saved the jobs of saboteurs like Victoria Nuland. Though it looked doubtful for a moment Obama truly has reclaimed U.S. foreign policy for the messianic-imperialist team.

    If you're trying to extoll the diplomatic prudence of Democrat leadership in general, spin while you can: it'll be harder not to laugh once Obama's Libya architect is in the White House again, bombing aspirin factories for a source of "Meet the Press" talking points.
  26. Dr. Doom says:

    Muammar Qaddafi, like anyone else who has paid attention lately was worried about the US Dollar. Uncle Sham has been generous to a san andreas size fault and never pays any of his debt back. This is only possible because the US Dollar is the World Reserve Currency which other countries use to trade with each other since most countries use different money. Qaddafi was no friend to America obviously, but since giving up that whole terrorism thing after Reagan bombed his house with F-111s, he was making big bucks shipping oil to Europe. However, he was tired of the inflation wiping out part of his fortune in US Dollars, and wanted to switch Africa to the Gold Dinar. OMG! Qaddafi was a libertarian who wanted hard currency! Shortly after he introduced that plan, suddenly everyone noticed after 25 years he was a ruthless dictator and the US and NATO Air Forces started bombing his troops who were fighting rebels led by Al Queda. Was it a coincidence? Was Jack the Ripper actually Nessie a sixty foot sea serpent from Scotland? We may never know the answers to these questions…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    Didn't our old friend Saddam make some noise about a gold dinar as well?
    , @Anonymous
    Bullshit or not - you decide!
  27. @Dennis Dale
    Hillary wanted to wage a successful war to campaign on. Like W supposedly told someone, you can't be remembered as a great president without winning a war. She saw the chance to get it done ahead of time. Why Obama assented to it is the question I have.

    I disagree.

    1.) COL Kathafee was going to take gold only for his oil payments, not petrodollars. Bankster elites don’t like competition for their fiat currency. (http://bit.ly/1EGEOa6)

    2.) COL Gaddafi beat down muslim extremists. The current admin and the deep state both believe muslim extremists to be useful cudgels against other countries in the region, not radicals who should be crushed by those who favor law and order in their own countries.

    3.) COL Qadaffy stopped illegal inflitraitors from flooding Europe. The US Deep State now sees an advantage to those same people infiltrating Europe.

    4.) COL Quathafee didn’t want his country being used as a way point for the CIA to arm Al-Qaeda in its fight against Syria so Qatar can build an LNG pipeline through Syria. The Saudis also want a friendly puppet installed to spite the Iranians and the Qataris. He was removed, and the arms flowed freely. The same forces we armed are the same ones we are now technically fighting. Which makes us, in theory, aligned with the Syrians. Which we definitely are not, since we support the Saudis. And the Qataris. Even though they fund the radicals. Whom we are fighting. Phew.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    5.) Lockerbie. The whole thing is a mess. Some combination of Libya didn't do it, Libya had to pay off or buy western officials to get out of sanctions, etc. The COL turned out to be too much of a loose cannon, surprise, surprise. His son Saif got bottled up in some tiny town as well.
    , @rod1963
    Europe also wanted Qadaffi's $60 billion in frozen assets and his oil. They got his assets which promptly vanished, as for the oil no one gets it now.

    In short the Libyan war was a looting expedition by the elites that blew up in their faces. Now they get to choke on the bill.
  28. Trelane says:

    There’s no idelogy here, don’t give the guy more credit than he’s due. If we could closely examine his brain cell flickering to and fro (take ‘fro’ for example) like a firefly below the moon one night, over a vast radiant beach, like a child is like a flower, it’s head just floating in the breeze…

    There’s nothing there, move along nothing to see here.

    Read More
  29. AnAnon says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Can anybody speculate as to the real reason behind the Libya war?

    To destabilize the region. Same reason we went into Iraq, same reason we demanded Egypt be turned over to the muslim brotherhood, same reason we want Assad gone.

    Read More
  30. mts-1 says:

    Lift your left hand, palm facing you, then make the middle finger sign, keeping your thumb along your index finger and not crossing over it. Now look at upside down Africa. The heel of the thumb is the Arab Peninsula, the thumbnail Somalia, etc. I wonder why I never caught that one before. Maybe because I don’t see Africa turned upside down on a regular basis.

    Read More
  31. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The wikipedia claims that Libya is in the middle of a war:

    “Libyan Civil War (2014–present): The Second Libyan Civil War is an ongoing conflict between four rival organizations seeking to control Libya…”

    I guess there’s no reason for this one to make the news.

    August, 2015, has not been uneventful:

    “…On August 14, Anonymous multiple airstrikes were conducted on Sirte after the massacre committed by ISIL. The air assault lasted for half an hour targeting multiple areas in Sirte including the town’s internal security complex, the Ouagadougou Conference centre, part of the university campus and the Mahari hotel…”

    It does make you wonder. Just who is launching anonymous airstrikes? Is the NYT on the case? I wasn’t the anonymous who did it!

    Read More
  32. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Can anybody speculate as to the real reason behind the Libya war?

    There was a book published recently called “Toppling Qaddafi” by Christopher Chivvis of the Rand Institute, which is non-partisan and is one of the premier foreign policy and national security think tanks and has close ties to the military.

    From a review:

    https://www.morningstaronline.co.uk/a-c6d6-Book-review-Toppling-Qaddafi-Libya-And-The-Limits-Of-Liberal-Intervention-by-Christopher-Chivvis

    Chivvis reiterates the official justification for war — that Gadaffi was engaged in a deadly crackdown on peaceful demonstrators calling for “democracy.”

    Interestingly, he is unable to introduce any new or convincing evidence, instead relying on various reports that appeared in the mainstream press at the time and which have since been comprehensively discredited, some examples being “evidence of systematic rape by regime militias” and the prevalence of “mercenaries from Africa and eastern Europe.”

    As for the real reasons for going to war, little is said of the West’s enduring distrust of Gadaffi. In spite of eight years of rapprochement and somewhat improved relations, the US remained decidedly uneasy about Libya’s resource nationalism, its increasing orientation towards China and Russia and its efforts towards African political, economic and military integration.

    However, Chivvis suggests that one motive for intervention was that, were the uprising to fail, it “could reverse a democratic surge expected to be in the US interest in the long haul.” In other words, the West had every expectation of being able to turn the Arab spring to its own advantage.

    Meanwhile the barbaric bombing campaign, going far beyond what was authorised by UN security council resolution 1970, “was no doubt intended to demonstrate US capabilities to other regional powers such as Iran and Syria.”

    Chivvis details the close tactical collaboration between the rebels and Nato, without which the overthrow of the Gadaffi government would not have been possible. “The thuwwar (rebels) could never have won by themselves. Without Nato’s intervention, their uprising would most likely have been snuffed out by Qaddafi’s assault on Benghazi,” he states. He admits too that there was direct military assistance on the ground, something strenuously denied at the time, with special forces “fighting alongside [the rebels] as they took Tripoli and tracked down Qaddafi afterward.”

    The sordid details, including a description of Nato’s involvement in the capture and murder of a sovereign nation’s head of state, reads an awful lot more like a war of regime change than the imposition of a no-fly zone.

    Was it all worth it? Most Libyans would answer in the negative, given that their country is now on the verge of a full-scale civil war. But as far as Chivvis is concerned the war has been a success.

    Libya, he asserts, should remain an “antidote” to the sense of helplessness and cynicism about US power setting in after the deeply trying experiences of Iraq and Afghanistan and this is a “good thing.”

    Thus Libya is a boon for Nato in the geostrategic context of the Project For A New American Century, the US’s desperate attempt to maintain its hegemony and prevent the emergence of a multipolar world order.

    This is a strategy of “divide and ruin” — violating national sovereignty, creating civil wars and removing states that refuse to play ball, all in the interests of creating an unstable global political environment that only the Western powers have the military weight to control.

    Read More
  33. Lugash says:
    @DCThrowback
    I disagree.

    1.) COL Kathafee was going to take gold only for his oil payments, not petrodollars. Bankster elites don't like competition for their fiat currency. (http://bit.ly/1EGEOa6)

    2.) COL Gaddafi beat down muslim extremists. The current admin and the deep state both believe muslim extremists to be useful cudgels against other countries in the region, not radicals who should be crushed by those who favor law and order in their own countries.

    3.) COL Qadaffy stopped illegal inflitraitors from flooding Europe. The US Deep State now sees an advantage to those same people infiltrating Europe.

    4.) COL Quathafee didn't want his country being used as a way point for the CIA to arm Al-Qaeda in its fight against Syria so Qatar can build an LNG pipeline through Syria. The Saudis also want a friendly puppet installed to spite the Iranians and the Qataris. He was removed, and the arms flowed freely. The same forces we armed are the same ones we are now technically fighting. Which makes us, in theory, aligned with the Syrians. Which we definitely are not, since we support the Saudis. And the Qataris. Even though they fund the radicals. Whom we are fighting. Phew.

    5.) Lockerbie. The whole thing is a mess. Some combination of Libya didn’t do it, Libya had to pay off or buy western officials to get out of sanctions, etc. The COL turned out to be too much of a loose cannon, surprise, surprise. His son Saif got bottled up in some tiny town as well.

    Read More
  34. Hacienda says:

    Well written. A piece of history. White men don’t talk to black men that way anymore.

    Read More
  35. rod1963 says:
    @Wilkey
    "Has anyone ever asked the President if the main result of his Libya policy, the current Camp of the Saints in the Mediterranean, strikes him as a bug…or as a feature?"

    If you have to ask then you already know the answer.

    We are living at a decision point that is every bit as consequential, if not more so, as any in the last century. Western culture has voted for hedonism, self-righteousness, and for demographic and cultural suicide - the result of an ideology in which so many are brainwashed that is every bit as fanatical as communism, nazism, or the worst religion.

    Nice summation of what has happened in the West.

    Read More
  36. rod1963 says:
    @DCThrowback
    I disagree.

    1.) COL Kathafee was going to take gold only for his oil payments, not petrodollars. Bankster elites don't like competition for their fiat currency. (http://bit.ly/1EGEOa6)

    2.) COL Gaddafi beat down muslim extremists. The current admin and the deep state both believe muslim extremists to be useful cudgels against other countries in the region, not radicals who should be crushed by those who favor law and order in their own countries.

    3.) COL Qadaffy stopped illegal inflitraitors from flooding Europe. The US Deep State now sees an advantage to those same people infiltrating Europe.

    4.) COL Quathafee didn't want his country being used as a way point for the CIA to arm Al-Qaeda in its fight against Syria so Qatar can build an LNG pipeline through Syria. The Saudis also want a friendly puppet installed to spite the Iranians and the Qataris. He was removed, and the arms flowed freely. The same forces we armed are the same ones we are now technically fighting. Which makes us, in theory, aligned with the Syrians. Which we definitely are not, since we support the Saudis. And the Qataris. Even though they fund the radicals. Whom we are fighting. Phew.

    Europe also wanted Qadaffi’s $60 billion in frozen assets and his oil. They got his assets which promptly vanished, as for the oil no one gets it now.

    In short the Libyan war was a looting expedition by the elites that blew up in their faces. Now they get to choke on the bill.

    Read More
  37. duderino says:
    @flyover hick
    Has anyone ever asked the President if that result were a bug — or a feature — of his policy?

    If asked, would you expect him to tell the truth?

    The thing with Obama is that I never know whether his words are related to his thoughts or are an artistic creation of what he wants us to think he thinks. Thinking back to his 08 comments about being a Rorschach test, the guy knows that there’s a purposeful gap between his public image and self identity.

    I tend to believe the stories of him being a college Marxist. (You didn’t build that!) I would think he’d rather redistribute money to Africa than relocate them, but who knows? Unless he’s changed, I can’t see him believing chaos in Africa is inevitable without white leadership. From a Marxist worldview, there must be some oppression keeping them down.

    Read More
  38. slumber_j says:

    The “Plaza Mejor”: where and what is that? And mustn’t he mean swallows instead of “sparrows”? The embarrassingly mistaken specificity reminds me of some of the authorial shortcomings of David Foster Wallace.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    There is a typo in the book or Steve's excerpt. He means Plaza Mayor, or "Old Square" in Madrid.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plaza_Mayor,_Madrid

    It is a very rushed itinerary. He visited France, England, Germany and Spain over only three weeks. That requires a big budget and an odd willingness to spend a large part of the time in trains and buses and not much time to enjoy himself.

    Who goes to Paris and after three days says "Been there done that, time to take an expensive 15 hour train ride to Madrid"?
  39. The Englishman on the plane prattling on to Obama about the glories of Apartheid South Africa sounds like an obvious straw man. Not that I am complaining.

    Read More
  40. dk says:

    OT:

    From the Guardian:

    Burning Man founder: ‘Black folks don’t like to camp as much as white folks’

    Larry Harvey discusses lack of racial diversity and the allegation that Silicon Valley bosses in luxury camps are destroying the festival’s egalitarian ethos

    http://www.theguardian.com/culture/2015/sep/04/burning-man-founder-larry-harvey-race-diversity-silicon-valley

    Read More
  41. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “Google to fix ‘anti-semitic bug’ which claims that ‘Jews control Hollywood’”

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3222375/Google-fix-anti-semitic-bug-claims-Jews-control-Hollywood.html

    “Google is working to fix an anti-semitic bug which automatically suggests ‘the Jews’ when the internet search engine is asked: ‘Who runs Hollywood?’

    The baffling answer is returned due to Google’s complicated algorithms which return a particular page on what it deems to be the most relevant to a person’s question…”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    Now, if Google is claiming their algorithm is incorrect here, why should we believe the algorithm is correct on any other particular result of a Google search.

    It really calls the whole algorithm into question, doesn't it?

    Unless the algorithm is actually correct....
    , @Anonymous
    This is Sisyphean, right? Goofle used to put a bolded "Special Note" explaining themselves on (potentially) embarrassing results pages; hilariously, the A.I. note would also appear for innocuous searches like "jewish deli" or "jew's harp." If they're going to curb the algorithm from offending anyone, in this golden age of offense, when does it begin eating into the usefulness of the product, i.e. a dynamic web assistant-service efficiently pointing users to information or goods they're genuinely interested in? Once the censorship factor starts hitting you in the face, it changes the way you search, thus weakening or at least distorting the operation of the underlying mechanism from G's revenue point of view.

    OK Google, is Tibet part of China
    OK Google, what did Mohammed look like
    OK Google, how many women have gold-medaled in the decathlon
    etc.
  42. backup says:

    Wow. Unbelievable how that man remembers conversations. Either he must have a photographic memory or this is all edited and therefore semi-fiction.

    Read More
  43. @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one

    .

    Now wait just a second… are you putting him in the same class as Theodore Roosevelt? Or Thomas Jefferson? They weren’t ghosted, either. Some folks think Lincoln could write, as well. It’s been decades since I read Reagan’s book-length essay on abortion (and I may be confusing some of it with Ron Paul’s similar tome), but I remember being impressed with it.

    Read More
  44. e says:
    @Richard of Melbourne
    Brits don't actually speak the way Obama records here. It's a fair attempt, granted, but the idioms are lifted from movies and TV shows and probably a generation out of date (assuming the incident is set in the 1980s). (Hopefully your British readers can back me up on this.)

    I suspect the geological student on the plane comes from the same place as the racist girlfriend - Obama's fertile imagination.

    Thanks, Steve, for reading Obama's book so the rest of us don't have to.

    Agreed–I don’t believe much of what he says or what he has written or what he has professed to have written.

    Read More
  45. 5371 says:
    @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    You’re kidding, right? It’s flatulent self-regarding drivel. And his attempt to render the Brit’s conversation would be embarrassing from a fourteen year old.

    Read More
    • Replies: @silviosilver

    And his attempt to render the Brit’s conversation would be embarrassing from a fourteen year old.
     
    That makes me think Obama actually was the author.
    , @Father O'Hara
    He had a "great emptiness" in him.I guess he tried to get that emptiness filled.Fill it up go the rim so to speak.Overflowing and dripping down the side...OK I'll stop.
    , @Father O'Hara
    I can just see Michelle reading this.Her eyes would roll so hard they'd ache for hours...
  46. Lot says:

    Alert! Ultra-rare poll on immigration without absurdly biased prompts released!

    https://d25d2506sfb94s.cloudfront.net/cumulus_uploads/document/01si63uzmv/tabs_OPI_Border_Fence_20150902.pdf

    Republicans support a Mexico border fence 87 to 8.

    67% of Republicans “strongly support” a Mexico fence, while 1% strongly oppose.

    Read More
  47. Lot says:
    @slumber_j
    The "Plaza Mejor": where and what is that? And mustn't he mean swallows instead of "sparrows"? The embarrassingly mistaken specificity reminds me of some of the authorial shortcomings of David Foster Wallace.

    There is a typo in the book or Steve’s excerpt. He means Plaza Mayor, or “Old Square” in Madrid.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Plaza_Mayor,_Madrid

    It is a very rushed itinerary. He visited France, England, Germany and Spain over only three weeks. That requires a big budget and an odd willingness to spend a large part of the time in trains and buses and not much time to enjoy himself.

    Who goes to Paris and after three days says “Been there done that, time to take an expensive 15 hour train ride to Madrid”?

    Read More
  48. Everyone knows that the (current) people of Europe are completely against mass immigration. The elite politicians and academics are pushing it on them. Whose side are they on?

    I read some pbs.org article saying,

    “The polls are against it. The Hungarians are against it. A lot of the new members from Central Europe are against mandatory quotas. So it’s going to be difficult. But the E.U. commission is working on ideas that perhaps some countries won’t take refugees, but provide money instead for these centers.”

    Maybe if the indigenous people of Europe are overwhelmingly against this destruction of their homeland, the noble leadership shouldn’t be “working on ideas” to make it happen, they should be working on ideas to stop it?

    And it still baffles me that the liberal media academic outlets are putting all the pressure on White Christian areas to accommodate, but are giving nations like Qatar a complete pass. Qatar funded much Syrian upheaval, is filthy rich, and gets a complete pass. The liberal world ignores the aggressive anti-refugee policy and physical borders of all the non-white nations of the world in the Middle East, Asia, and Africa.

    Additionally, it would seem wise for the government to pass this off to regular citizens of Austria and Germany to help, and not guarantee mass assistance and official welcome centers. This is nuts.

    Read More
  49. Dave M. says:
    @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    There is no way Obama wrote that. Read anything he wrote before either of “his” books were written and you can tell that is someone else’s prose. He is a lie and a fraud. On a side note, when I first visited Europe, I did not feel I belonged either and that in no way surprised me. I am an American and grew up in the U.S., why would I feel at home in Europe – especially France?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    David Maraniss's big 2012 biography of Obama has a bunch of his letters to a girlfriend around age 22-23, and they're in roughly the same Creative Writing 302-style as "Dreams from My Father:"

    "Manhattan streets are broad and bumpy; the cool crisp grey of fall glows on the teeming faces of the midtown rush; the drunk slides back and forth on his subway seat under the gaze of the neat older woman knitting her mauve yarn; the pigeons comb the cobblestones on Riverside, white and grey and plump …"

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/global-elites-and-the-first-black-president-maraniss-s-barack-obama-the-official-story-reve

    , @Dmitri Helios
    "There is no way Obama wrote that...he is a lie and a fraud."

    We both know your actual argument is basically: blacks are stupid (low IQ's), so there's no way Obama could've written that. He went to Columbia and Harvard Law School? Oh, just affirmative action, reverse racism...take a deep breath, ok? He's just smarter than you. It's ok.

    , @Priss Factor
    "There is no way Obama wrote that. Read anything he wrote before either of “his” books were written and you can tell that is someone else’s prose"

    No, it totally sounds like him.

    I'm sure someone brushed it up, but editors do that with all books and articles.

    It is him because it sounds so bogus. Zero candor and all calculation, however, one that pretends to be candor.

    DREAMS would have us believe that Obama is sincerely peering into his own psyche and soul, but it's just him peeking into the minds of sucker white readers and playing with their anxieties by pushing the right Goldilockian buttons that sound just a bit angry(thus proving he is no Tom) but sufficiently mainstream(thus non-threatening). It's the empathy of a sociopath. T Obama's credit, he knows the white mind better than white people do.

    It's classic Oprah's Book of the Month material.

    PS. Though Obama certainly wrote the book, that account on the plane is suspect. It sounds too much like a 'teachable moment'.
  50. Pat Casey says:
    @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    Good to regard Hugh Kenner’s maxim: we are always blind to the styles of our time. Who knows what the future will say, but I suspect past generations would read that passage and above all note a deceptive ability to accidentally dramatize self-delusion. How could someone so aware of their emotions be so unaware of their assumptions? Is he serious? That’s a main reason DeQuincy’s Confessions of an Opium Eater is so well done—he wrote striking realism because he could write above his emotions about his self-delusion. He always knew what his assumptions were, and states upfront that the book was only worth writing because his abiding interest was philosophy. The fundamental point about Obama’s writing is that the clarity of his prose actually obfuscates the direction of his thought.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dmitri Helios
    I happen to agree with you. The beauty of the prose often has little to do with clarity of thought. Anybody who's read Allen Ginsberg can attest to that.
  51. @Adar.
    “Politics aside, Bill Ayers is a good writer.”

    "Style strikes me as Huey Newton rewritten by Mister Rogers."


    Has anyone ever done a literary forensics of these black militants from the 1960 era to see how much of their stuff was ghost written for them?

    Cleaver, Jackson, Newton. Etc.

    Has anyone ever done a literary forensics of these black militants from the 1960 era to see how much of their stuff was ghost written for them?

    Wow, what a great question.

    I vaguely remember a few vague attempts having been made at a little of that but I don’t think there is any readily available comprehensive analysis.

    I remember reading “Pimp” by Iceberg Slim and thinking, really, is this a 170 IQ black man as the author claims who has mastered pimping to later realize how horrible it is and having turned away from it? Perhaps, perhaps not.

    A good counter-reference or “sanity check” as engineer Robert Pease would have said, is a contemporaneous Holloway House title I read as a kid, and still have, called “Honolulu Madam”, allegedly the autobiography of a former Hawaii prostitute and madam named “Iolana Mitsuko” (Holloway House being the publisher of the Iceberg Slim oeuvre). It is basically-upon a rereading now, by my fiftysomething self- a racial exposition on the situation of native and Japanese people in 1940s-1950s Hawaii interspersed with stilted sex scenes almost certainly written by a man trying (and not terribly well succeeding) to write as a woman. It does not have the ring of being written by someone with “Mitsuko’s” alleged educational background. It would be interesting to have a forensic analyst compare and contrast it to Beck’s writing and also to see if there was any such real person in Hawaii by the name of “Iolana Mitsuko”. It claims to be an autobiography, and does not state that the author’s name or any others in the book are pseudonyms, which would be understandable but I would think should be stated clearly.

    Certainly, we know that most material allegedly written by Martin Luther King was either heavily plagiarized or heavily redacted, edited, and reworked by King’s handlers. Whether this is also true of a few, most, or all of the black militant writers of the 1950s and 1960s is something I have no idea of, not having heavily read their work. As the OP says it bears some study.

    I do know, however, that most white militant/white nationalist/white ‘supremacist’ writings are in fact written by their alleged authors, and in most cases I can pretty well spot whether something was written, say, by Revilo Oliver (key giveaway is the vocabulary and use of British English spellings in many cases), by William Pierce, by Kevin Strom, or by George Lincoln Rockwell. I can generally also identify writings by “Kurt Saxon” (pseudonym of survivalist writer who intersected with both Pierce’s National Alliance and Anton LaVey’s Church of Satan), by Eric Thomson (National Socialist and inventor of the term “ZOG”), by Harold Covington und so weiter. All are (highly) idiosyncratic writers with a certain vocabulary and style.

    Also in previous jobs, I had to read a lot of work reports and statements written by, primarily, underclass or working-underclass black employees and again generally certain elements stand out, even on those where spelling, punctuation and general idiomatic style do not transgress normal usage.

    A pretty good guess is that here is an enormously productive field but one which is a certain quagmire of career quicksand for anyone who approaches it, so that it is left alone not because no one suspects something is not right here but rather because people versed in the art know full well that it is indeed not right and that it is career cyanide to get involved with it.

    Read More
  52. @Dave M.
    There is no way Obama wrote that. Read anything he wrote before either of "his" books were written and you can tell that is someone else's prose. He is a lie and a fraud. On a side note, when I first visited Europe, I did not feel I belonged either and that in no way surprised me. I am an American and grew up in the U.S., why would I feel at home in Europe - especially France?

    David Maraniss’s big 2012 biography of Obama has a bunch of his letters to a girlfriend around age 22-23, and they’re in roughly the same Creative Writing 302-style as “Dreams from My Father:”

    “Manhattan streets are broad and bumpy; the cool crisp grey of fall glows on the teeming faces of the midtown rush; the drunk slides back and forth on his subway seat under the gaze of the neat older woman knitting her mauve yarn; the pigeons comb the cobblestones on Riverside, white and grey and plump …”

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/global-elites-and-the-first-black-president-maraniss-s-barack-obama-the-official-story-reve

    Read More
    • Replies: @e
    Yet a guy who writes like this (and who, one must presume and is led to believe, reads a lot) pronounces "corps" as "corpse". He said "the Navy signal corpse", not in just one speech but in two that I know of. The guy is a liar and a fraud.
    , @Anonymous
    I didn't read DFMF, but I thought that his girlfriend in the book (or maybe it was a different girlfriend from the ones the letters were written to) was actually a composite of several girlfriends that he had had. If that's true, then the letters to her might be a composite of actual letters written, as well.
  53. e says:
    @Steve Sailer
    David Maraniss's big 2012 biography of Obama has a bunch of his letters to a girlfriend around age 22-23, and they're in roughly the same Creative Writing 302-style as "Dreams from My Father:"

    "Manhattan streets are broad and bumpy; the cool crisp grey of fall glows on the teeming faces of the midtown rush; the drunk slides back and forth on his subway seat under the gaze of the neat older woman knitting her mauve yarn; the pigeons comb the cobblestones on Riverside, white and grey and plump …"

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/global-elites-and-the-first-black-president-maraniss-s-barack-obama-the-official-story-reve

    Yet a guy who writes like this (and who, one must presume and is led to believe, reads a lot) pronounces “corps” as “corpse”. He said “the Navy signal corpse”, not in just one speech but in two that I know of. The guy is a liar and a fraud.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Kabala
    It used to be a common idea that pronouncing a rare word (and in Obama's decidedly non-military world "corps" is a rare word) confidently but wrongly was actually a sign of being well-read. The speaker had seen the word before, so he did not show any hesitation or stumble at encountering an unfamiliar word, but he had only seen it in books, never heard it spoken aloud, and it turned out his internal pronunciation had been wrong all these years. Whether this makes any sense or is merely a cover story for bad pronouncers is something I am not competent to judge.
  54. @Dave M.
    There is no way Obama wrote that. Read anything he wrote before either of "his" books were written and you can tell that is someone else's prose. He is a lie and a fraud. On a side note, when I first visited Europe, I did not feel I belonged either and that in no way surprised me. I am an American and grew up in the U.S., why would I feel at home in Europe - especially France?

    “There is no way Obama wrote that…he is a lie and a fraud.”

    We both know your actual argument is basically: blacks are stupid (low IQ’s), so there’s no way Obama could’ve written that. He went to Columbia and Harvard Law School? Oh, just affirmative action, reverse racism…take a deep breath, ok? He’s just smarter than you. It’s ok.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TWS
    No the argument is that Obama is a lazy under achieving drug user who smoked his way through high school and never wrote a thing as the editor of the Law Review. Typically the editor writes quite a bit.

    Ayers wrote it. He admitted it after both of them first said that he didn't know Ayers he was just a guy who, 'lived in my neighborhood'. Etc. He is a liar and lazy. That doesn't make anyone else on earth a liar or lazy. Just Obama.
  55. @Pat Casey
    Good to regard Hugh Kenner's maxim: we are always blind to the styles of our time. Who knows what the future will say, but I suspect past generations would read that passage and above all note a deceptive ability to accidentally dramatize self-delusion. How could someone so aware of their emotions be so unaware of their assumptions? Is he serious? That's a main reason DeQuincy's Confessions of an Opium Eater is so well done---he wrote striking realism because he could write above his emotions about his self-delusion. He always knew what his assumptions were, and states upfront that the book was only worth writing because his abiding interest was philosophy. The fundamental point about Obama's writing is that the clarity of his prose actually obfuscates the direction of his thought.

    I happen to agree with you. The beauty of the prose often has little to do with clarity of thought. Anybody who’s read Allen Ginsberg can attest to that.

    Read More
  56. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    If you are troubled by the relative poverty and backwardness of sub-Saharan Africa, pouring sub-Saharan Africans into Europe is a way to ameliorate that in two ways at once. It will make the individual Africans who migrate to Europe richer, and it will make Europe poorer and take it down a peg.

    Similarly, if you are troubled by the continuing inequality of income, wealth, etc. between blacks and whites in the U.S., a half century after the Great Society, one way to tackle that is to bring whites down by making everyone on the bottom half of the economic ladder poorer. The jobs report released Friday offered some encouragement if that’s your goal, as the workforce participation rate is at a 38 year low, with 93 million working-age Americans out of work.

    An added bonus of creating more poor whites is it increases popular support for various welfare programs.

    Read More
    • Agree: Marat, IA
    • Replies: @Massimo Heitor
    @Dave Pinsen, what a horrific mean spirited comment. Sailer and this crowd on a bad day are kinder people than you.
    , @Marat
    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people? Only so much more debt and financialization trickery can go on before TdoodooHTF. (Unless there is a plan for that we don't have an inkling about yet. Maybe that's what TPP etc is for -- exploiting overseas minerals and natural resources to finance the poverty at home in First World sucker countries.)

    It is becoming clearer every day, piece by piece, that people are be offshored from US war zones and Africa in to the First World. What's the next piece of the Strategic Grand Plan. Is this what PoppyBush meant when he spoke of "A New World Order" back in '92?
  57. @Dennis Dale
    Isn't that bit about European civilization and how it "wasn't mine" lifted from Baldwin? I've read the Obama book and I've never read any Baldwin, but I remember an excerpt of his I saw somewhere that says much the same thing only Baldwin, despite his inherent bitterness (I imagine as a gay black man born long before the sexual revolution he actually understood what it means to be alienated from one's surroundings, but I digress), makes peace with it, whereas O, ever mindful to craft the image of himself bearing his alienation like a cross, almost disdains it. This despite the fact he's half white! It could be his, but he rejects it to later rhapsodize about grandma's hut in Kenya and the barbershop back in Chicago (though he never managed to spend much time in either, I notice). What a dick. What a profound...dick.

    And how does Obama's obsession with blood inheritance square with the left's environmental blank-slatism and race as social construct tenets? Raised in a white culture and enjoying all its benefits, it seems to me all he has to hang his selected identity on are his African features. Did they ever hamper him beyond the profound indignity of someone asking to touch his hair once?

    This despite the fact he’s half white! It could be his, but he rejects it to later rhapsodize about grandma’s hut in Kenya and the barbershop back in Chicago (though he never managed to spend much time in either, I notice). What a dick. What a profound…dick.

    It ‘could’ be his, but that is far easier said than done. Race is a chasm that few manage to cross, so I don’t blame him for falling short – or being unwilling to try. I like neither Obama himself nor his race, but in this I find him faultless. Not at all a dick.

    Read More
  58. @5371
    You're kidding, right? It's flatulent self-regarding drivel. And his attempt to render the Brit's conversation would be embarrassing from a fourteen year old.

    And his attempt to render the Brit’s conversation would be embarrassing from a fourteen year old.

    That makes me think Obama actually was the author.

    Read More
  59. @Dave Pinsen
    If you are troubled by the relative poverty and backwardness of sub-Saharan Africa, pouring sub-Saharan Africans into Europe is a way to ameliorate that in two ways at once. It will make the individual Africans who migrate to Europe richer, and it will make Europe poorer and take it down a peg.

    Similarly, if you are troubled by the continuing inequality of income, wealth, etc. between blacks and whites in the U.S., a half century after the Great Society, one way to tackle that is to bring whites down by making everyone on the bottom half of the economic ladder poorer. The jobs report released Friday offered some encouragement if that's your goal, as the workforce participation rate is at a 38 year low, with 93 million working-age Americans out of work.

    An added bonus of creating more poor whites is it increases popular support for various welfare programs.

    , what a horrific mean spirited comment. Sailer and this crowd on a bad day are kinder people than you.

    Read More
  60. In this passage, Obama seems to be angry because his thoughts were starting to wander off into forbidden territory: perhaps, Africans have better living standards in white ruled countries; and perhaps, African rulers are just as (if not more) exploitative and rapacious than European colonialists (Orwell’s Animal Farm is applicable here). But as a black leftist, Obama rejected these troubling thoughts, and he reaffirmed his dogmatic beliefs: Western civilization is somehow responsible for all the Third World’s problems; and the achievements of Western civilization should really be attributed to non-whites because they were exploited and oppressed by the white man.

    Read More
  61. Deduction says:

    Barrack Obama writes descriptions of Brits and the way we talk like an old fashioned minstrel show portrays black Americans….

    Take from that what you will.

    Read More
  62. I’ve gotten the sense that Obama’s not really interested in intervening and fighting wars in the Middle East; it’s just something he has to do as president (someone who believes in non-intervention, like Ron Paul, would not get anywhere near the White House). I think his views on race and the third-world, as presented in his autobiography, really come out in his domestic policies. In other words, he’s only really interested in inviting the third-world to America and declaring war on America’s “racist past”; he doesn’t seem that interested in a neo-conservative/liberal hawkish foreign policy for the Middle East (Sub-Saharan Africa might be a different story, though).

    Read More
  63. @AshTon
    The "pale, gangly youth" talks like a middle-aged Graham Greene character from the 1950s. For a taste of this absurdity, American readers can imagine listening to a modern teen speaking like a hardboiled Sam Spade in perfect sentences.

    I read a bunch of Graham Greene novels in the 1970s. He was big. He was a leftist Catholic. Obama was working for some kind of quasi-Catholic leftist organization in Chicago, so people like Father Pfleger were likely big on Greene.

    You don’t hear much about him anymore the way you hear about Orwell and Waugh, but he was quite good. I read the first 50 pages of Greene’s “The Power and the Glory” in 2004 and was impressed. (I didn’t finish

    Read More
  64. @AshTon
    The "pale, gangly youth" talks like a middle-aged Graham Greene character from the 1950s. For a taste of this absurdity, American readers can imagine listening to a modern teen speaking like a hardboiled Sam Spade in perfect sentences.

    I read a bunch of Graham Greene novels in the 1970s. He was big. He was a leftist Catholic. Obama was working for some kind of quasi-Catholic leftist organization in Chicago, so people like, say, Father Pfleger were likely big on Greene, although Greene hardly needed a personal introduction: he was big in the papers in the 1980s as a friend of Castro and the like.

    You don’t hear much about Greene anymore the way you hear about Orwell and Waugh, but he was quite good. I read the first 50 pages of Greene’s “The Power and the Glory” in 2004 and was impressed. (I didn’t finish it, but that was my fault not Greene’s.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill B.
    “That was my first instinct -- to protect him. It never occurred to me that there was a greater need to protect myself. Innocence always calls mutely for protection when we would be so much wiser to guard ourselves against it: innocence is like a dumb leper who has lost his bell, wandering the world, meaning no harm.”
    ― Graham Greene, The Quiet American


    A cracking novel about people who interfere in other countries with the best of intentions. One of the most satisfying novels I have ever read, even if I don't like Greene's politics. Greene was thrown out of Vietnam because the French thought he was spying for the British. Which he more or less was. The films don't do the book justice.

    , @TWS
    Let's not forget who wrote this. Bill Ayers. Obama couldn't write anything as the editor at the law journal.

    You want to know what Obama's thinking? Go ask his drug using buddies or his golf buddies. Don't read anything he's supposed to have written. He let stand that he was born in Kenya for Christs sake for twenty years. He doesn't write it or read it.
  65. Marat says:
    @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    Just not buying that he wrote all of it. Some? Sure. Creative direction? Sure. Possibly even final edit? Sure. But do you really think Obama wouldn’t want his vanity project to turn out as polished as his midnight blue suits?

    Read More
  66. Marat says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    If you are troubled by the relative poverty and backwardness of sub-Saharan Africa, pouring sub-Saharan Africans into Europe is a way to ameliorate that in two ways at once. It will make the individual Africans who migrate to Europe richer, and it will make Europe poorer and take it down a peg.

    Similarly, if you are troubled by the continuing inequality of income, wealth, etc. between blacks and whites in the U.S., a half century after the Great Society, one way to tackle that is to bring whites down by making everyone on the bottom half of the economic ladder poorer. The jobs report released Friday offered some encouragement if that's your goal, as the workforce participation rate is at a 38 year low, with 93 million working-age Americans out of work.

    An added bonus of creating more poor whites is it increases popular support for various welfare programs.

    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people? Only so much more debt and financialization trickery can go on before TdoodooHTF. (Unless there is a plan for that we don’t have an inkling about yet. Maybe that’s what TPP etc is for — exploiting overseas minerals and natural resources to finance the poverty at home in First World sucker countries.)

    It is becoming clearer every day, piece by piece, that people are be offshored from US war zones and Africa in to the First World. What’s the next piece of the Strategic Grand Plan. Is this what PoppyBush meant when he spoke of “A New World Order” back in ’92?

    Read More
    • Replies: @IA

    What's the next piece of the Strategic Grand Plan?
     
    LGBT to defeat Russia. Biggest threat by far are white orthodox Christians.
    , @TWS
    They're taking homes from Germans now for the criminal invaders. Wait till they start that shit here.
    , @Dave Pinsen

    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people?
     
    Once you've got a de facto one-party state, bought with immigration and generous government benefits, you can reduce costs by throttling back on those government benefits, at least to those not in preferred groups. The reality is you can't have Scandinavian-style social democracy with Central American-style demographics.

    My sister just got back from Bogota, Colombia, where she visited a hospital on business. It was gleaming, modern, and had spaceship doors that opened and closed with a "whoosh", she said. Locals told her it was a private hospital for political and business leaders. There's another tier of quality hospitals just for the police and their families. The lumpenproletariat has a much lower quality of care in the third tier hospitals.
  67. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I am British and have been in Switzerland for a number of years. Switzerland has wages that are DOUBLE those of Germany, France or Austria. But why aren’t the migrants coming here? Because they know if they come here they will be deported. The Swiss have a no-nonsense approach to immigration.

    Legal immigration in Switzerland (mostly from the EU) is very high. “Immigrants” or foreigners make up 30-40 per cent of the Swiss population but it is truly a paradise on earth. You only have to cross the border into France on a weekend to feel the difference.

    Read More
  68. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I don’t care what anyone says, I find his writing style to be irritating and yuk inducing. The plane conversation strikes me as being made up. He’s just one big fake. Then again, most of our leaders are fakes, aren’t they?

    Read More
  69. IA says:
    @Massimo Heitor
    @Dave Pinsen, what a horrific mean spirited comment. Sailer and this crowd on a bad day are kinder people than you.

    Are you parodying Perfect Eloi?

    Read More
  70. Jack D says:
    @Clyde
    You really think teleprompter Obama has (had) it in him to write a 404 page book? Bill Ayers wrote 70-100% of Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. Proven to my satisfaction by Jack Cashill who spent a few years decoding the true authorship. He had the book digitized to aid him in word and phrase searches and finding correspondences with Ayer's own books.

    He could have bought the Kindle version for $9.99 and saved himself a couple of years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Godwin Daily
    I think he meant that the critic blogger ran the Obama text through a Bayesian/brute-force "plagiarism checker" software like Copyspace, except modified with the input constraint to compare Dreams From My Father against given works of Ayers (I'd be surprised if the bulk of his earlier writings have been scanned into digital format, but he's definitely churned out a lot of prose in the electronic era).

    1) I have my doubts about the authority of such artificial-analysis "style similarity" experiments. At current level of sophistication, it's fine for catching an 8th grader who lifts from Wikipedia. However, forensic-level it's decidedly not. I've never seen software that catches known historical ghost-writing, without tampering with the routine anyway. The choice of pattern database colors the process of a computer algorithm's primed comparison, and for the sake of getting usable "matches" bigger is not always better. On the comparatively simpler problem of plagiarism, how precisely does it check? If you fed "I, Claudius" and "The Manchurian Candidate" into a Bayesian evaluation model incorporating some prior "training" how much tinkering & revision is needed before it catches the plagiarized passages (and concepts) in the latter work? Unless the Obama critic has peer-reviewed the digital analysis method with John Searle or Daniel Dennett or the like, I don't think it adds much to his case to claim a piece of pseudo-scientific computer proof.

    2) Obama authored 2 heavily-edited books, and not much else when he had ample chance to do so (if I'm correct about him I find that I identify with the personality type: impressed by the art of writing and possessing a literary bent but rarely connecting internally w/ a need for self-expression; he's somewhat cerebral but not an artist). Thus I don't read a whole lot into the dialogue verisimilitude for the pimply English white guy he clearly dislikes in that well-established passive-aggro manner of his. Barring the discovery of early manuscripts of Dreams From My Father, lol, I'm going to assume the written passage itself was punched up 2 or 3 times by a middle-aged female editor who later became a huge J.K. Rowling fangirl. Obama's "characters" are always kinda secondary and uncompelling anyway, so to a certain extent he's just invented them all.
  71. IA says:
    @Marat
    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people? Only so much more debt and financialization trickery can go on before TdoodooHTF. (Unless there is a plan for that we don't have an inkling about yet. Maybe that's what TPP etc is for -- exploiting overseas minerals and natural resources to finance the poverty at home in First World sucker countries.)

    It is becoming clearer every day, piece by piece, that people are be offshored from US war zones and Africa in to the First World. What's the next piece of the Strategic Grand Plan. Is this what PoppyBush meant when he spoke of "A New World Order" back in '92?

    What’s the next piece of the Strategic Grand Plan?

    LGBT to defeat Russia. Biggest threat by far are white orthodox Christians.

    Read More
  72. Busby says:
    @Dennis Dale
    Hillary wanted to wage a successful war to campaign on. Like W supposedly told someone, you can't be remembered as a great president without winning a war. She saw the chance to get it done ahead of time. Why Obama assented to it is the question I have.

    I remember this quote being attributed to Billy Jeff.

    Read More
  73. anon says: • Disclaimer

    wait, why would a guy who studies geology have the accent of a chav?

    Read More
  74. Hunsdon says:
    @Dr. Doom
    Muammar Qaddafi, like anyone else who has paid attention lately was worried about the US Dollar. Uncle Sham has been generous to a san andreas size fault and never pays any of his debt back. This is only possible because the US Dollar is the World Reserve Currency which other countries use to trade with each other since most countries use different money. Qaddafi was no friend to America obviously, but since giving up that whole terrorism thing after Reagan bombed his house with F-111s, he was making big bucks shipping oil to Europe. However, he was tired of the inflation wiping out part of his fortune in US Dollars, and wanted to switch Africa to the Gold Dinar. OMG! Qaddafi was a libertarian who wanted hard currency! Shortly after he introduced that plan, suddenly everyone noticed after 25 years he was a ruthless dictator and the US and NATO Air Forces started bombing his troops who were fighting rebels led by Al Queda. Was it a coincidence? Was Jack the Ripper actually Nessie a sixty foot sea serpent from Scotland? We may never know the answers to these questions...

    Didn’t our old friend Saddam make some noise about a gold dinar as well?

    Read More
  75. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @cipher
    JW123,

    A middle east in total disarray prevents the formation of an alliance of states hostile to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the other little gulf sheikdoms along the Arabian coast.

    Not to mention the fact that chaos offers opportunities for profit and consolidation of power.

    A middle east in total disarray prevents the formation of an alliance of states hostile to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the other little gulf sheikdoms

    More importantly, the destruction of strong, independent states eliminates possible challenges to Israel from a conventional military and sophisticated weaponry (including biological) and a source of funds and weaponry to non-state actors.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Israel hasn't faced an existential conventional military threat in 42 years. No need to tear Syria apart to prevent that.
  76. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dr. Doom
    Muammar Qaddafi, like anyone else who has paid attention lately was worried about the US Dollar. Uncle Sham has been generous to a san andreas size fault and never pays any of his debt back. This is only possible because the US Dollar is the World Reserve Currency which other countries use to trade with each other since most countries use different money. Qaddafi was no friend to America obviously, but since giving up that whole terrorism thing after Reagan bombed his house with F-111s, he was making big bucks shipping oil to Europe. However, he was tired of the inflation wiping out part of his fortune in US Dollars, and wanted to switch Africa to the Gold Dinar. OMG! Qaddafi was a libertarian who wanted hard currency! Shortly after he introduced that plan, suddenly everyone noticed after 25 years he was a ruthless dictator and the US and NATO Air Forces started bombing his troops who were fighting rebels led by Al Queda. Was it a coincidence? Was Jack the Ripper actually Nessie a sixty foot sea serpent from Scotland? We may never know the answers to these questions...

    Bullshit or not – you decide!

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Bullshit or not – you decide!
     
    It's plausible to me. I mean, I don't have time to pay attention to what people like Qaddafi are doing, but if he threatened the dollar's supremacy, that would be reason for the USG to take him out. The hegemony of the dollar is what allows the US empire to extract tribute.
  77. It’s interesting that we no longer hear about how eloquent a speaker Obama is — except, of course, on those occasions in which he speaks about how racist our society is. Thus, his speech on the Charleston murders was, of course, depicted as hugely moving; but that praise could as well have been written in advance.

    But I have always been struck by how unmemorable is everything that has ever come out of his mouth, or from his pen. Where’s the great line or great passage one associates with Obama? He can’t even seem to hire good speechwriters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles
    Give Obama his due: "You didn't build that."

    Though it might originally have come from Fauxcahontas.
  78. Priss Factor [AKA "skiapolemistis"] says:
    @Dave M.
    There is no way Obama wrote that. Read anything he wrote before either of "his" books were written and you can tell that is someone else's prose. He is a lie and a fraud. On a side note, when I first visited Europe, I did not feel I belonged either and that in no way surprised me. I am an American and grew up in the U.S., why would I feel at home in Europe - especially France?

    “There is no way Obama wrote that. Read anything he wrote before either of “his” books were written and you can tell that is someone else’s prose”

    No, it totally sounds like him.

    I’m sure someone brushed it up, but editors do that with all books and articles.

    It is him because it sounds so bogus. Zero candor and all calculation, however, one that pretends to be candor.

    DREAMS would have us believe that Obama is sincerely peering into his own psyche and soul, but it’s just him peeking into the minds of sucker white readers and playing with their anxieties by pushing the right Goldilockian buttons that sound just a bit angry(thus proving he is no Tom) but sufficiently mainstream(thus non-threatening). It’s the empathy of a sociopath. T Obama’s credit, he knows the white mind better than white people do.

    It’s classic Oprah’s Book of the Month material.

    PS. Though Obama certainly wrote the book, that account on the plane is suspect. It sounds too much like a ‘teachable moment’.

    Read More
  79. Sign me up for the team that thinks the Obama passage is awful. To my mind, that’s narcissistic, sensitive-adolescent, arrested-development Ivy-undergrad level writing. It’s J.D. Salinger reincarnated as a politician. Prestigious northeastern colleges turn out thousands of kids who can write like this every year. I don’t get the commenters here who find the passage beautiful.

    Read More
  80. @Lugash
    5.) Lockerbie. The whole thing is a mess. Some combination of Libya didn't do it, Libya had to pay off or buy western officials to get out of sanctions, etc. The COL turned out to be too much of a loose cannon, surprise, surprise. His son Saif got bottled up in some tiny town as well.

    Nice catch, forgot about that one.

    Read More
  81. Bill B. says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Can anybody speculate as to the real reason behind the Libya war?

    Bernard-Henri Lévy. Samantha Power.

    Sarkozy, a key figure, was egged on by the absurd charlatan BHL.

    BHL has Intello long hair and habitually lets us admire his ‘sexy’ chest hair.

    The New Yorker‘s Jon Lee Anderson asked him why Libya:

    “Why? I don’t know!” he said. “Of course, it was human rights, for a massacre to be prevented, and blah blah blah—but I also wanted them to see a Jew defending the liberators against a dictatorship, to show fraternity. I wanted the Muslims to see that a Frenchman—a Westerner and a Jew—could be on their side.”

    The Irish comedienne Samantha Power jumped on the R2P bandwagon to boost her career and wrote a crap, empty book about it Problem from Hell that sold well. She persuaded Obama to go all in.

    (R2P was described by its proponents like former Oz foreign minister Gareth Evans as a genius new concept to rival the Treaty of Westphalia but was really just a badge that progressives and neocon types could pin on before doing whatever they felt like.)

    Read More
  82. Bill B. says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I read a bunch of Graham Greene novels in the 1970s. He was big. He was a leftist Catholic. Obama was working for some kind of quasi-Catholic leftist organization in Chicago, so people like, say, Father Pfleger were likely big on Greene, although Greene hardly needed a personal introduction: he was big in the papers in the 1980s as a friend of Castro and the like.

    You don't hear much about Greene anymore the way you hear about Orwell and Waugh, but he was quite good. I read the first 50 pages of Greene's "The Power and the Glory" in 2004 and was impressed. (I didn't finish it, but that was my fault not Greene's.)

    “That was my first instinct — to protect him. It never occurred to me that there was a greater need to protect myself. Innocence always calls mutely for protection when we would be so much wiser to guard ourselves against it: innocence is like a dumb leper who has lost his bell, wandering the world, meaning no harm.”
    ― Graham Greene, The Quiet American

    A cracking novel about people who interfere in other countries with the best of intentions. One of the most satisfying novels I have ever read, even if I don’t like Greene’s politics. Greene was thrown out of Vietnam because the French thought he was spying for the British. Which he more or less was. The films don’t do the book justice.

    Read More
    • Replies: @5371
    [Which he more or less was.]

    Yes. In Greene's autobiography he describes how General de Lattre accused him to his face of being a spy, and adds what seems like a vigorous refutation of the charge. One needs to read the passage carefully to see that there is in fact no denial.

  83. TWS says:
    @Marat
    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people? Only so much more debt and financialization trickery can go on before TdoodooHTF. (Unless there is a plan for that we don't have an inkling about yet. Maybe that's what TPP etc is for -- exploiting overseas minerals and natural resources to finance the poverty at home in First World sucker countries.)

    It is becoming clearer every day, piece by piece, that people are be offshored from US war zones and Africa in to the First World. What's the next piece of the Strategic Grand Plan. Is this what PoppyBush meant when he spoke of "A New World Order" back in '92?

    They’re taking homes from Germans now for the criminal invaders. Wait till they start that shit here.

    Read More
  84. TWS says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I read a bunch of Graham Greene novels in the 1970s. He was big. He was a leftist Catholic. Obama was working for some kind of quasi-Catholic leftist organization in Chicago, so people like, say, Father Pfleger were likely big on Greene, although Greene hardly needed a personal introduction: he was big in the papers in the 1980s as a friend of Castro and the like.

    You don't hear much about Greene anymore the way you hear about Orwell and Waugh, but he was quite good. I read the first 50 pages of Greene's "The Power and the Glory" in 2004 and was impressed. (I didn't finish it, but that was my fault not Greene's.)

    Let’s not forget who wrote this. Bill Ayers. Obama couldn’t write anything as the editor at the law journal.

    You want to know what Obama’s thinking? Go ask his drug using buddies or his golf buddies. Don’t read anything he’s supposed to have written. He let stand that he was born in Kenya for Christs sake for twenty years. He doesn’t write it or read it.

    Read More
  85. TWS says:
    @Dmitri Helios
    "There is no way Obama wrote that...he is a lie and a fraud."

    We both know your actual argument is basically: blacks are stupid (low IQ's), so there's no way Obama could've written that. He went to Columbia and Harvard Law School? Oh, just affirmative action, reverse racism...take a deep breath, ok? He's just smarter than you. It's ok.

    No the argument is that Obama is a lazy under achieving drug user who smoked his way through high school and never wrote a thing as the editor of the Law Review. Typically the editor writes quite a bit.

    Ayers wrote it. He admitted it after both of them first said that he didn’t know Ayers he was just a guy who, ‘lived in my neighborhood’. Etc. He is a liar and lazy. That doesn’t make anyone else on earth a liar or lazy. Just Obama.

    Read More
  86. J1234 says:
    @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    …. one of the best writer-presidents America has had….

    You forgot to factor in the black activist magnifier effect. Obama is being relatively honest in these passages about (among other things) his resentment towards whites for being, well…just white. Finding emotional honesty and thoughtful introspection among black activist authors is kind of like finding a Rolls Royce in a used car lot in Cleveland ; it seems a lot more extraordinary than it would had you discovered it in the places where it’s usually found. You wouldn’t bat an eye if saw it driving around Beverly Hills. Hence, the magnifier.

    Read More
  87. @Dmitri Helios
    You gotta give it to him, though. Some of it is beautiful prose, possibly one of the best writer-presidents America has had, perhaps even the best one.

    You should thank Bill Ayers for this sea yarn.

    Read More
  88. @Anonymous
    "Google to fix 'anti-semitic bug' which claims that 'Jews control Hollywood'"

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3222375/Google-fix-anti-semitic-bug-claims-Jews-control-Hollywood.html

    "Google is working to fix an anti-semitic bug which automatically suggests 'the Jews' when the internet search engine is asked: 'Who runs Hollywood?'

    The baffling answer is returned due to Google's complicated algorithms which return a particular page on what it deems to be the most relevant to a person's question..."

    Now, if Google is claiming their algorithm is incorrect here, why should we believe the algorithm is correct on any other particular result of a Google search.

    It really calls the whole algorithm into question, doesn’t it?

    Unless the algorithm is actually correct….

    Read More
  89. @Richard of Melbourne
    Brits don't actually speak the way Obama records here. It's a fair attempt, granted, but the idioms are lifted from movies and TV shows and probably a generation out of date (assuming the incident is set in the 1980s). (Hopefully your British readers can back me up on this.)

    I suspect the geological student on the plane comes from the same place as the racist girlfriend - Obama's fertile imagination.

    Thanks, Steve, for reading Obama's book so the rest of us don't have to.

    I agree, As an Englishmen- and they are the only “Brits” qualified to comment, the language struck me as false. Perhaps his racist girlfriend is shacked up with his uncle who liberated Auschwitz.

    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/44/2008/05/obamas-uncle-and-the-liberatio.html

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    If I recall correctly, on another occasion Obama claimed his uncle was among the liberators of Treblinka...which is even more idiotic because the Germans demolished Treblinka death camp during the war and there wasn't anything to liberate in '45.
  90. Father O'Hara [AKA "rihanna"] says:
    @5371
    You're kidding, right? It's flatulent self-regarding drivel. And his attempt to render the Brit's conversation would be embarrassing from a fourteen year old.

    He had a “great emptiness” in him.I guess he tried to get that emptiness filled.Fill it up go the rim so to speak.Overflowing and dripping down the side…OK I’ll stop.

    Read More
  91. Father O'Hara [AKA "rihanna"] says:
    @5371
    You're kidding, right? It's flatulent self-regarding drivel. And his attempt to render the Brit's conversation would be embarrassing from a fourteen year old.

    I can just see Michelle reading this.Her eyes would roll so hard they’d ache for hours…

    Read More
  92. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “On August 14, Anonymous multiple airstrikes were conducted on Sirte after the massacre committed by ISIL. The air assault lasted for half an hour targeting multiple areas in Sirte..”

    The world’s full of mystery air forces these days I guess.

    I have no idea what the war in Libya was about, but here’s a theory that might be as good as any.

    Gaddafi was deposed by the West because he was too weak a dictator, at least with respect to keeping his Islamists inline. He wasn’t doing nearly as good a job in running his country as Algerian military intelligence was doing running theirs, for instance. (Of course, it helped that he had been an old Cold War foe, and Nato can blindly fight old Cold War foes without any thought — or justification, really — required.)

    The largest number of Islamic State in Iraq (al-Qaeda) foreign fighters were coming from the Benghazi area. So we were to a significant extent already fighting Libya (or at least Libyans) in Iraq. Gaddafi apparently was okay with letting his Islamists carry on, as long as they left the country to fight.

    One argument against this theory was that the real opening of the all-out war in Libya was when Nato took out much of Gaddafi’s equivalent of the Republican Guard in one air strike. These were his real loyal co-ethnics who could defeat any force in Libya because they had a good number of Italian Palmaria self-propelled howitzers, which have a firing range of about 20 miles. He didn’t need an air force, he could just pound the opposition from afar. They were getting in place to defeat the Islamists in Benghazi. (Second Battle of Benghazi: “…The battle marked the start of a United Nations-mandated military intervention in the conflict…”.)

    Why would we attack Gaddafi just as he was starting to try to clear the Islamists out of Benghazi? Maybe simply because all his really loyal forces were in one place with no air cover and it was just easy to do. Break Gaddafi’s power in one stroke and install someone hopefully like the Algerian military who would really crack down, not just let his Islamists go fight the West.

    So the war was just another campaign against the Islamic State.

    If this is the case, the war probably happened because the Pentagon was aware that the war on the ground in Iraq against what became the Islamic State was being lost and would continue to be lost unless the fundamental problem was changed. Somebody had probably done the calculation, or played the war-game, and similar to the Pentagon about 1967 with respect to Vietnam, realized that at the current casualty rate; the influx rate of foreign fighters; the political situation; and Libyan demographics, the war in Iraq could be sustained by the Islamists indefinitely.

    See “The CIA’s Libya Rebels: The Same Terrorists who Killed US, NATO Troops in Iraq:
    2007 West Point Study Shows Benghazi-Darnah-Tobruk Area was a World Leader in Al Qaeda Suicide Bomber Recruitment”
    :

    “…a… 2007 West Point study examining the background of foreign guerrilla fighters — …including suicide bombers — crossing the Syrian border into Iraq during the 2006-2007 timeframe, under the auspices of… Al Qaeda. This study is based on a mass of about 600 Al Qaeda personnel files which were captured by US forces in the fall of 2007, and analyzed at West Point… The resulting study permits us to make important findings about the mentality and belief structures of the northeastern Libyan population…

    …The most striking finding which emerges from the West Point study is that the corridor which goes from Benghazi to Tobruk, passing through the city of Darnah (also transliterated as Derna)… represents one of the greatest concentrations of jihadi terrorists to be found anywhere in the world, and by some measures can be regarded as the leading source of suicide bombers anywhere on the planet. Darnah, with one terrorist fighter sent into Iraq to kill Americans for every 1,000 to 1,500 persons of population, emerges as suicide bomber heaven…”

    So the campaign in Libya might somewhat resemble the campaign in Laos in 1971 at the end of the Vietnam war (Operation Lam Son 719, a “spoiling attack”.)

    Read More
  93. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Richard of Melbourne
    Brits don't actually speak the way Obama records here. It's a fair attempt, granted, but the idioms are lifted from movies and TV shows and probably a generation out of date (assuming the incident is set in the 1980s). (Hopefully your British readers can back me up on this.)

    I suspect the geological student on the plane comes from the same place as the racist girlfriend - Obama's fertile imagination.

    Thanks, Steve, for reading Obama's book so the rest of us don't have to.

    Funny, I inferred as much myself while reading. Like most things involving Obama, truth takes a back seat to the narrative.

    Read More
  94. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dmitri Helios
    Umm, no. It would seem like that, if you were limited to reading Breitbart and American Thinker. There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be "joking" when he made the "claim."

    “There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be “joking” when he made the “claim.””

    Yeah, because it’s normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it’s really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend’s/colleague’s book.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Murray
    Of course Ayers wouldn't admit to ghostwriting DFMF. A critical element of Obama's appeal to leftist poseurs was the conceit that he's a literary prodigy. The Left loves to conceive of its leaders as super-genius philosopher-kings who will magically fix everything with their giant brains, and that's the template they fixated on with Obama.

    But nothing the man has ever said in public has given me the slightest reason to believe that he's actually capable of even the middling level of intellectual insight on display in that excerpt. To all appearances, he is strikingly banal and incurious.

    That said, Steve makes a credible case based on Obama's letters to his girlfriend, so I guess the jury's still out.

    , @Richard

    Yeah, because it’s normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it’s really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend’s/colleague’s book.
     
    At the time Ayers made the joke/comment, the rumor was already going around that he had ghostwritten Obama's book. Making a puckish riff on that would be entirely in keeping with the sense of humor of Ayers' milieu and generation. (Which doesn't mean he didn't help write the book, just that the "claim" doesn't count for much.)
  95. notsaying says:

    As best I can make out, Obama’s reaction to Europe is about him, not Europe.

    Is it surprising that as someone whose black father took off to another continent when he was an infant and who is half European-American but considered black by most people that he felt the way he did?

    Under the circumstances, for his trip to Kenya and thoughts about his father to be uppermost in his mind seems natural to me. That Obama felt restless and unsatisfied by his stopover in Europe seems natural to me too.

    Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.

    I think US policy on Libya was not primarily a result of anything Obama thought. It was a lot more about our hopes and desires for a different Middle East. There were a lot of decisionmakers here and in Europe who thought it would be a good idea to support the Arab Spring with more than words.

    There’s some current Republican Presidential candidates who talk about “American exceptionalism” who seem to be all but promising us to get the US into a lot more wars in the future. I do not understand why so many Americans support that idea. Do they not realize when politicians say America has to “lead” by putting boots on the ground in this conflict and that conflict or we will look weak that more billion and trillion dollar wars will be the result?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Undocumented Shopper
    Trump is an exception, but the rest of them are like McCain. As bad as Obama is, at least his Middle Eastern meddling is done on the cheap, without sending ground troops.
    , @notsaying
    I realize that my last two paragraphs seem to be connected but I did not mean that. I think our response to the Arab Spring and the general idea of "American exceptionalism" and constantly sending troops abroad are not the same things. Sorry
    , @Ozymandias
    "Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out."

    Spoiler Alert and Trigger Warning!
    He pulled the stopper and Africa poured into Europe. Then the Libyan weapons were shipped to Syrian rebels. Then the Middle East poured into Europe.

    FIN
    , @AnotherDad

    Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.
     
    He got to Kenya and found out ... it's like the South Side of Chicago!

    It's really Obama discovers HBD! I'm guessing that ever sinse then he's on board the program of grievance out of simple racial solidarity, but deep down not really a true believer. He knows too much and the knowledge eats away at him leaving him ill at ease. The only escape--more golf.

  96. Murray says:
    @Anonymous
    "There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be “joking” when he made the “claim.”"

    Yeah, because it's normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it's really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend's/colleague's book.

    Of course Ayers wouldn’t admit to ghostwriting DFMF. A critical element of Obama’s appeal to leftist poseurs was the conceit that he’s a literary prodigy. The Left loves to conceive of its leaders as super-genius philosopher-kings who will magically fix everything with their giant brains, and that’s the template they fixated on with Obama.

    But nothing the man has ever said in public has given me the slightest reason to believe that he’s actually capable of even the middling level of intellectual insight on display in that excerpt. To all appearances, he is strikingly banal and incurious.

    That said, Steve makes a credible case based on Obama’s letters to his girlfriend, so I guess the jury’s still out.

    Read More
  97. @notsaying
    As best I can make out, Obama's reaction to Europe is about him, not Europe.

    Is it surprising that as someone whose black father took off to another continent when he was an infant and who is half European-American but considered black by most people that he felt the way he did?

    Under the circumstances, for his trip to Kenya and thoughts about his father to be uppermost in his mind seems natural to me. That Obama felt restless and unsatisfied by his stopover in Europe seems natural to me too.

    Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.

    I think US policy on Libya was not primarily a result of anything Obama thought. It was a lot more about our hopes and desires for a different Middle East. There were a lot of decisionmakers here and in Europe who thought it would be a good idea to support the Arab Spring with more than words.

    There's some current Republican Presidential candidates who talk about "American exceptionalism" who seem to be all but promising us to get the US into a lot more wars in the future. I do not understand why so many Americans support that idea. Do they not realize when politicians say America has to "lead" by putting boots on the ground in this conflict and that conflict or we will look weak that more billion and trillion dollar wars will be the result?

    Trump is an exception, but the rest of them are like McCain. As bad as Obama is, at least his Middle Eastern meddling is done on the cheap, without sending ground troops.

    Read More
  98. 5371 says:
    @Bill B.
    “That was my first instinct -- to protect him. It never occurred to me that there was a greater need to protect myself. Innocence always calls mutely for protection when we would be so much wiser to guard ourselves against it: innocence is like a dumb leper who has lost his bell, wandering the world, meaning no harm.”
    ― Graham Greene, The Quiet American


    A cracking novel about people who interfere in other countries with the best of intentions. One of the most satisfying novels I have ever read, even if I don't like Greene's politics. Greene was thrown out of Vietnam because the French thought he was spying for the British. Which he more or less was. The films don't do the book justice.

    [Which he more or less was.]

    Yes. In Greene’s autobiography he describes how General de Lattre accused him to his face of being a spy, and adds what seems like a vigorous refutation of the charge. One needs to read the passage carefully to see that there is in fact no denial.

    Read More
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Frederick Forsyth has admitted being an MI6 agent.

    Yes that Englishman sounds like an American stereotype not a real person.

    Obama's problem is he has allowed himself to be dragged into various disastrous foreign policy decisions because he is weak, with Libya by Hillary despite strong reservations from the deep state. He is at heart an isolationist.

  99. notsaying says:
    @notsaying
    As best I can make out, Obama's reaction to Europe is about him, not Europe.

    Is it surprising that as someone whose black father took off to another continent when he was an infant and who is half European-American but considered black by most people that he felt the way he did?

    Under the circumstances, for his trip to Kenya and thoughts about his father to be uppermost in his mind seems natural to me. That Obama felt restless and unsatisfied by his stopover in Europe seems natural to me too.

    Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.

    I think US policy on Libya was not primarily a result of anything Obama thought. It was a lot more about our hopes and desires for a different Middle East. There were a lot of decisionmakers here and in Europe who thought it would be a good idea to support the Arab Spring with more than words.

    There's some current Republican Presidential candidates who talk about "American exceptionalism" who seem to be all but promising us to get the US into a lot more wars in the future. I do not understand why so many Americans support that idea. Do they not realize when politicians say America has to "lead" by putting boots on the ground in this conflict and that conflict or we will look weak that more billion and trillion dollar wars will be the result?

    I realize that my last two paragraphs seem to be connected but I did not mean that. I think our response to the Arab Spring and the general idea of “American exceptionalism” and constantly sending troops abroad are not the same things. Sorry

    Read More
  100. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @matt
    Obviously, we should have elected John McCain in 2008. For McCain, you see, having no particular emotional or ancestral ties to the African continent, would therefore never have bombed Libya. Not in a million years.

    There’s a difference between a theoretical McCain administration’s war designs & what it could actually pull off during a Reid-Pelosi Congress. Another obstacle would be the anti-war “movement”/media fad, a supposed force of nature that evaporated once the polished Benneton boy was in charge. Consistently the whiteliberal synthetic romance with Blackus Aurelius has not only shielded generic R2P nitwits of the Susan Power/Sam Rice stripe, it’s also created or saved the jobs of saboteurs like Victoria Nuland. Though it looked doubtful for a moment Obama truly has reclaimed U.S. foreign policy for the messianic-imperialist team.

    If you’re trying to extoll the diplomatic prudence of Democrat leadership in general, spin while you can: it’ll be harder not to laugh once Obama’s Libya architect is in the White House again, bombing aspirin factories for a source of “Meet the Press” talking points.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    But Yosemite Sam McCain would have been thinking up places to bomb himself, while Obama waits for his staff to come up with ideas of places for him to bomb.

    President McCain might be bombing Hungary by now.

    , @Undocumented Shopper
    When a president wants to start a war, no Congress can stop him.

    The technique was designed and tested by Clinton: you start a war without congressional approval, then you accuse your of opponents of being unpatriotic. Next, you give the sheep orders to bleat "we must support our troops!"
    , @Anonymous
    "Though it looked doubtful for a moment Obama truly has reclaimed U.S. foreign policy for the messianic-imperialist team."

    I think Obama's Nobel Peace Prize was perhaps a pre-emptive action on the part of Europeans to try to put pressure on Obama to refrain from adopting a U.S. foreign policy for the "messianic-imperialist team". They might have felt it was one of the few weapons they have to influence U.S. foreign policy, especially since the E.U. increasingly seems to be the U.S.'s bitch. (Okay, this might be a bit hyperbolic.)

  101. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I don’t get the impression that Obama cares much about foreign policy. Why did Obama intervene in Libya? It’s likely “he” didn’t, but just let his SoS go off and do whatever she wanted there.

    Read More
  102. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    "Google to fix 'anti-semitic bug' which claims that 'Jews control Hollywood'"

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3222375/Google-fix-anti-semitic-bug-claims-Jews-control-Hollywood.html

    "Google is working to fix an anti-semitic bug which automatically suggests 'the Jews' when the internet search engine is asked: 'Who runs Hollywood?'

    The baffling answer is returned due to Google's complicated algorithms which return a particular page on what it deems to be the most relevant to a person's question..."

    This is Sisyphean, right? Goofle used to put a bolded “Special Note” explaining themselves on (potentially) embarrassing results pages; hilariously, the A.I. note would also appear for innocuous searches like “jewish deli” or “jew’s harp.” If they’re going to curb the algorithm from offending anyone, in this golden age of offense, when does it begin eating into the usefulness of the product, i.e. a dynamic web assistant-service efficiently pointing users to information or goods they’re genuinely interested in? Once the censorship factor starts hitting you in the face, it changes the way you search, thus weakening or at least distorting the operation of the underlying mechanism from G’s revenue point of view.

    OK Google, is Tibet part of China
    OK Google, what did Mohammed look like
    OK Google, how many women have gold-medaled in the decathlon
    etc.

    Read More
  103. @Anonymous
    There's a difference between a theoretical McCain administration's war designs & what it could actually pull off during a Reid-Pelosi Congress. Another obstacle would be the anti-war "movement"/media fad, a supposed force of nature that evaporated once the polished Benneton boy was in charge. Consistently the whiteliberal synthetic romance with Blackus Aurelius has not only shielded generic R2P nitwits of the Susan Power/Sam Rice stripe, it's also created or saved the jobs of saboteurs like Victoria Nuland. Though it looked doubtful for a moment Obama truly has reclaimed U.S. foreign policy for the messianic-imperialist team.

    If you're trying to extoll the diplomatic prudence of Democrat leadership in general, spin while you can: it'll be harder not to laugh once Obama's Libya architect is in the White House again, bombing aspirin factories for a source of "Meet the Press" talking points.

    But Yosemite Sam McCain would have been thinking up places to bomb himself, while Obama waits for his staff to come up with ideas of places for him to bomb.

    President McCain might be bombing Hungary by now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Godwin Daily
    Personnel is policy. Next you'll tell me McCain would have unfurled executive amnesty for all the 19-year-old illegal strivers this close to getting their healthcare billing/Salesforce.com A.A.s -- wow, really dodged a bullet there! Enemy-of-My-Enemy '16, '20, '24 ad infinitum
  104. @Bill Jones
    I agree, As an Englishmen- and they are the only "Brits" qualified to comment, the language struck me as false. Perhaps his racist girlfriend is shacked up with his uncle who liberated Auschwitz.
    http://voices.washingtonpost.com/44/2008/05/obamas-uncle-and-the-liberatio.html

    If I recall correctly, on another occasion Obama claimed his uncle was among the liberators of Treblinka…which is even more idiotic because the Germans demolished Treblinka death camp during the war and there wasn’t anything to liberate in ’45.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Death camps are like summer camps. They all look the same, and are easy to confuse.
  105. Svigor says:

    We both know your actual argument is basically: blacks are stupid (low IQ’s), so there’s no way Obama could’ve written that. He went to Columbia and Harvard Law School? Oh, just affirmative action, reverse racism…take a deep breath, ok? He’s just smarter than you. It’s ok.

    I’d say Hussein lacks much of a work ethic (lots of support for that), thinks himself above petty grinds like writing books (ditto), and most importantly, he’s an empty suit whose single greatest qualification for the presidency is Affirmative Action. So, it seems at least likely that his books were ghost-written, and absolutely certain that having books ghost-written for him is 100% in-character. But no, he’s not too stupid to have written them. And he probably isn’t nearly as smart as you seem to think he is (seems a silly argument to link to an idea like Dave’s, since anyone can take it up); the upper bounds of his IQ have been pretty well-estimated here in previous arguments, at 130 (TL;DR version: he didn’t make it past National Merit Scholarship semifinalist (IIRC)).

    (Hussein can put all of this to bed by releasing his records, something he’s gone to court to oppose, again IIRC)

    I don’t remember seeing your refutation of Cashill’s analysis. Eventually someone with impeccable credentials and pedigree will analyze Obama’s writing (probably after he’s left office), and my guess is Cashill will be proven right. And an educated guess is all it is, though I’m much more confident in my prediction that someone will put his supposed work under the microscope.

    Is it really all that hard to imagine that his books were written by one of the legion of more-qualified, white leftist writers? Is it really all that hard to imagine them being delighted at the prospect of propping up a “clean” black for the cause? Is it really hard to imagine leftists lying to get God’s Work done? Do you find Hussein such a known quantity, so genuine, so earthy, and so obviously not invented, that you can’t wrap your head around him benefiting from ghost writers (lol)?

    Yet a guy who writes like this (and who, one must presume and is led to believe, reads a lot) pronounces “corps” as “corpse”. He said “the Navy signal corpse”, not in just one speech but in two that I know of. The guy is a liar and a fraud.

    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you’ve never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as “corps” would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Godwin Daily
    This girl I knew was the daughter of a fairly high-up judge in Michigan, I think appellate, whose husband was a confidante of John Engler (N.B. while the latter indicates zip, class-wise, I still rightly or wrongly view upper-echelon magistrate as a somewhat g-loaded post). Anyway one time I met her mother and she in hubby's direction referred to the parking lot valet with a hard "et" (rhymes with wallet). This was so funny to me that I remember nothing else about her other than that I was trying to work Swiss ski lodges and gunfire trajectory angles into the conversation however improbably.

    p.s. I shouldn't neglect the possibility that this was a normal upper Midwestern pronunciation with which I was merely unfamiliar, thus putting the joke on me if ever I find myself in Grossay Point riding in a Chevrolette
    , @Anonymous
    According to Cashill, Obama didn't finish DFMF by the original deadline given to him, so it's possible he might have needed a ghostwriter to actually finish the book.

    From Cashill, "With advance in hand, Obama repaired to Chicago where he dithered. At one point, in order to finish without interruption, he and wife Michelle decamped to Bali. Obama was supposed to have finished the book within a year. Bali or not, advance or no, he could not. He was surely in way over his head.

    "According to a surprisingly harsh 2006 article by liberal publisher Peter Osnos, which detailed the "ruthlessness" of Obama's literary ascent, Simon & Schuster canceled the contract. Dystel did not give up. She solicited Times Book, the division of Random House at which Osnos was publisher. He met with Obama, took his word that he could finish the book, and authorized a new advance of $40,000."

    http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/10/who_wrote_dreams_from_my_fathe_1.html#ixzz3kvj0VRb1

    , @silviosilver

    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you’ve never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as “corps” would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.
     
    Yeah, I've botched a few pronunciations in my time too. Most embarrassing was pronouncing mystic as "my stick," and being corrected by an older cousin in front of the whole family.

    But that's nothing. I've had a history professor who pronounced Yalta as "Yat-la" among other howlers, and even more egregiously a lecturer in global political economy who pronounced Keynesian as "Keneezian." Both were native English-speakers. These guys may have been dyslexic but how the hell did they manage to become professors without ever hearing these words pronounced properly?

    Bad as that is, I think it's even worse - or harder to live down - to incorrectly write words you've only ever heard spoken. A classic example of this is writing "walla" for voila - and yes, I've done that. (It has to be on that level though - it can't just be a simple spelling error.)
  106. Svigor says:

    You really think teleprompter Obama has (had) it in him to write a 404 page book? Bill Ayers wrote 70-100% of Dreams from My Father: A Story of Race and Inheritance. Proven to my satisfaction by Jack Cashill who spent a few years decoding the true authorship. He had the book digitized to aid him in word and phrase searches and finding correspondences with Ayer’s own books.

    I think what Dmitri meant was, there’s no evidence he’ll ever admit to believing. The edifice of “Affirmative Action” probably isn’t monumental enough, never mind leftists’ abiding love of lying.

    And how does Obama’s obsession with blood inheritance square with the left’s environmental blank-slatism and race as social construct tenets?

    The left’s environmental blank-slatism and delusion of race as social construct take a distant back seat to the left’s devotion to “who-whom?,” so it’s probably no big deal. It’s non-Jewish whites who are policed.

    The Englishman on the plane prattling on to Obama about the glories of Apartheid South Africa sounds like an obvious straw man.

    Seems not nearly socialist, naive, and PC enough for a young Brit in the 80s (maybe that’s why Obama made him an oil worker), but I’m just going by vague impressions over the years.

    “Google is working to fix an anti-semitic bug which automatically suggests ‘the Jews’ when the internet search engine is asked: ‘Who runs Hollywood?’

    The baffling answer is returned due to Google’s complicated algorithms which return a particular page on what it deems to be the most relevant to a person’s question…”

    The poor bastards patching this are gonna have their work cut out when AI comes along.

    Read More
  107. Svigor says:

    Of course Ayers wouldn’t admit to ghostwriting DFMF. A critical element of Obama’s appeal to leftist poseurs was the conceit that he’s a literary prodigy. The Left loves to conceive of its leaders as super-genius philosopher-kings who will magically fix everything with their giant brains, and that’s the template they fixated on with Obama.

    Don’t forget to roll in their delusion of racial cognitive equality (and their resulting overcompensation). Taken together, we get the absurd conversations about Obama’s intellect. First leftists say he’s a genius. Then sane people say no, he’s not all that, he’s within the typical range for a president (120-130). Then the leftists run around with their wigs off claiming we’re calling him stupid because he’s a negro. Then we point out that we just said he isn’t a genius, not that he’s stupid. Then lefties reset their memories and we have the conversation all over again.

    “There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be “joking” when he made the “claim.””

    Yeah, because it’s normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it’s really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend’s/colleague’s book.

    On the other hand, it’s completely normal for a liar, who adheres to an ideology based on lies, to pull a “wink-wink nudge-nudge” non-admission admission to having ghostwritten the president’s biographies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Obama in his 20s wrote short stories about himself, and had his friends read them. They thought they were okay but they don't seem to have advised him to quit his day job. I would imagine that some of those drafts made their way into Dreams from My Father.

    As a Creative Writing-type prose stylist, Obama is competent but undistinguished. Literature as a career is a steep pyramid, and there was never much evidence that he would ever be quite good enough to, say, get a string of stories published in The New Yorker. There's not a lot of money in being good enough to get published in little journals that nobody except other short story authors read.

    As a nonfiction analytic prose writer, he's competent too. He wrote up essay questions and answers for his U. of Chicago race law classes, and they are fine.

    But most of what he writes has been moderately to extremely dull because he doesn't want to say anything too interesting or, heavens, controversial. He'd rather draw attention to the gracefulness of his personal thought processes than to any conclusions he reaches.

    You can't say that his career strategy of being an attractive "blank screen," of emphasizing his theoretical potential rather than the ideas he has actually achieved, has worked out badly for him.

  108. @Anonymous
    There's a difference between a theoretical McCain administration's war designs & what it could actually pull off during a Reid-Pelosi Congress. Another obstacle would be the anti-war "movement"/media fad, a supposed force of nature that evaporated once the polished Benneton boy was in charge. Consistently the whiteliberal synthetic romance with Blackus Aurelius has not only shielded generic R2P nitwits of the Susan Power/Sam Rice stripe, it's also created or saved the jobs of saboteurs like Victoria Nuland. Though it looked doubtful for a moment Obama truly has reclaimed U.S. foreign policy for the messianic-imperialist team.

    If you're trying to extoll the diplomatic prudence of Democrat leadership in general, spin while you can: it'll be harder not to laugh once Obama's Libya architect is in the White House again, bombing aspirin factories for a source of "Meet the Press" talking points.

    When a president wants to start a war, no Congress can stop him.

    The technique was designed and tested by Clinton: you start a war without congressional approval, then you accuse your of opponents of being unpatriotic. Next, you give the sheep orders to bleat “we must support our troops!”

    Read More
  109. @Svigor

    Of course Ayers wouldn’t admit to ghostwriting DFMF. A critical element of Obama’s appeal to leftist poseurs was the conceit that he’s a literary prodigy. The Left loves to conceive of its leaders as super-genius philosopher-kings who will magically fix everything with their giant brains, and that’s the template they fixated on with Obama.
     
    Don't forget to roll in their delusion of racial cognitive equality (and their resulting overcompensation). Taken together, we get the absurd conversations about Obama's intellect. First leftists say he's a genius. Then sane people say no, he's not all that, he's within the typical range for a president (120-130). Then the leftists run around with their wigs off claiming we're calling him stupid because he's a negro. Then we point out that we just said he isn't a genius, not that he's stupid. Then lefties reset their memories and we have the conversation all over again.

    “There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be “joking” when he made the “claim.””

    Yeah, because it’s normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it’s really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend’s/colleague’s book.
     
    On the other hand, it's completely normal for a liar, who adheres to an ideology based on lies, to pull a "wink-wink nudge-nudge" non-admission admission to having ghostwritten the president's biographies.

    Obama in his 20s wrote short stories about himself, and had his friends read them. They thought they were okay but they don’t seem to have advised him to quit his day job. I would imagine that some of those drafts made their way into Dreams from My Father.

    As a Creative Writing-type prose stylist, Obama is competent but undistinguished. Literature as a career is a steep pyramid, and there was never much evidence that he would ever be quite good enough to, say, get a string of stories published in The New Yorker. There’s not a lot of money in being good enough to get published in little journals that nobody except other short story authors read.

    As a nonfiction analytic prose writer, he’s competent too. He wrote up essay questions and answers for his U. of Chicago race law classes, and they are fine.

    But most of what he writes has been moderately to extremely dull because he doesn’t want to say anything too interesting or, heavens, controversial. He’d rather draw attention to the gracefulness of his personal thought processes than to any conclusions he reaches.

    You can’t say that his career strategy of being an attractive “blank screen,” of emphasizing his theoretical potential rather than the ideas he has actually achieved, has worked out badly for him.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    You can’t say that his career strategy of being an attractive “blank screen"… has worked out badly for him.

     

    So is he more Zelig, or Chance the Gardiner?
  110. @Jack D
    He could have bought the Kindle version for $9.99 and saved himself a couple of years.

    I think he meant that the critic blogger ran the Obama text through a Bayesian/brute-force “plagiarism checker” software like Copyspace, except modified with the input constraint to compare Dreams From My Father against given works of Ayers (I’d be surprised if the bulk of his earlier writings have been scanned into digital format, but he’s definitely churned out a lot of prose in the electronic era).

    1) I have my doubts about the authority of such artificial-analysis “style similarity” experiments. At current level of sophistication, it’s fine for catching an 8th grader who lifts from Wikipedia. However, forensic-level it’s decidedly not. I’ve never seen software that catches known historical ghost-writing, without tampering with the routine anyway. The choice of pattern database colors the process of a computer algorithm’s primed comparison, and for the sake of getting usable “matches” bigger is not always better. On the comparatively simpler problem of plagiarism, how precisely does it check? If you fed “I, Claudius” and “The Manchurian Candidate” into a Bayesian evaluation model incorporating some prior “training” how much tinkering & revision is needed before it catches the plagiarized passages (and concepts) in the latter work? Unless the Obama critic has peer-reviewed the digital analysis method with John Searle or Daniel Dennett or the like, I don’t think it adds much to his case to claim a piece of pseudo-scientific computer proof.

    2) Obama authored 2 heavily-edited books, and not much else when he had ample chance to do so (if I’m correct about him I find that I identify with the personality type: impressed by the art of writing and possessing a literary bent but rarely connecting internally w/ a need for self-expression; he’s somewhat cerebral but not an artist). Thus I don’t read a whole lot into the dialogue verisimilitude for the pimply English white guy he clearly dislikes in that well-established passive-aggro manner of his. Barring the discovery of early manuscripts of Dreams From My Father, lol, I’m going to assume the written passage itself was punched up 2 or 3 times by a middle-aged female editor who later became a huge J.K. Rowling fangirl. Obama’s “characters” are always kinda secondary and uncompelling anyway, so to a certain extent he’s just invented them all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Did Obama make up the "book" about Africa he gave up reading, too? It sounds an awful lot like Los Angeles Times' Nairobi correspondent David Lamb's "The Africans," which was published the year before his trip.

    If Obama were inclined to make up things, you'd think he make up more interesting thing ...

    , @Clyde
    You are way too dismissive of Jack Cashill's deconstruction of Obama's first book showing that Bill Ayers wrote most of it. Someday, when you have the time, you can take a look at Cashsill's work.
  111. @notsaying
    As best I can make out, Obama's reaction to Europe is about him, not Europe.

    Is it surprising that as someone whose black father took off to another continent when he was an infant and who is half European-American but considered black by most people that he felt the way he did?

    Under the circumstances, for his trip to Kenya and thoughts about his father to be uppermost in his mind seems natural to me. That Obama felt restless and unsatisfied by his stopover in Europe seems natural to me too.

    Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.

    I think US policy on Libya was not primarily a result of anything Obama thought. It was a lot more about our hopes and desires for a different Middle East. There were a lot of decisionmakers here and in Europe who thought it would be a good idea to support the Arab Spring with more than words.

    There's some current Republican Presidential candidates who talk about "American exceptionalism" who seem to be all but promising us to get the US into a lot more wars in the future. I do not understand why so many Americans support that idea. Do they not realize when politicians say America has to "lead" by putting boots on the ground in this conflict and that conflict or we will look weak that more billion and trillion dollar wars will be the result?

    “Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.”

    Spoiler Alert and Trigger Warning!
    He pulled the stopper and Africa poured into Europe. Then the Libyan weapons were shipped to Syrian rebels. Then the Middle East poured into Europe.

    FIN

    Read More
  112. @Steve Sailer
    But Yosemite Sam McCain would have been thinking up places to bomb himself, while Obama waits for his staff to come up with ideas of places for him to bomb.

    President McCain might be bombing Hungary by now.

    Personnel is policy. Next you’ll tell me McCain would have unfurled executive amnesty for all the 19-year-old illegal strivers this close to getting their healthcare billing/Salesforce.com A.A.s — wow, really dodged a bullet there! Enemy-of-My-Enemy ’16, ’20, ’24 ad infinitum

    Read More
  113. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I’m skeptical of Obama-is-an-idiot narratives just as I was of the Bush-is-an-idiot narratives that preceded them. However both men are undeniably lazy and owe their prominence to their ancestry rather than their personal abilities and exertions.

    Read More
  114. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @cipher
    JW123,

    A middle east in total disarray prevents the formation of an alliance of states hostile to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the other little gulf sheikdoms along the Arabian coast.

    Not to mention the fact that chaos offers opportunities for profit and consolidation of power.

    If you go back 30 years ago, when the Middle East was in much less disarray, no such alliance formed then either. I don’t think it explains current policy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Israeli foreign policy is to balkanise the Middle East into as many sectarian cantons based on religion/ethnicity as possible.

    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/pdf/The%20Zionist%20Plan%20for%20the%20Middle%20East.pdf
  115. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Marat
    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people? Only so much more debt and financialization trickery can go on before TdoodooHTF. (Unless there is a plan for that we don't have an inkling about yet. Maybe that's what TPP etc is for -- exploiting overseas minerals and natural resources to finance the poverty at home in First World sucker countries.)

    It is becoming clearer every day, piece by piece, that people are be offshored from US war zones and Africa in to the First World. What's the next piece of the Strategic Grand Plan. Is this what PoppyBush meant when he spoke of "A New World Order" back in '92?

    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people?

    Once you’ve got a de facto one-party state, bought with immigration and generous government benefits, you can reduce costs by throttling back on those government benefits, at least to those not in preferred groups. The reality is you can’t have Scandinavian-style social democracy with Central American-style demographics.

    My sister just got back from Bogota, Colombia, where she visited a hospital on business. It was gleaming, modern, and had spaceship doors that opened and closed with a “whoosh”, she said. Locals told her it was a private hospital for political and business leaders. There’s another tier of quality hospitals just for the police and their families. The lumpenproletariat has a much lower quality of care in the third tier hospitals.

    Read More
  116. @Godwin Daily
    I think he meant that the critic blogger ran the Obama text through a Bayesian/brute-force "plagiarism checker" software like Copyspace, except modified with the input constraint to compare Dreams From My Father against given works of Ayers (I'd be surprised if the bulk of his earlier writings have been scanned into digital format, but he's definitely churned out a lot of prose in the electronic era).

    1) I have my doubts about the authority of such artificial-analysis "style similarity" experiments. At current level of sophistication, it's fine for catching an 8th grader who lifts from Wikipedia. However, forensic-level it's decidedly not. I've never seen software that catches known historical ghost-writing, without tampering with the routine anyway. The choice of pattern database colors the process of a computer algorithm's primed comparison, and for the sake of getting usable "matches" bigger is not always better. On the comparatively simpler problem of plagiarism, how precisely does it check? If you fed "I, Claudius" and "The Manchurian Candidate" into a Bayesian evaluation model incorporating some prior "training" how much tinkering & revision is needed before it catches the plagiarized passages (and concepts) in the latter work? Unless the Obama critic has peer-reviewed the digital analysis method with John Searle or Daniel Dennett or the like, I don't think it adds much to his case to claim a piece of pseudo-scientific computer proof.

    2) Obama authored 2 heavily-edited books, and not much else when he had ample chance to do so (if I'm correct about him I find that I identify with the personality type: impressed by the art of writing and possessing a literary bent but rarely connecting internally w/ a need for self-expression; he's somewhat cerebral but not an artist). Thus I don't read a whole lot into the dialogue verisimilitude for the pimply English white guy he clearly dislikes in that well-established passive-aggro manner of his. Barring the discovery of early manuscripts of Dreams From My Father, lol, I'm going to assume the written passage itself was punched up 2 or 3 times by a middle-aged female editor who later became a huge J.K. Rowling fangirl. Obama's "characters" are always kinda secondary and uncompelling anyway, so to a certain extent he's just invented them all.

    Did Obama make up the “book” about Africa he gave up reading, too? It sounds an awful lot like Los Angeles Times’ Nairobi correspondent David Lamb’s “The Africans,” which was published the year before his trip.

    If Obama were inclined to make up things, you’d think he make up more interesting thing …

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    It reminded me of Keith Richburg's devastating "Out of America", but that came out a decade after Lamb's book.
  117. @Svigor

    We both know your actual argument is basically: blacks are stupid (low IQ’s), so there’s no way Obama could’ve written that. He went to Columbia and Harvard Law School? Oh, just affirmative action, reverse racism…take a deep breath, ok? He’s just smarter than you. It’s ok.
     
    I'd say Hussein lacks much of a work ethic (lots of support for that), thinks himself above petty grinds like writing books (ditto), and most importantly, he's an empty suit whose single greatest qualification for the presidency is Affirmative Action. So, it seems at least likely that his books were ghost-written, and absolutely certain that having books ghost-written for him is 100% in-character. But no, he's not too stupid to have written them. And he probably isn't nearly as smart as you seem to think he is (seems a silly argument to link to an idea like Dave's, since anyone can take it up); the upper bounds of his IQ have been pretty well-estimated here in previous arguments, at 130 (TL;DR version: he didn't make it past National Merit Scholarship semifinalist (IIRC)).

    (Hussein can put all of this to bed by releasing his records, something he's gone to court to oppose, again IIRC)

    I don't remember seeing your refutation of Cashill's analysis. Eventually someone with impeccable credentials and pedigree will analyze Obama's writing (probably after he's left office), and my guess is Cashill will be proven right. And an educated guess is all it is, though I'm much more confident in my prediction that someone will put his supposed work under the microscope.

    Is it really all that hard to imagine that his books were written by one of the legion of more-qualified, white leftist writers? Is it really all that hard to imagine them being delighted at the prospect of propping up a "clean" black for the cause? Is it really hard to imagine leftists lying to get God's Work done? Do you find Hussein such a known quantity, so genuine, so earthy, and so obviously not invented, that you can't wrap your head around him benefiting from ghost writers (lol)?

    Yet a guy who writes like this (and who, one must presume and is led to believe, reads a lot) pronounces “corps” as “corpse”. He said “the Navy signal corpse”, not in just one speech but in two that I know of. The guy is a liar and a fraud.
     
    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you've never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as "corps" would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.

    This girl I knew was the daughter of a fairly high-up judge in Michigan, I think appellate, whose husband was a confidante of John Engler (N.B. while the latter indicates zip, class-wise, I still rightly or wrongly view upper-echelon magistrate as a somewhat g-loaded post). Anyway one time I met her mother and she in hubby’s direction referred to the parking lot valet with a hard “et” (rhymes with wallet). This was so funny to me that I remember nothing else about her other than that I was trying to work Swiss ski lodges and gunfire trajectory angles into the conversation however improbably.

    p.s. I shouldn’t neglect the possibility that this was a normal upper Midwestern pronunciation with which I was merely unfamiliar, thus putting the joke on me if ever I find myself in Grossay Point riding in a Chevrolette

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    This girl I knew was the daughter of a fairly high-up judge in Michigan, I think appellate, whose husband was a confidante of John Engler (N.B. while the latter indicates zip, class-wise, I still rightly or wrongly view upper-echelon magistrate as a somewhat g-loaded post). Anyway one time I met her mother and she in hubby’s direction referred to the parking lot valet with a hard “et” (rhymes with wallet).

     

    Actually, if you're a fan of Downton Abbey or other British period dramas, you'll have noted that the Lords and Ladies of the best breeding indeed did (and I believe still do) pronounce the word 'VAL-ett', with the accent on the first syllable, and a hard 't' at the end.

    Is it possible she was sufficiently posh to have heard the word pronounced in context in England, or among Anglophilic upper-crust types?

  118. @Steve Sailer
    Obama in his 20s wrote short stories about himself, and had his friends read them. They thought they were okay but they don't seem to have advised him to quit his day job. I would imagine that some of those drafts made their way into Dreams from My Father.

    As a Creative Writing-type prose stylist, Obama is competent but undistinguished. Literature as a career is a steep pyramid, and there was never much evidence that he would ever be quite good enough to, say, get a string of stories published in The New Yorker. There's not a lot of money in being good enough to get published in little journals that nobody except other short story authors read.

    As a nonfiction analytic prose writer, he's competent too. He wrote up essay questions and answers for his U. of Chicago race law classes, and they are fine.

    But most of what he writes has been moderately to extremely dull because he doesn't want to say anything too interesting or, heavens, controversial. He'd rather draw attention to the gracefulness of his personal thought processes than to any conclusions he reaches.

    You can't say that his career strategy of being an attractive "blank screen," of emphasizing his theoretical potential rather than the ideas he has actually achieved, has worked out badly for him.

    You can’t say that his career strategy of being an attractive “blank screen”… has worked out badly for him.

    So is he more Zelig, or Chance the Gardiner?

    Read More
  119. @German_reader
    If I recall correctly, on another occasion Obama claimed his uncle was among the liberators of Treblinka...which is even more idiotic because the Germans demolished Treblinka death camp during the war and there wasn't anything to liberate in '45.

    Death camps are like summer camps. They all look the same, and are easy to confuse.

    Read More
  120. @e
    Yet a guy who writes like this (and who, one must presume and is led to believe, reads a lot) pronounces "corps" as "corpse". He said "the Navy signal corpse", not in just one speech but in two that I know of. The guy is a liar and a fraud.

    It used to be a common idea that pronouncing a rare word (and in Obama’s decidedly non-military world “corps” is a rare word) confidently but wrongly was actually a sign of being well-read. The speaker had seen the word before, so he did not show any hesitation or stumble at encountering an unfamiliar word, but he had only seen it in books, never heard it spoken aloud, and it turned out his internal pronunciation had been wrong all these years. Whether this makes any sense or is merely a cover story for bad pronouncers is something I am not competent to judge.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Indeed.

    How many years have we been hearing about "corps"? Are there any new examples since then?

    , @Reg Cæsar
    He was mīzl'd!

    The past tense if to misle, ie, misled.

    , @Veracitor
    So how should we interpret Malcolm Gladwell's "Igon Values?"
  121. “Has anyone ever asked the President if the main result of his Libya policy, the current Camp of the Saints in the Mediterranean, strikes him as a bug … or as a feature?”

    Oh come on! Like we don’t already know the answer to that! Actually BOTH answers! The lie that Obama would tell to disarm White people and the TRUTHFUL answer!

    Read More
  122. @James Kabala
    It used to be a common idea that pronouncing a rare word (and in Obama's decidedly non-military world "corps" is a rare word) confidently but wrongly was actually a sign of being well-read. The speaker had seen the word before, so he did not show any hesitation or stumble at encountering an unfamiliar word, but he had only seen it in books, never heard it spoken aloud, and it turned out his internal pronunciation had been wrong all these years. Whether this makes any sense or is merely a cover story for bad pronouncers is something I am not competent to judge.

    Indeed.

    How many years have we been hearing about “corps”? Are there any new examples since then?

    Read More
  123. @notsaying
    As best I can make out, Obama's reaction to Europe is about him, not Europe.

    Is it surprising that as someone whose black father took off to another continent when he was an infant and who is half European-American but considered black by most people that he felt the way he did?

    Under the circumstances, for his trip to Kenya and thoughts about his father to be uppermost in his mind seems natural to me. That Obama felt restless and unsatisfied by his stopover in Europe seems natural to me too.

    Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.

    I think US policy on Libya was not primarily a result of anything Obama thought. It was a lot more about our hopes and desires for a different Middle East. There were a lot of decisionmakers here and in Europe who thought it would be a good idea to support the Arab Spring with more than words.

    There's some current Republican Presidential candidates who talk about "American exceptionalism" who seem to be all but promising us to get the US into a lot more wars in the future. I do not understand why so many Americans support that idea. Do they not realize when politicians say America has to "lead" by putting boots on the ground in this conflict and that conflict or we will look weak that more billion and trillion dollar wars will be the result?

    Actually this excerpt left me wanting to read more and to find out how things turned out.

    He got to Kenya and found out … it’s like the South Side of Chicago!

    It’s really Obama discovers HBD! I’m guessing that ever sinse then he’s on board the program of grievance out of simple racial solidarity, but deep down not really a true believer. He knows too much and the knowledge eats away at him leaving him ill at ease. The only escape–more golf.

    Read More
  124. Marat says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Indeed. The question is, with the tax base so bloated on the bottom, as you describe, how does the elite imagine financing all these people?
     
    Once you've got a de facto one-party state, bought with immigration and generous government benefits, you can reduce costs by throttling back on those government benefits, at least to those not in preferred groups. The reality is you can't have Scandinavian-style social democracy with Central American-style demographics.

    My sister just got back from Bogota, Colombia, where she visited a hospital on business. It was gleaming, modern, and had spaceship doors that opened and closed with a "whoosh", she said. Locals told her it was a private hospital for political and business leaders. There's another tier of quality hospitals just for the police and their families. The lumpenproletariat has a much lower quality of care in the third tier hospitals.

    Maybe that’s where ObamaCare comes in.

    Read More
  125. Clyde says:
    @Godwin Daily
    I think he meant that the critic blogger ran the Obama text through a Bayesian/brute-force "plagiarism checker" software like Copyspace, except modified with the input constraint to compare Dreams From My Father against given works of Ayers (I'd be surprised if the bulk of his earlier writings have been scanned into digital format, but he's definitely churned out a lot of prose in the electronic era).

    1) I have my doubts about the authority of such artificial-analysis "style similarity" experiments. At current level of sophistication, it's fine for catching an 8th grader who lifts from Wikipedia. However, forensic-level it's decidedly not. I've never seen software that catches known historical ghost-writing, without tampering with the routine anyway. The choice of pattern database colors the process of a computer algorithm's primed comparison, and for the sake of getting usable "matches" bigger is not always better. On the comparatively simpler problem of plagiarism, how precisely does it check? If you fed "I, Claudius" and "The Manchurian Candidate" into a Bayesian evaluation model incorporating some prior "training" how much tinkering & revision is needed before it catches the plagiarized passages (and concepts) in the latter work? Unless the Obama critic has peer-reviewed the digital analysis method with John Searle or Daniel Dennett or the like, I don't think it adds much to his case to claim a piece of pseudo-scientific computer proof.

    2) Obama authored 2 heavily-edited books, and not much else when he had ample chance to do so (if I'm correct about him I find that I identify with the personality type: impressed by the art of writing and possessing a literary bent but rarely connecting internally w/ a need for self-expression; he's somewhat cerebral but not an artist). Thus I don't read a whole lot into the dialogue verisimilitude for the pimply English white guy he clearly dislikes in that well-established passive-aggro manner of his. Barring the discovery of early manuscripts of Dreams From My Father, lol, I'm going to assume the written passage itself was punched up 2 or 3 times by a middle-aged female editor who later became a huge J.K. Rowling fangirl. Obama's "characters" are always kinda secondary and uncompelling anyway, so to a certain extent he's just invented them all.

    You are way too dismissive of Jack Cashill’s deconstruction of Obama’s first book showing that Bill Ayers wrote most of it. Someday, when you have the time, you can take a look at Cashsill’s work.

    Read More
  126. @Steve Sailer
    Did Obama make up the "book" about Africa he gave up reading, too? It sounds an awful lot like Los Angeles Times' Nairobi correspondent David Lamb's "The Africans," which was published the year before his trip.

    If Obama were inclined to make up things, you'd think he make up more interesting thing ...

    It reminded me of Keith Richburg’s devastating “Out of America”, but that came out a decade after Lamb’s book.

    Read More
  127. @James Kabala
    It used to be a common idea that pronouncing a rare word (and in Obama's decidedly non-military world "corps" is a rare word) confidently but wrongly was actually a sign of being well-read. The speaker had seen the word before, so he did not show any hesitation or stumble at encountering an unfamiliar word, but he had only seen it in books, never heard it spoken aloud, and it turned out his internal pronunciation had been wrong all these years. Whether this makes any sense or is merely a cover story for bad pronouncers is something I am not competent to judge.

    He was mīzl’d!

    The past tense if to misle, ie, misled.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    IIRC, Kennedy was accused of not having written a book attributed to him. He denied this and even threatened people with libel lawsuits over it, but years after his death it turned out the claims were true after all. I think he wrote the introduction and closing chapter but everything else was ghostwritten.
  128. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Reg Cæsar
    He was mīzl'd!

    The past tense if to misle, ie, misled.

    IIRC, Kennedy was accused of not having written a book attributed to him. He denied this and even threatened people with libel lawsuits over it, but years after his death it turned out the claims were true after all. I think he wrote the introduction and closing chapter but everything else was ghostwritten.

    Read More
  129. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    IIRC, Kennedy was accused of not having written a book attributed to him. He denied this and even threatened people with libel lawsuits over it, but years after his death it turned out the claims were true after all. I think he wrote the introduction and closing chapter but everything else was ghostwritten.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    "Profiles in Courage" - widely believed to be written by Theodore Sorensen. Also, his undergraduate thesis "Why England Slept" was published as a book and widely believed to be ghostwritten.
  130. Veracitor says:
    @James Kabala
    It used to be a common idea that pronouncing a rare word (and in Obama's decidedly non-military world "corps" is a rare word) confidently but wrongly was actually a sign of being well-read. The speaker had seen the word before, so he did not show any hesitation or stumble at encountering an unfamiliar word, but he had only seen it in books, never heard it spoken aloud, and it turned out his internal pronunciation had been wrong all these years. Whether this makes any sense or is merely a cover story for bad pronouncers is something I am not competent to judge.

    So how should we interpret Malcolm Gladwell’s “Igon Values?”

    Read More
    • Replies: @res

    So how should we interpret Malcolm Gladwell’s “Igon Values?”
     
    The opposite. Someone who has heard a word but either not read it or never connected the two. In this case an indication the word was never encountered in formal combined spoken/written instruction (e.g. college). Also a good clue he does not know what he is talking about. How much advanced math is learned exclusively verbally?

    I tend to the reader's problem so sympathize with Obama a bit, but corps seems like an odd word to mispronounce in adulthood (did he never see a marine corps TV ad or news segment?). I'm pretty sure I made that mistake as a child, but it did not persist even though mistakes like this seem to have some stickiness to them.

  131. @Richard of Melbourne
    Brits don't actually speak the way Obama records here. It's a fair attempt, granted, but the idioms are lifted from movies and TV shows and probably a generation out of date (assuming the incident is set in the 1980s). (Hopefully your British readers can back me up on this.)

    I suspect the geological student on the plane comes from the same place as the racist girlfriend - Obama's fertile imagination.

    Thanks, Steve, for reading Obama's book so the rest of us don't have to.

    There’s good chance the kid was a graduate of the Royal School of Mines – part of Imperial College. And that dialogue seems reasonably like an RSM oik from the ’80s.

    Read More
  132. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous
    A middle east in total disarray prevents the formation of an alliance of states hostile to Israel, Saudi Arabia, Qatar and the other little gulf sheikdoms

    More importantly, the destruction of strong, independent states eliminates possible challenges to Israel from a conventional military and sophisticated weaponry (including biological) and a source of funds and weaponry to non-state actors.

    Israel hasn’t faced an existential conventional military threat in 42 years. No need to tear Syria apart to prevent that.

    Read More
  133. Richard says:
    @Anonymous
    "There is no evidence for it, Ayers, himself claimed to be “joking” when he made the “claim.”"

    Yeah, because it's normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it's really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend's/colleague's book.

    Yeah, because it’s normal to claim to have ghostwritten a book for a friend. Maybe Obama really did write his book himself, but it’s really quite odd for a someone to joke around by claiming to have ghostwritten a friend’s/colleague’s book.

    At the time Ayers made the joke/comment, the rumor was already going around that he had ghostwritten Obama’s book. Making a puckish riff on that would be entirely in keeping with the sense of humor of Ayers’ milieu and generation. (Which doesn’t mean he didn’t help write the book, just that the “claim” doesn’t count for much.)

    Read More
  134. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Anonymous
    There's a difference between a theoretical McCain administration's war designs & what it could actually pull off during a Reid-Pelosi Congress. Another obstacle would be the anti-war "movement"/media fad, a supposed force of nature that evaporated once the polished Benneton boy was in charge. Consistently the whiteliberal synthetic romance with Blackus Aurelius has not only shielded generic R2P nitwits of the Susan Power/Sam Rice stripe, it's also created or saved the jobs of saboteurs like Victoria Nuland. Though it looked doubtful for a moment Obama truly has reclaimed U.S. foreign policy for the messianic-imperialist team.

    If you're trying to extoll the diplomatic prudence of Democrat leadership in general, spin while you can: it'll be harder not to laugh once Obama's Libya architect is in the White House again, bombing aspirin factories for a source of "Meet the Press" talking points.

    “Though it looked doubtful for a moment Obama truly has reclaimed U.S. foreign policy for the messianic-imperialist team.”

    I think Obama’s Nobel Peace Prize was perhaps a pre-emptive action on the part of Europeans to try to put pressure on Obama to refrain from adopting a U.S. foreign policy for the “messianic-imperialist team”. They might have felt it was one of the few weapons they have to influence U.S. foreign policy, especially since the E.U. increasingly seems to be the U.S.’s bitch. (Okay, this might be a bit hyperbolic.)

    Read More
  135. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    David Maraniss's big 2012 biography of Obama has a bunch of his letters to a girlfriend around age 22-23, and they're in roughly the same Creative Writing 302-style as "Dreams from My Father:"

    "Manhattan streets are broad and bumpy; the cool crisp grey of fall glows on the teeming faces of the midtown rush; the drunk slides back and forth on his subway seat under the gaze of the neat older woman knitting her mauve yarn; the pigeons comb the cobblestones on Riverside, white and grey and plump …"

    http://www.vdare.com/articles/global-elites-and-the-first-black-president-maraniss-s-barack-obama-the-official-story-reve

    I didn’t read DFMF, but I thought that his girlfriend in the book (or maybe it was a different girlfriend from the ones the letters were written to) was actually a composite of several girlfriends that he had had. If that’s true, then the letters to her might be a composite of actual letters written, as well.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Maraniss's biography documents Obama's life up through age his mid-20s with numbing thoroughness.
  136. @Anonymous
    I didn't read DFMF, but I thought that his girlfriend in the book (or maybe it was a different girlfriend from the ones the letters were written to) was actually a composite of several girlfriends that he had had. If that's true, then the letters to her might be a composite of actual letters written, as well.

    Maraniss’s biography documents Obama’s life up through age his mid-20s with numbing thoroughness.

    Read More
  137. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Svigor

    We both know your actual argument is basically: blacks are stupid (low IQ’s), so there’s no way Obama could’ve written that. He went to Columbia and Harvard Law School? Oh, just affirmative action, reverse racism…take a deep breath, ok? He’s just smarter than you. It’s ok.
     
    I'd say Hussein lacks much of a work ethic (lots of support for that), thinks himself above petty grinds like writing books (ditto), and most importantly, he's an empty suit whose single greatest qualification for the presidency is Affirmative Action. So, it seems at least likely that his books were ghost-written, and absolutely certain that having books ghost-written for him is 100% in-character. But no, he's not too stupid to have written them. And he probably isn't nearly as smart as you seem to think he is (seems a silly argument to link to an idea like Dave's, since anyone can take it up); the upper bounds of his IQ have been pretty well-estimated here in previous arguments, at 130 (TL;DR version: he didn't make it past National Merit Scholarship semifinalist (IIRC)).

    (Hussein can put all of this to bed by releasing his records, something he's gone to court to oppose, again IIRC)

    I don't remember seeing your refutation of Cashill's analysis. Eventually someone with impeccable credentials and pedigree will analyze Obama's writing (probably after he's left office), and my guess is Cashill will be proven right. And an educated guess is all it is, though I'm much more confident in my prediction that someone will put his supposed work under the microscope.

    Is it really all that hard to imagine that his books were written by one of the legion of more-qualified, white leftist writers? Is it really all that hard to imagine them being delighted at the prospect of propping up a "clean" black for the cause? Is it really hard to imagine leftists lying to get God's Work done? Do you find Hussein such a known quantity, so genuine, so earthy, and so obviously not invented, that you can't wrap your head around him benefiting from ghost writers (lol)?

    Yet a guy who writes like this (and who, one must presume and is led to believe, reads a lot) pronounces “corps” as “corpse”. He said “the Navy signal corpse”, not in just one speech but in two that I know of. The guy is a liar and a fraud.
     
    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you've never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as "corps" would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.

    According to Cashill, Obama didn’t finish DFMF by the original deadline given to him, so it’s possible he might have needed a ghostwriter to actually finish the book.

    From Cashill, “With advance in hand, Obama repaired to Chicago where he dithered. At one point, in order to finish without interruption, he and wife Michelle decamped to Bali. Obama was supposed to have finished the book within a year. Bali or not, advance or no, he could not. He was surely in way over his head.

    “According to a surprisingly harsh 2006 article by liberal publisher Peter Osnos, which detailed the “ruthlessness” of Obama’s literary ascent, Simon & Schuster canceled the contract. Dystel did not give up. She solicited Times Book, the division of Random House at which Osnos was publisher. He met with Obama, took his word that he could finish the book, and authorized a new advance of $40,000.”

    http://www.americanthinker.com/2008/10/who_wrote_dreams_from_my_fathe_1.html#ixzz3kvj0VRb1

    Read More
  138. @Anonymous
    Bullshit or not - you decide!

    Bullshit or not – you decide!

    It’s plausible to me. I mean, I don’t have time to pay attention to what people like Qaddafi are doing, but if he threatened the dollar’s supremacy, that would be reason for the USG to take him out. The hegemony of the dollar is what allows the US empire to extract tribute.

    Read More
  139. @Svigor

    We both know your actual argument is basically: blacks are stupid (low IQ’s), so there’s no way Obama could’ve written that. He went to Columbia and Harvard Law School? Oh, just affirmative action, reverse racism…take a deep breath, ok? He’s just smarter than you. It’s ok.
     
    I'd say Hussein lacks much of a work ethic (lots of support for that), thinks himself above petty grinds like writing books (ditto), and most importantly, he's an empty suit whose single greatest qualification for the presidency is Affirmative Action. So, it seems at least likely that his books were ghost-written, and absolutely certain that having books ghost-written for him is 100% in-character. But no, he's not too stupid to have written them. And he probably isn't nearly as smart as you seem to think he is (seems a silly argument to link to an idea like Dave's, since anyone can take it up); the upper bounds of his IQ have been pretty well-estimated here in previous arguments, at 130 (TL;DR version: he didn't make it past National Merit Scholarship semifinalist (IIRC)).

    (Hussein can put all of this to bed by releasing his records, something he's gone to court to oppose, again IIRC)

    I don't remember seeing your refutation of Cashill's analysis. Eventually someone with impeccable credentials and pedigree will analyze Obama's writing (probably after he's left office), and my guess is Cashill will be proven right. And an educated guess is all it is, though I'm much more confident in my prediction that someone will put his supposed work under the microscope.

    Is it really all that hard to imagine that his books were written by one of the legion of more-qualified, white leftist writers? Is it really all that hard to imagine them being delighted at the prospect of propping up a "clean" black for the cause? Is it really hard to imagine leftists lying to get God's Work done? Do you find Hussein such a known quantity, so genuine, so earthy, and so obviously not invented, that you can't wrap your head around him benefiting from ghost writers (lol)?

    Yet a guy who writes like this (and who, one must presume and is led to believe, reads a lot) pronounces “corps” as “corpse”. He said “the Navy signal corpse”, not in just one speech but in two that I know of. The guy is a liar and a fraud.
     
    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you've never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as "corps" would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.

    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you’ve never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as “corps” would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.

    Yeah, I’ve botched a few pronunciations in my time too. Most embarrassing was pronouncing mystic as “my stick,” and being corrected by an older cousin in front of the whole family.

    But that’s nothing. I’ve had a history professor who pronounced Yalta as “Yat-la” among other howlers, and even more egregiously a lecturer in global political economy who pronounced Keynesian as “Keneezian.” Both were native English-speakers. These guys may have been dyslexic but how the hell did they manage to become professors without ever hearing these words pronounced properly?

    Bad as that is, I think it’s even worse – or harder to live down – to incorrectly write words you’ve only ever heard spoken. A classic example of this is writing “walla” for voila – and yes, I’ve done that. (It has to be on that level though – it can’t just be a simple spelling error.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Back in the 1970s a lot of people learned how to pronounce big words from watching William F. Buckley Jr. on TV: e.g., "inimitable."
    , @Anonymous
    Bivouac, Phoebe, Wilkes Barre - I was surprised by the pronunciations of all of these words/names when I was young.
  140. @silviosilver

    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you’ve never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as “corps” would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.
     
    Yeah, I've botched a few pronunciations in my time too. Most embarrassing was pronouncing mystic as "my stick," and being corrected by an older cousin in front of the whole family.

    But that's nothing. I've had a history professor who pronounced Yalta as "Yat-la" among other howlers, and even more egregiously a lecturer in global political economy who pronounced Keynesian as "Keneezian." Both were native English-speakers. These guys may have been dyslexic but how the hell did they manage to become professors without ever hearing these words pronounced properly?

    Bad as that is, I think it's even worse - or harder to live down - to incorrectly write words you've only ever heard spoken. A classic example of this is writing "walla" for voila - and yes, I've done that. (It has to be on that level though - it can't just be a simple spelling error.)

    Back in the 1970s a lot of people learned how to pronounce big words from watching William F. Buckley Jr. on TV: e.g., “inimitable.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Veracitor
    President Jimmy Carter famously called himself a "nucular engineer."
  141. Pericles says:
    @Dennis Dale
    Isn't that bit about European civilization and how it "wasn't mine" lifted from Baldwin? I've read the Obama book and I've never read any Baldwin, but I remember an excerpt of his I saw somewhere that says much the same thing only Baldwin, despite his inherent bitterness (I imagine as a gay black man born long before the sexual revolution he actually understood what it means to be alienated from one's surroundings, but I digress), makes peace with it, whereas O, ever mindful to craft the image of himself bearing his alienation like a cross, almost disdains it. This despite the fact he's half white! It could be his, but he rejects it to later rhapsodize about grandma's hut in Kenya and the barbershop back in Chicago (though he never managed to spend much time in either, I notice). What a dick. What a profound...dick.

    And how does Obama's obsession with blood inheritance square with the left's environmental blank-slatism and race as social construct tenets? Raised in a white culture and enjoying all its benefits, it seems to me all he has to hang his selected identity on are his African features. Did they ever hamper him beyond the profound indignity of someone asking to touch his hair once?

    Has anyone here ever touched or asked to touch a black man or woman’s hair, or seen or heard anyone of their acquaintance do the same? I haven’t.

    Read More
  142. LondonBob says:
    @5371
    [Which he more or less was.]

    Yes. In Greene's autobiography he describes how General de Lattre accused him to his face of being a spy, and adds what seems like a vigorous refutation of the charge. One needs to read the passage carefully to see that there is in fact no denial.

    Frederick Forsyth has admitted being an MI6 agent.

    Yes that Englishman sounds like an American stereotype not a real person.

    Obama’s problem is he has allowed himself to be dragged into various disastrous foreign policy decisions because he is weak, with Libya by Hillary despite strong reservations from the deep state. He is at heart an isolationist.

    Read More
  143. Pericles says:
    @candid_observer
    It's interesting that we no longer hear about how eloquent a speaker Obama is -- except, of course, on those occasions in which he speaks about how racist our society is. Thus, his speech on the Charleston murders was, of course, depicted as hugely moving; but that praise could as well have been written in advance.

    But I have always been struck by how unmemorable is everything that has ever come out of his mouth, or from his pen. Where's the great line or great passage one associates with Obama? He can't even seem to hire good speechwriters.

    Give Obama his due: “You didn’t build that.”

    Though it might originally have come from Fauxcahontas.

    Read More
  144. LondonBob says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    If you go back 30 years ago, when the Middle East was in much less disarray, no such alliance formed then either. I don't think it explains current policy.

    Israeli foreign policy is to balkanise the Middle East into as many sectarian cantons based on religion/ethnicity as possible.

    http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/pdf/The%20Zionist%20Plan%20for%20the%20Middle%20East.pdf

    Read More
  145. res says:
    @Veracitor
    So how should we interpret Malcolm Gladwell's "Igon Values?"

    So how should we interpret Malcolm Gladwell’s “Igon Values?”

    The opposite. Someone who has heard a word but either not read it or never connected the two. In this case an indication the word was never encountered in formal combined spoken/written instruction (e.g. college). Also a good clue he does not know what he is talking about. How much advanced math is learned exclusively verbally?

    I tend to the reader’s problem so sympathize with Obama a bit, but corps seems like an odd word to mispronounce in adulthood (did he never see a marine corps TV ad or news segment?). I’m pretty sure I made that mistake as a child, but it did not persist even though mistakes like this seem to have some stickiness to them.

    Read More
  146. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @silviosilver

    This can happen when what you read is at a higher level than the conversations around you; nobody uses the word, so you’ve never heard it pronounced. Though as mundane a word as “corps” would seem to be a poor example; I remember making the same mistake, and being corrected, at age 9 or so.
     
    Yeah, I've botched a few pronunciations in my time too. Most embarrassing was pronouncing mystic as "my stick," and being corrected by an older cousin in front of the whole family.

    But that's nothing. I've had a history professor who pronounced Yalta as "Yat-la" among other howlers, and even more egregiously a lecturer in global political economy who pronounced Keynesian as "Keneezian." Both were native English-speakers. These guys may have been dyslexic but how the hell did they manage to become professors without ever hearing these words pronounced properly?

    Bad as that is, I think it's even worse - or harder to live down - to incorrectly write words you've only ever heard spoken. A classic example of this is writing "walla" for voila - and yes, I've done that. (It has to be on that level though - it can't just be a simple spelling error.)

    Bivouac, Phoebe, Wilkes Barre – I was surprised by the pronunciations of all of these words/names when I was young.

    Read More
  147. @Godwin Daily
    This girl I knew was the daughter of a fairly high-up judge in Michigan, I think appellate, whose husband was a confidante of John Engler (N.B. while the latter indicates zip, class-wise, I still rightly or wrongly view upper-echelon magistrate as a somewhat g-loaded post). Anyway one time I met her mother and she in hubby's direction referred to the parking lot valet with a hard "et" (rhymes with wallet). This was so funny to me that I remember nothing else about her other than that I was trying to work Swiss ski lodges and gunfire trajectory angles into the conversation however improbably.

    p.s. I shouldn't neglect the possibility that this was a normal upper Midwestern pronunciation with which I was merely unfamiliar, thus putting the joke on me if ever I find myself in Grossay Point riding in a Chevrolette

    This girl I knew was the daughter of a fairly high-up judge in Michigan, I think appellate, whose husband was a confidante of John Engler (N.B. while the latter indicates zip, class-wise, I still rightly or wrongly view upper-echelon magistrate as a somewhat g-loaded post). Anyway one time I met her mother and she in hubby’s direction referred to the parking lot valet with a hard “et” (rhymes with wallet).

    Actually, if you’re a fan of Downton Abbey or other British period dramas, you’ll have noted that the Lords and Ladies of the best breeding indeed did (and I believe still do) pronounce the word ‘VAL-ett’, with the accent on the first syllable, and a hard ‘t’ at the end.

    Is it possible she was sufficiently posh to have heard the word pronounced in context in England, or among Anglophilic upper-crust types?

    Read More
  148. Veracitor says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Back in the 1970s a lot of people learned how to pronounce big words from watching William F. Buckley Jr. on TV: e.g., "inimitable."

    President Jimmy Carter famously called himself a “nucular engineer.”

    Read More
  149. Hibernian says:
    @Anonymous
    IIRC, Kennedy was accused of not having written a book attributed to him. He denied this and even threatened people with libel lawsuits over it, but years after his death it turned out the claims were true after all. I think he wrote the introduction and closing chapter but everything else was ghostwritten.

    “Profiles in Courage” – widely believed to be written by Theodore Sorensen. Also, his undergraduate thesis “Why England Slept” was published as a book and widely believed to be ghostwritten.

    Read More

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
The evidence is clear — but often ignored