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Here’s a bike ride last fall through the homeless encampment along the Santa Ana River in Anaheim, Orange County, CA.

And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years.

Solution: more immigration!

The standard of living of homeless people appears to have gone up in recent decades to about that of backpackers. It’s no longer just crazy people sleeping on the ground, it’s people with tents and air mattresses. How do they protect their stuff when they are off begging? Do they have electronic alarms now?

It looks like we are part way to Tyler Cowen’s Brazilian shantytowns for America. I presume an artistic renaissance will be emerging from them at any moment.

 
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  1. Pat Casey says:

    That’s crazy. It looks like he rides right over those pigeons at 28 seconds.

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  2. anonguy says:

    Steve, I saw this and thought, hmm, how is this showing up on google maps/street view.

    My understanding is that this is the Santa Ana river bike trail.

    Turns out, not single bit of evidence of a single homeless encampment for the entire trail in google maps.

    I thought, wow, and then I checked other public areas that I know have homeless encampments, again, zippo.

    So I guess google scrubs this for some reason. Perfectly ok to show my house, how and a where I live, but apparently not the homes of “homeless” people. I don’t even understand the logic, though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Carol
    I think they scrubbed Montmartre and Place de Clichy too. Fall 2017 street views look like Paris circa 1970.
    , @Realist
    "Steve, I saw this and thought, hmm, how is this showing up on google maps/street view."

    Google maps isn't updated daily.
    , @The Alarmist

    "Turns out, not single bit of evidence of a single homeless encampment for the entire trail in google maps."
     
    The areas along the river, and even the river itself, are pixelated and show editing that suggests they are indeed scrubbed. How long before they end up being shown in the UN?
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  3. 1/ Being homeless in CA=SWPL

    2/ Wonder how many of them have phones that let them comment on websites.

    Anyhow:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    LA, like much of the West Coast, has a long hobo tradition.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4XEhnRBnA8

    There likely needs to be some sort of housing for drop-outs and people who can't hack it for various reasons. A certain percentage of the population simply cannot function is a highly complex society. This fact was easier to hide when you did not need a credit card, a bank account and a mortgage to survive. It used to much easier to live on the margins. Skyrocketing real estate prices have not helped things. It is difficult to justify spending funds on such people when we can't properly house struggling families with children.

    Add to that the rampant drug addiction, the druggy lifestyle, family dysfunction and the general nihilism promoted by pop culture, and none of this is surprising.
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  4. Clyde says:

    Tyler Cowen could get rich selling his own brand of canned beans there. Who is in the shanty town? I would think mostly immigrants legal and illegal. Some whites. Blacks don’t camp out. We have seen stories of google and other tech workers camping out and living in their vehicles.

    Op-Ed Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America? (LA Times January 14th) http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114-story.html

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    Op-Ed Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America? (LA Times January 14th)
     
    Tucker Carlson has had a number of very smart people from California on his show who will tell you that the problem is that California is still part of the Union, which has restrictionist immigration policies. If we can reform immigration "comprehensively," California will be free to attract the immigrants it needs to boost its economic prospects. It seems like you're unaware that there is an X number of additional immigrants California needs to return itself to prosperity. It's just simple economics, really.
    , @oddsbodkins
    "Who is in the shanty town? I would think mostly immigrants legal and illegal."

    We have lots of small versions of this camp in Berkeley. White to black ratio is roughly that of the town. I've never seen a hispanic or asian in one.

    One reason there is so much of this in CA is because the weather is so good and the cops and laws are friendly in many towns. A homeless person anywhere in the US needs a good reason not to come to California and live easier.
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  5. J.Ross says: • Website

    This is the logical and predictable outcome of government guaranteed student loans for arts majors. Soros astroturf outfits can recruit from places like this. They need an Arizonan octogenarian to stop ticket-splitting and come teach them the beauty of work.

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  6. whorefinder says: • Website

    Where do you think the Occutards got the idea to take over city parks from?

    Camping is a very white people thing to do. I would bet these white homeless folks were too apprehensive of getting welfare housing because the local ones in their area were all black and puerto rican and really rough. So they just decided to camp in an area rather than live in the same building as Slave-Americans and San Juan-Americans.

    Interestingly, I saw a documentary once where the black subject was trying to be an actor in LA, and to save money, instead of renting a room or moving to the ghetto, hiked up the hills in LA and camped out in the woods every night. The black guy said he was there during some riots but was completely safe where he was—far away from his brothers

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    • Replies: @benjaminl
    I've heard for at least a couple of decades about UC Santa Cruz students saving money by living in the surrounding forest.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/UCSC/comments/4agkeq/serious_fulltime_student_considering_living_in/
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  7. Thomas says:

    How do they protect their stuff when they are off begging? Do they have electronic alarms now?

    I think I’ve commented before that, thanks to Amazon, Wal-Mart, and China, camping stuff (along with a lot of other things) is dirt cheap now, like less than $50 new for a basic tent and air mattress. There’s not much percentage to stealing it, especially for people who don’t have a car, and would have to trundle it off somewhere, when it’s already probably in a pretty good spot. A bigger problem might be somebody deciding to squat in your camp or tent and not leaving. A lot of these encampments look sort of semi-permanent now, possibly more permanent than the residents.

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    • Replies: @bartok
    Planet Fitness showers for $20/month.
    Calif. state beach annual day pass for your car or RV: ~$300.

    Beats slaving in an Amazon warehouse full-time or working for Uber for $0.52 / hr after expenses.
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  8. Thomas says:

    And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years.

    Most of coastal California has erected serious barriers to entry to new housing, enough so that it would probably take a decade of deregulation to clear the market.

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    • Replies: @Hare Krishna
    Correct. This is a consequence of super strict zoning
    , @1661er
    https://blog.savesfbay.org/2013/09/bay-or-river/

    San Francisco Bay was supposed to have almost 400 more square miles of lands to build housing on by 2020, from the plan in the 1960s.

    But a bunch of rich home owners on Berkeley Hills didn't like how it would affect there viewshed. So people are homeless. What can you do?

    Let's repeal CEQA/ESA/CWA and pave the bay.
    , @AnotherDad

    Most of coastal California has erected serious barriers to entry to new housing, enough so that it would probably take a decade of deregulation to clear the market.
     
    This is just one of the twenty odd things i listed last week where progressive policy/ideology is contradictory to their open borders ideology.

    You can absolutely have strict zoning to preserve a particular "look and feel" and open space. But if you have it with open immigration to a generous welfare state the crappy result--soaring housing prices and squatter slums--are entirely predictable.
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  9. Steve, I read the San Francisco Chronicle on line. Homelessness is big business, with San Fran spending a record $241 million in 2017 and that doesn’t include charitable contributions and services. When the homeless go away so do all sorts of government jobs and jobs at NGOs. However, the homeless also bring big health risks as San Diego is discovering with a hepatitis outbreak.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    San Francisco, and its sister progville Portlandia have spawned maps to show where to avoid human waste. Used to be just dogs, now human sidewalk behavior has become more fluid.
    , @jill
    New York city spent 1.7 billion on the homeless in 2017

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-york-city-homeless-strategy-expansive-costly/
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  10. TG says:

    Welcome to the third world.

    You will know that Californians are really scr*wed when the liberals start referring to these tent-cities as ‘colorful,’ ‘vibrant,’ or ‘dynamic.’

    There is an old Chinese curse: ‘may you live in interesting times.’ I have a new one. ‘May a liberal describe your living situation as rich, vibrant, and full of life.’ Just pray that they never have reason to call it ‘sustainable.’

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    • Agree: j
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  11. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    I don’t get why this sort of thing is tolerated.

    If people want to camp out, let them do it in a campground.

    If they’re temporarily without shelter due to some issue, have a shelter where they can stay for a few days or a week. After that, tell them if they’re found sleeping outside, they’ll be arrested and offer them a free bus ride to a long term homeless encampment set up out in the sticks somewhere.

    A state like Mississippi could set up a homeless city complete with social services and amenities and charge rich California cities a couple hundred dollars per person per month for the homeless they send over.

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    • Agree: International Jew
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    When Sirius XM (actually when they were separate, I had XM) had a novelty music channel they played a folksey cowboy-chord-strummy tune called "Draft The Bums". I only heard it once.

    I think it really upset people and they pulled it. That was about 2002 or 2003.

    They played a lot of stuff I have never heard anywhere else as well, including an ode to Dwight Yoakam entitled, "My Jeans Are Too Tight". I wish I'd rolled tape on this stuff.
    , @SteveRogers42
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Civilian_Conservation_Corps
    , @Benjaminl
    I assume that the Imperial Judiciary has informed the lowly city councils that the Constitution prohibits taking any measures against the Individual Rights of junkies who literally sh*t on public property.
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  12. vinny says:

    What’s the next cheapest option if you can’t find a friend with a couch? A $1000 a month apartment in Lancaster? Makes skid row sound kind of nice.

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    • Replies: @CCZ
    Maybe not:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khpl3JCrtUg
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  13. https://www.youtube.com/embed/ xOwSaSl_PGk

    The Wreck of the H Rodham Clinton.

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  14. It’s Anaheim, not Fountain Valley. This runs along the 57 freeway, where it meets the 5, near Angels stadium. Fountain Valley, right next to Huntington Beach, would not tolerate this.

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  15. Ivy says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, I read the San Francisco Chronicle on line. Homelessness is big business, with San Fran spending a record $241 million in 2017 and that doesn't include charitable contributions and services. When the homeless go away so do all sorts of government jobs and jobs at NGOs. However, the homeless also bring big health risks as San Diego is discovering with a hepatitis outbreak.

    San Francisco, and its sister progville Portlandia have spawned maps to show where to avoid human waste. Used to be just dogs, now human sidewalk behavior has become more fluid.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    DESIGNATED
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  16. Altai says:

    The standard of living of homeless people appears to have gone up in recent decades to about that of backpackers. It’s no longer just crazy people sleeping on the ground, it’s people with tents and air mattresses.

    Sounds like a modern version of Hooverville.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

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    • Replies: @charles w abbott
    Thank you for mentioning Hoovervilles. I read somewhere when the last Hooverville from the Great Depression was finally removed from Manhattan, but offhand can't remember. That fact was mentioned as an offhand comment in a personal recollection of growing up in New York City
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  17. Carol says:
    @anonguy
    Steve, I saw this and thought, hmm, how is this showing up on google maps/street view.

    My understanding is that this is the Santa Ana river bike trail.

    Turns out, not single bit of evidence of a single homeless encampment for the entire trail in google maps.

    I thought, wow, and then I checked other public areas that I know have homeless encampments, again, zippo.

    So I guess google scrubs this for some reason. Perfectly ok to show my house, how and a where I live, but apparently not the homes of "homeless" people. I don't even understand the logic, though.

    I think they scrubbed Montmartre and Place de Clichy too. Fall 2017 street views look like Paris circa 1970.

    Read More
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  18. CCZ says:
    @vinny
    What's the next cheapest option if you can't find a friend with a couch? A $1000 a month apartment in Lancaster? Makes skid row sound kind of nice.

    Maybe not:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seth Largo
    On a related thread last week, some commenters said the homeless camps in places like Orange County and SF are surprisingly white, young-ish, and kinda nice in a hippy way. If this is true, it would be interesting to compare the OC and SF camps with a place like Skid Row, which is not any of those things.
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  19. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Ivy
    San Francisco, and its sister progville Portlandia have spawned maps to show where to avoid human waste. Used to be just dogs, now human sidewalk behavior has become more fluid.

    DESIGNATED

    Read More
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  20. jcd1974 says:

    How do they protect their stuff when they go off begging?

    I suppose they same way they do in my city, by the “code of the streets”. If you touch a homeless persons stuff you risk a beating by someone who would look forward to going to jail.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Take it with you, hide it, or hope for the best. A lot if it is passively defended by not being worth stealing.
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  21. Maybe California could seize the Trump National Golf Club in Palos Verdes via eminent domain and use it to build housing for the homeless. It’s very easy to have land declared blighted in California and with a public purpose established the state could escalate its war against Trump. Given Trump’s defense of Agenda 21 and Kelo, and his refusal to let go of his company, he would look like a massive hypocrite fighting such an action.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alden
    The multimillionaire liberalswho live in Palos Verdes would never allow a homeless encampment in their city.
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  22. @Thomas

    And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years.
     
    Most of coastal California has erected serious barriers to entry to new housing, enough so that it would probably take a decade of deregulation to clear the market.

    Correct. This is a consequence of super strict zoning

    Read More
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  23. Given the number of gangs in that area I’m sure the gangs could make genuine money by clearing the homeless out, and perhaps acting as death squads….just like in Latin America

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  24. J.Ross says: • Website
    @jcd1974
    How do they protect their stuff when they go off begging?

    I suppose they same way they do in my city, by the "code of the streets". If you touch a homeless persons stuff you risk a beating by someone who would look forward to going to jail.

    Take it with you, hide it, or hope for the best. A lot if it is passively defended by not being worth stealing.

    Read More
    • Agree: Alden
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  25. George says:

    Land Titles for the Urban Poor

    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/josephine-dallant/land-titles-for-the-urban_b_5327595.html

    Rio Is Finally Issuing Land Titles In The Notorious Favelas

    http://www.businessinsider.com/rio-is-finally-issuing-land-titles-in-its-favelas-2012-5

    See once they have valid title they can get mortgages and buy cars and stuff.

    Read More
    • Replies: @George
    The Clinton Foundation has the answer, micro land!

    Micro-Land Ownership in India

    https://www.clintonfoundation.org/clinton-global-initiative/commitments/micro-land-ownership-india
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  26. I agree that immigration will improve neither California’s homelessness nor water problems.

    Steve, this is not the first time you’ve written something like, “How do they protect their stuff when they are off begging?” First, some may be off working. Second, it seems like the best answers would come not from Unz commenters but from driving out to Anaheim and asking the folks there.

    Read More
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  27. @CCZ
    Maybe not:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=khpl3JCrtUg

    On a related thread last week, some commenters said the homeless camps in places like Orange County and SF are surprisingly white, young-ish, and kinda nice in a hippy way. If this is true, it would be interesting to compare the OC and SF camps with a place like Skid Row, which is not any of those things.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clifford Brown
    Homelessness that used to be restricted to just Skid Row Downtown, some of Venice and Santa Monica Palisades Park has spread to all over Los Angeles. Shanty towns exist under many freeway overpasses. The change is most prominent in Venice Beach where the growth has been exponential. Gutter punk type homeless live on the beach and RV campers are parked all over the neighborhood. RV living has become semi-commonplace in Los Angeles. It is a very weird sight and I wonder if it will spread to the rest of the nation.

    The Skid Row Downtown is a homeless universe until itself. Much rougher and drug addicted than the rest of the City. The heart of Skid Row is a real hellscape. No hippy homeless scene Downtown. Strangely, there are homeless encampments in Downtown LA over the 101 Freeway that are borderline civilized with some rather nice tents.

    The December 2017 Skirball Fire near the 405 Freeway was likely started in a homeless encampment.
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  28. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Mostly forgotten now, Roger Miller was huge back in the early to mid-60s.

    He was widely covered by various artists, well known and obscure, and there were several “answer songs” to King of the Road as well.

    One interesting thing about him was that he employed one of the more unusual sidemen in the history of country (or any other kind of) music, ,”Thumbs” Carille. He was a guitarist who played the guitar set down flat, like a steel guitar, using his fingers as if he were typing.

    Read More
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  29. MEH 0910 says:

    OT: Tom Petty Died From Accidental Drug Overdose Involving Opioids, Coroner Says

    Tom Petty, the chart-topping singer and songwriter, died in October from an accidental drug overdose as a result of mixing medications that included opioids, the medical examiner-coroner for the county of Los Angeles announced on Friday, ending the mystery surrounding his sudden death last year.

    The coroner, Jonathan Lucas, said that Mr. Petty’s system showed traces of the drugs fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Barely a week after Mr. Petty, 66, had concluded a tour with his band, the Heartbreakers, with two shows at the Hollywood Bowl, representatives said the singer had suffered cardiac arrest at his home in Malibu, Calif. on Oct. 2. But Mr. Petty’s official death certificate, released about a week later, listed his cause of death as “deferred” pending an autopsy.

    In a statement posted to Mr. Petty’s Facebook page on Friday, his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,” but that he continued to tour, worsening his conditions. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” the statement said.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Same as Prince?
    , @Daniel H
    >>his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,”

    Sedentary, rock and roll lifestyle is not good for you, especially as you age. He should have been at the gym 5 days/ week with a personal trainer, doing heavy resistance and intense, short burst cardio.

    When you are in your 60s, and your hip just ups and breaks, it's because you have spent too damn much time sitting on your ass. And I have heard that hip fractures are quite painful.
    , @wren
    Sounds like he may have been killed by Mexican gangs with Chinese poison.

    Or is that not what happened?
    , @Clifford Brown
    Sad.**

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6A99Q0vTi8

    Petty, Prince, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hard not to speculate about Dolores O'Riordan of The Cranberries, who had chronic back pain issues later in life.

    Opiates kill about one Vietnam War worth of Americans every year. This has got to be stopped.

    ** Note that in 1985, Petty could still write a song that references picking fruit in Florida as an American citizen. Someone needs to tell Congress.

    , @KevinB
    Anxiety and depression drugs as well. That stuff is garbage and is more harmful than the pseudo opiates he was on. Just a really sad way to go.
    , @Anon

    fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.
     
    Lol! He fixed that hip pain real good.
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  30. George says:
    @George
    Land Titles for the Urban Poor
    https://www.huffingtonpost.com/josephine-dallant/land-titles-for-the-urban_b_5327595.html

    Rio Is Finally Issuing Land Titles In The Notorious Favelas
    http://www.businessinsider.com/rio-is-finally-issuing-land-titles-in-its-favelas-2012-5

    See once they have valid title they can get mortgages and buy cars and stuff.

    The Clinton Foundation has the answer, micro land!

    Micro-Land Ownership in India

    https://www.clintonfoundation.org/clinton-global-initiative/commitments/micro-land-ownership-india

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. 1661er says:
    @Thomas

    And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years.
     
    Most of coastal California has erected serious barriers to entry to new housing, enough so that it would probably take a decade of deregulation to clear the market.

    https://blog.savesfbay.org/2013/09/bay-or-river/

    San Francisco Bay was supposed to have almost 400 more square miles of lands to build housing on by 2020, from the plan in the 1960s.

    But a bunch of rich home owners on Berkeley Hills didn’t like how it would affect there viewshed. So people are homeless. What can you do?

    Let’s repeal CEQA/ESA/CWA and pave the bay.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thomas
    San Francisco gets compared to Boston a lot, but that's one big difference: Boston reclaimed a ton of land before environmentalism was ever a thing.
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  32. @MEH 0910
    OT: Tom Petty Died From Accidental Drug Overdose Involving Opioids, Coroner Says

    Tom Petty, the chart-topping singer and songwriter, died in October from an accidental drug overdose as a result of mixing medications that included opioids, the medical examiner-coroner for the county of Los Angeles announced on Friday, ending the mystery surrounding his sudden death last year.

    The coroner, Jonathan Lucas, said that Mr. Petty’s system showed traces of the drugs fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Barely a week after Mr. Petty, 66, had concluded a tour with his band, the Heartbreakers, with two shows at the Hollywood Bowl, representatives said the singer had suffered cardiac arrest at his home in Malibu, Calif. on Oct. 2. But Mr. Petty’s official death certificate, released about a week later, listed his cause of death as “deferred” pending an autopsy.

    In a statement posted to Mr. Petty’s Facebook page on Friday, his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,” but that he continued to tour, worsening his conditions. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” the statement said.
     

    Same as Prince?

    Read More
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/arts/music/tom-petty-cause-death-opioid-overdose.html

    In 2016, the pop singer Prince was found to have died from an accidental overdose of self-administered fentanyl, a synthetic opiate estimated to be more than 50 times more powerful than heroin. In 2015, federal officials said that incidents and overdoses with fentanyl were “occurring at an alarming rate throughout the United States.” Drug deaths involving fentanyl more than doubled from 2015 to 2016, according to the governmental account of nationwide drug deaths last year.

    Prince, his friends and associates said after his death, also suffered from chronic hip pain that was exacerbated by a breakneck touring schedule, and he sought to hide what became a serious opiate addiction.
     
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  33. Daniel H says:

    Get your Hepatitis A/B vaccination, Steve. Hepatitis is running wild through these homeless shantytowns all around the LA area, and it just takes links with a few restaurant workers to vector this thing straight at the general population. Even the callous, wealthy Malibu types can’t totally avoid it. Most of their domestic help and restaurant workers are illegals or affiliated with illegals who interact with these encampments.

    I just completed the second course of my 3 course vaccination last week. I fear Hepatitis much more than I fear the Flu.

    Oh, isn’t diversity wonderful.

    Read More
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  34. Daniel H says:
    @MEH 0910
    OT: Tom Petty Died From Accidental Drug Overdose Involving Opioids, Coroner Says

    Tom Petty, the chart-topping singer and songwriter, died in October from an accidental drug overdose as a result of mixing medications that included opioids, the medical examiner-coroner for the county of Los Angeles announced on Friday, ending the mystery surrounding his sudden death last year.

    The coroner, Jonathan Lucas, said that Mr. Petty’s system showed traces of the drugs fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Barely a week after Mr. Petty, 66, had concluded a tour with his band, the Heartbreakers, with two shows at the Hollywood Bowl, representatives said the singer had suffered cardiac arrest at his home in Malibu, Calif. on Oct. 2. But Mr. Petty’s official death certificate, released about a week later, listed his cause of death as “deferred” pending an autopsy.

    In a statement posted to Mr. Petty’s Facebook page on Friday, his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,” but that he continued to tour, worsening his conditions. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” the statement said.
     

    >>his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,”

    Sedentary, rock and roll lifestyle is not good for you, especially as you age. He should have been at the gym 5 days/ week with a personal trainer, doing heavy resistance and intense, short burst cardio.

    When you are in your 60s, and your hip just ups and breaks, it’s because you have spent too damn much time sitting on your ass. And I have heard that hip fractures are quite painful.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Or you spent a lot of time jumping off risers during encores, like Petty and Prince did.
    , @BB753
    Sitting on your ass is bad for you, but definitely the rock and roll lifestyle of non-stop touring, late shows, no sleep, doing drugs, etc will kill you at age 66.
    The problem these old rock stars face is that they make little revenue from album sales in this digital age, so they've got to keep on touring till they drop dead. And very few rockers age gracefully and in good health like the Rolling Stones.
    , @Autochthon
    True. The aging rockers who stay healthy are invariably those who demand less grueling touring schedules (using residencies in Vegas or insisting on being away from home no more than three or four days at a time and taking many months if not years off between stints on the town of only three more months or so...).

    These guys who make it this far, if not fools, usually have plenty of coin to dictate such terms, so I never understand those who don't (an obsessive syndrome to be workaholics, as it were?).

    Compare Petty, Nelson, et al. to the guys from Kiss, Rush, Extreme.... Many of the latter hit the gym and are in better shape than guys ten or twenty years younger. The healthy ones also very often abstain from the boozing, smoking, and other drugs, or partake only once in awhile with sensible moderation. Heck, the guys from Rush and Genesis flat-out retired, quite wisely. There's no reason not to. These guys can still work at a relaxed pace in the studio, and play a festival or residency once in a while to get the thrill of performing live and feel like their dedicated fans aren't being deprived. Instead, they work themselves to death like an aging stevedore or cook with no savings who has no choice. Human behaviour is weird.
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  35. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    I don't get why this sort of thing is tolerated.

    If people want to camp out, let them do it in a campground.

    If they're temporarily without shelter due to some issue, have a shelter where they can stay for a few days or a week. After that, tell them if they're found sleeping outside, they'll be arrested and offer them a free bus ride to a long term homeless encampment set up out in the sticks somewhere.

    A state like Mississippi could set up a homeless city complete with social services and amenities and charge rich California cities a couple hundred dollars per person per month for the homeless they send over.

    When Sirius XM (actually when they were separate, I had XM) had a novelty music channel they played a folksey cowboy-chord-strummy tune called “Draft The Bums”. I only heard it once.

    I think it really upset people and they pulled it. That was about 2002 or 2003.

    They played a lot of stuff I have never heard anywhere else as well, including an ode to Dwight Yoakam entitled, “My Jeans Are Too Tight”. I wish I’d rolled tape on this stuff.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    They played a lot of stuff I have never heard anywhere else as well, including an ode to Dwight Yoakam entitled, “My Jeans Are Too Tight”. I wish I’d rolled tape on this stuff
     
    .

    I have XM in the car; I don't drive it much, but flashing through some of the new art channels reveals some interesting stuff. I wish the mainstream guys knew more than four chords.
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  36. @Daniel H
    >>his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,”

    Sedentary, rock and roll lifestyle is not good for you, especially as you age. He should have been at the gym 5 days/ week with a personal trainer, doing heavy resistance and intense, short burst cardio.

    When you are in your 60s, and your hip just ups and breaks, it's because you have spent too damn much time sitting on your ass. And I have heard that hip fractures are quite painful.

    Or you spent a lot of time jumping off risers during encores, like Petty and Prince did.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    Prince was known for jumping off risers, but was Petty?
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Yep.
    , @Olorin
    I see the Prince matter a bit differently.

    Seeing his far-outlier range of hip motions and hearing descriptions of his severe suffering later in life led me to suspect he had congenital hip dysplasia, uncorrected at birth, probably not recognized in his early years, and not corrected by surgery.

    At some point, iirc, a double hip replacement was recommended to him, but since JW doesn't allow blood transfusions, he refused what would have been a reasonably bloody procedure.

    At the time of Prince's birth, infants were not widely screened for CHD. Lack of normal hip socket formation can, in young adulthood, and for as long as the joint lasts, allow an astonishing range of motion, flexibility, and movement, particularly in jazz/modern and ballet dance.

    It has even been suggested that hip dysplasia may be selected for among dancers, since its "joint laxity" allows for more extreme physics (and thus can produce more extreme injuries).

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3535121/

    I found it useful for anything involving mobility strength and flexibility, like hand-over-hand climbing up rocks, or the gymnastics involved in sailing, or hockey, figure, and speed skating. Also had multiple teams of Ivy League and Big Ten sports ortho people assess the "unusual" range of motion. They didn't recognize its cause even that recently (late '90s).

    So it isn't just "jumping off risers," though that surely contributed to overall degeneration of the Princely joints.

    FWIW, on two occasions I had to re-seat a dislocated hip--once at the barre, once while backpacking solo. Likely not as big a deal as it would be for someone with a normal acetabulum ("cup"). Had no idea what was happening, just the joint being more funny than usual. Another time in performance I thought it was happening again, but it whomped out, then sorta klunked back into place at the end of the series of jumps. Managed to cover up my surprise and the off-balance it produced. As for the pain, some people bear it better than others, though after about 12 years it was hellish and I was deeply grateful to have it repaired/gone. I never "took anything" for it, not having (((pain management specialists))) pushing Sacklerish Pills on me.

    I have thought many times with great empathy on what Prince must have experienced in the last years of his life. RIP, based genius.

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  37. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Or you spent a lot of time jumping off risers during encores, like Petty and Prince did.

    Prince was known for jumping off risers, but was Petty?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In 1978.
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  38. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    There’s even a “gated community”! I wonder what you have to do to get a lot in there, behind the green plastic sheets?

    Or maybe it’s one guy’s “villa.” The boss.

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  39. Thomas says:
    @1661er
    https://blog.savesfbay.org/2013/09/bay-or-river/

    San Francisco Bay was supposed to have almost 400 more square miles of lands to build housing on by 2020, from the plan in the 1960s.

    But a bunch of rich home owners on Berkeley Hills didn't like how it would affect there viewshed. So people are homeless. What can you do?

    Let's repeal CEQA/ESA/CWA and pave the bay.

    San Francisco gets compared to Boston a lot, but that’s one big difference: Boston reclaimed a ton of land before environmentalism was ever a thing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    So did San Francisco.
    , @Steve Sailer
    San Francisco's existing landfill shakes a lot in earthquakes. SF's landfill Marina district was hit quite hard by the 1989 World Series earthquake that was centered about 60 miles to the south. I don't know if civil engineers have figured out yet how to do landfill that is earthquake safe.
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  40. Alden says:
    @Hare Krishna
    Maybe California could seize the Trump National Golf Club in Palos Verdes via eminent domain and use it to build housing for the homeless. It's very easy to have land declared blighted in California and with a public purpose established the state could escalate its war against Trump. Given Trump's defense of Agenda 21 and Kelo, and his refusal to let go of his company, he would look like a massive hypocrite fighting such an action.

    The multimillionaire liberalswho live in Palos Verdes would never allow a homeless encampment in their city.

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  41. And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years

    That’s just it – the premise is wrong. The Dow Jones is NOT the economy. Unemployment numbers have been bogus for a long time – anyone unemployed longer than the benefits last (if he even gets them) is no longer counted. Inflation numbers are bogus. Little old ladies have to be invested in the market with their late husband’s hard-earned savings due to the FED keeping rates down below 1 % for about a decade. Yes, I read Zerohedge, so what? ;-}

    I’m not arguing with the point that mass immigration has hurt the economy and quality of life in California immensely.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rocks Off
    Everything you say has been true for the past ten years. Are you arguing that during the past ten years the economy has been better than it is today? If not then you haven't refuted anything.

    The low black unemployment number, as fake they may be, are lower relative to the equally fake number during the past ten years, and this tells me we are indeed experiencing the best economy for employment during the past ten years.
    , @ScarletNumber

    Unemployment numbers have been bogus for a long time – anyone unemployed longer than the benefits last (if he even gets them) is no longer counted.
     
    The number is indeed bogus, but not for the reason you state. The official number is the U3 number, which excludes discouraged workers, marginally attached workers, and the underemployed. The number that includes all of these is the U6 number, and is currently 8.1%, as opposed to the official U3 number, which is 4.1%
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  42. bomag says:
    @Anonymous
    When Sirius XM (actually when they were separate, I had XM) had a novelty music channel they played a folksey cowboy-chord-strummy tune called "Draft The Bums". I only heard it once.

    I think it really upset people and they pulled it. That was about 2002 or 2003.

    They played a lot of stuff I have never heard anywhere else as well, including an ode to Dwight Yoakam entitled, "My Jeans Are Too Tight". I wish I'd rolled tape on this stuff.

    They played a lot of stuff I have never heard anywhere else as well, including an ode to Dwight Yoakam entitled, “My Jeans Are Too Tight”. I wish I’d rolled tape on this stuff

    .

    I have XM in the car; I don’t drive it much, but flashing through some of the new art channels reveals some interesting stuff. I wish the mainstream guys knew more than four chords.

    Read More
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  43. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    A blogger summarizes Tyler Cowen’s book Average is Over:

    http://www.nickthewolven.com/?p=40

    For starters, Cowen thinks we’ll soon be shunting elderly people into Sao Paolo-like favelas, patched-up shantytowns in which the grandmas and grandpas of the future will survive on a diet of cheap TV and canned beans. These taco-munching, Hulu-watching shanty-dwellers, meager as their existence appears, will still benefit at the expense of their grandkids. The aging of the population will create a self-serving, senescent voting bloc that siphons government aid from the young and poor and channels it into wasteful entitlements.

    The kids of the future will have a rough time, too. Crashing wages will leave twenty-somethings scraping out a day-to-day existence in grungy bohemias.

    And that’s not all. We’ll see a full collapse of traditional media, worsening political polarization, a thorough vulgarization of public discourse, an increase in government gridlock and corruption.

    The humanities will wither away, along with most of the university system. College professors will be out of work.

    They won’t be alone.

    The job markets in nearly every field will crater, leaving marketing and finance as the only healthy sectors. Mad men and bankers will hoard all the wealth.

    Just what you hope for, huh? But don’t feel too envious of these professional takers, fakers, and shakedown artists. Their work will be more grueling than ever. Voice-recognition and face-scanning technology will spy on every human behavior, leading to an arms race of manipulation and deceit.

    As discretionary income dams up in the accounts of elites, the service and entertainment industries will be forced to squabble for handouts from high-earners, who will in turn be harassed by relentless moochers and hangers-on.

    Will STEM careers be the solution to this cyborgian rat race?

    Keep dreaming! Science will become so abstruse and bureaucratic that people will give up even trying to understand it. We’ll slowly sink back into medieval superstition.

    Silver linings? Try this. The creationism debate won’t much of an issue–because public schooling will have disappeared. Instead we’ll force kids through a gauntlet of relentless machine-drilling and life-coaching–“like the Marines,” as Cowen says.

    Unlike the Marines, however, this model will benefit mostly women, as young men continue to slide inexorably into violence and apathy.

    These restive lugs will be kept in line, though. Law enforcement will use Minority Report-style methods to predict antisocial behavior before it even takes place–using drones, for instance, to scan people for hostile body language. Talk about profiling. In this future, just walking funny will bring the cops to your door.

    Indeed, most people will be under constant surveillance, tracked at work, in public, in their homes, with every peccadillo, every failure of efficiency, recorded and duly punished. Privacy will die.

    So will hope. Genetic screening and constant monitoring will sort children into two stark categories: winners and failures. There won’t be much point dreaming of a better future. Machines will tell us all what to do, who to marry, even what to desire. Ideas like authority, dignity, responsibility, and autonomy will fade away. Oligarchs and hoi polloi alike will become “handmaidens to the computer.”

    Not that it’s all bad. Some people will manage to evade this totalitarian meatgrinder. Cowen expects that large numbers of Americans will fall out of civilization entirely, railroaded into tent camps and anarchic trailer-slums, living a life of noisy desperation, off the grid, without amenities or water–without, really, much of anything at all, except, one imagines, a rusty machete hidden for defense under a sleeping bag.

    “A lot of people will have serious objections to some of these trends,” Cowen writes. “So be it.”

    The blogger also links to reviews of the book, ranging from Matthew Yglesias, who thinks it contains a “good policy reform agenda,” to William Galston, who thought it was “Swiftian satire.”

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  44. wren says:
    @MEH 0910
    OT: Tom Petty Died From Accidental Drug Overdose Involving Opioids, Coroner Says

    Tom Petty, the chart-topping singer and songwriter, died in October from an accidental drug overdose as a result of mixing medications that included opioids, the medical examiner-coroner for the county of Los Angeles announced on Friday, ending the mystery surrounding his sudden death last year.

    The coroner, Jonathan Lucas, said that Mr. Petty’s system showed traces of the drugs fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Barely a week after Mr. Petty, 66, had concluded a tour with his band, the Heartbreakers, with two shows at the Hollywood Bowl, representatives said the singer had suffered cardiac arrest at his home in Malibu, Calif. on Oct. 2. But Mr. Petty’s official death certificate, released about a week later, listed his cause of death as “deferred” pending an autopsy.

    In a statement posted to Mr. Petty’s Facebook page on Friday, his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,” but that he continued to tour, worsening his conditions. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” the statement said.
     

    Sounds like he may have been killed by Mexican gangs with Chinese poison.

    Or is that not what happened?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    You didn't get the memo: The Russians are behind Tom Petty's death. They traded rocket technology to the Norks to get them to do the actual deed.
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  45. Isn’t it precisely the “good economy” that’s causing this situation?

    Looks like a lot of young-ish Whites, even girls. Honestly, I kind of think good for these people. I think the cops should run them out of town, but since that isn’t happening, party on guys. Beats paying 1-2 thousand a month just to share a crappy apartment that they would hardly have time to live in anyway between work and commuting. Hopefully this experience teaches them to reject consumerism and stuff-accumulation.

    WNs should be subtly evangelizing and recruiting in these camps.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel H
    >>I think the cops should run them out of town, but since that isn’t happening, party on guys.

    Santa Monica is a "sanctuary" city for the homeless. Bums lounging around all over the place. But few seem to mind, so I won't complain. If they are ousted from their encampments in downtown LA or Orange Cty they can head there. But if hundreds more descend on that lovely city I do think the residents will complain and the police will chase them off. Where to then? The canyons, maybe, where an errantly attended campfire can start a conflagration that will burn down 100s of houses, as happened last month.
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  46. PSR says:

    Internment in a labor camp for 90 days. Minimum wage occupation, release with pay. Second offense, labor camp for 120 days, etc.

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  47. @anony-mouse
    1/ Being homeless in CA=SWPL

    2/ Wonder how many of them have phones that let them comment on websites.

    Anyhow:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=OmOe27SJ3Yc

    LA, like much of the West Coast, has a long hobo tradition.

    There likely needs to be some sort of housing for drop-outs and people who can’t hack it for various reasons. A certain percentage of the population simply cannot function is a highly complex society. This fact was easier to hide when you did not need a credit card, a bank account and a mortgage to survive. It used to much easier to live on the margins. Skyrocketing real estate prices have not helped things. It is difficult to justify spending funds on such people when we can’t properly house struggling families with children.

    Add to that the rampant drug addiction, the druggy lifestyle, family dysfunction and the general nihilism promoted by pop culture, and none of this is surprising.

    Read More
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
    Thank you for this common sense. "homelessness" will never be solved because some people just aren't willing to do what it takes to have a home.

    We have the same phenomena here in Sacramento with scores of homeless guys camping along the rivers and in the remoter regions of public parks. Same drugs, drink, filth, disease, mental illness that has been obvious since the 80's.

    As for their stuff, the churches and other charities are giving them loads of free camping gear. My old church did this, although i didn't contribute to that particular ministry. I feel bad for some of these guys, but free stuff isn't the answer. Sobriety and discipline is the answer, but they desperately don't want that.
    , @J1234
    That Haggard song sure sounds like a ripoff of John Hartford. I like it though.

    I think the bike ride video is dramatic, but rather misleading. My view is that California has tent city homeless people in the way Minnesota has a lot of people with snowshoes. Not necessarily something that's going to spread to a whole lot of other places, as Steve sort of implies:


    It looks like we are part way to Tyler Cowen’s Brazilian shantytowns for America.
     
    All the homeless people flock to places like southern California because it's warm and dry. When a segment of the national population has a tendency towards something dysfunctional, that population usually stays dispersed, but when climate plays a role in facilitating the dysfunction, the population gravitates to the best suited climate. When my wife and I were married almost 25 years ago, she said she'd never move to a warm climate like the South or the southwestern US because it attracts too many freeloaders. (Unbeknownst to her - she's a democrat - that's a "racist" notion that goes along with the morally discredited premise of environmental determinism.) 25 years ago was (more or less) before homelessness became the "epidemic" the media said it was.

    Here in the upper midwest, our homeless people are still largely of the crazy variety, though others might migrate through during the summer months. There are homeless shelters, but much of that is derived from domestic abuse situations. The California thing looks more like a way of life, to me. It maybe didn't exist to that extent in the past, but, as other have said, it was probably always there. As the population grows, the number of drifters and lazy people grows, too.

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  48. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Has RT latched onto this yet? Seems like it could be a feature story for them.

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  49. benjaminl says:
    @whorefinder
    Where do you think the Occutards got the idea to take over city parks from?

    Camping is a very white people thing to do. I would bet these white homeless folks were too apprehensive of getting welfare housing because the local ones in their area were all black and puerto rican and really rough. So they just decided to camp in an area rather than live in the same building as Slave-Americans and San Juan-Americans.

    Interestingly, I saw a documentary once where the black subject was trying to be an actor in LA, and to save money, instead of renting a room or moving to the ghetto, hiked up the hills in LA and camped out in the woods every night. The black guy said he was there during some riots but was completely safe where he was---far away from his brothers

    I’ve heard for at least a couple of decades about UC Santa Cruz students saving money by living in the surrounding forest.

    https://www.reddit.com/r/UCSC/comments/4agkeq/serious_fulltime_student_considering_living_in/

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  50. @MEH 0910
    OT: Tom Petty Died From Accidental Drug Overdose Involving Opioids, Coroner Says

    Tom Petty, the chart-topping singer and songwriter, died in October from an accidental drug overdose as a result of mixing medications that included opioids, the medical examiner-coroner for the county of Los Angeles announced on Friday, ending the mystery surrounding his sudden death last year.

    The coroner, Jonathan Lucas, said that Mr. Petty’s system showed traces of the drugs fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Barely a week after Mr. Petty, 66, had concluded a tour with his band, the Heartbreakers, with two shows at the Hollywood Bowl, representatives said the singer had suffered cardiac arrest at his home in Malibu, Calif. on Oct. 2. But Mr. Petty’s official death certificate, released about a week later, listed his cause of death as “deferred” pending an autopsy.

    In a statement posted to Mr. Petty’s Facebook page on Friday, his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,” but that he continued to tour, worsening his conditions. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” the statement said.
     

    Sad.**

    Petty, Prince, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hard not to speculate about Dolores O’Riordan of The Cranberries, who had chronic back pain issues later in life.

    Opiates kill about one Vietnam War worth of Americans every year. This has got to be stopped.

    ** Note that in 1985, Petty could still write a song that references picking fruit in Florida as an American citizen. Someone needs to tell Congress.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MEH 0910

    Petty, Prince, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hard not to speculate about Dolores O’Riordan of The Cranberries, who had chronic back pain issues later in life.
     
    Also Patton Oswalt's late wife, true crime writer Michelle McNamara.

    https://pagesix.com/2017/02/03/patton-oswalt-reveals-wifes-cause-of-death/

    Comedian and actor Patton Oswalt says coroner’s officials have told him that his wife died last year from a combination of prescription medications and an undiagnosed heart condition.

    Oswalt writes in a statement to The Associated Press that he and his wife Michelle McNamara did not know she had a condition that caused blockages in her arteries.

    His statement released by a publicist says coroner’s officials told him that the blockages, combined with her taking the medications Adderall, Xanax and the pain medication fentanyl, caused his wife’s death in April 2016.
     
    , @The preferred nomenclature is...
    My wife bought me that box set for Christmas the year it came out. Freakin' awesome.

    Chronic pain really, really sucks. I've lived with it since a teenager when I was in a very bad car wreck and jacked up a bunch of joints, especially a hip. I've had more surgeries over the years than you can count on your fingers. I take an anti-inflammatory pill a few times a week is all. No drugs or even alcohol to medicate.

    You have to stay active, eat right, don't smoke and be an asshole to deal with it. I discovered barbell training (Starting Strength) in my late 40's after my second hip replacement and a cracked femur. My hip has never been better. It still sucks but 15% less than before.
    , @nebulafox
    He looks a lot like Johnny Ramone.
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  51. It is illegal to build what people can afford to rent.

    Because the government is protecting people from “substandard” housing.

    You see articles on “micro-housing” as if nobody had ever thought of smaller units. It is never properly reported that the LAW is what’s prohibiting affordable housing.

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  52. @Seth Largo
    On a related thread last week, some commenters said the homeless camps in places like Orange County and SF are surprisingly white, young-ish, and kinda nice in a hippy way. If this is true, it would be interesting to compare the OC and SF camps with a place like Skid Row, which is not any of those things.

    Homelessness that used to be restricted to just Skid Row Downtown, some of Venice and Santa Monica Palisades Park has spread to all over Los Angeles. Shanty towns exist under many freeway overpasses. The change is most prominent in Venice Beach where the growth has been exponential. Gutter punk type homeless live on the beach and RV campers are parked all over the neighborhood. RV living has become semi-commonplace in Los Angeles. It is a very weird sight and I wonder if it will spread to the rest of the nation.

    The Skid Row Downtown is a homeless universe until itself. Much rougher and drug addicted than the rest of the City. The heart of Skid Row is a real hellscape. No hippy homeless scene Downtown. Strangely, there are homeless encampments in Downtown LA over the 101 Freeway that are borderline civilized with some rather nice tents.

    The December 2017 Skirball Fire near the 405 Freeway was likely started in a homeless encampment.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seth Largo
    I haven't been west of the 110 in years, so thanks for the update.

    Still, there's an interesting study waiting to be done about the demographics of these encampments.
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  53. Daniel H says:
    @27 year old
    Isn't it precisely the "good economy" that's causing this situation?

    Looks like a lot of young-ish Whites, even girls. Honestly, I kind of think good for these people. I think the cops should run them out of town, but since that isn't happening, party on guys. Beats paying 1-2 thousand a month just to share a crappy apartment that they would hardly have time to live in anyway between work and commuting. Hopefully this experience teaches them to reject consumerism and stuff-accumulation.

    WNs should be subtly evangelizing and recruiting in these camps.

    >>I think the cops should run them out of town, but since that isn’t happening, party on guys.

    Santa Monica is a “sanctuary” city for the homeless. Bums lounging around all over the place. But few seem to mind, so I won’t complain. If they are ousted from their encampments in downtown LA or Orange Cty they can head there. But if hundreds more descend on that lovely city I do think the residents will complain and the police will chase them off. Where to then? The canyons, maybe, where an errantly attended campfire can start a conflagration that will burn down 100s of houses, as happened last month.

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  54. A 3 am visit by a pair of mountain lions should enliven their camping experience a bit.

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  55. Joe H says:

    During the Great Depression the press called these Hoovervilles. Why hasn’t the press been reporting on these camps, calling them Obamavilles? Yes, we all know why.

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  56. No wonder there has been an outbreak of hepatitis in SoCal.

    Where the heck is all of their waste being disposed (including needles and condoms, not just feces and urine)?

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  57. @Steve Sailer
    Or you spent a lot of time jumping off risers during encores, like Petty and Prince did.

    Yep.

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  58. @Clyde
    Tyler Cowen could get rich selling his own brand of canned beans there. Who is in the shanty town? I would think mostly immigrants legal and illegal. Some whites. Blacks don't camp out. We have seen stories of google and other tech workers camping out and living in their vehicles.

    Op-Ed Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America? (LA Times January 14th) http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114-story.html

    Op-Ed Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America? (LA Times January 14th)

    Tucker Carlson has had a number of very smart people from California on his show who will tell you that the problem is that California is still part of the Union, which has restrictionist immigration policies. If we can reform immigration “comprehensively,” California will be free to attract the immigrants it needs to boost its economic prospects. It seems like you’re unaware that there is an X number of additional immigrants California needs to return itself to prosperity. It’s just simple economics, really.

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    • Replies: @Bernardo Pizzaro Cortez Del Castro
    California already gets 60% of the immigrants coming to America each year....resulting in more traffic, housing shortages, degrading public schools, etc..
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  59. Other than the old man next to the car saying sorry, was the only clearly enunciated word the F word? It’s the only one I made out.

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  60. KevinB says:
    @MEH 0910
    OT: Tom Petty Died From Accidental Drug Overdose Involving Opioids, Coroner Says

    Tom Petty, the chart-topping singer and songwriter, died in October from an accidental drug overdose as a result of mixing medications that included opioids, the medical examiner-coroner for the county of Los Angeles announced on Friday, ending the mystery surrounding his sudden death last year.

    The coroner, Jonathan Lucas, said that Mr. Petty’s system showed traces of the drugs fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Barely a week after Mr. Petty, 66, had concluded a tour with his band, the Heartbreakers, with two shows at the Hollywood Bowl, representatives said the singer had suffered cardiac arrest at his home in Malibu, Calif. on Oct. 2. But Mr. Petty’s official death certificate, released about a week later, listed his cause of death as “deferred” pending an autopsy.

    In a statement posted to Mr. Petty’s Facebook page on Friday, his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,” but that he continued to tour, worsening his conditions. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” the statement said.
     

    Anxiety and depression drugs as well. That stuff is garbage and is more harmful than the pseudo opiates he was on. Just a really sad way to go.

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  61. anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Another thing that’s big in the Bay Area (probably lots of other place also) is people who are basically homeless living illegally in semi-abandoned warehouses. The real owners, wink-wink, have no idea!

    Oakland not that long ago had a tragedy where one of these burned down, the Ghost Ship Fire:

    “…a fire broke out in a warehouse, known as Ghost Ship, that had been converted into an artist collective… Neither residential nor entertainment uses were allowed under the warehouse’s permits at the time of the fire… A total of 36 people were killed in the fire, the deadliest in the history of Oakland…

    …There were no fire sprinklers in the building… no smoke detectors…

    …have cited the fire as a symptom of the San Francisco Bay Area’s underlying housing crisis… City inspectors have voiced suspicions that dozens of live-work warehouses similar to Ghost Ship exist in Oakland…”

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  62. Anon • Disclaimer says:
    @MEH 0910
    OT: Tom Petty Died From Accidental Drug Overdose Involving Opioids, Coroner Says

    Tom Petty, the chart-topping singer and songwriter, died in October from an accidental drug overdose as a result of mixing medications that included opioids, the medical examiner-coroner for the county of Los Angeles announced on Friday, ending the mystery surrounding his sudden death last year.

    The coroner, Jonathan Lucas, said that Mr. Petty’s system showed traces of the drugs fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Barely a week after Mr. Petty, 66, had concluded a tour with his band, the Heartbreakers, with two shows at the Hollywood Bowl, representatives said the singer had suffered cardiac arrest at his home in Malibu, Calif. on Oct. 2. But Mr. Petty’s official death certificate, released about a week later, listed his cause of death as “deferred” pending an autopsy.

    In a statement posted to Mr. Petty’s Facebook page on Friday, his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,” but that he continued to tour, worsening his conditions. “On the day he died he was informed his hip had graduated to a full on break and it is our feeling that the pain was simply unbearable and was the cause for his over use of medication,” the statement said.
     

    fentanyl, oxycodone, temazepam, alprazolam, citalopram, acetyl fentanyl and despropionyl fentanyl.

    Lol! He fixed that hip pain real good.

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  63. @Clyde
    Tyler Cowen could get rich selling his own brand of canned beans there. Who is in the shanty town? I would think mostly immigrants legal and illegal. Some whites. Blacks don't camp out. We have seen stories of google and other tech workers camping out and living in their vehicles.

    Op-Ed Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America? (LA Times January 14th) http://www.latimes.com/opinion/op-ed/la-oe-jackson-california-poverty-20180114-story.html

    “Who is in the shanty town? I would think mostly immigrants legal and illegal.”

    We have lots of small versions of this camp in Berkeley. White to black ratio is roughly that of the town. I’ve never seen a hispanic or asian in one.

    One reason there is so much of this in CA is because the weather is so good and the cops and laws are friendly in many towns. A homeless person anywhere in the US needs a good reason not to come to California and live easier.

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  64. bartok says:
    @Thomas

    How do they protect their stuff when they are off begging? Do they have electronic alarms now?
     
    I think I've commented before that, thanks to Amazon, Wal-Mart, and China, camping stuff (along with a lot of other things) is dirt cheap now, like less than $50 new for a basic tent and air mattress. There's not much percentage to stealing it, especially for people who don't have a car, and would have to trundle it off somewhere, when it's already probably in a pretty good spot. A bigger problem might be somebody deciding to squat in your camp or tent and not leaving. A lot of these encampments look sort of semi-permanent now, possibly more permanent than the residents.

    Planet Fitness showers for $20/month.
    Calif. state beach annual day pass for your car or RV: ~$300.

    Beats slaving in an Amazon warehouse full-time or working for Uber for $0.52 / hr after expenses.

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  65. Kirt says:

    I doubt that many of these “campers” are immigrants. I was in LA for an extended vacation recently (I lived there for 35 years) and was surprised by the size and quality of the tents I saw at the “encampments”. I was informed by a friend of mine who is an avid outdoorsman that even large tents are pretty cheap. Some of the commentators above confirm this. I think this has a lot more to do with the ridiculous cost of real estate in coastal California. My nice but modest 4-bedroom $150,000 house in south Texas would go for close to a million in any reasonably decent neighborhood in LA. So why not enjoy the usually pleasant SoCal climate on the cheap by permanently camping out there?

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  66. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Same as Prince?

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/01/19/arts/music/tom-petty-cause-death-opioid-overdose.html

    In 2016, the pop singer Prince was found to have died from an accidental overdose of self-administered fentanyl, a synthetic opiate estimated to be more than 50 times more powerful than heroin. In 2015, federal officials said that incidents and overdoses with fentanyl were “occurring at an alarming rate throughout the United States.” Drug deaths involving fentanyl more than doubled from 2015 to 2016, according to the governmental account of nationwide drug deaths last year.

    Prince, his friends and associates said after his death, also suffered from chronic hip pain that was exacerbated by a breakneck touring schedule, and he sought to hide what became a serious opiate addiction.

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  67. Spud Boy says:

    So tell me, why do I have to pay $25 or more a night to camp in a CA national park when these nimrods can camp on public land for free?
    .
    .

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    • Replies: @27 year old
    You can camp in national forests for free. California has several of those. In many states, state forest lands are free to camp also.
    , @International Jew
    This is just one more facet of anarchotyranny.
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  68. @MEH 0910
    Prince was known for jumping off risers, but was Petty?

    In 1978.

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  69. MEH 0910 says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Sad.**

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6A99Q0vTi8

    Petty, Prince, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hard not to speculate about Dolores O'Riordan of The Cranberries, who had chronic back pain issues later in life.

    Opiates kill about one Vietnam War worth of Americans every year. This has got to be stopped.

    ** Note that in 1985, Petty could still write a song that references picking fruit in Florida as an American citizen. Someone needs to tell Congress.

    Petty, Prince, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hard not to speculate about Dolores O’Riordan of The Cranberries, who had chronic back pain issues later in life.

    Also Patton Oswalt’s late wife, true crime writer Michelle McNamara.

    https://pagesix.com/2017/02/03/patton-oswalt-reveals-wifes-cause-of-death/

    Comedian and actor Patton Oswalt says coroner’s officials have told him that his wife died last year from a combination of prescription medications and an undiagnosed heart condition.

    Oswalt writes in a statement to The Associated Press that he and his wife Michelle McNamara did not know she had a condition that caused blockages in her arteries.

    His statement released by a publicist says coroner’s officials told him that the blockages, combined with her taking the medications Adderall, Xanax and the pain medication fentanyl, caused his wife’s death in April 2016.

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  70. Rocks Off says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years
     
    That's just it - the premise is wrong. The Dow Jones is NOT the economy. Unemployment numbers have been bogus for a long time - anyone unemployed longer than the benefits last (if he even gets them) is no longer counted. Inflation numbers are bogus. Little old ladies have to be invested in the market with their late husband's hard-earned savings due to the FED keeping rates down below 1 % for about a decade. Yes, I read Zerohedge, so what? ;-}

    I'm not arguing with the point that mass immigration has hurt the economy and quality of life in California immensely.

    Everything you say has been true for the past ten years. Are you arguing that during the past ten years the economy has been better than it is today? If not then you haven’t refuted anything.

    The low black unemployment number, as fake they may be, are lower relative to the equally fake number during the past ten years, and this tells me we are indeed experiencing the best economy for employment during the past ten years.

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    R.O., I don't know how it's composed demographically, but the percentage of working-age people that are employed is at a low and decreasing. Lots of the recently-created jobs are just for waitresses/waiters, excuse me, "servers" and the like. They are not career jobs or anything one can raise a family on - nowadays. I am not arguing that the economy, as seen in the Dow Jones and bogus govenment numbers, was better in the last ten years, but the underlying actual important stuff, manufacturing jobs, real wages, the trade deficit and debt (US Gov't, consumer debt, etc.) have been sliding for a long time.

    We are a nation living via credit cards, personal ones and national ones. Look at auto loan debt and student loan debt numbers. People still want to live the consumer life of a few decades ago, but without the required wealth creation. The F.I.R.E. economy (more here), the only thing the US seems to be good at anymore, does not create wealth.

    We are not just drawing down on the wealth created over many years, but also the reputation of the American economic might. That means the reputation of the US Dollar, and when that falls it'll be a SHTF situation, per prepper parlance. It can take a while, surely, as there is a lot of ruin in a nation. (Part 2 and Part 3)

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  71. Rocks Off says:

    From what I can tell this homeless encampment was shutdown in November. From the linked LA Times article below it seems most of the residents were white Americans.

    http://www.latimes.com/local/california/la-me-santa-ana-river-unfurled-gallery-20171109-htmlstory.html

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  72. Hibernian says:
    @Thomas
    San Francisco gets compared to Boston a lot, but that's one big difference: Boston reclaimed a ton of land before environmentalism was ever a thing.

    So did San Francisco.

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  73. Realist says:
    @anonguy
    Steve, I saw this and thought, hmm, how is this showing up on google maps/street view.

    My understanding is that this is the Santa Ana river bike trail.

    Turns out, not single bit of evidence of a single homeless encampment for the entire trail in google maps.

    I thought, wow, and then I checked other public areas that I know have homeless encampments, again, zippo.

    So I guess google scrubs this for some reason. Perfectly ok to show my house, how and a where I live, but apparently not the homes of "homeless" people. I don't even understand the logic, though.

    “Steve, I saw this and thought, hmm, how is this showing up on google maps/street view.”

    Google maps isn’t updated daily.

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  74. Damn…I thought it was bad here in the East Bay under our freeway overpasses. This is mile after mile along a bike path in what I imagine was a nice suburban area not many decades ago. How long ago did this happen? How did we let this happen? The Third World has arrived in America, in Orange County and elsewhere.

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  75. Portland, Oregon looks just like this. The city has effectively given up on enforcing its ordinances restricting camping, but they leave ‘em on the books for show – aaaand for when homeless folks’ tents pop up like toadstools in the neighborhoods of the rich and powerful. Then the deadbeats are told to move along.

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  76. BB753 says:
    @Daniel H
    >>his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,”

    Sedentary, rock and roll lifestyle is not good for you, especially as you age. He should have been at the gym 5 days/ week with a personal trainer, doing heavy resistance and intense, short burst cardio.

    When you are in your 60s, and your hip just ups and breaks, it's because you have spent too damn much time sitting on your ass. And I have heard that hip fractures are quite painful.

    Sitting on your ass is bad for you, but definitely the rock and roll lifestyle of non-stop touring, late shows, no sleep, doing drugs, etc will kill you at age 66.
    The problem these old rock stars face is that they make little revenue from album sales in this digital age, so they’ve got to keep on touring till they drop dead. And very few rockers age gracefully and in good health like the Rolling Stones.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The Rolling Stones, especially Mick and Keith have really serious money. Most rock and rollers really don’t.
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  77. @Thomas
    San Francisco gets compared to Boston a lot, but that's one big difference: Boston reclaimed a ton of land before environmentalism was ever a thing.

    San Francisco’s existing landfill shakes a lot in earthquakes. SF’s landfill Marina district was hit quite hard by the 1989 World Series earthquake that was centered about 60 miles to the south. I don’t know if civil engineers have figured out yet how to do landfill that is earthquake safe.

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    • Replies: @1661er
    Most of the FiDi is build on landfills. They did fine. The best example being the iconic Transamerica building. The local lore is that it was build on top of a sunken ship that's hotel/warehouse/brothel during the gold rush.

    Japanese have no problem building on Odiba in Tokyo Bay with their raft foundation technique. So it's just the matter of political will.

    I think if the modern day Arkies/Orkies and people who currently commute from Tracy/Stockton/Los Banos can afford to live in the area, that will change the political landscape enough that Polosi can no longer cruising through reelections.
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  78. In America, every man is free, to take care of his home and his family
    (Randy Newman)

    Joe Bageant
    Deer Hunting with Jesus

    Paul Theroux
    Deep South – Four Seasons on Backroads

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  79. The largest numbers of homeless people are in two of the nation’s most liberal states: California and new York.

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  80. Olorin says:

    Brazilian shantytowns for America. I presume an artistic renaissance will be emerging from them at any moment.

    What an aesthetic and urban culture atavism you are, host!

    These bluetarp porta-favelas themselves are art installations! Isn’t it obvious by the fact that the likes of the LAT assemble GALLERIES of images documenting them!?

    Then there’s the New Media angle: think of all the photo-j Pulitzers to be won and documentary grants to be gleaned!

    Hell, they’re even a new genre! Like, I dunno, the Victorian-tableaux-posing rape child of Diane Arbus photography and Situationist street theater in a three-way with an REI camping gear catalogue!

    The Homeless thus supply our lefties and our elites with a sort of perpetual and self-generating Renaissance memory theatre of oppression and down-troddenness into which the Elect delve when they have a need to assuage their guilt. Or simply need to use that road to get somewhere.

    Kinda like people meditated on the circles of Hell in Dante’s time.

    Anyway, they’re not so Homeless as they are…ya know…living the Burning Man lifestyle year round!

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  81. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @BB753
    Sitting on your ass is bad for you, but definitely the rock and roll lifestyle of non-stop touring, late shows, no sleep, doing drugs, etc will kill you at age 66.
    The problem these old rock stars face is that they make little revenue from album sales in this digital age, so they've got to keep on touring till they drop dead. And very few rockers age gracefully and in good health like the Rolling Stones.

    The Rolling Stones, especially Mick and Keith have really serious money. Most rock and rollers really don’t.

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    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    The King of the Surf Guitar Dick Dale keeps touring to pay for his colostomy bags.

    https://www.pghcitypaper.com/pittsburgh/at-78-and-with-a-myriad-of-health-issues-surf-rock-legend-dick-dale-plays-through-the-pain/Content?oid=1843341

    https://www.billboard.com/articles/news/6663777/surf-guitar-legend-dick-dale-touring-illness

    , @BB753
    The Rolling Stones keep on performing live occasionally but they don't go on long tours anymore. Because they don't need the money, as you mention. About two years ago I predicted rock stars would start dying like flies and I was right. And late Boomers and Generation Xers are going to be hit harder, because selling your recorded music doesn't make you rich anymore, if it ever did except for a lucky few artists who got good contracts.
    Sex and Drugs and Rock and Roll= early grave.
    https://youtu.be/erGNSQMJ79Q
    , @europeasant
    Internet says Tom Petty net worth at 95 million. That is some F****N serious cash.Maybe he willed some of it to White homeless people, some of whom probably bought his albums and attended his concerts.

    Camping is all nice and good but even campers need to eat. Maybe the solution is group homes which seen to be popular with some young folks that I know.Five to ten living in a 4 or 5 bedroom house with shared expenses and chores.

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  82. @Rocks Off
    Everything you say has been true for the past ten years. Are you arguing that during the past ten years the economy has been better than it is today? If not then you haven't refuted anything.

    The low black unemployment number, as fake they may be, are lower relative to the equally fake number during the past ten years, and this tells me we are indeed experiencing the best economy for employment during the past ten years.

    R.O., I don’t know how it’s composed demographically, but the percentage of working-age people that are employed is at a low and decreasing. Lots of the recently-created jobs are just for waitresses/waiters, excuse me, “servers” and the like. They are not career jobs or anything one can raise a family on – nowadays. I am not arguing that the economy, as seen in the Dow Jones and bogus govenment numbers, was better in the last ten years, but the underlying actual important stuff, manufacturing jobs, real wages, the trade deficit and debt (US Gov’t, consumer debt, etc.) have been sliding for a long time.

    We are a nation living via credit cards, personal ones and national ones. Look at auto loan debt and student loan debt numbers. People still want to live the consumer life of a few decades ago, but without the required wealth creation. The F.I.R.E. economy (more here), the only thing the US seems to be good at anymore, does not create wealth.

    We are not just drawing down on the wealth created over many years, but also the reputation of the American economic might. That means the reputation of the US Dollar, and when that falls it’ll be a SHTF situation, per prepper parlance. It can take a while, surely, as there is a lot of ruin in a nation. (Part 2 and Part 3)

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  83. Olorin says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Or you spent a lot of time jumping off risers during encores, like Petty and Prince did.

    I see the Prince matter a bit differently.

    Seeing his far-outlier range of hip motions and hearing descriptions of his severe suffering later in life led me to suspect he had congenital hip dysplasia, uncorrected at birth, probably not recognized in his early years, and not corrected by surgery.

    At some point, iirc, a double hip replacement was recommended to him, but since JW doesn’t allow blood transfusions, he refused what would have been a reasonably bloody procedure.

    At the time of Prince’s birth, infants were not widely screened for CHD. Lack of normal hip socket formation can, in young adulthood, and for as long as the joint lasts, allow an astonishing range of motion, flexibility, and movement, particularly in jazz/modern and ballet dance.

    It has even been suggested that hip dysplasia may be selected for among dancers, since its “joint laxity” allows for more extreme physics (and thus can produce more extreme injuries).

    https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3535121/

    I found it useful for anything involving mobility strength and flexibility, like hand-over-hand climbing up rocks, or the gymnastics involved in sailing, or hockey, figure, and speed skating. Also had multiple teams of Ivy League and Big Ten sports ortho people assess the “unusual” range of motion. They didn’t recognize its cause even that recently (late ’90s).

    So it isn’t just “jumping off risers,” though that surely contributed to overall degeneration of the Princely joints.

    FWIW, on two occasions I had to re-seat a dislocated hip–once at the barre, once while backpacking solo. Likely not as big a deal as it would be for someone with a normal acetabulum (“cup”). Had no idea what was happening, just the joint being more funny than usual. Another time in performance I thought it was happening again, but it whomped out, then sorta klunked back into place at the end of the series of jumps. Managed to cover up my surprise and the off-balance it produced. As for the pain, some people bear it better than others, though after about 12 years it was hellish and I was deeply grateful to have it repaired/gone. I never “took anything” for it, not having (((pain management specialists))) pushing Sacklerish Pills on me.

    I have thought many times with great empathy on what Prince must have experienced in the last years of his life. RIP, based genius.

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  84. It looks like we are part way to Tyler Cowen’s Brazilian shantytowns for America. I presume an artistic renaissance will be emerging from them at any moment.

    It’s already happening. Last year’s documenta in Kassel/Germany and Athens – the world’s fair of recent art – looked pretty much like this video, by and large.

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  85. @Altai

    The standard of living of homeless people appears to have gone up in recent decades to about that of backpackers. It’s no longer just crazy people sleeping on the ground, it’s people with tents and air mattresses.
     
    Sounds like a modern version of Hooverville.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hooverville

    Thank you for mentioning Hoovervilles. I read somewhere when the last Hooverville from the Great Depression was finally removed from Manhattan, but offhand can’t remember. That fact was mentioned as an offhand comment in a personal recollection of growing up in New York City

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  86. @Spud Boy
    So tell me, why do I have to pay $25 or more a night to camp in a CA national park when these nimrods can camp on public land for free?
    .
    .

    You can camp in national forests for free. California has several of those. In many states, state forest lands are free to camp also.

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  87. “The standard of living of homeless people appears to have gone up in recent decades to about that of backpackers.”

    I guess you can say that the standard of living has improved if you make the assumption that they would have been homeless in any case

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  88. @anonguy
    Steve, I saw this and thought, hmm, how is this showing up on google maps/street view.

    My understanding is that this is the Santa Ana river bike trail.

    Turns out, not single bit of evidence of a single homeless encampment for the entire trail in google maps.

    I thought, wow, and then I checked other public areas that I know have homeless encampments, again, zippo.

    So I guess google scrubs this for some reason. Perfectly ok to show my house, how and a where I live, but apparently not the homes of "homeless" people. I don't even understand the logic, though.

    “Turns out, not single bit of evidence of a single homeless encampment for the entire trail in google maps.”

    The areas along the river, and even the river itself, are pixelated and show editing that suggests they are indeed scrubbed. How long before they end up being shown in the UN?

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  89. @wren
    Sounds like he may have been killed by Mexican gangs with Chinese poison.

    Or is that not what happened?

    You didn’t get the memo: The Russians are behind Tom Petty’s death. They traded rocket technology to the Norks to get them to do the actual deed.

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  90. I believe that Charles Murray’s “Universal Basic Income” is the solution. See his book: “In Our Hands: A Plan to Replace the Welfare State”. For understandable political reasons he does not address the obvious requirement to severely restrict immigration. Maybe he and Trump should have a conversation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    It will be have the same outcomes as social benefit has had for the English working class and welfare has had for black Americans.
    , @AnotherDad

    I believe that Charles Murray’s “Universal Basic Income” is the solution.
     
    I thought that was a good idea in about 1970.

    I'm with MBlanc46. Any welfare program that really lets people skate on work is a bad idea. It builds a crappy dependency culture in your lumpen proletariat.

    Better is to have the government guarantee some sort of employment at a low minimum wage that would be sufficient just to eat and have a little one room box to live in--but you have to show up and work 40 like everyone else. (Birth control should be another requirement.) The low wage is an incentive to get your ass in gear and chase down some private sector employment--which would have to be priced higher to attract folks--so you could live a decent lifestyle.

    Paying people to be lay-abouts is pretty much always a bad idea. People living off the taxpayers should always be forced to work as much as the taxpayers.
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  91. @Clifford Brown
    Sad.**

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6A99Q0vTi8

    Petty, Prince, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hard not to speculate about Dolores O'Riordan of The Cranberries, who had chronic back pain issues later in life.

    Opiates kill about one Vietnam War worth of Americans every year. This has got to be stopped.

    ** Note that in 1985, Petty could still write a song that references picking fruit in Florida as an American citizen. Someone needs to tell Congress.

    My wife bought me that box set for Christmas the year it came out. Freakin’ awesome.

    Chronic pain really, really sucks. I’ve lived with it since a teenager when I was in a very bad car wreck and jacked up a bunch of joints, especially a hip. I’ve had more surgeries over the years than you can count on your fingers. I take an anti-inflammatory pill a few times a week is all. No drugs or even alcohol to medicate.

    You have to stay active, eat right, don’t smoke and be an asshole to deal with it. I discovered barbell training (Starting Strength) in my late 40′s after my second hip replacement and a cracked femur. My hip has never been better. It still sucks but 15% less than before.

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  92. jill says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Steve, I read the San Francisco Chronicle on line. Homelessness is big business, with San Fran spending a record $241 million in 2017 and that doesn't include charitable contributions and services. When the homeless go away so do all sorts of government jobs and jobs at NGOs. However, the homeless also bring big health risks as San Diego is discovering with a hepatitis outbreak.

    New York city spent 1.7 billion on the homeless in 2017

    https://www.cbsnews.com/news/new-york-city-homeless-strategy-expansive-costly/

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  93. MEH 0910 says:
    @Anonymous
    The Rolling Stones, especially Mick and Keith have really serious money. Most rock and rollers really don’t.
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  94. BB753 says:
    @Anonymous
    The Rolling Stones, especially Mick and Keith have really serious money. Most rock and rollers really don’t.

    The Rolling Stones keep on performing live occasionally but they don’t go on long tours anymore. Because they don’t need the money, as you mention. About two years ago I predicted rock stars would start dying like flies and I was right. And late Boomers and Generation Xers are going to be hit harder, because selling your recorded music doesn’t make you rich anymore, if it ever did except for a lucky few artists who got good contracts.
    Sex and Drugs and Rock and Roll= early grave.

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  95. Anon7 says:

    I’ve been saying for years that the “Tiny House” fashion beloved by hipster millennials is the forerunner of America’s coming shanty towns (i.e. barrio).

    Amusingly, the Spanish word “barrio” which to American eyes looks like a vast, sprawling slum next to a big city, is derived from an Arabic word meaning “open country”.

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  96. Anarcho-tyranny at its finest.

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  97. jwm says:

    And this when practically every vacant lot in So Cal is being bulldozed for high density apartment/condo development. They’re building as fast as they can import Mexicans to do the work. In the last five years I’ve seen literally thousands of rental units erupt within a two mile radius of my house. Rent in these tenements starts around $1800-2,000 a pop. Most single folks just can not afford it. At the same time we are seeing vibrant negroes moving into some section8 designated housing in this once very quiet, and safe little corner of OC. We got bums on the street, and beggars at the intersections. Traffic in Orange County is jammed up 24/7. Part of the immigrant invasion that you do NOT hear about is the Chinese & Koreans in So Cal. I grew up here, and it has become a foreign country. Just try driving down any of the north-south thoroughfares around here. You’ll discover that the center lane is where you begin left or right turns, and that it’s very polite to drive 10-15 mph under the posted speed limit so you can pay attention to your cell phone.
    I ride the river trails here quite often. They are all like this. Every place where a street crosses over a river bed there is a camp. Every place someone can pitch a tent has someone pitching a tent. So Cal used to be the crown jewel of America. Now it’s a shithole.

    JWM

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  98. 1661er says:
    @Steve Sailer
    San Francisco's existing landfill shakes a lot in earthquakes. SF's landfill Marina district was hit quite hard by the 1989 World Series earthquake that was centered about 60 miles to the south. I don't know if civil engineers have figured out yet how to do landfill that is earthquake safe.

    Most of the FiDi is build on landfills. They did fine. The best example being the iconic Transamerica building. The local lore is that it was build on top of a sunken ship that’s hotel/warehouse/brothel during the gold rush.

    Japanese have no problem building on Odiba in Tokyo Bay with their raft foundation technique. So it’s just the matter of political will.

    I think if the modern day Arkies/Orkies and people who currently commute from Tracy/Stockton/Los Banos can afford to live in the area, that will change the political landscape enough that Polosi can no longer cruising through reelections.

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  99. @Clifford Brown
    LA, like much of the West Coast, has a long hobo tradition.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4XEhnRBnA8

    There likely needs to be some sort of housing for drop-outs and people who can't hack it for various reasons. A certain percentage of the population simply cannot function is a highly complex society. This fact was easier to hide when you did not need a credit card, a bank account and a mortgage to survive. It used to much easier to live on the margins. Skyrocketing real estate prices have not helped things. It is difficult to justify spending funds on such people when we can't properly house struggling families with children.

    Add to that the rampant drug addiction, the druggy lifestyle, family dysfunction and the general nihilism promoted by pop culture, and none of this is surprising.

    Thank you for this common sense. “homelessness” will never be solved because some people just aren’t willing to do what it takes to have a home.

    We have the same phenomena here in Sacramento with scores of homeless guys camping along the rivers and in the remoter regions of public parks. Same drugs, drink, filth, disease, mental illness that has been obvious since the 80′s.

    As for their stuff, the churches and other charities are giving them loads of free camping gear. My old church did this, although i didn’t contribute to that particular ministry. I feel bad for some of these guys, but free stuff isn’t the answer. Sobriety and discipline is the answer, but they desperately don’t want that.

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  100. @Achmed E. Newman

    And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years
     
    That's just it - the premise is wrong. The Dow Jones is NOT the economy. Unemployment numbers have been bogus for a long time - anyone unemployed longer than the benefits last (if he even gets them) is no longer counted. Inflation numbers are bogus. Little old ladies have to be invested in the market with their late husband's hard-earned savings due to the FED keeping rates down below 1 % for about a decade. Yes, I read Zerohedge, so what? ;-}

    I'm not arguing with the point that mass immigration has hurt the economy and quality of life in California immensely.

    Unemployment numbers have been bogus for a long time – anyone unemployed longer than the benefits last (if he even gets them) is no longer counted.

    The number is indeed bogus, but not for the reason you state. The official number is the U3 number, which excludes discouraged workers, marginally attached workers, and the underemployed. The number that includes all of these is the U6 number, and is currently 8.1%, as opposed to the official U3 number, which is 4.1%

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    All that being true (and I believe you), one could still just make a graph of the U-6 number and see it possibly decreasing. Of course, it won't be touted much. What I'm saying is that the unemployed who have no reason to deal with any government offices about it are not counted because they can't easily be. This means that the government numbers can be completely bogus, not just off because of the different categories (those are similar to the money supply, M-1, M-2, etc, that add on different types of "money" each stage).

    The best measure is from census data of the actual number of people including age (which I don't give, cause it's not written into the Constitution, but most do) and just divide the number of employees and small-business owners from income tax info by that. That give % working-age-people employed on the books. Subtract that from 1 and you get the % unemployed. This value has been getting higher and higher. It doesn't mean they all WANT TO work, of course. If one uses W-4 and 1099 data, which may be the way the Zerohedge articles do things,, you don't count for the fact that many people have multiple low-paying service jobs.
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  101. @Clifford Brown
    Homelessness that used to be restricted to just Skid Row Downtown, some of Venice and Santa Monica Palisades Park has spread to all over Los Angeles. Shanty towns exist under many freeway overpasses. The change is most prominent in Venice Beach where the growth has been exponential. Gutter punk type homeless live on the beach and RV campers are parked all over the neighborhood. RV living has become semi-commonplace in Los Angeles. It is a very weird sight and I wonder if it will spread to the rest of the nation.

    The Skid Row Downtown is a homeless universe until itself. Much rougher and drug addicted than the rest of the City. The heart of Skid Row is a real hellscape. No hippy homeless scene Downtown. Strangely, there are homeless encampments in Downtown LA over the 101 Freeway that are borderline civilized with some rather nice tents.

    The December 2017 Skirball Fire near the 405 Freeway was likely started in a homeless encampment.

    I haven’t been west of the 110 in years, so thanks for the update.

    Still, there’s an interesting study waiting to be done about the demographics of these encampments.

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  102. nebulafox says:
    @Clifford Brown
    Sad.**

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_6A99Q0vTi8

    Petty, Prince, Philip Seymour Hoffman. Hard not to speculate about Dolores O'Riordan of The Cranberries, who had chronic back pain issues later in life.

    Opiates kill about one Vietnam War worth of Americans every year. This has got to be stopped.

    ** Note that in 1985, Petty could still write a song that references picking fruit in Florida as an American citizen. Someone needs to tell Congress.

    He looks a lot like Johnny Ramone.

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  103. One thing the California-bashers always conveniently forget is that homeless people, by definition, have no homes. They are exposed to the elements. People don’t want to freeze to death. The coastal areas are warm because of the moderating effect of the ocean. People without homes would rather be homeless in a warm climate.

    In the early 90′s, before mass internet-use, the lawn in front of Santa Monica City Hall was covered with homeless campers. But when the typical Breitbart reader from Oklahoma sees new pictures of homeless people near the Pacific Ocean, he says: “Cletis, I done told ya! Them there Californians ain’t got no jobs! Them lazy hippies don’t wanna work!” It is also conveniently forgotten that the fools in Sacramento can’t get away with anything that is not tacitly approved of by the “Deep State” in D.C.

    Finally, H.L. Mencken was right when he said Americans need a class of people to feel morally superior to. Whether it’s Russians, Iranians, the French, or Californians, someone has to be the scapegoat in the endless American morality-play.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seth Largo
    Our state's homeless problem has gotten objectively worse over the last two decades. No use denying it.

    But I'd be willing to accept that CA homelessness was just as bad during the Depression.
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  104. @Alec Leamas

    Op-Ed Why is liberal California the poverty capital of America? (LA Times January 14th)
     
    Tucker Carlson has had a number of very smart people from California on his show who will tell you that the problem is that California is still part of the Union, which has restrictionist immigration policies. If we can reform immigration "comprehensively," California will be free to attract the immigrants it needs to boost its economic prospects. It seems like you're unaware that there is an X number of additional immigrants California needs to return itself to prosperity. It's just simple economics, really.

    California already gets 60% of the immigrants coming to America each year….resulting in more traffic, housing shortages, degrading public schools, etc..

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  105. @Kam Phlodius
    One thing the California-bashers always conveniently forget is that homeless people, by definition, have no homes. They are exposed to the elements. People don't want to freeze to death. The coastal areas are warm because of the moderating effect of the ocean. People without homes would rather be homeless in a warm climate.

    In the early 90's, before mass internet-use, the lawn in front of Santa Monica City Hall was covered with homeless campers. But when the typical Breitbart reader from Oklahoma sees new pictures of homeless people near the Pacific Ocean, he says: "Cletis, I done told ya! Them there Californians ain't got no jobs! Them lazy hippies don't wanna work!" It is also conveniently forgotten that the fools in Sacramento can't get away with anything that is not tacitly approved of by the "Deep State" in D.C.

    Finally, H.L. Mencken was right when he said Americans need a class of people to feel morally superior to. Whether it's Russians, Iranians, the French, or Californians, someone has to be the scapegoat in the endless American morality-play.

    Our state’s homeless problem has gotten objectively worse over the last two decades. No use denying it.

    But I’d be willing to accept that CA homelessness was just as bad during the Depression.

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  106. @Anonymous
    The Rolling Stones, especially Mick and Keith have really serious money. Most rock and rollers really don’t.

    Internet says Tom Petty net worth at 95 million. That is some F****N serious cash.Maybe he willed some of it to White homeless people, some of whom probably bought his albums and attended his concerts.

    Camping is all nice and good but even campers need to eat. Maybe the solution is group homes which seen to be popular with some young folks that I know.Five to ten living in a 4 or 5 bedroom house with shared expenses and chores.

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  107. J1234 says:
    @Clifford Brown
    LA, like much of the West Coast, has a long hobo tradition.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u4XEhnRBnA8

    There likely needs to be some sort of housing for drop-outs and people who can't hack it for various reasons. A certain percentage of the population simply cannot function is a highly complex society. This fact was easier to hide when you did not need a credit card, a bank account and a mortgage to survive. It used to much easier to live on the margins. Skyrocketing real estate prices have not helped things. It is difficult to justify spending funds on such people when we can't properly house struggling families with children.

    Add to that the rampant drug addiction, the druggy lifestyle, family dysfunction and the general nihilism promoted by pop culture, and none of this is surprising.

    That Haggard song sure sounds like a ripoff of John Hartford. I like it though.

    I think the bike ride video is dramatic, but rather misleading. My view is that California has tent city homeless people in the way Minnesota has a lot of people with snowshoes. Not necessarily something that’s going to spread to a whole lot of other places, as Steve sort of implies:

    It looks like we are part way to Tyler Cowen’s Brazilian shantytowns for America.

    All the homeless people flock to places like southern California because it’s warm and dry. When a segment of the national population has a tendency towards something dysfunctional, that population usually stays dispersed, but when climate plays a role in facilitating the dysfunction, the population gravitates to the best suited climate. When my wife and I were married almost 25 years ago, she said she’d never move to a warm climate like the South or the southwestern US because it attracts too many freeloaders. (Unbeknownst to her – she’s a democrat – that’s a “racist” notion that goes along with the morally discredited premise of environmental determinism.) 25 years ago was (more or less) before homelessness became the “epidemic” the media said it was.

    Here in the upper midwest, our homeless people are still largely of the crazy variety, though others might migrate through during the summer months. There are homeless shelters, but much of that is derived from domestic abuse situations. The California thing looks more like a way of life, to me. It maybe didn’t exist to that extent in the past, but, as other have said, it was probably always there. As the population grows, the number of drifters and lazy people grows, too.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There's been some kind of phase change in California homelessness in recent years. I post about it in part because I don't fully understand what has happened and am looking for suggestions.
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  108. @Daniel H
    >>his wife, Dana, and daughter, Adria, wrote that Mr. Petty suffered from “many serious ailments including emphysema, knee problems and most significantly a fractured hip,”

    Sedentary, rock and roll lifestyle is not good for you, especially as you age. He should have been at the gym 5 days/ week with a personal trainer, doing heavy resistance and intense, short burst cardio.

    When you are in your 60s, and your hip just ups and breaks, it's because you have spent too damn much time sitting on your ass. And I have heard that hip fractures are quite painful.

    True. The aging rockers who stay healthy are invariably those who demand less grueling touring schedules (using residencies in Vegas or insisting on being away from home no more than three or four days at a time and taking many months if not years off between stints on the town of only three more months or so…).

    These guys who make it this far, if not fools, usually have plenty of coin to dictate such terms, so I never understand those who don’t (an obsessive syndrome to be workaholics, as it were?).

    Compare Petty, Nelson, et al. to the guys from Kiss, Rush, Extreme…. Many of the latter hit the gym and are in better shape than guys ten or twenty years younger. The healthy ones also very often abstain from the boozing, smoking, and other drugs, or partake only once in awhile with sensible moderation. Heck, the guys from Rush and Genesis flat-out retired, quite wisely. There’s no reason not to. These guys can still work at a relaxed pace in the studio, and play a festival or residency once in a while to get the thrill of performing live and feel like their dedicated fans aren’t being deprived. Instead, they work themselves to death like an aging stevedore or cook with no savings who has no choice. Human behaviour is weird.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I think a big problem with touring is that you have to meet a schedule and be UP at the moment you take the stage, radiating energy. Then you have to come down and get to sleep so you can do it again on schedule tomorrow. Throw in travel, and that's a recipe for turning to drugs for energy and then sleep.

    A residency situation, like Bruce Springsteen is doing now on Broadway, at least eliminates the travel and lets you get on a schedule and have time for the gym.

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  109. @ScarletNumber

    Unemployment numbers have been bogus for a long time – anyone unemployed longer than the benefits last (if he even gets them) is no longer counted.
     
    The number is indeed bogus, but not for the reason you state. The official number is the U3 number, which excludes discouraged workers, marginally attached workers, and the underemployed. The number that includes all of these is the U6 number, and is currently 8.1%, as opposed to the official U3 number, which is 4.1%

    All that being true (and I believe you), one could still just make a graph of the U-6 number and see it possibly decreasing. Of course, it won’t be touted much. What I’m saying is that the unemployed who have no reason to deal with any government offices about it are not counted because they can’t easily be. This means that the government numbers can be completely bogus, not just off because of the different categories (those are similar to the money supply, M-1, M-2, etc, that add on different types of “money” each stage).

    The best measure is from census data of the actual number of people including age (which I don’t give, cause it’s not written into the Constitution, but most do) and just divide the number of employees and small-business owners from income tax info by that. That give % working-age-people employed on the books. Subtract that from 1 and you get the % unemployed. This value has been getting higher and higher. It doesn’t mean they all WANT TO work, of course. If one uses W-4 and 1099 data, which may be the way the Zerohedge articles do things,, you don’t count for the fact that many people have multiple low-paying service jobs.

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  110. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Just after the 2016 election someone here predicted that after 8 years of silence the media would soon begin making a fuss about homelessness.

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  111. @Autochthon
    True. The aging rockers who stay healthy are invariably those who demand less grueling touring schedules (using residencies in Vegas or insisting on being away from home no more than three or four days at a time and taking many months if not years off between stints on the town of only three more months or so...).

    These guys who make it this far, if not fools, usually have plenty of coin to dictate such terms, so I never understand those who don't (an obsessive syndrome to be workaholics, as it were?).

    Compare Petty, Nelson, et al. to the guys from Kiss, Rush, Extreme.... Many of the latter hit the gym and are in better shape than guys ten or twenty years younger. The healthy ones also very often abstain from the boozing, smoking, and other drugs, or partake only once in awhile with sensible moderation. Heck, the guys from Rush and Genesis flat-out retired, quite wisely. There's no reason not to. These guys can still work at a relaxed pace in the studio, and play a festival or residency once in a while to get the thrill of performing live and feel like their dedicated fans aren't being deprived. Instead, they work themselves to death like an aging stevedore or cook with no savings who has no choice. Human behaviour is weird.

    I think a big problem with touring is that you have to meet a schedule and be UP at the moment you take the stage, radiating energy. Then you have to come down and get to sleep so you can do it again on schedule tomorrow. Throw in travel, and that’s a recipe for turning to drugs for energy and then sleep.

    A residency situation, like Bruce Springsteen is doing now on Broadway, at least eliminates the travel and lets you get on a schedule and have time for the gym.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The real way to do it is the way the surviving members of Queen (plus Freddie's estate) have done it: rent rights to a jukebox musical show that runs for years and makes mega millions. No arduous touring at all, and wealth beyond even rock stars dreams.

    Never mind that the musical (We Will Rock You) is execrable--the music carries it. And that's the part the band contributed anyway.
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  112. @J1234
    That Haggard song sure sounds like a ripoff of John Hartford. I like it though.

    I think the bike ride video is dramatic, but rather misleading. My view is that California has tent city homeless people in the way Minnesota has a lot of people with snowshoes. Not necessarily something that's going to spread to a whole lot of other places, as Steve sort of implies:


    It looks like we are part way to Tyler Cowen’s Brazilian shantytowns for America.
     
    All the homeless people flock to places like southern California because it's warm and dry. When a segment of the national population has a tendency towards something dysfunctional, that population usually stays dispersed, but when climate plays a role in facilitating the dysfunction, the population gravitates to the best suited climate. When my wife and I were married almost 25 years ago, she said she'd never move to a warm climate like the South or the southwestern US because it attracts too many freeloaders. (Unbeknownst to her - she's a democrat - that's a "racist" notion that goes along with the morally discredited premise of environmental determinism.) 25 years ago was (more or less) before homelessness became the "epidemic" the media said it was.

    Here in the upper midwest, our homeless people are still largely of the crazy variety, though others might migrate through during the summer months. There are homeless shelters, but much of that is derived from domestic abuse situations. The California thing looks more like a way of life, to me. It maybe didn't exist to that extent in the past, but, as other have said, it was probably always there. As the population grows, the number of drifters and lazy people grows, too.

    There’s been some kind of phase change in California homelessness in recent years. I post about it in part because I don’t fully understand what has happened and am looking for suggestions.

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  113. @Dave Pinsen
    I don't get why this sort of thing is tolerated.

    If people want to camp out, let them do it in a campground.

    If they're temporarily without shelter due to some issue, have a shelter where they can stay for a few days or a week. After that, tell them if they're found sleeping outside, they'll be arrested and offer them a free bus ride to a long term homeless encampment set up out in the sticks somewhere.

    A state like Mississippi could set up a homeless city complete with social services and amenities and charge rich California cities a couple hundred dollars per person per month for the homeless they send over.
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  114. @Spud Boy
    So tell me, why do I have to pay $25 or more a night to camp in a CA national park when these nimrods can camp on public land for free?
    .
    .

    This is just one more facet of anarchotyranny.

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  115. Liberals need to understand that it’s not in their interest to let the homeless take over downtown. The homeless drive business to malls and suburban shopping centers, because these sit on private property and can therefore keep out the homeless. But, being private property, they also keep out other things dear to liberals — political demonstrations, college students raising money for Greenpeace, the ACLU and the SPLC. What good is holding a demonstration downtown, if nobody’s there to see it?

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  116. AnonAnon says:

    Steve, the OC Register did a big series of articles on how drug rehab places are advertising and bussing in addicts from other states and when their insurance runs out they’re booted out to the streets. For some reason Anaheim and Orange have let them set up camp in the riverbed – county land so the city and county point fingers at each other – where it’s gotten out of control. We went to a Ducks game a couple of months ago and the side of the stadium nearest to the river smelled like a pit toilet.

    They shouldn’t be called “homeless”, they are more aptly called transients and they’re young, white, thieving addicts and their population has exploded in the last three years. I see them on the main commercial thoroughfare of Orange, begging all the time. The people in the neighborhoods near the riverbed have to put up with the transients leaving trash in their yards and trying to steal from them. The residents are beyond fed up with the situation. The mayor of Orange is said to be a homeless advocate and various idiot “Christian” churches bring them food. The John and Ken show on KFI show has been bringing some heat on local politicians so they’re supposedly finally going to get evicted on Monday. I’ll believe it when I see it.

    https://www.ocregister.com/2017/12/17/are-drug-rehab-centers-fueling-homelessness-in-southern-california/

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    Thanks. That might explain what's been going on in recent years.
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  117. @AnonAnon
    Steve, the OC Register did a big series of articles on how drug rehab places are advertising and bussing in addicts from other states and when their insurance runs out they’re booted out to the streets. For some reason Anaheim and Orange have let them set up camp in the riverbed - county land so the city and county point fingers at each other - where it’s gotten out of control. We went to a Ducks game a couple of months ago and the side of the stadium nearest to the river smelled like a pit toilet.

    They shouldn’t be called “homeless”, they are more aptly called transients and they’re young, white, thieving addicts and their population has exploded in the last three years. I see them on the main commercial thoroughfare of Orange, begging all the time. The people in the neighborhoods near the riverbed have to put up with the transients leaving trash in their yards and trying to steal from them. The residents are beyond fed up with the situation. The mayor of Orange is said to be a homeless advocate and various idiot “Christian” churches bring them food. The John and Ken show on KFI show has been bringing some heat on local politicians so they’re supposedly finally going to get evicted on Monday. I’ll believe it when I see it.


    https://www.ocregister.com/2017/12/17/are-drug-rehab-centers-fueling-homelessness-in-southern-california/

    Thanks. That might explain what’s been going on in recent years.

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  118. If someone doesn’t have kids, nor intends to have them (which is a bad idea, by the way), a tent-type lifestyle in Mid to Southern California does not strike the refined mind as being a bad idea. It beats Saint Paul, MN, or even making $25,000 a year and having to live in while living in the Upper Midwest. But of course many of these people are addicts. Being able to live in Central to SoCal, not far from the coat, even as a backer, has to be worth $30,000 or so.

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  119. MBlanc46 says:
    @Robert Hume
    I believe that Charles Murray’s “Universal Basic Income” is the solution. See his book: “In Our Hands: A Plan to Replace the Welfare State”. For understandable political reasons he does not address the obvious requirement to severely restrict immigration. Maybe he and Trump should have a conversation.

    It will be have the same outcomes as social benefit has had for the English working class and welfare has had for black Americans.

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    Welfare results in a very high marginal income tax. Murray’s UBI is untaxed; the first dollar earned pays the lowest possible income tax. Thus, work is encouraged in order to have a higher than minimal income.

    In addition, Murray does away with all government welfare. The only remaining welfare would be that coming from private organizations such as churches. Those institutions could choose to not give welfare to those without a good explanation for what they did with their UBI.

    Most conservative objections to a UBI are thoroughly addressed in Murray’s book.
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  120. Feeeney says:

    From the OC Register series:

    “Sovereign Health has not commented since the raid, but has touted itself as a top-notch provider of addiction treatment services in the past.

    Sharma, its CEO, has 30 years of experience as a researcher, neuroscientist, psychiatrist, lecturer, author and health care executive, “with a unique insight into the care and management of patients with behavioral health and substance use disorders,” according to his bio on the MHA Conference site. “His background as a psychiatrist gives him unique insight into the care of behavioral health patients and the management of mental health facilities in the U.S., Europe, and India.”

    His bio does not mention that his license to practice psychiatry was revoked in the United Kingdom for conduct deemed dishonest, unprofessional and misleading, according to documents from the General Medical Council of the UK, which licenses physicians there. He still has his license in India, a Sovereign Health spokesman said.

    Sharma’s presentation at the conference is off, Sovereign Health will still have an exhibitor’s spot, Wallace said.

    The recovery industry has come under fire for widespread insurance fraud, patient-dumping and poor quality of care. An investigation by The Southern California News Group found that “body brokering,” where drug-addicted patients are essentially sold to the rehabs that will pay the most for them – and their insurance coverage – is a widespread practice. The investigation also found that out-of-state patients often are lured to Southern California with promises of cash payments, free health care and luxurious accommodations, only to be kicked to the curb when their insurance benefits run out. Many of these problems, the investigation found, can be tracked to recent changes in federal health care and lack of oversight by state and federal agencies that make it tougher for many centers to provide strong medical care and still turn a profit.

    Though many legitimate operators remain in the industry, the Los Angeles and Orange County area is infamous in the industry as the “Rehab Riviera,” a key part of a national problem.

    Man stripped of UK medical license runs local rehab https://www.ocregister.com/2010/08/23/man-stripped-of-uk-medical-license-runs-local-rehab/

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  121. @Thomas

    And this level of homelessness in California is with the best economy in ten years.
     
    Most of coastal California has erected serious barriers to entry to new housing, enough so that it would probably take a decade of deregulation to clear the market.

    Most of coastal California has erected serious barriers to entry to new housing, enough so that it would probably take a decade of deregulation to clear the market.

    This is just one of the twenty odd things i listed last week where progressive policy/ideology is contradictory to their open borders ideology.

    You can absolutely have strict zoning to preserve a particular “look and feel” and open space. But if you have it with open immigration to a generous welfare state the crappy result–soaring housing prices and squatter slums–are entirely predictable.

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    So you can see why Californians love it. Grandfathered in to ridiculously low property taxes thanks to Prop 13, and then able to cash out for megabucks due to the manipulation of supply and demand. Both of my sisters have gotten wealthy this way, though one also got rich lawyering.
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  122. @Robert Hume
    I believe that Charles Murray’s “Universal Basic Income” is the solution. See his book: “In Our Hands: A Plan to Replace the Welfare State”. For understandable political reasons he does not address the obvious requirement to severely restrict immigration. Maybe he and Trump should have a conversation.

    I believe that Charles Murray’s “Universal Basic Income” is the solution.

    I thought that was a good idea in about 1970.

    I’m with MBlanc46. Any welfare program that really lets people skate on work is a bad idea. It builds a crappy dependency culture in your lumpen proletariat.

    Better is to have the government guarantee some sort of employment at a low minimum wage that would be sufficient just to eat and have a little one room box to live in–but you have to show up and work 40 like everyone else. (Birth control should be another requirement.) The low wage is an incentive to get your ass in gear and chase down some private sector employment–which would have to be priced higher to attract folks–so you could live a decent lifestyle.

    Paying people to be lay-abouts is pretty much always a bad idea. People living off the taxpayers should always be forced to work as much as the taxpayers.

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  123. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I think a big problem with touring is that you have to meet a schedule and be UP at the moment you take the stage, radiating energy. Then you have to come down and get to sleep so you can do it again on schedule tomorrow. Throw in travel, and that's a recipe for turning to drugs for energy and then sleep.

    A residency situation, like Bruce Springsteen is doing now on Broadway, at least eliminates the travel and lets you get on a schedule and have time for the gym.

    The real way to do it is the way the surviving members of Queen (plus Freddie’s estate) have done it: rent rights to a jukebox musical show that runs for years and makes mega millions. No arduous touring at all, and wealth beyond even rock stars dreams.

    Never mind that the musical (We Will Rock You) is execrable–the music carries it. And that’s the part the band contributed anyway.

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  124. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @AnotherDad

    Most of coastal California has erected serious barriers to entry to new housing, enough so that it would probably take a decade of deregulation to clear the market.
     
    This is just one of the twenty odd things i listed last week where progressive policy/ideology is contradictory to their open borders ideology.

    You can absolutely have strict zoning to preserve a particular "look and feel" and open space. But if you have it with open immigration to a generous welfare state the crappy result--soaring housing prices and squatter slums--are entirely predictable.

    So you can see why Californians love it. Grandfathered in to ridiculously low property taxes thanks to Prop 13, and then able to cash out for megabucks due to the manipulation of supply and demand. Both of my sisters have gotten wealthy this way, though one also got rich lawyering.

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  125. Benjaminl says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    I don't get why this sort of thing is tolerated.

    If people want to camp out, let them do it in a campground.

    If they're temporarily without shelter due to some issue, have a shelter where they can stay for a few days or a week. After that, tell them if they're found sleeping outside, they'll be arrested and offer them a free bus ride to a long term homeless encampment set up out in the sticks somewhere.

    A state like Mississippi could set up a homeless city complete with social services and amenities and charge rich California cities a couple hundred dollars per person per month for the homeless they send over.

    I assume that the Imperial Judiciary has informed the lowly city councils that the Constitution prohibits taking any measures against the Individual Rights of junkies who literally sh*t on public property.

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  126. Read More
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  127. @MBlanc46
    It will be have the same outcomes as social benefit has had for the English working class and welfare has had for black Americans.

    Welfare results in a very high marginal income tax. Murray’s UBI is untaxed; the first dollar earned pays the lowest possible income tax. Thus, work is encouraged in order to have a higher than minimal income.

    In addition, Murray does away with all government welfare. The only remaining welfare would be that coming from private organizations such as churches. Those institutions could choose to not give welfare to those without a good explanation for what they did with their UBI.

    Most conservative objections to a UBI are thoroughly addressed in Murray’s book.

    Read More
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  128. Cato says:

    From my experience in the 1970s: you hitchhike out west, and you come to a stop at the coast. You might go up or down the coast a bit, but you are not tempted to turn back and get stuck in Barstow for three days. So everyone piles up on the coast, and it’s actually a pretty great time–lots of interesting people to talk to, good weather, you’ll get high pretty often. Nothing to complain about. The only “homeless” people I feel sorry for are those for whom the experience is obviously not voluntary–they are crazy, or unintelligent, or simply can’t submit to the discipline of a job.

    Great video! Really appreciate it!

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