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From the Caltech alumni magazine:

A Conversation with April Castañeda

April Castañeda, appointed in the summer of 2018 to the newly created position of assistant vice president for equity and equity investigations and Title IX coordinator at Caltech, will design and implement a comprehensive approach to all issues pertaining to discrimination, unlawful harassment, and sexual misconduct.

Though the role is new for both the Institute and Castañeda, she is no stranger to campus, having served in a variety of roles at Caltech (in the provost’s and president’s offices, as well as Human Resources) for more than 20 years before spending two year as the assistant director for human resources at JPL.

WHAT MOTIVATES YOU TO DO THIS WORK?
I’ve spent most of my career doing things that are engaged around social justice. It’s important to me that people have the rights and the ability to do good work.

When I first came to Caltech, I was reluctant to be an intern here because before then I had always worked with underserved populations, and here I saw a lot of privilege.

Who hasn’t met some privileged scion who had his rich dad pull some strings so he could get into Caltech and loaf through 4 years with a Gentleman’s C?

About 15 years ago I was walking across the Caltech campus when I paused to listen to a young lady tour guide telling a group of potential applicants and their parents about life at Caltech. One dad asked, “How hard is the homework?”

The sophomore tour guide thought about it for a moment, and then broke into tears. After 10 or 15 seconds of sobbing, she recovered enough to say that while last year had been pretty tough, this year was much better.

But when Ms. Castañeda first came to Caltech, she, instead, “saw a lot of privilege.”

 
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  1. assistant vice president for equity and equity investigations and Title IX coordinator at Caltech

    Oh! Oh! Ask her what her job pays!

    We had one of these where I went to grad school. She hated whites with a passion, especially white males. She’d watched a lot of television to get where she was.

  2. Russia….please nuke us…..drop a big 0ne…bullseye on the Yellowstone Caldera….

    • Replies: @James Speaks
    , @AnotherDad
  3. J.Ross says: • Website

    When math and an ability to follow laboratory safety protocols can be dismissed as unearned hereditary privilege, it is time to replace the Doomsday Clock of the Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists with a countdown to the end of reliable electricity.

  4. When I first came to Caltech, I was reluctant to be an intern here because before then I had always worked with underserved populations, and here I saw a lot of privilege.

    Translation: I am really too dumb to be at Caltech but if whitey wants to throw money at me who am I to refuse.

    • Replies: @Trevor H.
    , @res
    , @Realist
  5. brioche says:

    All good things must come to a diverse and equitable end.

  6. trelane says:

    I wonder if she knows Don Juan, she looks like she might.

  7. Oh, c’mon, iSteve. You know the face of Caltech is . . . East Asian.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @fish
    , @Edward
  8. what percentage of these things are obese?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Alfa158
  9. Alice says:

    We let the diversity hires into HR thinking they couldn’t do any damage there–HR was always incompetent. Joke was on us.

    I’m sorry the last US domino of pure competence fell. The only upside is it hurts the Asian kids worse.

    Speaking of tour guides crying, Caltech was the place where they tried to get RP Feynman to help the undergrads who were taking his freshman physics course and getting the worst grades of any freshmen (because his course taught none of them how to solve any problems at all.) His response? If they weren’t bright enough not to need his help they didn’t belong in freshman physics (..and not at Caltech either).

    I finally understood my 5 (well…6) years of despair at MIT when I read Jordan Peterson’s Rules for Life chap 1 on the status hierarchy of lobsters. Take the sharpest kids and make them have the human equiv of dog fights with their classes/profs for years and see how low they go when they dint win a single battle. But MIT kids were still on Everest compared to how low the Caltech kids felt. Nowhere else do kids say “no, I had to be an applied physics major because I’m dumb”.

  10. @Mr McKenna

    These people love a title!

    • Replies: @anon
  11. indocon says:
    @J.Ross

    Count down on to end of reliable electricity is not a joke anymore. Imagine in 50 years who is going to be working in businesses like electric utilities? A good quiz for iSteveworld would be to predict the NAM workforce % by industries by let’s say 2060?

  12. Trevor H. says:
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    When I’d gotten safely ensconced at one of our ‘elite’ institutions, I quickly learned what my Achilles’ heel was going to be. The other students weren’t necessarily smarter than me, but the work load was crushing and they were extremely disciplined and industrious.

    The “Professional POCs” and their friends yapping about “privilege” have no idea. No idea. And thanks to the emphasis on “equal results” and “Disparate impact” they may never have to know.

  13. I saw a lot of privilege.

    It all depends how you define “privilege.”

    If she means, “I saw a lot of people who had the advantage of being born with a high IQ,” then I’m sure her observation is 100% correct.

    • Replies: @Dr. X
  14. inertial says:

    assistant vice president for equity and equity investigations

    Equity investigations?

    will design and implement a comprehensive approach to all issues pertaining to discrimination, unlawful harassment, and sexual misconduct.

    So this woman will be the judge of what is or is not sexual misconduct.

    When I first came to Caltech, I was reluctant to be an intern here because before then I had always worked with underserved populations, and here I saw a lot of privilege.

    Translation:
    “Underserved populations” = dumb people.
    “Privilege” = smart people.

    • Replies: @Anon
  15. Nothing says Diversity with a capital D like having a fat Mexican telling the future rocket scientists what to do for $400k a year.

    We are truly doomed when this kind of shite has come to Cal Tech.

  16. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    The countdown clock hit zero in Venezuela today. LA to follow in how many years?

  17. Jack D says:

    last year had been pretty tough,

    CalTech is filled with kids who were the smartest kids in their high school and then they get to CalTech and they are nothing special.

  18. Trevor H. says:

    Sort of OT, the San Francisco Department of Public Health declined to identify the nation in question because white racism. As if there is any other kind!

    “Airline passenger spread measles to travelers on flight to San Francisco, officials say”

    https://www.sacbee.com/news/state/california/article227261869.html

  19. @Lot

    Oh, c’mon, iSteve. You know the face of Caltech is . . . East Asian

    Let’s not over generalize . . . they also have some South Asians as well.

  20. She’s an impressive specimen, if only judging by her gross morphology. Well, it’s about damned time that folks with type 2 diabetes and gout, but little academic achievement made their presences felt at Caltech. The physical presence in her case is ~200 pounds.

    Caltech alumni have traditionally been brainy, not brawny types. Weird men (gasp) with little body fat, muscle mass, or coordination (until Stephen Hsu came along, that is).

    She big.

  21. At Alma Mater (inside joke – AKA Ma Tech), the remark is that you were two weeks behind on the first day of class. At MIT, a notch higher on the undergrad difficulty scale, the remark is that the work load is like drinking from a fire hose. My suspicion is that the requirement to learn at CalTech is so much higher that Ms. Dogood can’t even comprehend how much more difficult it is.

    If there is privilege, and I certainly hope there is the right kind that makes a better learning environment, and this POS ho intends to remove that privilege, then all I can say is, “I hope the CalTech students still pull the sort of pranks they were known for a generation ago.”

    • Replies: @Dtbb
    , @Counterinsurgency
  22. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    CalTech doesn’t even have 1000 combined undergrads. So each entire class is ballpark around 250 kids. In many universities you have classes in a lecture hall with 500 kids at a time. To just take that few is a testament to how tough it is.

  23. @War for Blair Mountain

    If Russia truly hates us, they won’t.

  24. istevefan says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Michelle Obama had a similar type job at the University of Chicago for which she was paid handsomely. I’d like to see a study on exactly how much diversity outreach positions cost institutions, and see if it is correlated in any way with the outrageous increases in tuition that the average American must accept.

  25. Anon[709] • Disclaimer says: • Website

    I don’t think she has to worry about sexual misconduct against her.

  26. @Jack D

    That’s what Steve Hsu has said ( he earned his bachelor’s degree there ). I think he stated that most National Merit Scholars would struggle there, unfortunately it appears they are going to follow the rest of academia off the cliff. I think they were the last holdout against anything but token AA in admissions.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  27. I’ll bet she has a detectable gravitational field all her own.

    • LOL: donut, Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @James Speaks
    , @Escher
  28. JimB says:

    April Castañeda will spend the remainder of her career convincing CalTech to double the size of their administration and populate it with innumerate Latinos. The UCs are in the midst of a big push to hire any Latinos they can for any job titles preceded by associate or assistant: assistant dean, associate vice chancellor, associate director, etc.

  29. As an undergrad at Caltech in the early ’70s, I knew one rich kid: he would talk about how lovely Paris was in the spring. He did not fit in.

    My frosh roommate’s dad was a small business owner, but he seemed to be a working-class guy who had saved up and started his own business (welding or something like that). The dad of my girlfriend (now my wife) was an engineer. I remember another girl whose dad was an insurance agent.

    One of my friends had spent a summer before coming to ‘Tech quite literally shoveling chickenshit. He would go on and on about how much he hated chickenshit — I assume his family was not affluent.

    There must have been a smattering of upper-middle class parents (doctors, lawyers, professors), but I did not know of any.

    In short, predominant SES ranged pretty much from lower working class to solid middle-class with a small number of upper-middle class and a smattering of poverty cases (still bright kids though — white as well as black and Hispanic).

    We went back to visit a couple years ago — I did not notice much change: still very bright kids whose level of social adjustment was, well, not high.

  30. JimB says:

    When I first came to Caltech, I was reluctant to be an intern here because before then I had always worked with underserved populations, and here I saw a lot of privilege.

    This is more likely to be the case at Harvard and Yale. CalTech cuts hard at the 3 sigma mark for student IQ so they still need to draw heavily from the middle class to have a big enough population of students.

  31. @J.Ross

    Mind if i put that on a t-shirt?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  32. CAL TECH? I adamantly believe that The Republic (or at least the Bear one) will fall before CAL TECH does. The once impervious, University of Chicago, has become pretty wobbly of late, but CAL TECH?

    Those are some hardcore fucking nerds.

    Kind of boring, but exceptionally polite and brilliant. We should defend them at all costs.

  33. “. . . doing things that are engaged around social justice.”

    That might be the most Current Year phrase you’ll see, well, this current year.

  34. @International Jew

    I’ll bet she has a detectable gravitational field all her own.

    {Insert black hole joke here.}

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  35. @JimB

    Who hasn’t met some rich scion who had Daddy pull some strings so he could get into Caltech and loaf his way through with a Gentleman’s C?

  36. It’s important to me that people have the rights and the ability to do good work.

    I wonder if one of those rights is the right to not have your education effed up by some AA blob who thinks a gluon is a sticky note.

  37. An accurate physical description of this life form would certainly not pass the isteve comment moderation standard.

    • Replies: @Bartleby the Scrivner
  38. @JimB

    3 sigma mark

    I’m thinking CalTech is more like 4 sigma and up. Which makes me wonder just what Ms. Castelottof is going to say to any student that comes to visit her. I’m thinking she’ll find them all to be unsuitable for scientific work due to poor attitudes towards the lesser privileged … because that’s what’s really important.

    • LOL: Bubba
    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  39. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @indocon

    If there is no middle class, the very wealthy will all have gensets, batteries, solar panels and small wind generators and won’t care. The poor will just have to do with power when it’s there.

  40. J.Ross says: • Website
    @JeremiahJohnbalaya

    Go ahead. Probably want to clean it up first: a t-shirt should ideally be one word, maybe one line, at most one and a half. Is there a market for paragraph t-shirts?

  41. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Lot

    Poor social adjustment is one thing but who the hell signed off on that carpet?

  42. MBlanc46 says:
    @J.Ross

    Hear, hear! That one, with credit, will be turning up in comments sections all over the Internet.

  43. MBlanc46 says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Big article in the Chicago Trib about Zimmer whining about Trump tying (or threatening to tie) federal dollars to freedom of speech. Ed Levi must be spinning in his grave.

  44. @Trevor H.

    The other students weren’t necessarily smarter than me, but the work load was crushing and they were extremely disciplined and industrious.

    However, it’s worse than that.

    You also have to have the cognitive horsepower.

    Those underrepresented minorities generally don’t have the cognitive horsepower.

  45. fish says:
    @Inquiring Mind

    Cal Tech has always been at war with Eastasians……

  46. It’s good to see Jabba the Hutt has been able to find work after Disney ruined the Star Wars franchise.

  47. Similar lunacy from today’s Inside Higher Ed:

    https://www.insidehighered.com/advice/2019/03/08/colleges-should-have-required-core-curriculum-racial-literacy-opinion

    “In the case of race, if the diversity curricular requirement is truly to foster racial literacy, then a core curriculum must be institutionalized and mandated for all students. I draw here on Robin DiAngelo, who has written so compellingly about “white fragility,” or the tendency among white people to receive “any suggestion of racially problematic behavior as a personal blow.” DiAngelo attributes this fragility to racial illiteracy or the lack of awareness of many white people that their “race has meaning and grants unearned advantage.” It is this kind of illiteracy that leaves so many white students on campus unable to understand, for example, why blackface is such a big deal or why their campus needs different cultural centers.”

    How about “black fragility” about test scores, especially IQ test scores?

  48. Clyde says:
    @Kibernetika

    No way does that critter weigh less than 250.

  49. mmack says:
    @J.Ross

    Electricity is a tool of the cisheteronormative patriarchy, and evil to boot.

  50. anonymous[117] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kibernetika

    Where is your grammar, sir?

    “She be big.”

  51. Dr. X says:
    @Hypnotoad666

    Not to mention people with a normal BMI…

  52. Dr. X says:
    @Anon

    People like her are the ones most likely to manufacture a complaint.

  53. mmack says:
    @Kibernetika

    Hell’s Bells her systolic BP or A1C would be a good qualifying speed number for the Indianapolis 500 (230+).

    • LOL: Hibernian
  54. res says:
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    After she arrived at Caltech I expect the most (unearned) privilege she saw was while looking in the mirror each morning.

    • Replies: @Prester John
  55. @PhysicistDave

    In short, predominant SES ranged pretty much from lower working class to solid middle-class

    Yeah, that was us. I remember in high school, walking on air because I’d gotten accepted.

    But my mom (working class) had never heard of the place and kept mixing it up with Cal State Poly. She knew that a good college had to be famous. So I wasn’t allowed to go.

  56. @Trevor H.

    My mental image of a measles carrier is the child of rich whites who subscribe to Mother Jones.

  57. Better keep Sheldon Cooper away from her. He’s likely to say something to get himself fired.

    • Replies: @guest
  58. @J.Ross

    “market”… Myself and an occasional friend. Ranging between a few sentences of pithiness, to nerd cartoons, all the way to toddlers drawings.

  59. @Jim Don Bob

    Where are you getting that she makes 400k a year for her job? It’s very likely to be much lower than that.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
  60. Paul says:

    Did April Castaneda notice the same thing about the scientists and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)? A bunch of overprivileged, but otherwise mediocre, men? It is a miracle guys like that were able to get us to the moon!

  61. Goatweed says:

    She wasn’t a legacy hire?

  62. @The Practical Conservative

    Our most recent former First Lady got a raise from $120K per year to $310K per year after her husband got elected to the US Senate, after her husband became POTUS, they got rid of the position entirely. That was 15 years ago, maybe factoring cost of living adjustments and whatnot.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  63. Whiskey says: • Website

    This kind of stuff is proof positive that the Military Industrial complex does not see any major threat so can have soldiers in high heels and the farm team for the skunk works cluttered up with this stuff.

    Either that or they are high on their own stash of hopium. Hell of a drug, hopium.

    Either they figure there is no risk and its a peacetime military industrial complex, or they actually believe the Colors of Benetton.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  64. Anon[199] • Disclaimer says:

    “The New Face of Caltech”

    That is so mean!! I like this lol.

    We are meant to be ruled over by the wealthy, the good-looking, the intelligent, and ideally, the virtuous. And these qualities often go together. What is the alternative, to be ruled over by poor indigent ugly dumb people? Doesn’t sound great. In fact this goes against the divine order of things. But there are always some envious people who think they can do better and that’s why we get monstrosities like this given positions of power over their would be superiors.

  65. @JimB

    At Harvard, 3% of students are from the .1%, 15% are from the top 1%, and 39% are from the top 5%. At Caltech, less than 1% of students are from the top .1%, 3% are from the top 1%, and 25% are from the top 5%. Much of tomorrow’s professional-managerial upper middle class is produced by yesterday’s professional-managerial upper middle class because of IQ reasons, but that extra margin at Harvard can serve as a measurement of how much Daddy’s money can grease the wheels.

    At Caltech, a full 75% of students *aren’t* from the top 5%. And our upper class (.1%) participation doesn’t even break a full percent, as opposed to its 30x over-representation at Harvard.

  66. Patrick82 says:
    @Lot

    3 or 4 whites, about 10 south Asians and 10 east Asians…and one handsy lesbian

  67. @J.Ross

    Go ahead. Probably want to clean it up first: a t-shirt should ideally be one word, maybe one line, at most one and a half. Is there a market for paragraph t-shirts?

    Picture the international prohibition sign and the words Oblate Lard Noir

  68. @Mr McKenna

    Oh! Oh! Ask her what her job pays!

    Oh! Oh! Ask her what she weighs!

    • LOL: Mr McKenna
    • Replies: @Escher
  69. And what does the wise, wide Latina have in mind for the privileged gringos?

  70. unit472 says:

    She belongs at Tijuana Tech as Dean of Nacho Studies.

    • Replies: @Trevor H.
  71. Dtbb says:

    Maybe she will go on to win an academy award.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
  72. unit472 says:

    At the end of the Bridges of Toko Ri the Admiral turns to another officer and asks “where do we get such men” as jets take off for anothor mission. I have to ask the same about this tortilla pounder!

  73. Dtbb says:
    @James Speaks

    Since she comes from JPL, maybe the students can calculate how much gas she will need to pass to achieve liftoff; complete with graphs and diagrams of course.

    • Replies: @Dtbb
  74. April Castañeda

    I may be the most “homophobic” guy here, but even I’d have to admit that Carlos Castaneda was prettier than this individual. And possibly more honest.

    However, there are a lot of men with that name out there:

    https://cbs4local.com/news/local/man-accused-of-inappropriately-touching-young-girl-more-than-10-times-documents-say

  75. @James Speaks

    {Insert black hole joke here.}

    Are there brown holes, too?

  76. @Paul

    Did April Castaneda notice the same thing about the scientists and engineers at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL)?

    Oh, that JPL. I was thinking more like, Joliet Public Library.

  77. Dtbb says:
    @Dtbb

    If I knew how I would imbed the video from the James Bond movie where he shot the fat black guy with the gas bullet.

  78. Mr. Anon says:

    If this can happen at Cal Tech, then no university is safe. They’re going to destroy their own brand. They might as well just higher a flat-earther as Vice Provost for Research.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  79. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    He looks just like Raul Julia.

  80. Anon[328] • Disclaimer says:

    You know, these people are just glorified ‘house-mothers’ of the sort they had in colleges back in the 1950s and earlier. They’re chaperones for female students who feel they need protecting just as much as women did in the 1800s. “You can’t say anything nasty in a lady’s presence, no no no!”

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  81. @Lot

    I’d say the blonde girl in the gray vest in the back row on the right is the only girl in that pic I akshually find attractive. Amirite or what?

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  82. Bet she can’t even evaluate
    Integral exp(-t^2)dt from 0 to inf.
    If you don’t see how that’s as easy as 1+1 then you have no business ANYWHERE at Caltech except janitorial

    All this just cause we actually care if someone cries “racist!”

    • Replies: @Prester John
    , @anonomy
  83. jim jones says:
    @Trevor H.

    The Philippines has the highest incidence of Measles in the World

  84. @Monsieur le Baron

    I call BS on this. Caltech traditionally has had one of the highest SAT cutoffs, certainly higher than Harvard. Anyways, Caltech has had some sort of diversity muppet-heads at least for a couple of decades. People there usually just don’t talk or think about that. And yeah the workload can be tough, but they have been relaxing the requirements little by little. Still, a great school, probably the best for undergrads who want to see how real science gets done and even do some of it. Not that good for social life or even future earnings potential – there are easier paths in life.

  85. @Clifford Brown

    Wow. It’s hard to encapsulate the entire future of humanity in a single photo,
    but that one sure comes close.

  86. Well, according to the interview, she’s been at Caltech for 22 years, all of her working career, so I suspect her appointment is a defensive move. Better an insider who knows the culture than some outsider who comes in with a crusade.

    When I was in grad school at USC [where Castañeda earned a master’s degree in social work], I did my internship here in Caltech’s Staff and Faculty Consultation Center. They asked me to stay on, and I worked full-time…I then became a diversity liaison under David Baltimore, when he was president. From there, I came into HR as the head of staff education and development, and ultimately became executive director of Human Resources. About two and a half years ago, JPL asked me to come over there as assistant director of Human Resources to work on building communication and getting the different branches of HR to all grow in the same direction.

    When I was very young, PiltdownBrothers were both EE majors at a really tough engineering school. But they were simply in awe of Caltech, where Richard Feynman was on the faculty.

    I remember reading, with their encouragement, circa 1968, an article about “Ditch Day” at Caltech, where upperclassmen would lock up and secure their rooms in ingenious ways, and freshmen and sophomores would have to unlock their rooms with even greater ingenuity. Amazingly, I found the article with a google search.

    https://archive.org/stream/in.ernet.dli.2015.100926/2015.100926.The-Readers-Digest-Vol90april-nov1967_djvu.txt

    PhysicistDave would be able to tell us far more, of course.

  87. Anonymous[414] • Disclaimer says:
    @BigDickNick

    before spending two year as the assistant director for human resources at JPL

    She must have hit the Mars Bar.

    “It’s time to slow down and go into a stable orbit”

  88. El Dato says:
    @Mr McKenna

    S.T.A.L.K.E.R: Shadow of South Africa

    Supporters of the governing ANC party protest against the power cuts in Soweto township

    Power cuts are racist!

    The government is considering splitting Eskom into three companies, one each responsible for generation, transmission and distribution. Many industry analysts believe that this could make the sector more competitive, and therefore more efficient.

    But the plan is opposed by powerful labour unions, who worry that the move will lead to privatisation and job losses. The unions have resisted attempts to trim the workforce, and recently won a fight for pay rises at the cash-strapped firm.

    Versions of the plan to split Eskom have been tabled by successive governments since the 1990s, without any success. But with the crisis at the utility now threatening the economy, the need for decisive action has never been greater.

    It’s really like France, only worse.

    • Replies: @Trevor H.
  89. @Reg Cæsar

    Remember when Don Juan taught the fat Mexican woman to be a sorceress? He had her spend many hours doing the Gait of Power in the Mexican desert. She lost the weight but became quite terrifying. I think she later tried to kill Carlos. It took all of his personal power to fight her off.
    I hope no naguals try anything like that with this bloated pig!

    • Replies: @El Dato
  90. Edward says:
    @J.Ross

    Genetic privilege is, technically, unearned hereditary privilege. The ability to do math and follow laboratory safety protocols are heritable traits, and both rely on a high g factor to a significant degree.

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
  91. Edward says:
    @Inquiring Mind

    Does anyone have more specific statistics on Caltech’s intake by ethnicity than they put on their website?

    Perhaps the best approximation is UC Berkeley’s undergraduate intake by ethnicity: Asians as a whole make up 41.7% of their intake, with Northeast Asians making up ~23% of the intake, Indian-Americans making up ~11% of the intake, and Whites making up ~21% of the intake.

    https://opa.berkeley.edu/uc-berkeley-fall-enrollment-data

    • Replies: @caffeine withdrawals
  92. El Dato says:
    @Father O'Hara

    Carlos was really roof-level high all the time but at least he inspired Moebius to do beautiful comics.

  93. @istevefan

    “I’d like to see a study on exactly how much diversity outreach positions cost institutions, and see if it is correlated in any way with the outrageous increases in tuition that the average American must accept.”

    Check this (below) out. At the University of Michigan the “Diversity” division tops out at around 100, with the head guy making almost $400K. Total annual personnel costs at 8 million.

    https://www.intellectualtakeout.org/article/diversity-staff-university-michigan-nearly-100-full-time-employees

  94. The sophomore tour guide thought about it for a moment, and then broke into tears. After 10 or 15 seconds of sobbing, she recovered enough to say that while last year had been pretty tough, this year was much better.

    “Sophomore” means “second year student”. Many educational institutions take in a load of first-years to qualify for a load of funding, and deliberately winnow out more than half of them. Hence this person’s experience.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  95. @Reg Cæsar

    I don’t know who that is but that’s not Carlos Castaneda.

  96. Realist says:
    @Peripatetic Commenter

    Yes, intelligence many times begets privilege.

    If she has a degree what is it? I’ll bet the high IQ scientists at Caltech really enjoy having her there.

  97. “saw a lot of privilege.”

    This means she saw a lot of white people.

  98. JMcG says:
    @J.Ross

    I have some familiarity with the electric utility industry. Diversity is officially our number two priority, after safety. In practice, diversity is ascendant. My advice is to buy and know how to use a generator. This diversity push comes at the same time our infrastructure has really entered obsolescence.
    If you think our roads are in bad shape, take a good look at some of the electric pole lines around you, they are likely in terrible shape. We have always had tree and storm induced outages, but outages caused by poles or cross arms just rotting away after fifty or sixty years have become a weekly occurrence.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  99. Anon[319] • Disclaimer says:

    Is the anecdote about the weeping tour guide real, or part of the surrounding eye-rolling iSteve counterfactual sarcasm?

    Seriously, sometimes reading this blog is like reading a James Clavell novel where he changes point of view within single paragraphs and you never can figure out who is narrating or thinking what.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  100. RobRich says: • Website
    @Mr McKenna

    Privilege? If this can happen at Cal Tech, is any university safe?

    I had a friend went there years ago. The first day of calculus the prof gave 100 problems throughout the book to be solved and turned in by the next week. The next week 2/3rds of students were gone.

    The prof then told them it was to ‘weed out the weak’ who had no business there. The surviving 1/3rd spent the semester discussing the philosophical foundations of calculus, reading Newton, and looking at pretty involved engineering and social sciences applications usually treated in graduate schools.

    It’s like karate. Studying it can benefit a man in a wheelchair. But if you can’t do 500 pushups to start, why’re you in a dojo looking to be a black belt?

    • Replies: @Dan Kurt
  101. Trevor H. says:
    @El Dato

    Reminds me of Puerto Rico.

  102. Trevor H. says:
    @unit472

    This is nacho tech school anymore gringo!

  103. Escher says:

    Don’t these people feel guilty when they receive their paychecks?

    • Replies: @Anon
  104. Escher says:

    There goes the last bastion of meritocracy.
    JPL will soon be renamed to the “Wakanda technology development center”.

  105. Escher says:
    @Hippopotamusdrome

    About average for someone in this kind of “job”.

  106. Escher says:
    @Paul

    Ain’t gonna be no more moon landings (or space travel) by America at this rate.
    On the plus side, sales of Big Macs, grape soda and chimichangas will markedly increase in Pasadena.

  107. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:
    @Henry's Cat

    Plaques for Blacks

  108. Escher says:
    @International Jew

    Will she set up satellite offices for her assistants?

  109. @Trevor H.

    On a left wing forum I was called racist for proposing that we restrict travel to the US for unvaccinated people, with exemptions for people from countries like Mexico that have universal inoculation.

    I specifically mentioned an outbreak in Washington State that traces to a Ukrainian epidemic.

    But, it is racist to discriminate against anti-vaxxers now, because some countries in Asia and Africa have low vaccination rates.

  110. Sunbeam says:
    @PhysicistDave

    If you attended Caltech, and have a degree in physic, please try to answer a question that has bugged me for a while.

    Where are all the Caltch Fields Medal winners? Nobel Laureates? Startup companies with innovative technology?

    Geez, published academic papers even.

    Maybe there are more than I’m thinking of, but Caltech seems to punch WAY less hard than MIT, Harvard, or Stanford.

    So what is it? Obviously Caltech has a very small student body even by the standards of other elite schools. But given that most students at Caltech are majoring in technical or scientific fields (the impression at least), I’d think their number of engineering, physics, and math students is comparable to a Harvard or Stanford.

    So where is the promethian fire? A long time ago, in some thread or another, someone posted a list of famous Caltech figures. Most of them were from long ago, or were educated elsewhere (like at Cambridge or somthing).

    • Replies: @res
    , @PhysicistDave
    , @Yucca
  111. CalTech eh?

    Ok, I’m just going to come right out and ask the Magic Question:

    What were this woman’s SAT scores?

  112. @Franz Liszt von Raiding

    From the looks of Chubby Cassie she might have been the dorm cafeteria manager and chief customer as well.

  113. anonomy says:
    @Franz Liszt von Raiding

    Math is repetitive problem solving. Not necessarily a genius could be more like rainman. Not even real problem solving just adding numbers endlessly like you were on speed or some drug and can’t stop. A compulsive disorder. The greatest math genius’ seem to always build a bomb.

    “Grothendieck burned many of his papers in 1991, just before moving to Lasserre, though tens of thousands of unpublished pages remain. For years before his death in 2014, at age 86, he could be seen through a ground-floor window, writing long into the night. The pages revealed an obsession with environmental apocalypse. He was said to rave to locals about God and the devil and to have renounced all his mathematical work. This remains hard to accept for many who knew him. To them, he was the greatest mathematician of the 20th century. ”
    https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/articles/201707/the-mad-genius-mystery

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Hibernian
  114. @res

    Someone should introduce her to Hillary Clinton, Kamalalalalolala Harris, and Pow Wow Warren.

  115. dvorak says:
    @Jack D

    CalTech is filled with kids who were the smartest kids in their high school and then they get to CalTech and they are nothing special.

    This describes any top-15 UG in engineering. Caltech/MIT are even worse.

    Everyone meets his Waterloo. The guy who later founded Evernote says that after breezing through MIT, when he joined a Cambridge-area startup, he then found that he was nothing special.

    Ron Unz famously met his Waterloo in pitching his physics thesis to Feynman.

  116. Danindc says:

    Definitely too large to be a Hidden Figure…

  117. @Trevor H.

    The other students weren’t necessarily smarter than me, but the work load was crushing and they were extremely disciplined and industrious.

    Meh. We talk a big game stateside, but it wasn’t until I got to the UK that I saw a real workload. Architecture students excepted of course.

    If you’ve got time for beer pong you don’t really have much of a workload.

  118. @Edward

    https://www.collegefactual.com/colleges/california-institute-of-technology/student-life/diversity/

    Looks like it’s a little more white and a little less Indian than Berkeley. Asian numbers are similar. And here’s another amusing article I found bitching about the lack of blacks and how we should all strive to be like Stanford:

    https://mic.com/articles/7995/caltech-s-shocking-lack-of-diversity-a-microcosm-for-the-united-states#.UWjvneWUL

    • Replies: @Edward
  119. There’s also a lot of such privilege at the US Math Olympiad Summer Camp. One of my kids went to MOP a couple of times. He’s at the 1-in-10,000 level when it comes to mental stamina, but even he was just burned out at the end of his first MOP.

    And, as you might guess, there is almost never any “Diversity” at MOP.

    https://vdare.com/articles/derbyshire-on-race-and-the-international-math-olympiad

    The U.S.A. team emerges from the famously grueling Mathematical Olympiad Summer Program (abbreviated MOSP but known to everyone as MOP). From its website:

    The combination of these [program elements] makes MOP an extraordinarily intense experience. One participant at 2007 MOP calculated that by the end of the second week members of Blue MOP had already spent more time in a classroom than most calculus classes do in a year, and by the end of the third week participants had spent 170 hours over 19 days either in class or taking practice test for an average of roughly 9 hours a day of math—and that’s before time spent doing problem sets and working on the team contest outside of class is included.

  120. @Anon

    There was a reason they got rid of those house mothers, but yeah, that’s exactly what they are.

  121. @J.Ross

    I’m with Edward on this.

    My addendum:
    “White Privilege” is what used to be called “White Superiority” or “non-white inferiority”, only with the addendum that Whites are bad because superior. I’d say that “White privilege” is the ability to live and work productively in an industrial society. “White Privilege” is an excellent example of an inversion so big that nobody has noticed it.

    The attack on White Privilege is divided into two parts:
    a) Destroy white ability to live in industrial society.
    Affirmative action is a variant on:
    “Tax the rich to feed the poor
    until the rich are rich no more.”
    In the name of POC (the “poor”), it cripples the education needed to be productive in an industrial society, reduces the rewards for being educated, and hobbles the ability of management to respond to reality.
    b) Destroy industrial society.
    Industrial society has to find new resources and new techniques lest it use up the renewable resources upon which it depends. Freeze innovation and you destroy industrial society. That’s what the Caltech takeover is about.

    Note re: homework.

    You have to live like a monk to get through one of the top tier science/engineering colleges. No joke.

    Counterinsurgency

  122. @Paul

    That was fifty years ago. I wouldn’t count on even the JPL crew being “like that” now.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  123. Hibernian says:
    @istevefan

    I think Michelle’s job was more oriented towards relations with the surrounding community, which at the U of C is very predominantly black.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  124. Hibernian says:
    @Unladen Swallow

    I doubt they got rid of it entirely, probably just reorganized, you always need community political fixers at a place like that. Back in the day, they’d most likely be Irish or Jewish.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  125. Hibernian says:
    @Monsieur le Baron

    I think you’re talking about parental wealth, but it takes about 30 seconds of reading to realize that, at least for me. At first I thought you were talking about IQ and therefore being very contrarian in your view of Caltech vs. the Ivies.

  126. @Jim Don Bob

    We are truly doomed when this kind of shite has come to Cal Tech.

    Well, maybe not doomed, but we’re headed for a singularity. Current system can’t be maintained. If nothing else, the US is going to end up with many POC using their position to get even or for their own personal enrichment. Perhaps they are smart enough to be productive for society as a whole if they wanted to, but that won’t be their first priority. Think South Africa, Rhodesia, Imperial China towards the end of a dynasty.
    What will replace the current system?

    The upshot has always been conflict, rivalry and chronic collision among human groups, both great and small. Even if world government were to come, such rivalries would not cease, though their expression would have to alter in deference to the overriding power or a bureaucratic world administration. In all probability, human genetic inheritance is attuned to membership in a small, primary community. Only so can life have meaning and purpose. Only so can moral rules be firm and definite enough to simplify choices. But membership in such groups perpetuates the gap between ‘us’ and ‘them’ and invites conflict since the best way to consolidate any group is to have an enemy close at hand.

    [1]

    Beyond that, _nobody_ knows. Outcomes of prolonged conflicts have never been successfully predicted beyond “there will be mass destruction and everything will be changed.”

    So get your game hat on [2].

    Counterinsurgeny

    1] William H. McNeil.
    “The Changing Shape of World History”.
    1994.
    http://www.hartford-hwp.com/archives/10/041.html

    2] “We play a dangerous game” thought Jazzica. “But it’s dangerous!! and it isn’t a game!!!”
    https://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1118059.National_Lampoon_s_Doon

  127. @Hibernian

    Michelle’s job was dumping patients on other hospitals.

  128. @James Speaks

    My suspicion is that the requirement to learn at CalTech is so much higher that Ms. Dogood can’t even comprehend how much more difficult it is.

    Right on the money there. I’ve run into such people. Their base position is that the whole “smart guy” thing is a con. It’s like the evil boss in Dilbert, or like the person described in:
    “I am a Master of this College.
    What I don’t know isn’t knowledge.”
    This same phenomenon is what cripples organizations that have to take Affirmative Action input seriously, irrespective of its likely results.

    This is taken seriously because has some serious philosophy behind it: Postmodernism. (or maybe it’s the other way ’round: Postmodernism is taken seriously because of the political power in democracies of stupid people on vast numbers, the more so when organized by a small homogeneous group of smart people). See Hick’s [1] or Peterson’s [2] descriptions of Postmondernism. If you don’t know why a raw dismissal of everything real, logical, and verbal (a psychotic break with reality on the face of it) is taken seriously, then you can’t resist it.

    An old world is dying, and a new one forming. You might want the new one to have a place for you and your kids to live.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] Search web for “Stephen Hicks explaining postmodernism”
    2] Search web for “Jordon Peterson explaining postmodernism”

    • Replies: @El Dato
  129. Hibernian says:
    @FormerRocketMan

    I believe Mr. Baron was talking about parental wealth, not any form of IQ test scores, but he was not clear.

  130. @indocon

    Just look at how quickly the electric utility ESKOM fell apart in South Africa under the post-apartheid regime.

    • Replies: @Bubba
    , @Jim Don Bob
  131. @Clifford Brown

    Kind of boring, but exceptionally polite and brilliant. We should defend them at all costs.

    Right, but . . .
    You have to be careful.

    Science and engineering is very often not taught in terms of concepts. It is taught as algorithms, and one is supposed to pick up the concepts by working problems. Examinations in science / engineering always consist of numerical or mathematical problems to be solved. Very seldom do they include essay questions, which would be difficult or impossible to grade.

    This process is fairly easy to corrupt.

    The corrupting group first insists that problems be restricted to one particular set of problems, on the ground that studying is memorization and practice of algorithms (which is mostly is). The next step is to make a bank of problems from which test questions are drawn. The next step is for students to memorize answers to the questions. The final step is to reduce the number of problems in the bank by removing the “racist” questions that hare too hard to memorize.
    I actually ran into that in the early 1980s in a second tier. Students were not supposed to understand, just pass the examinations.

    That’s the transformation that “assistant vice president for equity and equity investigations” is supposed to effect.

    Note the word “equity”. Postmodernism says that equity is impossible; only domination is possible. Therefore, any equity investigations will find that there is no equity. It’s a grant of absolute proprietorial power.

    Counterinsurgency

  132. @Unladen Swallow

    unfortunately it appears they are going to follow the rest of academia off the cliff.

    Lucy VonPelt best described the current situation while explaining autumn leaf loss to Linus:
    “Leaves don’t fall in autumn. They jump before the squirrels can get them.”

    Counterinsurgency

  133. @Clifford Brown

    Kind of boring, but exceptionally polite and brilliant. We should defend them at all costs.

    Right, but . . .
    You have to be careful.

    Science and engineering is very often not taught in terms of concepts. It is taught as algorithms, and one is supposed to pick up the concepts by working problems. Examinations in science / engineering always consist of numerical or mathematical problems to be solved. Very seldom do they include essay questions, which would be difficult or impossible to grade.

    The process for corrupting this process is well established.
    The corrupting group first insists that problems be restricted to one particular set of problems, on the ground that studying is memorization and practice of algorithms (which is mostly is). The next step is to make a bank of problems from which test questions are drawn. The next step is for students to memorize answers to the questions. The final step is to reduce the number of problems in the bank by removing the “racist” questions that hare too hard to memorize.
    I actually ran into that in the early 1980s in a second tier. Students were not supposed to understand, just pass the examinations.

    That’s the transformation that “assistant vice president for equity and equity investigations” is supposed to effect.

    Note the word “equity”. Postmodernism says that equity is impossible; only domination is possible. Therefore, any equity investigations will find that there is no equity. It’s a grant of absolute proprietorial power.

    Counterinsurgency

  134. @James Speaks

    I’m thinking she’ll find them all to be unsuitable for scientific work due to poor attitudes towards the lesser privileged … because that’s what’s really important.

    Apparently mathematicians are being hired at some universities because they have worked as tutors for POC.

    If you think that mathematics is just public relations, a flimflam the camouflages a structure of oppression, and that the structure is wrong (because you’re not the one doing the oppressing), then he above hiring criterion makes perfect sense.

    Counterinsurgency

  135. @Whiskey

    This kind of stuff is proof positive that the Military Industrial complex does not see any major threat so can have soldiers in high heels and the farm team for the skunk works cluttered up with this stuff

    .

    The MIC hasn’t seen any serious threat at least since they put a PR General Officer (Westmoreland) in charge of the Vietnam effort. Even his replacement (Abrams) just meant they saw a mess that needed competent cleanup, not a threat to CONUS. To this day you’ll find long term service members who believe the the US won the Vietnam war and hasn’t done badly since.

    The political class hasn’t seen a threat since AD 1946, about seven decades back. Korea was treated as a matter of US domestic politics, a way to show that the Democrats could not be saddled with the “loss off Korea” as they had been saddled with the “loss of China”. Nobody knows or cares about the non-domestic effects of US policy. That’s one of the reasons the Russians consider the US to be “not agreement capable.” It’s no that the US elite wants to break treaties, it’s just that they don’t consider treaties important enough to remember.

    Counterinsurgency

  136. @Kibernetika

    Didn’t Spinal Tap have a song about women like her?

  137. res says:
    @Monsieur le Baron

    Where did you get the data for that? Your numbers sound plausible to me, but I am reluctant to take something affirming my priors at face value.

    It does not help that your second paragraph imparts a bit of spin IMHO. If your numbers are accurate (and assuming “less than 1%” is close to 1%, what is it exactly?) then the difference which really jumps out at me is 15% vs. 3% for the top 1%. Which implies that the 1.01%-5% numbers would be 24% and 22% so not much different in that range at all.

    I wonder if those top 0.1% and 1% representational differences are due more to applicant pool or university choice. I can see the elite highly favoring Harvard over Caltech for their children.

    It would be fascinating to see the Harvard data broken down by race.

    P.S. Wealth or income?

  138. @Mr. Anon

    They’re going to destroy their own brand.

    Nah. The administrators think they can do the equivalent of buying a high-end liquor distillery, reduce costs by reducing quality, and “monetize” [1] the brands reputation all the way down to bankruptcy. It’s the old “sell it for 10 cents on the dollar, make a 5 cent profit, and become rich” game.

    The institution’s reputation and lower standards means that its services can be sold to the dumb offspring of status hungry affluent parents (a fairly large group, given population replacement). This is much like what the IV league universities have actually done.

    1] “convert to money” or “steal”.

    Counterinsurgency

  139. @Father O'Hara

    Mr. Derbyshire wishes to meet you on the field of honor, suh!

    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
  140. @Mr McKenna

    Marching around in circles cured cancer, so why can’t it generate electrical power?

    Counterinsurgency

  141. @PhysicistDave

    I did not notice much change: still very bright kids whose level of social adjustment was, well, not high.

    Right, I’ve seen this general comment very often.

    Question:
    a) If you have to study your ass off to learn the basics of a subject, if you can’t communicate with 80% of the human race because the IQ gap is 20 points, then how, exactly, are you supposed to build up “social skills” that elite members start learning in kindergarten, go to private schools to learn, and spend their lives practicing because they have to be good at them to avoid getting metaphorically knifed by other elite members?
    b) If, through all the training and experience, you have something of extreme value (as did Jensen, for example) to offer, why is it that people insist you have “social skills” (obtained through the process described in (a)) to get paid for it? Isn’t that rather like insisting that you be over 9 feet tall?
    c) Why doesn’t the “no social skills, no pay” criterion applied to athletes, Hollywood moguls, big tech entrepreneurs (those who were flat thieves, for example), top models, etc.?

    Think carefully. Upon your answer depends the supply of smart and capable people willing to work with you, hence your ability to respond to the competition (the international competition, if nothing else).

    Counterinsurgency

  142. Jack D says:
    @Hibernian

    I doubt that. Her title was Vice President for Community and External Affairs at the U. Chicago Medical Center. Back in the day everyone who worked in the hospital actually had something to do with healing sick people. Of course nowadays you do need fixers in case you want to buy up another couple of blocks of the ghetto to put in more parking, but her job sounded like a featherbedding job that was created for the wife of a promising pol. As soon as she left, they eliminated the position and re-assigned her duties to another brother who was already working there (thereby saving 1 full headcount), in particular to “Dr. Eric Whitaker, Executive Vice President for Strategic Affiliations and Associate Dean for Community Based Research.”

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @Anon
  143. Jack D says:
    @Monsieur le Baron

    Sure, this makes complete sense. Your prototypical Harvard student is a white kid who is very bright but is the son of an alum who is himself very successful. Your prototypical CalTech student is an Asian nerd whose dad works in a Chinese restaurant and speaks broken Engrish.

    STEM is (rightly although with some exceptions due to the tech boom) not seen as the path to fame and fortune in America – spending 20 years shut up in lab making peanuts as a grad student/post doc may be appealing to someone whose dad runs a dry cleaning shop but not to the sons of the rich and famous. And math is hard.

    • Replies: @Anon
  144. Alfa158 says:
    @BigDickNick

    Just from casual observation, somewhere around 75%. What’s really sad is the anchor babies who are already this shape while still in grade school. It’s weird seeing 8 year olds who are square, weigh 80 pounds and already have the thing where the fat on the back of the neck forms a fold at the base of the skull. The Amerindian genotype of the Southwest is adapted to an environment of long dry periods and low food source densities. As a result it packs weight on as fast as possible against periods of scarcity. In a society with modern levels of food abundance you end up with teenagers who are waddling around knock-kneed from the stress of growing up carrying all that weight.

    • Replies: @BigDickNick
  145. Anon[234] • Disclaimer says:

    So, ignoring the Marxist takeover of the humanities because only “high IQ” STEM fields matter kinda bit y’all in the ass, eh? Good on ya.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  146. Bubba says:
    @The Wild Geese Howard

    You ain’t kidding – what a disaster for their economy and standard of living.

    But I think they prefer to live in their own excrement.

  147. fitzGetty says:

    … how very UNPRETTY – in every sense …

  148. Mr. Anon says:
    @Anon

    So, ignoring the Marxist takeover of the humanities because only “high IQ” STEM fields matter kinda bit y’all in the ass, eh? Good on ya.

    Good point. It is the corollary of all those white collar workers who didn’t care about the outsourcing of blue-collar jobs

  149. El Dato says:
    @Desiderius

    JPL delivers all the time.

    JPL software and software-hardware systems deliver stuff into the gravity well of Mars and to Jupiter, Saturn, Pluto and Ultima Thule.

    On the other other hand, when you are working in the “industry” you notice that software is overall shit-tier and it’s only a miracle that it can even manage to get data from the browser text button into the database unmangled. Idiocracy in ICT is here and it’s not pretty.

    • Agree: Counterinsurgency
  150. El Dato says:
    @a reader

    Miss Abbott’s concern [of being raped, killed and murdered] was disclosed on International Women’s Day – 24 hours after Home Secretary Amber Rudd had to apologise for clumsily referring to her as ‘coloured’.

    So what exactly did the International Congregation of the Elders of Woke decide shall be used to refer to a Coloured One now?

    Not that Amber “real people don’t need end-to-end encryption” Rudd would be commendable in any way, shape or form.

  151. bomag says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Interesting in how the article is written; seems to be a developed modern style designed to deflect blame; things are the fault of vague economic forces. E.g.:

    The price of coal has meanwhile gone up, as has the cost of employing a workforce that is almost 50% larger now than it was 10 years ago.

    LOL, hiring more people makes you un-economic.

  152. @The Wild Geese Howard

    Probably because electric utilities require boring things like maintenance.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  153. Hibernian says:
    @Jack D

    I forgot that her job was specific to the medical school. Nonetheless, the U of C has been heavily involved in politics, real estate, neighborhood relations, and security issues since shortly after WW2.

    • Replies: @Anon
  154. @Steve Sailer

    It appears to me that most of the people here who bitch about Harvard simply don’t know anything about the place becuz they didn’t go there.

    Maybe it’s not the same place as it was in the Before-fore Timey-times, but back in the Ancienty-ancient times, most non-STEM kids who showed up there had already gotten their baseline Bucknell-level safety school college education back in high school. Harvard was an excuse to get weird.

    It used to be, Yale and Columbia were breeding grounds for competent government time-servers, Princeton and MIT produced technocrats, but Harvard was the place for visionary weirdos.

    The joke at Harvard was that you ignored the professors and spent your time learning from the other students.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Hibernian
    , @Anonymous
  155. Edward says:
    @caffeine withdrawals

    Thank you, though that isn’t much more specific than the figures posted on the Caltech website. (Indian-Americans are classed as Asians.) The UC Berkeley figures break Asians down into Koreans, Chinese, Japanese, Indians, and so on.

    But yes, that second article is very amusing indeed. I doubt that Caltech will actually abandon its stringent admissions system, but if it does, then there’s no hope left for the rest of the country.

    • Replies: @Anon
  156. guest says:

    Are discrimination, harassment, and sexual misconduct outside the school’s common law tradition?

    Or, wait, are we using “equity” in the general sense of impartiality? In that case, shouldn’t every university department be an equity department?

    Naw, they’ve simply moved onto to new words to gobble up and deprive of meaning.

  157. dr kill says:
    @Trevor H.

    Yes. In my case they were smarter, but since I already knew that , I was not crushed to find I was not a top 10 student. Some of them had the misfortune to discover this inadequacy in med school. Some never recovered. But 45 med school credits a semester does focus your mind beautifully.

  158. guest says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    And not even a Nobel Prize could protect him. (Seriously, the show is toying with gifting him the Nobel.)

  159. The sitcom writes itself:

    Take 1,000 Asian and White skinny geniuses with zero social skills and a near-autistic insistence on reality, who have earned their spot in the meritocracy…

    Drop in one obese, seething Chicana who’s only studied social work and women’s studies, and give her unlimited power to “investigate” anything…

    Hilarity ensues!

    • Replies: @El Dato
  160. @FormerRocketMan

    @Former Rocket Man
    @Hibernian
    My apologies for the bad wording! It is income percentiles, not IQ.

    @res
    The New York Times has a database of the parental SES of students for almost every college worth noting in America.

    • Replies: @res
  161. El Dato says:
    @anonomy

    “The greatest math genius’ seem to always build a bomb.”

    There is a difference between math, engineering and Big Boom Project management. The amalgamation of the three comes from a bad interpretation of the race to build a nuke, which in the end and seen in the rearward mirror was neither particularly high tech nor mathematically edgy except for a few differential equations.

    Grothendieck worked in Algebraic Geometry but that stuff is difficult to weaponize.

    Here is mathematician John Baez trying to get a grip on it while in his 50s, very readable: http://m.nautil.us/issue/69/patterns/the-math-that-takes-newton-into-the-quantum-world

  162. @JMcG

    My advice is to buy and know how to use a generator.

    What kind do you recommend? Stand alone? Whole house?

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
    , @JMcG
  163. El Dato says:
    @struggling

    You may end up with dead chicana. An “accident”. Nobody could have forseen that the investigation would lead her into the room marked “extreme radiation hazard” over the weekend.

    I think that’s a trope btw.

  164. Sunbeam says:
    @res

    I was mainly talking about people who were educated at Caltech, primarily undergrad, but graduate eduction would count as well.

    Here is a wiki page with a list of Fields Medal winners by “university affiliation.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Fields_Medal_winners_by_university_affiliation

    Caltech has one alumni on that list, and that was someone who got a Doctorate there (he had no other schools listed, maybe he went to schools unworthy of being mentioned?). By comparison Princeton and Harvard have seven, MIT four, Berkeley 3.

    Here is a wiki page with a similar list for Caltech (note many more Nobels are awarded versus Fields Medals):

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Nobel_laureates_by_university_affiliation#California_Institute_of_Technology_(8th)

    Here are the people who won Nobels in Physics, and were affiliated with Caltech by education (not as Faculty):

    “Kip Thorne[615] (B.S) – 2017
    Arthur B. McDonald[616] (PhD) – 2015
    Douglas Osheroff[588] (B.S) – 1996
    William A. Fowler[223] (PhD) – 1983
    Kenneth G. Wilson[27] (PhD) – 1982
    Robert W. Wilson[39] (PhD) – 1978
    James Rainwater[503] (B.S) – 1975
    Charles Townes[339] (PhD) – 1964
    Donald Glaser[340] (PhD) – 1960
    William Shockley[561] (B.S) – 1956
    Carl D. Anderson[617] (B.S, PhD) – 1936”

    No where as many as I would have thought. And it seems like they don’t do as well at this as they used to.

    I have no idea if Physics is abnormal in this regard, it’s just the only one I looked at.

    • Replies: @Edward
  165. SLM says:

    According to the article, California has “about 40 different protected classes.”

  166. El Dato says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    In the UK, university curricula shall be “decolonized” by royal family decree. That’s quite a Sonderbehandlung. Were universities colonized? Must they be handed back to the colored ones? When will people proceed to “decimation” of the curricula?

    https://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6713833/Meghan-Markle-backs-campaign-decolonise-curriculum-UK-universities.html

    That’s the Smurf Empire that imports military gear from the US and can’t build its own nuclear reactors anymore (or at least no longer can find a design that is within economic reach and politically acceptable.)

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  167. Bruno says:

    Black ladies at Caltech look whites :

    http://diversity.caltech.edu/about/who_we_serve/black-ladies-association-caltech-blac

    Now even Caltech who was praise for ignoring diversity is obliged to bend to it. Never has been the pressure so Steong since Trump. It’s like the forces who were going progressively decided it was urgent to unleash their wrath ….

  168. res says:
    @Sunbeam

    You appear superficially right about the Field Medal based on the topline stats at this page: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_Fields_Medal_winners_by_university_affiliation
    which does make your question interesting. But if you take a closer look you will see Caltech down there tied for number 16 (with 4, compare 18 for Harvard). Which after you account for a class size currently around 230 compared to, say, Harvard with about 1500 things start looking rather different. Though your point about STEM concentration is a good one and raises the issue of how best to account for size. One might also want to consider the size of graduate programs along with the number of professors and how those are accounted for.

    This post from Steve Hsu looks at rank by combined Nobel, Fields, or Turing prizes per capita: http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2015/09/colleges-ranked-by-nobel-fields-turing.html
    Caltech dominates that list. And also leads (but not quite so dominant) in a lower threshold list measured by NAS, NAE, or IOM membership.

    More at the original source of the data: https://qz.com/498534/these-25-schools-are-responsible-for-the-greatest-advances-in-science/
    This data is based on undergraduate attendance.

    Hopefully Dave has something to add.

    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    , @FormerRocketMan
  169. res says:
    @Monsieur le Baron

    Thanks! Is that NYT database accessible? How fine grained is it? Based on your <1% figure I am guessing you were working from percentiles?

    (from the article below I am guessing the data in question was Raj Chetty's)

    A quick search returned this article: https://www.nytimes.com/interactive/2017/01/18/upshot/some-colleges-have-more-students-from-the-top-1-percent-than-the-bottom-60.html
    I think that is a good contribution to this discussion. One especially nice feature is you can add your own colleges to the article tables (use California Institute of Technology rather than Caltech).

    I think their chart of "Where today's 25-year-olds went to college, grouped by their parents' income" is an extremely interesting look at the college attendance characteristics of different classes in the US. Unfortunately, I don't see any way to embed that graphic here.

    P.S. I did not find an iSteve post on that article with a quick search (did I miss it?) though it was mentioned in this comment: http://www.unz.com/isteve/obey-giant/#comment-1744575

  170. anonymous[191] • Disclaimer says:

    The benefits of being a 400 pound Lesbian!

  171. @res

    Thanks for that. I’ll add that Caltech is traditionally not a top-5 school for CS, Math or even EE. And there is almost no economics there. Caltech is more about fundamental science: think black holes, earthquakes, the Large Hadron Collider or LIGO. So physics, chemistry, geology and biology is top-notch there. But this not how you make money in start-ups. That stuff might pay off in 20-30 years, or maybe never. This set-up has also largely insulated Caltech from the big diversity push until recently. But it is slowly getting noticeable even there. Bah, there is always China and Singapore – they have been trying to lure scientists for a while, including non-ethnic Chinese.

  172. I’ll add that Caltech and to smaller extent MIT are largely about doing science, not about educating students. The students do get access to real science labs where they are very welcome. But enough about that, eh. That photo is funny though. I remember when the face of diversity was an Iranian woman, then they hired an attractive enough black woman who looked really out of place. I also remember when they started a minority freshmen camp, out of 20 or so incoming black or native american students probably only 25% looked non-white. That was pretty funny to observe.

  173. Jeff says:

    I’m still stuck on what it means when she says she can “see privilege”. If it means that she sees the race of the students, that seems nothing but racist.

    She said that before she got there, so she wouldn’t have had access to any data on the students. Even if she had that data, what exactly is the privilege that she sees? That the students all have high ACT/SAT scores? So what’s next, enroll dumb students?

    What a complete crock of shit.

    Signed, a University of Phoenix graduate.

  174. Ibound1 says:
    @J.Ross

    The only question is will AI and robotics save a bit of civilization here from the coming dysgenic disaster. It will be a close run thing and unpleasant either way.

    Japan and Singapore will have AI and robotics and no dysgenics. Their societies will be what we imagined the future to be in 1950.

  175. Dan Kurt says:
    @RobRich

    re: “The first day of calculus the prof gave 100 problems throughout the book to be solved and turned in by the next week. The next week 2/3rds of students were gone.” RobRich

    The story I remember hearing from an acquaintance who went to Cal Tech from 1959-1963 was that Freshmen were given by the Dean of Freshmen a list of 100 problems (I believe in Physics) called the Strong Problems. One had four years to finish them as a challenge and few ever did. They were called the Strong Problems because the Dean had the last name of Strong, T. Foster Strong. Here is a story about Dean Strong and his problems: http://calteches.library.caltech.edu/283/1/retiring.pdf

    Dan Kurt

  176. “the newly created position of assistant vice president for equity and equity investigations and Title IX coordinator at Caltech, will design and implement a comprehensive approach to all issues pertaining to discrimination, unlawful harassment, and sexual misconduct”

    And I will bet you $1 that she finds discrimination, unlawful harassment, and sexual misconduct everywhere she looks……..

  177. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Edward

    America was destroyed in the summer of 1968 when the affirmative action civil rights act was passed.

    Last 50 years was just the mopping up operation

  178. @Lot

    I call bullshit!
    Where are all the POC??

  179. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @inertial

    She’ll be out there spray painting swatztikas and making nooses in no time. Maybe not, she looks like she can hardly walk.

    Black woman Spanish name an affirmative action trifecta

  180. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Trevor H.

    Another gift from Asia is bedbugs. One of the reasons for the Asian exclusion acts was leprosy and bubonic plague brought by immigrants from China and Japan.

    There’s still bubonic plague among rats chipmunks gophers etc in California brought by Asian immigrants 120 years ago.

  181. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kibernetika

    She’s plus 260, probably pushing 300.

  182. @Jack D

    That comment gave me a flashback.

    In 1980 I was 67/1500 at Lane Tech, a tough HS in Chicago.

    Got a free ride to IIT in Chemical Engineering.

    Upon beginning my first year, it was apparent that I was completely outmatched by the other Freshmen.

    The Asians with the pocket protectors crushed me academically.

    Did a year and left to lick my wounds. It took 23 extra years to finish my undergrad work.

    To say I was nothing special was an understatement.

  183. @MikeatMikedotMike

    See, now I would have said the same thing, only differently, such as “What the hell is that thing??!!”

  184. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hibernian

    It has to, it’s surrounded by one of the most dangerous black ghettoes in the country.

    Amazing, Yale Columbia Temple UPenn UofC Johns Hopkins USC hundreds of colleges and universities surrounded by the worst black ghettoed in the country and they are still the headquarters of the hate law abiding Whites, love the marauding blacks who rob rape and assault our students.

  185. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    It’s always been that way and always will be. Non stem college students who attended private schools from prole to aristocrat level can just sleep and party thru college.

  186. Anon[169] • Disclaimer says:

    That wedding ring ain’t never coming off.

    Given her long CalTech history, maybe she knows rhe the score, and what her role is: do not cause trouble.

  187. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Not all stereotypes are true.

    The Chinese STEM students I knew at UCLA all came from solid middle class backgrounds including one whose Dad was not the CEO but a top executive at Panda Express.

    A lot of those immigrant dry cleaner and restaurant owners were engineers and STEM people back in the old country.

    And a lot of the dry cleaners restaurants and little furniture stores are just money laundering fronts and a means of getting those E-5 immigrant investor and entrepreneur visas. They’re supposed to have proof of $500k to start the business hardly poverty stricken

    Ron Unz has pretty much proved that Harvard discriminates against both the White Goyim and Asians in favor of Jews. It’s the Jewish admissions people, not the Goy alums who decide who gets into Harvard now days.

    • Replies: @Ganderson
  188. Rusty says:

    Caltech is famous for it’s elaborate practical jokes.

    They may have outdone themselves this time.

  189. Hibernian says:
    @Dave from Oz

    Color me skeptical. I think this is true of lower tier law schools; other institutions may be this way to some extent, but a two or more to one ratio seems, in general, to be very unlikely. I’ve never seen anything like that anywhere I’ve been, including the diploma mill where I got my Master’s in project management.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  190. This woman knows nothing about tech schools. Holy roly-poly.

  191. Hibernian says:
    @anonomy

    “Math is repetitive problem solving.”

    Only at the high school level or below.

    • Agree: PhysicistDave
  192. Hibernian says:
    @Hibernian

    Also, I’ve heard that elite institutions are less likely to weed out a large percentage of students than lesser schools, I heard this relative to both engineering and law.

  193. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    I thought she worked at Michael Reese or is Reese part of the UofC medical center? Convenient commute as well if it was on the UofC campus

    I bet she checked in at 8/30 left for meetings at 10, went home and came back around 4 so her numerous assistants could tell her what they’d done all day.

    She didn’t practice law at the Jewish firm of Sidley Austin. She was executive director in charge of recruiting law students for summer internships for God’s sakes.

    She passed the bar and could have done something resembling practicing law for that firm But the proponents of affirmative action wouldn’t risk an affirmative action hire doing anything but a created specially for dummies job.

  194. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Escher

    No, they bitch that they’re not getting more.

  195. @War for Blair Mountain

    Russia….please nuke us…..drop a big 0ne…bullseye on the Yellowstone Caldera….

    This will be huge when it goes, though the sheer isolation of Wyoming means that America can survive the event, though it will be a disaster of epic proportions. However, nuking it–even with the biggest hydrogen bomb–isn’t going to set it off. The super-volcano will make up its own mind about that.

  196. @Ecotopia Fats

    Ecotopia Fats wrote to me:

    But my mom (working class) had never heard of the place and kept mixing it up with Cal State Poly. She knew that a good college had to be famous. So I wasn’t allowed to go.

    Yeah, my dad’s uncle, who knew something about colleges (he was one of the finance guys at Northwestern), never could be convinced that I was not at Cal Poly!

    For what it’s worth, you were probably better off not going to Caltech. I liked it, but my wife hated it, and her feelings were more typical of the students there. It’s a very strange place with very strange people: part of the reason I liked it was that it was the first time in my life that I was somewhere that my social skills (in particular with girls) were actually above average.

    I’d guess that of the kids who go to Caltech, only about a quarter really are happy there.

  197. @Ecotopia Fats

    I knew a working class man who got into Stanford about 60 years ago. On the first day the President of Stanford says, “Welcome to Leland Stanford Junior University.”

    My friend thought to himself, “Wow, I didn’t realize Stanford was only a Junior University. I guess I’ll have to go somewhere else for my junior and senior years.”

  198. @Sunbeam

    Sunbeam wrote to me:

    But given that most students at Caltech are majoring in technical or scientific fields (the impression at least), I’d think their number of engineering, physics, and math students is comparable to a Harvard or Stanford.

    No, the number of STEM majors at Caltech is smaller than Stanford.

    Stanford has seven or eight times the undergrads that Caltech has. And, at least when we last visited Stanford, they told us that STEM majors dominated: they were trying to disprove the claim that Stanford is really just a tech school, MIT West!

    What is also true is that “success” in many STEM fields nowadays depends more on politics, intersectionality points, etc. than ability. This is, alas, in fact now true of the field I did my Ph.D. in, elementary-particle physics. (For infinite details about the very deep political/sociological problems in elementary-particle physics, see Peter Woit’s blog or Sabine Hossenfelder’s blog.)

    I actually know a current physics prof holding a named chair at Caltech of all places who should not have been given a bachelor’s degree. Quite incompetent, but he churns out lots and lots of papers (not all correct, of course!), he has very strong social skills (I like him myself, even though I am complaining about him), and he checks off the right ethnic group box. I’d say much the same of a former chair of the Harvard physics department who was a fellow student of mine at Stanford.

    The rot and corruption has extended very deep and is present even in the most hard-core STEM fields. To which Sailer’s post above adds further evidence, alas, in the case of Caltech.

    Regression to the mean.

  199. @Redneck farmer

    Accepted! My second shall be attilla the hen.

  200. @FormerRocketMan

    FormerRocketMan wrote:

    I’ll add that Caltech is traditionally not a top-5 school for CS, Math or even EE. And there is almost no economics there.

    Strangely enough, the Nobel laureate in economics, Vernon Smith , was at Caltech from 1973 to 1975, and Caltech had some strength back then in experimental economics. Although I overlapped with Smith, I unfortunately never got to know him. The econ professors I did get to know were one jerk, one nice but slightly crazy guy, and one real gentleman with whom I became friends even though we disagreed on almost everything (he gave me A+s because I could show I grasped what he said even though I disagreed).

    FRM also wrtoe:

    Caltech is more about fundamental science: think black holes, earthquakes, the Large Hadron Collider or LIGO. So physics, chemistry, geology and biology is top-notch there. But this not how you make money in start-ups.

    Exactly. Think of the place as a really bizarre monastery, and you won’t be far off.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  201. @res

    Yes, that’s the one. There’s a way to go to the pages to each school instead of just adding them to the table in the article, though I just use Google instead of trying to navigate the NYT website.

  202. @FormerRocketMan

    I was under the impression that EE and ME were two of the more popular undergraduate majors at least until recently. I know Vernon Smith, the Nobel Prize winning economist was an EE major at Caltech in the late 40’s.

    He said in his Nobel biography that Caltech was much harder than he ever could have ever imagined back in Kansas. He said he was grateful for the experience and implied that his graduate training in economics was pretty easy by comparison.

  203. @res

    My analysis of Chetty’s data on how much graduates of different colleges earn:

    https://www.takimag.com/article/alma_mater_blotter_steve_sailer/

    • Replies: @res
  204. res says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Thanks! That goes along with your post on iSteve: http://www.unz.com/isteve/top-50-rich-kid-colleges-ranked-by-mom-and-dads-income/

    It might be dated, but if you have the interest I think that NYT article I linked has some interesting ideas on offer and might be worth a followup. Especially if you can figure out how to get to the school data as Monsieur le Baron described in comment 203.

  205. Anonymous[204] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    baseline Bucknell-level safety school college education

    What does this mean?

  206. @Dtbb

    “Maybe she will go on to win an academy award.”

    #OscarsSoAttractive

  207. @Edward

    Genetic physical superiority, such as longer limbs, greater fast-twitch muscle fiber, higher endogenous levels of testosterone, and mental aggression due to fewer MAO inhibitor genes, is technically unearned privilege too, one that falls largely to blacks.

    As average IQ falls, physical superiority will still be recognized and accepted by all while cognitive superiority is often and will increasingly be unrecognized, denied, wasted, and accused of being cheating by a dumbed-down society- except in cases where it is employed in scheming and deception instead of for the greater good. In such a dystopia the young and strong led by the intelligently malevolent few will rule.

  208. Ganderson says:
    @Anon

    The Dean of Admissions at Harvard is named Fitzsimmons…

    • Replies: @Anon
  209. The chaired professor who shouldn’t be one, which ethnic box does he check off? I know Caltech doesn’t have any persons of color to use tiny duck’s euphemistic language. Is it a South American or Spaniard who checks the Latino box?

  210. @Anon

    I would imagine that she has it that NOT hitting on her is also sexual harrasment

  211. @Anon

    How extremely satisfying.

    We aren’t beaten yet, not by a long shot.

  212. Yucca says:
    @Sunbeam

    If you do not know that Caltech Professors won Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry in the last 2 years; and that there is a Nature article presenting a research that the odds of a Caltech undergraduate student to win a Nobel Prize is much higher than any other university in the World; DO NOT MAKE CONCLUSIONS.
    If your goal is to limit your life to a startup. Yes; go MIT. If your goal is higher knowledge….there is no better school than Caltech.

    • Replies: @Sunbeam
  213. @Alfa158

    I was more referring to HR diversity ladys, but yes, meso americans have a huge obesity problem. The combination of meso american obesity and the desire for universal healthcare is gonna be ….interesting!

  214. Sunbeam says:
    @Yucca

    “f you do not know that Caltech Professors won Nobel Prizes in Physics and Chemistry in the last 2 years;”

    If you do not know that being a professor at Caltech, but educated elsewhere, is not the same as being a graduate of Caltech, do not make conclusions.

    As for the Nature article, I was totally unaware of it.

  215. EdwardM says:

    Assistant vice president? Outrageously low title for such an important function.

    Most universities are already creating titles at the vice provost level for this. It’s just a matter of time before the quadrupling-down results in the first President of Diversity and Inclusion, at the same level as the university president himself.

  216. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Ganderson

    The Dean doesn’t decide who is admitted. He or she is a manager of the delartmrnt, nothing to do with individual admissions.

  217. Anonymous[356] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lockean Proviso

    As average IQ falls, physical superiority will still be recognized and accepted by all while cognitive superiority is often and will increasingly be unrecognized, denied, wasted, and accused of being cheating by a dumbed-down society

    Why would average IQ fall as Asia (high relative IQ) rises?

    • Replies: @Lockean Proviso
  218. @Anonymous

    Average IQ in the western countries, due to dysgenics and low-skilled immigration, as well as the decline of educational standards and waning of the Flynn Effect. Asians in America (as well as whites) may persist but would be denied more opportunity to do high-level science and engineering, due to rampant URM quotas for a burgeoning population that swamps the brightest of whatever race. Asians in America may leave for greener pastures in their ancestral homelands, or if they stay not be as bright as they would otherwise be due to less challenge, fewer opportunities, and a dumbed-down society spending more on gibs and guns than on R&D.

    As for Asians in Asia, their brightest young people don’t seem to be having children at a replacement rate. Perhaps the Beijing Genomics Institute will act as deus ex machina and enhance CRISPR babies with DNA sequences that they scanned from the West’s top scientists and Nobel winners- the ultimate intellectual property transfer.

  219. Edward says:
    @Sunbeam

    Did you look at Steve Hsu’s post?

    http://infoproc.blogspot.com/2016/10/where-nobel-winners-get-their-start.html

    Per capita, Caltech alumni win more Nobel Prizes than those from virtually every other institution in the world.

  220. @El Dato

    In the UK, university curricula shall be “decolonized” by royal family decree. That’s quite a Sonderbehandlung.

    Think Rhodesia as an endpoint.

    Take a look at Hicks [1] to get an understanding of how anybody can think like this. Remember that (a) philosophical ideas are misleadingly simple and (b) their adherents believe and act in near perfect constancy with their philosophical ideas.

    In practice, of course, it comes down to “kill the enemy.” The philosophy part just makes “kill the enemy” compatible with the organization of the killer’s group, and with the killer’s conscience. I don’t like it either, but it’s a part of the human condition.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] Hicks.
    _Understanding Postmondernism”
    Also search YouTube.com for “Hicks Postmodernism 2018”.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  221. @Jim Don Bob

    Probably because electric utilities require boring things like maintenance.

    Official doctrine is that the above is just a White’s lie. There is no cause and effect, reality is not knowable, and so if the Whites wanted the utilities to last, they would last. If they don’t, that’s sabotage.

    See: Hicks, “Understanding Postmodernism” or, for that matter, Reilly, _The Closing of the Muslim Mind: How Intellectual Suicide Created the Modern Islamist Crisis_.

    The amazing thing to me is how similar Postmodernism and Islam are. Both appear to be paralyzed by their emphasis on omnipotence — in one case, the omnipotence of their religion’s god, in the other case by the omnipotence of politics. Both end up believing that their god’s will is the only thing that matters, which leaves them no role other than internecine squabbling (exercise of human will) for humans. Perhaps that’s why they are de facto allies. And, perhaps, it’s the Islamic influence in Eastern Europe (origin of Postmodernism being arguably Kant).

    Counterinsurgency

    Counterinsurgency

  222. @Anonymous

    baseline Bucknell-level safety school college education

    It’s said that Americans have a good high school education, but unfortunately have to go to college to get it.
    If you attend a prep school such as Andover, you can still get a reasonable high school education in high school.
    The joke here is that Bucknell imparts the high school education that most of Bucknell’s students don’t have, _and_ which is all that is needed to be a manager / leader. If you go to Andover _and_ Harvard, you don’t need more education than Bucknell would give you, so you can ignore the Harvard professors and concentrate on making connctions and a reputation. Or a fortune, if you’re Zuckerberg.

    Might even be true.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  223. @Anonymous

    baseline Bucknell-level safety school college education

    It’s said that Americans have a good high school education, but unfortunately have to go to college to get it.
    If you attend a prep school such as Andover, you can still get a reasonable high school education in high school.
    The joke here is that Bucknell imparts the high school education that most of Bucknell’s students don’t have, _and_ which is all that is needed to be a manager / leader. If you go to Andover _and_ Harvard, you don’t need more education than Bucknell would give you, so you can ignore the Harvard professors and concentrate on making connctions and a reputation. Or a fortune, if you’re Zuckerberg.

    Might even be true.

    Counterinsurgency

  224. @Jim Don Bob

    My advice is to buy and know how to use a generator.

    “What kind” depends on how long you want to generate electricity. If it’s days, a portable. If months, a whole house, probably w/ propane as it doesn’t go stale. Put a berm around the propane to keep out vandalism shots. If it’s years, and you think propane prices will greatly increase, go solar and hope nobody shoots the array. Price increases with each decision, and it’s hard to find a contractor most places. One firm sells solar systems that only work when the grid is up, because that’s cheaper and they boast that you can sell electricity to the grid and make money. ROI was negative when I looked at it, though.

    Counterinsurgency.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  225. @Anon

    Is the anecdote about the weeping tour guide real

    Don’t know, but I remember being very near to weeping myself at a somewhat easier school, so I’d say it’s true.

    Counterinsurgency

  226. @PhysicistDave

    Think of the place as a really bizarre monastery, and you won’t be far off.

    Classical Physics started out as a religious exercise, understanding God’s nature was a way to learn about God. Variant on Weber’s work [1].

    Surprisingly to Christians, Christianity is the only monotheistic religion that considers studying nature to be an important religious exercise. Islam says that studying nature is pointless, as Allah creates the universe in a series of unconnected miracles that cannot be understood or explained. Judaism agrees that physical reality exists, but does not consider that an important source of information about God. Judaisms’ knowledge of God comes from holy writings (and arguing about same), not secular knowledge. If Christianity goes, so does science, and (except as a craft) so does engineering.

    So, right, a bizarre monastery. Maybe one in process of being converted to a sort of trade school.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Protestant_Ethic_and_the_Spirit_of_Capitalism

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  227. @Lockean Proviso

    The most important “unearned privilege” just now is the ability to live and work productively in an industrial society. Physical strength isn’t usually the failure point, so it’s not important, at least in politics.

    Counterinsurgency

  228. JMcG says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    If you can swing it, get a whole house. Have it plumbed into a natural gas line if you have one, otherwise a large propane tank. That setup is expensive though.
    Depending on your HVAC system, a large portable can work. My portable generator and a manual throw over cost me around 1200, but I installed it myself. That will run my critical systems, in which I include my heat, but not my central air.
    I can arrange not to be without utility power for too very long though, at least I can unless an asteroid strikes.

  229. JMcG says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    You have this exactly right. A whole house generator uses a surprising amount of propane though. Solar with battery backup is the ideal, but super expensive and extremely vulnerable to outside interference.

  230. A whole house generator uses a surprising amount of propane though.

    My neighbor in Canada had one of these powered by a 250 gallon propane tank. During our last outage, she was going through about 50 gallons of propane a day.

    Me, I lost some steaks and ice cream in the freezer. It was the first outage of > 24 hours in 15 years. ($500 generator / $75 of frozen food) + gas + stabil + store generator = I don’t think so.

    Thanks for the tips.

  231. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    All the Walgreens stores had Onan gensets to run the refrigeration in the pharmacy for insulin and such that had to stay refrigerated. One day, looking around the bathroom/employee break area I saw the gensets were gone from where they had been.

    The pillcop told me Corporate had them all pulled out and thrown in dumpster or hauled for scrap. They decided it was cheaper to destroy the ruined meds and replace them than to maintain the genset. The genset had to be checked every six months by a tech and test run every month and that was considered too much work.

  232. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    In practice, of course, it comes down to “kill the enemy.” The philosophy part just makes “kill the enemy” compatible with the organization of the killer’s group, and with the killer’s conscience. I don’t like it either, but it’s a part of the human condition.

    Once sufficiently provoked, whites are really good at killing. One reson we, or at least a small remnant, still have a shot at survival.

    All the gangbangers in all the cities would be no match for a hundred farm kids with .30/06s in an even-up war.

    It won’t be even-up, it never is, but we can still win once we decide to fight, really fight to the death or victory.

  233. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    Surprisingly to Christians, Christianity is the only monotheistic religion that considers studying nature to be an important religious exercise. Islam says that studying nature is pointless, as Allah creates the universe in a series of unconnected miracles that cannot be understood or explained. Judaism agrees that physical reality exists, but does not consider that an important source of information about God. Judaisms’ knowledge of God comes from holy writings (and arguing about same), not secular knowledge. If Christianity goes, so does science, and (except as a craft) so does engineering.

    I’m more inclined to agree with this every day. The militant atheist scientists, by themselves, will never rule: if Christianity goes from the masses, it will be replaced by lower savagery in the nonwhites and a sort of generalized paganism in th whites, until they are browned out of existence.

  234. Well she certainly hasn’t been under-served.

    Not at Denny’s anyway.

  235. Olorin says:
    @J.Ross

    So much yoink, J–excellent one.

    I’ve said for a decade now that what we need is a Week Without White Men.

    That will never happen. But imagine a nationwide strike of sparkies and lineworkers right after TSHTF across an area affecting tens of millions, thanks to crazy winter storms or hurricanes or whatnot.

    We have regular power outages here in Pacific Cyclone Country, resulting from storms of varying duration and intensity. Some smashing major parts of the power grid. Within hours, trucks full of white men with big muscles come rolling in from all over North America to fix it.

    Owing to this mobilization of skilled white men, in the past 20 years I can think of only one grid disaster that kept even the most remote houses from getting their line power back within two weeks.

    The problem is encoded in that observation. When the power goes out, priority is given to the cities. And the cities are full of 400-pound multi-chinned Castanedans who are happy to partake of Privilege (that others generate, damn them all to hell!, now gimme gimme)…while spanking anyone smarter, prettier, or harder-working than they.

    But IBEW will never allow such a strike. Nor would the appallingly leftist UWUA, which illustrates its Web home page with T. Genius Coates’s less porky brutha.

    Our time is now, sisters!

    https://uwua.net/uwua-womens-caucus/

    IBEW’s home page is festooned with a twentysomething taupe looking female with light-duty work goggles who couldn’t hump a butt set up three flights of indoor stairs, never mind 90 pounds of tools and equipment up a 2,000 foot-tower climb. She’s wearing ornate silver jewelry and obviously working in a tidy, comfortable indoor environment, “Producing The Things North Americans Need.” Her impeccably pruned eyebrows seem designed for mating display.

    You can bet your left nad that when a hurricane hits the Gulf, this muffin isn’t out wrangling downed live lines and smashed poles and transformers that blew into the next county. But I’ll bet she’d love to land one of the white guys who does…then take him for everything he’s worth in divorce court. Good lord, how often we’ve seen that sort of thing Chez Olorin or I guess more accurately tried to mop up the guts of the guy who brought this on himself in his zeal to mate, spawn, and have a place to go where a bit of tenderness reigns…thanks to Dad.

    The workplace, like Higher Ed, now exists to give brown women access to mating up. Though as Jerelyn Luther at Yale taught us all, it rarely works out that way.

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