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The Literary Roots of Ta-Nehisi Coates
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From The Atlantic:

But whereas his forebears carried whiteness like an ancestral talisman, Trump cracked the glowing amulet open, releasing its eldritch energies.

From Google:



 

 

 
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  1. unit472 says:

    Back when the New York Times was still a somewhat respectable newspaper, their columnist and lexicographer, William Safire would dig deep into an obscure turn of phrase like ‘eldritch’ when he wasn’t turning out his own alliterative phrases like ‘pusilanamous pussyfooters’ for Spiro Agnew.

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    • Replies: @kihowi

    obscure turn of phrase like ‘eldritch’
     
    It's not that obscure anymore. It became a cool thing to say among millennial when referencing Lovecraft became a meme.

    None of those people have actually read his stories of course. There's plenty in there which which would get you called a nazi in the current year. "The village" is a story about a beautiful white neighborhood that gets taken over and destroyed by monster-like racial minorities. They were pretty eldritch too.

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  2. Ophidian says:

    Don’t forgot the Lee/Ditko Dr. Strange comic, where “eldritch” was used a lot.
    I think Coates is a big comic book geek. He does write the Black Panther comic currently.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ChrisZ
    The provenance is definitely from comics, but I was thinking more of writer Roy Thomas: Stan Lee's successor at Marvel, and the first fan turned pro. He brought a lot more self-serious pretension to his writing; but lacking the originality of Kirby/Ditko/Lee, Thomas borrowed heavily from his literary heroes Lovecraft, R.E. Howard, and Moorcock. I'd guess the lineage of "Eldritch energies" begins with one of those three, enters comics through Roy Thomas, is propegated by dozens of Thomas' imitators in the 1970s-80s, and was thereby internalized by the young Coates. He presents the phrase now as if it's the common currency of educated readers, when it's really more of a marker of taste for a certain kind of fantastic literature.

    Commenter #3 here (Anonymous) has it right, I think, in assessing Coates as a person who would be happier writing fantasy, instead of carrying the burden of "public intellectual."
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  3. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Every time I see references to him here, I can never tolerate more than skimming his writings. (I think a comment a few threads back raised a challenge on this, and I fail…) But he seems… at least contrasted with some people… to be a decent guy at heart, albeit a guy who is way over-promoted and now trapped in a gilded cage. Maybe in reality he’s just into swords and sorcery fantasy and never had any real desire to truly “be” a “real black man” or whatever he is posturing as. Why can’t he just try writing fantasy novels under an assumed name? Maybe he just wants to write straight old-school fantasy novels, not some SJW stuff. He doesn’t even need to “abandon” his real self, he can just translate his own experiences into that realm without trying to politicize things. No one would even know. If he tried this, his prose style would probably improve greatly, since much of its current badness seems to result from a drive to posture and “prove” himself. Or if he doesn’t want to write under a pseudonym, maybe he could frame his move into old-school fantasy as a bold move: here he is, a real black man, writing a real fantasy book, not some tendentious SJWized simulacrum of fantasy. Just go for it, dude! You’ll make less money and you’ll be less famous, but you might enjoy it and have more self-respect.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Excerpts I have seen here border on genocidal. Yet he is a good guy at heart?
    , @Humbles
    Ta-Nehisi Coates was raised by hardcore black power parents in central Baltimore, to be a Great Black Knight for the cause. He is moderately bookish (exceptionally bookish for a black guy) and so the Establishment has been happy to cast him as the New James Baldwin. But his racial polemics are overblown and weak. I feel like his heart really isn't into being a Professional Angry Black Man. Even his book was mainly just about how awful it is to grow up in a black community, surrounded by violent, irresponsible, anti-intellectual black people. Maybe he will finish up by being a moderately successful fantasy writer.
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  4. I was really hoping for some Blind Guardian or Hammerfall lyrics, maybe even some Hawkwind. But no, just rpg gibberish. What a nerd.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sammler
    Maybe TNC will work his way around to pointing out how all that prog was built on the oppressed bodies of Miles Davis and Billy Cobham...
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  5. george says:

    Coates is reimagining Tolkien with blond light skinned orcs.

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    • Replies: @Sammler
    Moorcock, rather than Tolkien.

    I'm disappointed that it didn't turn out to be a Lovecraft quote. Maybe next time.
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  6. Can recommend Tales of Maj’Eyal.
    Tales of Ta-Nehisi not so much :(.

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  7. cthulhu says:

    My man Genius T. Coates needs to remember the words of the mad Arab, Abdul Alhazred: Do Not Call Up What You Cannot Put Down.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux
    "My man Genius T. Coates needs to remember the words of the mad Arab, Abdul Alhazred: Do Not Call Up What You Cannot Put Down."

    I say to you againe, doe not call up Any that you cannot put downe; by the Which I mean, Any that can in Turne call up somewhat against you, whereby your Powerfullest Devices may not be of use. Ask of the Lesser, lest the Greater shall not wish to answer, and shall commande more than you.
     
    The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, HP Lovecraft
    , @Chrisnonymous
    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism... why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?
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  8. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Ta-Sneezy is an irritant, but I don’t think he has the excuse our Little Little Miss Muffett probably has. Let’s just say she can’t be wearing white slacks in this video.

    “I like the designer stuff, the good stuff, Christian Dior…….”

    “I plan to become more spiritual…If I meet someone and they don’t give me their undivided attention I get annoyed

    “Sorry love….it’s not your privilege to use that word” (Referring to ‘queer’, as in the Britishism, ‘queer as a scoutmaster’, one presumes.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cloudbuster
    Should I know who this is? Eleven subscribers. No likes/dislikes or comments on a week-old video?
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  9. backup says:

    There are a number of articles and books which go wrong right in the first sentence. You immediately know that reading it is a waste of time. Take for instance the Communist Manifesto:

    The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.

    This article has such an opening sentence:

    It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact.

    This is true for Obama, who was clearly elected because of his skin colour. It is not true for Trump. So I read a bit of it. It is the usual word dropping: Original Sin, White Supremacy. Blah blah.

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    I think many whites and perhaps some blacks voted for Obama (in 2008) because they thought he was uniquely positioned to be a racial uniter. Obviously his ethnic background was an inherent part of this. And probably some whites and many blacks voted for him BECAUSE he was "of color." So arguably the majority of his initial support was in some way tied to his ethnicity, although the awfulness of McCain/Palin must not be downplayed.

    I'm not so sure about his second term win. In hindsight, Romney/Ryan, as awful as they are, were not as horrifying a prospect as McCain/Palin were, at least to me. And Obama had clearly bursted any sane person's hope of racial reconciliation by November 2012. Of course other factors were at play. I'd be interested in reading cogent analyses of the 2012 election with five years hindsight.

    It's clear that many Trump voters had voted for Obama at least once. For some of these folks, race was never much of an issue to begin with. For others, race was always a big issue but the realities/perceptions of race had changed.

    Certainly, Trump appealed to me and many others insofar as he wasn't openly anti-white like virtually the entire left and much of the cuckservatariat. It's a big stretch to say that not being explicitly anti-white is the same as white supremacism, but it is the current year, after all.

    , @Antlitz Grollheim
    His strategy seems to be to pack so much high-concept horsefeathers into such a tight space that you become too lazy to think it through and assume it's brilliant.
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  10. Jason Liu says:

    Coates’ entire schtick is to recreate the Civil Rights era atmosphere for nice white liberals using elaborate, sensationalist language that makes them feel like they’re bearing witness to momentous historical events.

    Its the kinda vapidness that makes your daughters go “That’s so inspirational!” He is the literary equivalent of a quote superimposed over a Neil deGrasse Tyson picture.

    For normal people, his verbose yet obvious thesis can be summed up in one sentence: The Republican party is the party of white tribalism.

    “Eldritch” is a cool word, though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dr. X

    For normal people, his verbose yet obvious thesis can be summed up in one sentence: The Republican party is the party of white tribalism.
     
    The party of Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney???

    Ah, if only...
    , @AnotherDad

    Coates’ entire schtick is to recreate the Civil Rights era atmosphere for nice white liberals using elaborate, sensationalist language that makes them feel like they’re bearing witness to momentous historical events.

    Its the kinda vapidness that makes your daughters go “That’s so inspirational!” He is the literary equivalent of a quote superimposed over a Neil deGrasse Tyson picture.
     
    "Vapid" is exactly the word. "Tedious" is the other--the feeling that wells up in me when I--very occasionally--follow one of the links and try to read him.

    But "daughters" isn't the weird thing here. The weird thing is all these young lefty--heavily Jewish--men who absolutely swoon over the guy with "you must read him", "the best explanation ever", "must read".

    If it wasn't already so obvious that our establishment is bat-shit crazy insane, the swooning and fawning over this guy's tedious oh-poor-me drivel would be sufficient to raise concern.
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  11. a reader says:

    OT

    Deranged White case #852987:

    My brother’s killer is now my friend.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    The article is surprisingly candid about the convict's inability to deal with anger. And it ends eerily, conveying a sense of this woman's second thoughts about having worked so hard to see her brother's cold blooded murderer released from prison.

    "She notices every time Fields recounts the story of the murder he adds a few embellishments, taking a little less responsibility. 'He is sorry though. I don’t believe he is going to do it again.'"

    , @Cloudbuster
    The harm people like this do is incalculable. She not only is deranged in her personal life but appears to have spent most of her life helping out murderous Dindus.
    , @Neuday

    Deranged White case #852987:

    My brother’s killer is now my friend.
     
    "My civilization's killer is going to be my friend".

    This deranged White is only thinking globally but acting locally.
    , @Lurker
    Is there anything on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal?
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  12. “Eldritch energies” is interesting magic.
    The Eldrick Tont or “Tiger Wood” is related, though it can be used by lesser mages as a signaling device (in the ancient past for pure good, situational dominance, and more recently for “perspective” and cosmic reference).
    The Eldrick Tont had a shorter half-life than Eldrick Energy has had which is blamed on its material substrate, which was mixed and involved less cosmic magic than imagined in the mixing…

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  13. Dr. X says:
    @Jason Liu
    Coates' entire schtick is to recreate the Civil Rights era atmosphere for nice white liberals using elaborate, sensationalist language that makes them feel like they're bearing witness to momentous historical events.

    Its the kinda vapidness that makes your daughters go "That's so inspirational!" He is the literary equivalent of a quote superimposed over a Neil deGrasse Tyson picture.

    For normal people, his verbose yet obvious thesis can be summed up in one sentence: The Republican party is the party of white tribalism.

    "Eldritch" is a cool word, though.

    For normal people, his verbose yet obvious thesis can be summed up in one sentence: The Republican party is the party of white tribalism.

    The party of Paul Ryan and Mitt Romney???

    Ah, if only…

    Read More
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  14. I thought he might be talking about The Sisters of Mercy’s lead singer Andrew Eldrich. They had a song called Black Planet:

    So still so dark all over Europe
    And the rainbow rises here
    In the western sky
    The kill to show for
    At the end of the great white pier
    I see a Black Planet

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  15. Cortes says:
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  16. If the apocalypse doesn’t come soon, this clown will be studied … nay, he will be revered in our schools as a serious and weighty author. He makes one want to root for ISIS.

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  17. It looks to me as if Coates is employing a well-worn pedant bluffing technique: Use an obscure term that you are only vaguely familiar with but one that is catchy enough such that, if noticed, would signal your acquaintance with a whole vast body of esoteric knowledge, and use it confidently and casually enough that your readers and critics will be overawed by your prowess and will be too embarrassed to admit that they barely know what the hell it means, either.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Bullseye.
    , @Humbles
    Intelligent Dasein wins in the clever handle category.
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  18. ChrisZ says:
    @Ophidian
    Don't forgot the Lee/Ditko Dr. Strange comic, where "eldritch" was used a lot.
    I think Coates is a big comic book geek. He does write the Black Panther comic currently.

    The provenance is definitely from comics, but I was thinking more of writer Roy Thomas: Stan Lee’s successor at Marvel, and the first fan turned pro. He brought a lot more self-serious pretension to his writing; but lacking the originality of Kirby/Ditko/Lee, Thomas borrowed heavily from his literary heroes Lovecraft, R.E. Howard, and Moorcock. I’d guess the lineage of “Eldritch energies” begins with one of those three, enters comics through Roy Thomas, is propegated by dozens of Thomas’ imitators in the 1970s-80s, and was thereby internalized by the young Coates. He presents the phrase now as if it’s the common currency of educated readers, when it’s really more of a marker of taste for a certain kind of fantastic literature.

    Commenter #3 here (Anonymous) has it right, I think, in assessing Coates as a person who would be happier writing fantasy, instead of carrying the burden of “public intellectual.”

    Read More
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  19. Brainless shit-talking charlatan.

    It all started with the sixties liberal concept of “Everything or anything : soup cans, can be art” (or intellectualism).

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army Vet, and pro Jazz aritist.

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  20. kihowi says:

    Guys like this remind me of pulp fiction writers like Robert E. Howard. Making a tremendous effort, but not quite literate enough to make if flow right. Everything is juuuuust a little off. He doesn’t use language like a tool but wrestles with it like an adversary and that makes reading it exhausting.

    This also goes with a love for 10-dollar words. A writer whose name I’ve forgotten called that “the verbosity of the illiterate”.

    Cops don’t say:

    “we caught the guy”

    but:

    “at this moment in time we have apprehended the individual in question”

    Read More
    • Agree: sayless
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  21. Steve’s provided his 80s-Hipster bonafides many times. So, it stands to reason that he’s got a couple of THE SISTERS OF MERCY cassettes or LPs collecting dust somewhere in his garage.

    Andrew Eldritch (armed with a high IQ, myriad historical references, primitive drum machine, ultra-mega-baritone vocal chords and a super hot goth chick bass player) was arguably more implicitly huwhite than even “The Thin White Duke”. Where Bowie zigged towards funky, Eldritch zagged towards fashy.

    Lucretia My Reflection…. it doesn’t get much huwhiter than this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gunnar von Cowtown
    I stand corrected. It does get huwhiter.

    Bonus Implicit Whiteness Points for cultural appropriation, horseback riding and KANGZ!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWvOHT0zfXY
    , @AP
    Heh, that's what I thought when I read the word "eldritch."
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  22. kihowi says:
    @unit472
    Back when the New York Times was still a somewhat respectable newspaper, their columnist and lexicographer, William Safire would dig deep into an obscure turn of phrase like 'eldritch' when he wasn't turning out his own alliterative phrases like 'pusilanamous pussyfooters' for Spiro Agnew.

    obscure turn of phrase like ‘eldritch’

    It’s not that obscure anymore. It became a cool thing to say among millennial when referencing Lovecraft became a meme.

    None of those people have actually read his stories of course. There’s plenty in there which which would get you called a nazi in the current year. “The village” is a story about a beautiful white neighborhood that gets taken over and destroyed by monster-like racial minorities. They were pretty eldritch too.

    Read More
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  23. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @a reader
    OT

    Deranged White case #852987:

    My brother’s killer is now my friend.

    The article is surprisingly candid about the convict’s inability to deal with anger. And it ends eerily, conveying a sense of this woman’s second thoughts about having worked so hard to see her brother’s cold blooded murderer released from prison.

    “She notices every time Fields recounts the story of the murder he adds a few embellishments, taking a little less responsibility. ‘He is sorry though. I don’t believe he is going to do it again.’”

    Read More
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  24. @Gunnar von Cowtown
    Steve's provided his 80s-Hipster bonafides many times. So, it stands to reason that he's got a couple of THE SISTERS OF MERCY cassettes or LPs collecting dust somewhere in his garage.

    Andrew Eldritch (armed with a high IQ, myriad historical references, primitive drum machine, ultra-mega-baritone vocal chords and a super hot goth chick bass player) was arguably more implicitly huwhite than even "The Thin White Duke". Where Bowie zigged towards funky, Eldritch zagged towards fashy.

    Lucretia My Reflection.... it doesn't get much huwhiter than this.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUYPd1ag_WE

    I stand corrected. It does get huwhiter.

    Bonus Implicit Whiteness Points for cultural appropriation, horseback riding and KANGZ!

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qWvOHT0zfXY

    Read More
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  25. ic1000 says:

    One admirable thing about Ta-Nehisi Coates is that he uses his writing to communicate what he thinks and feels. Thus, interested parties don’t have to guess, all they have to do is read.

    The first 150 1/2 pages of TNC’s greatest book, “Between the World and Me,” are about being black (awesome and difficult), being around other black people (awesome and complicated), being around “people who believe they are white” (generally awful), and having to share space with people who believe they are white and American, known to him as Dreamers (the worst).

    At that point, TNC wraps it up by abruptly picking up an environmentalist cudgel. The book’s penultimate paragraph:

    Once, the Dream’s parameters were caged by technology and by the limits of horsepower and wind. But the Dreamers have improved themselves, and the damming of seas for voltage [sic], the extraction of coal, the transmuting of oil into food, have enabled an expansion in plunder with no known precedent. Ant this revolution has freed the Dreamers to plunder not just the bodies of humans but the body of the Earth itself. The Earth is not our creation. It has no respect for us. It has no use for us. And its vengeance is not the fire in the cities but the fire in the sky. Something more fierce than Marcus Garvey is riding on the whirlwind. Something more awful than all our African ancestors is rising with the seas. The two phenomena are known to each other. It was the cotton that passed through our chained hands that inaugurated this age. It is the flight from us that sent them sprawling into the subdivided woods. And the methods of transport through these new subdivisions, across the sprawl, is the automobile, the noose around the neck of the earth, and ultimately, the Dreamers themselves.

    It’s hard to see much affection on Coates’ part for the 86% of his fellow citizens who aren’t African-American (or, these days, Recent-African-Immigrant-Americans).

    Coates writing to The Atlantic‘s audience isn’t disavowing his trademark mix of schadenfreude and disgust, he’s building on it.

    I can see his black readers eating this stuff up, and it’s virtue-signalling grist for the SJW mill. Still, I can’t help but wonder whether the middlebrow liberals who contribute the most clicks to the magazine’s top line really understand what they’re consuming. The waiter spitting in the food before bringing it to the table, and all that.

    And in the Current Year’s furore over DACA, the scorn that drips from Coates’ use of the moniker “Dreamers” is amusing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sammler
    Eventually TNC will read Vollmann's "World in a Jar". Nothing will be the same, after that.
    , @El Dato
    In a parallel world described by PKD in "The Man in the High Castle", the Dreamer has awoken:

    Frink shut the radio off. Then, calmer, he turned it back on.

    Christ on the crapper, he thought. Africa. For the ghosts of dead tribes. Wiped out to make a land of - what? Who knew? Maybe even the master architects in Berlin did not know. Bunch of automatons, building and toiling away. Building? Grinding down. Ogres out of a paleontology exhibit, at their task of making a cup from an enemy's skull, the whole family industriously scooping out the contents - the raw brains - first, to eat. Then useful utensils of men's leg bones. Thrifty, to think not only of eating the people you did not like, but eating them out of their own skull. The first technicians! Prehistoric man in a sterile white lab coat in some Berlin university lab, experimenting with uses to which other people's skull, skin, ears, fat could be put to. Ja, Herr Doktor. A new use for the big toe; see, one can adapt the joint for a quick-acting cigarette lighter mechanism. Now, if only Herr Krupp can produce it in quantity . . .

    It horrified him, this thought: the ancient gigantic cannibal near-man flourishing now, ruling the world once more. We spent a million years escaping him, Frink thought, and now he's back. And not merely as the adversary . . . but as the master.

    '. . . we can deplore,' the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. '. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.' They, the Japs, were so strong on law. '. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: 'What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?'' The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.
     
    Mwahaha.

    We were talking about eldritch?

    Lovecraft used it a lot in early 20th century:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=%3Adagonbytes.com+eldritch&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8
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  26. Unz readers might enjoy the link in this essay to a youtube video about Duong Nem, who got stranded penniless in Africa yet managed to build a business from nothing. More wisdom in his simple words than most of what I have read from all the “digital nomads” writing about starting your internet business while living in paradise and banging all the hottest women.

    Find Your Inner Chicken Feet

    http://wp.me/p6QFjS-m5

    Read More
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  27. Sammler says: • Website
    @george
    Coates is reimagining Tolkien with blond light skinned orcs.

    Moorcock, rather than Tolkien.

    I’m disappointed that it didn’t turn out to be a Lovecraft quote. Maybe next time.

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  28. @Anonymous
    Ta-Sneezy is an irritant, but I don't think he has the excuse our Little Little Miss Muffett probably has. Let's just say she can't be wearing white slacks in this video.


    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5qwkdrE8jnc

    "I like the designer stuff, the good stuff, Christian Dior......."

    "I plan to become more spiritual...If I meet someone and they don't give me their undivided attention I get annoyed"

    "Sorry love....it's not your privilege to use that word" (Referring to 'queer', as in the Britishism, 'queer as a scoutmaster', one presumes.)

    Should I know who this is? Eleven subscribers. No likes/dislikes or comments on a week-old video?

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Her name is Natalie Hynde, the oh so British sounding offspring of Sir Ray Davies and Chrissie Hynde.

    She is of some (although as time goes on, I'd say limited) interest for having espoused a certain level of immigration-skeptical commentary. Girls getting raped for simply not wearing a burka sits poorly with her. She isn't stupid, but she is a little bit of a mess, like most offspring of wealthy parents who don't have jobs or families of their own.

    Her mother Chrissie Hynde is an odd case on her own of course. I've always suspected she has more knowledge of and agreement with Savitri Devi than she'd dare admit (Devi being one of the prime intellectual influences on post-1945 National Socialism).
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  29. Sammler says: • Website
    @Jean Ralphio
    I was really hoping for some Blind Guardian or Hammerfall lyrics, maybe even some Hawkwind. But no, just rpg gibberish. What a nerd.

    Maybe TNC will work his way around to pointing out how all that prog was built on the oppressed bodies of Miles Davis and Billy Cobham…

    Read More
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  30. @a reader
    OT

    Deranged White case #852987:

    My brother’s killer is now my friend.

    The harm people like this do is incalculable. She not only is deranged in her personal life but appears to have spent most of her life helping out murderous Dindus.

    Read More
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  31. AP says:
    @Gunnar von Cowtown
    Steve's provided his 80s-Hipster bonafides many times. So, it stands to reason that he's got a couple of THE SISTERS OF MERCY cassettes or LPs collecting dust somewhere in his garage.

    Andrew Eldritch (armed with a high IQ, myriad historical references, primitive drum machine, ultra-mega-baritone vocal chords and a super hot goth chick bass player) was arguably more implicitly huwhite than even "The Thin White Duke". Where Bowie zigged towards funky, Eldritch zagged towards fashy.

    Lucretia My Reflection.... it doesn't get much huwhiter than this.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yUYPd1ag_WE

    Heh, that’s what I thought when I read the word “eldritch.”

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  32. peterike says:

    One time I was on a date in Brooklyn, with this lady who seemed very nice but I knew right away it wasn’t going to happen. As we were wandering around Boerum Hill, she asked if we couldn’t pop into a book store we were passing. She just couldn’t wait to get the new Ta-Nehisi Coates book, she said.

    Oh dear, I thought. Do I just laugh and call him Genius T. Coates and mock his absurd blackity-black-black thing? Or do I see how politely I can extract myself from this? I took the second option, but I should have taken the first.

    I suppose I could add that she was Jewish, but it wouldn’t be difficult to guess that.

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  33. Neuday says:
    @a reader
    OT

    Deranged White case #852987:

    My brother’s killer is now my friend.

    Deranged White case #852987:

    My brother’s killer is now my friend.

    “My civilization’s killer is going to be my friend”.

    This deranged White is only thinking globally but acting locally.

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  34. Tiny Duck says:

    Mr. Coates is dead on in his eloquent observations about the wages of “whiteness” and racism on society and the health of mankind. Leonard Pitts has written extensively on this as well. This is why demographic change is of utmost importance. white men being outnumbered and effectively barred from the institutions of power are the only way society can save and redeem itself

    This is why white resistance to mass immigration is truthfully resistance to demographic change thus resistance to doing the right thing thus resistance to good fighting evil

    This is why antifa is right to go after not only Nazis but conservatives in general

    You people must be stopped for the sake of the children

    Read More
    • Replies: @fish

    Dat Trent Denton....he a card.


    - Leonard Pitts
     
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  35. Lurker says:
    @a reader
    OT

    Deranged White case #852987:

    My brother’s killer is now my friend.

    Is there anything on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    From my experience, the smartest whites and the stupidest whites both tend to be right-leaning. The mediocre intellects tend to be left-leaning. Left-leaning comments, unlike right-leaning comments, almost always have good spelling, grammar and logical cohesion, but they're also almost always devoid of nuanced, original thought.
    , @sayless
    Is there anything on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal?

    No, dear one. There is nothing on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal.
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  36. syonredux says:
    @cthulhu
    My man Genius T. Coates needs to remember the words of the mad Arab, Abdul Alhazred: Do Not Call Up What You Cannot Put Down.

    “My man Genius T. Coates needs to remember the words of the mad Arab, Abdul Alhazred: Do Not Call Up What You Cannot Put Down.”

    I say to you againe, doe not call up Any that you cannot put downe; by the Which I mean, Any that can in Turne call up somewhat against you, whereby your Powerfullest Devices may not be of use. Ask of the Lesser, lest the Greater shall not wish to answer, and shall commande more than you.

    The Case of Charles Dexter Ward, HP Lovecraft

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  37. @cthulhu
    My man Genius T. Coates needs to remember the words of the mad Arab, Abdul Alhazred: Do Not Call Up What You Cannot Put Down.

    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism… why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism… why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?
     
    Coates' mind has been infected by the White Man's voodoo......Now he has the true gnosis....


    1 Nor is it to be thought that man is either the oldest or the last of earth’s masters, or that the common bulk of life and substance walks alone.

    2 The Old Ones were, the Old Ones are, and the Old Ones shall be. 3 Not in the spaces we know, but between them, They walk serene and primal, undimensioned and to us unseen.

    4Yog-Sothoth knows the gate. Yog-Sothoth is the gate. Yog-Sothoth is the key and guardian of the gate. 5 Past, present, future, all are one in Yog-Sothoth. 6 He knows where the Old Ones broke through of old, and where They shall break through again. 7 He knows where They have trod earth’s fields, and where They still tread them, and why no one can behold Them as They tread.

    8 By Their smell can men sometimes know Them near, but of Their semblance can no man know, saving only in the features of those They have begotten on mankind; 9 and of those are there many sorts, differing in likeness from man’s truest eidolon to that shape without sight or substance which is Them.

    10 They walk unseen and foul in lonely places where the Words have been spoken and the Rites howled through at their Seasons. 11 The wind gibbers with Their voices, and the earth mutters with Their consciousness. 12 They bend the forest and crush the city, yet may not forest or city behold the hand that smites. 13 Kadath in the cold waste hath known Them, and what man knows Kadath? 14 The ice desert of the South and the sunken isles of Ocean hold stones whereon Their seal is engraven, but who hath seen the deep frozen city or the sealed tower long garlanded with seaweed and barnacles? 15 Great Cthulhu is Their cousin, yet can he spy Them only dimly. 16 Iä! Shub-Niggurath!

    17 As a foulness shall ye know Them. 18 Their hand is at your throats, yet ye see Them not; 19 and Their habitation is even one with your guarded threshold. 20 Yog-Sothoth is the key to the gate, whereby the spheres meet. 21 Man rules now where They ruled once; They shall soon rule where man rules now. 22 After summer is winter, and after winter summer. 23 They wait patient and potent, for here shall They reign again.

    , @syonredux

    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism… why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?
     
    HPL endures as that-which-must-be-hated. Cf how SJWs have made a cottage industy out of writing WOKE Lovecraftian tales:

    http://www.npr.org/2016/02/29/468558238/the-ballad-of-black-tom-offers-a-tribute-and-critique-of-lovecraft

    http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/lovecraftian-horror-creeps-into-amcs-the-ballad-of-black-tom

    Lovecraft Country is a 2016 dark fantasy horror novel by Matt Ruff, exploring the conjunction between the horror fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and racism in the United States during the era of Jim Crow laws, as experienced by black science fiction fan Atticus Turner and his family. It was published by Harper Collins.
    Reception[edit]
    Publishers Weekly commended Ruff for his "impressive grasp of classic horror themes", and noted that the book's "most unsettling" aspect is the constant bigotry experienced by the characters,[1] while Kirkus Reviews considered it a "series of bizarre chimerical adventures" and a "merrily macabre pastiche", comparing it favorably to Ruff's previous works.[2]
    At BoingBoing, Cory Doctorow described the characters as "active protagonists (with) lives, (...) dignity, and (...) indomitable spirit", and observed that because of their constant experiences with "harassment, violence, expropriation, and the legacy of slavery", they "don't need Elder Gods to experience horror",[3] while at Tor.com, Alex Brown judged that the book "thoroughly and effectively marries race and horror" and called it as "a tense thriller, a terrifying nightmare, a heartbreaking tragedy, and a tale of holding onto aspiration and optimism even while being chased through the woods by a hellbeast from another dimension".[4]
    Adaptation[edit]
    In 2017, HBO announced that they were preparing an adaptation of the novel, with Jordan Peele and J. J. Abrams as executive producers and Misha Green as showrunner
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovecraft_Country_(novel)

    "Shoggoths in Bloom" is a science fiction novelette by Elizabeth Bear, originally published in the March 2008 issue of American magazine Asimov's Science Fiction, and subsequently republished in Bear's 2012 collection "Shoggoths in Bloom".[1]


    In 1938, Paul Harding is a black college professor who has come to a coastal Maine village to study the wild shoggoths. As news reports of Kristallnacht appear in the background, Harding discovers the unexpected truth about shoggoths, and is faced with a difficult decision.
    Reception[edit]
    "Shoggoths" was the winner of the 2009 Hugo Award for Best Novelette.[2] Tor.com called it a "stand-out".[3]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoggoths_in_Bloom
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  38. @Anonymous
    Every time I see references to him here, I can never tolerate more than skimming his writings. (I think a comment a few threads back raised a challenge on this, and I fail...) But he seems... at least contrasted with some people... to be a decent guy at heart, albeit a guy who is way over-promoted and now trapped in a gilded cage. Maybe in reality he's just into swords and sorcery fantasy and never had any real desire to truly "be" a "real black man" or whatever he is posturing as. Why can't he just try writing fantasy novels under an assumed name? Maybe he just wants to write straight old-school fantasy novels, not some SJW stuff. He doesn't even need to "abandon" his real self, he can just translate his own experiences into that realm without trying to politicize things. No one would even know. If he tried this, his prose style would probably improve greatly, since much of its current badness seems to result from a drive to posture and "prove" himself. Or if he doesn't want to write under a pseudonym, maybe he could frame his move into old-school fantasy as a bold move: here he is, a real black man, writing a real fantasy book, not some tendentious SJWized simulacrum of fantasy. Just go for it, dude! You'll make less money and you'll be less famous, but you might enjoy it and have more self-respect.

    Excerpts I have seen here border on genocidal. Yet he is a good guy at heart?

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  39. In the words of the sage…WTF?!

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  40. CJ says:

    Surprising that no one has mentioned the 1965 novel The Three Stigmata of Palmer Eldritch by Philip K. Dick. Hollywood went through a phase of making movies based on PKD material, but AFAIK there is nothing based on that one. Too bad, because it really is one of those PKD works that seemed way out there in the 1960s-1970s but seems amazingly prescient now. It might not be quite as good as The Man in the High Castle, but it would be a better mini-series than most of the dreck out there now.

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  41. I’m glad I went to school in an era when the likes of Tennessee Coates didn’t appear on any mandatory reading lists.

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  42. AndrewR says:
    @backup
    There are a number of articles and books which go wrong right in the first sentence. You immediately know that reading it is a waste of time. Take for instance the Communist Manifesto:

    The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.
     
    This article has such an opening sentence:

    It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact.

     

    This is true for Obama, who was clearly elected because of his skin colour. It is not true for Trump. So I read a bit of it. It is the usual word dropping: Original Sin, White Supremacy. Blah blah.

    I think many whites and perhaps some blacks voted for Obama (in 2008) because they thought he was uniquely positioned to be a racial uniter. Obviously his ethnic background was an inherent part of this. And probably some whites and many blacks voted for him BECAUSE he was “of color.” So arguably the majority of his initial support was in some way tied to his ethnicity, although the awfulness of McCain/Palin must not be downplayed.

    I’m not so sure about his second term win. In hindsight, Romney/Ryan, as awful as they are, were not as horrifying a prospect as McCain/Palin were, at least to me. And Obama had clearly bursted any sane person’s hope of racial reconciliation by November 2012. Of course other factors were at play. I’d be interested in reading cogent analyses of the 2012 election with five years hindsight.

    It’s clear that many Trump voters had voted for Obama at least once. For some of these folks, race was never much of an issue to begin with. For others, race was always a big issue but the realities/perceptions of race had changed.

    Certainly, Trump appealed to me and many others insofar as he wasn’t openly anti-white like virtually the entire left and much of the cuckservatariat. It’s a big stretch to say that not being explicitly anti-white is the same as white supremacism, but it is the current year, after all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I voted third party in 2008 and 2012, because I live in a state that is not in play, and when an election is genuinely not in play my policy is always to vote third party. However, I would have never cast a ballot for McCain and Palin on the grounds that McCain is genuinely insane, whereas I would have held my nose and voted for Romney in 2012 had mine been possibly the deciding vote. He's a cuck, but not a madman.
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  43. AndrewR says:
    @Lurker
    Is there anything on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal?

    From my experience, the smartest whites and the stupidest whites both tend to be right-leaning. The mediocre intellects tend to be left-leaning. Left-leaning comments, unlike right-leaning comments, almost always have good spelling, grammar and logical cohesion, but they’re also almost always devoid of nuanced, original thought.

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  44. Yan Shen says:

    Food for thought.

    The number of articles or blog posts written by Steve Sailer that mentions the black John Derbyshire: dozens?

    The number of articles or blog posts written by black John Derbyshire that mentions Steve Sailer: 0?

    Not that that matters, but it does make uh one wonder why Mr. Derbyshire’s dark skinned doppelganger is such an intense topic of interest here…

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  45. Thomas says:

    Coates and Obama should start a Dungeons & Dragons group.

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  46. syonredux says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism... why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?

    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism… why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?

    Coates’ mind has been infected by the White Man’s voodoo……Now he has the true gnosis….

    1 Nor is it to be thought that man is either the oldest or the last of earth’s masters, or that the common bulk of life and substance walks alone.

    2 The Old Ones were, the Old Ones are, and the Old Ones shall be. 3 Not in the spaces we know, but between them, They walk serene and primal, undimensioned and to us unseen.

    4Yog-Sothoth knows the gate. Yog-Sothoth is the gate. Yog-Sothoth is the key and guardian of the gate. 5 Past, present, future, all are one in Yog-Sothoth. 6 He knows where the Old Ones broke through of old, and where They shall break through again. 7 He knows where They have trod earth’s fields, and where They still tread them, and why no one can behold Them as They tread.

    8 By Their smell can men sometimes know Them near, but of Their semblance can no man know, saving only in the features of those They have begotten on mankind; 9 and of those are there many sorts, differing in likeness from man’s truest eidolon to that shape without sight or substance which is Them.

    10 They walk unseen and foul in lonely places where the Words have been spoken and the Rites howled through at their Seasons. 11 The wind gibbers with Their voices, and the earth mutters with Their consciousness. 12 They bend the forest and crush the city, yet may not forest or city behold the hand that smites. 13 Kadath in the cold waste hath known Them, and what man knows Kadath? 14 The ice desert of the South and the sunken isles of Ocean hold stones whereon Their seal is engraven, but who hath seen the deep frozen city or the sealed tower long garlanded with seaweed and barnacles? 15 Great Cthulhu is Their cousin, yet can he spy Them only dimly. 16 Iä! Shub-Niggurath!

    17 As a foulness shall ye know Them. 18 Their hand is at your throats, yet ye see Them not; 19 and Their habitation is even one with your guarded threshold. 20 Yog-Sothoth is the key to the gate, whereby the spheres meet. 21 Man rules now where They ruled once; They shall soon rule where man rules now. 22 After summer is winter, and after winter summer. 23 They wait patient and potent, for here shall They reign again.

    Read More
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  47. syonredux says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism... why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?

    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism… why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?

    HPL endures as that-which-must-be-hated. Cf how SJWs have made a cottage industy out of writing WOKE Lovecraftian tales:

    http://www.npr.org/2016/02/29/468558238/the-ballad-of-black-tom-offers-a-tribute-and-critique-of-lovecraft

    http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/lovecraftian-horror-creeps-into-amcs-the-ballad-of-black-tom

    Lovecraft Country is a 2016 dark fantasy horror novel by Matt Ruff, exploring the conjunction between the horror fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and racism in the United States during the era of Jim Crow laws, as experienced by black science fiction fan Atticus Turner and his family. It was published by Harper Collins.
    Reception[edit]
    Publishers Weekly commended Ruff for his “impressive grasp of classic horror themes”, and noted that the book’s “most unsettling” aspect is the constant bigotry experienced by the characters,[1] while Kirkus Reviews considered it a “series of bizarre chimerical adventures” and a “merrily macabre pastiche”, comparing it favorably to Ruff’s previous works.[2]
    At BoingBoing, Cory Doctorow described the characters as “active protagonists (with) lives, (…) dignity, and (…) indomitable spirit”, and observed that because of their constant experiences with “harassment, violence, expropriation, and the legacy of slavery”, they “don’t need Elder Gods to experience horror”,[3] while at Tor.com, Alex Brown judged that the book “thoroughly and effectively marries race and horror” and called it as “a tense thriller, a terrifying nightmare, a heartbreaking tragedy, and a tale of holding onto aspiration and optimism even while being chased through the woods by a hellbeast from another dimension”.[4]
    Adaptation[edit]
    In 2017, HBO announced that they were preparing an adaptation of the novel, with Jordan Peele and J. J. Abrams as executive producers and Misha Green as showrunner

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovecraft_Country_(novel)

    “Shoggoths in Bloom” is a science fiction novelette by Elizabeth Bear, originally published in the March 2008 issue of American magazine Asimov’s Science Fiction, and subsequently republished in Bear’s 2012 collection “Shoggoths in Bloom”.[1]

    In 1938, Paul Harding is a black college professor who has come to a coastal Maine village to study the wild shoggoths. As news reports of Kristallnacht appear in the background, Harding discovers the unexpected truth about shoggoths, and is faced with a difficult decision.
    Reception[edit]
    “Shoggoths” was the winner of the 2009 Hugo Award for Best Novelette.[2] Tor.com called it a “stand-out”.[3]

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoggoths_in_Bloom

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sammler
    "Shoggoths in Bloom" might be the single most pointless thing I have ever seen in print. Worse still, I read it before understanding that SF had been conquered by virtue-signaling twits, so I thought a Hugo meant something.
    , @Anon
    https://www.counter-currents.com/2014/09/reflections-on-the-h-p-lovecraft-award/
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  48. I think we can all agree that the clever Genius T Coates has been topped by Tennessee Coates. Tennessee it is. What we need to do is get at the essence of Tennessee’s, and his fellow race hustlers’, raison d’etre, which is creating excuses for black failure and especially black parasitism–affirmative action, crime control (fact: economic cost of 1 murder is about $17M), transfer payments, land degradation, incivility, “education”–blah blah blah. Reread Tennessee’s article in this light; you’ll see I’m correct.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Tennessee as spoken by a slurring drunkard... TaNe (hic!) hisi. The capitalized TN gives the intentions of his equally literate mother.
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  49. Sean says:

    Reference to a Talisman suggests F Paul Wilson’s The Keep (the film was a minor disaster for Michael Mann)

    Eldritch is HP Lovecraft’s signature word

    “The organic things–Italo-Semitico-Mongoloid–inhabiting that awful cesspool could not by any stretch of the imagination be call’d human. They were monstrous and nebulous adumbrations of the pithecanthropoid and amoebal; vaguely moulded from some stinking viscous slime of earth’s corruption, and slithering and oozing in and on the filthy streets or in and out of windows and doorways in a fashion suggestive of nothing but infesting worms or deep-sea ”

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  50. What we are seeing here is the underground civil war among liberals: the non-Harry Potter fantasy supporters vs. the Harry Potter fantasy supporters.

    Also: I predict “coruscate” will be the next under-used word made famous.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Tex

    Also: I predict “coruscate” will be the next under-used word made famous.
     
    I was wondering when A. Merritt would get a look-in.
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  51. fish says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Mr. Coates is dead on in his eloquent observations about the wages of "whiteness" and racism on society and the health of mankind. Leonard Pitts has written extensively on this as well. This is why demographic change is of utmost importance. white men being outnumbered and effectively barred from the institutions of power are the only way society can save and redeem itself

    This is why white resistance to mass immigration is truthfully resistance to demographic change thus resistance to doing the right thing thus resistance to good fighting evil

    This is why antifa is right to go after not only Nazis but conservatives in general

    You people must be stopped for the sake of the children

    Dat Trent Denton….he a card.

    - Leonard Pitts

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  52. @Intelligent Dasein
    It looks to me as if Coates is employing a well-worn pedant bluffing technique: Use an obscure term that you are only vaguely familiar with but one that is catchy enough such that, if noticed, would signal your acquaintance with a whole vast body of esoteric knowledge, and use it confidently and casually enough that your readers and critics will be overawed by your prowess and will be too embarrassed to admit that they barely know what the hell it means, either.

    Bullseye.

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  53. Sammler says: • Website
    @ic1000
    One admirable thing about Ta-Nehisi Coates is that he uses his writing to communicate what he thinks and feels. Thus, interested parties don't have to guess, all they have to do is read.

    The first 150 1/2 pages of TNC's greatest book, "Between the World and Me," are about being black (awesome and difficult), being around other black people (awesome and complicated), being around "people who believe they are white" (generally awful), and having to share space with people who believe they are white and American, known to him as Dreamers (the worst).

    At that point, TNC wraps it up by abruptly picking up an environmentalist cudgel. The book’s penultimate paragraph:

    Once, the Dream's parameters were caged by technology and by the limits of horsepower and wind. But the Dreamers have improved themselves, and the damming of seas for voltage [sic], the extraction of coal, the transmuting of oil into food, have enabled an expansion in plunder with no known precedent. Ant this revolution has freed the Dreamers to plunder not just the bodies of humans but the body of the Earth itself. The Earth is not our creation. It has no respect for us. It has no use for us. And its vengeance is not the fire in the cities but the fire in the sky. Something more fierce than Marcus Garvey is riding on the whirlwind. Something more awful than all our African ancestors is rising with the seas. The two phenomena are known to each other. It was the cotton that passed through our chained hands that inaugurated this age. It is the flight from us that sent them sprawling into the subdivided woods. And the methods of transport through these new subdivisions, across the sprawl, is the automobile, the noose around the neck of the earth, and ultimately, the Dreamers themselves.
     
    It's hard to see much affection on Coates' part for the 86% of his fellow citizens who aren't African-American (or, these days, Recent-African-Immigrant-Americans).

    Coates writing to The Atlantic's audience isn't disavowing his trademark mix of schadenfreude and disgust, he's building on it.

    I can see his black readers eating this stuff up, and it's virtue-signalling grist for the SJW mill. Still, I can't help but wonder whether the middlebrow liberals who contribute the most clicks to the magazine's top line really understand what they're consuming. The waiter spitting in the food before bringing it to the table, and all that.

    And in the Current Year's furore over DACA, the scorn that drips from Coates' use of the moniker "Dreamers" is amusing.

    Eventually TNC will read Vollmann’s “World in a Jar”. Nothing will be the same, after that.

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  54. Sammler says: • Website
    @syonredux

    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism… why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?
     
    HPL endures as that-which-must-be-hated. Cf how SJWs have made a cottage industy out of writing WOKE Lovecraftian tales:

    http://www.npr.org/2016/02/29/468558238/the-ballad-of-black-tom-offers-a-tribute-and-critique-of-lovecraft

    http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/lovecraftian-horror-creeps-into-amcs-the-ballad-of-black-tom

    Lovecraft Country is a 2016 dark fantasy horror novel by Matt Ruff, exploring the conjunction between the horror fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and racism in the United States during the era of Jim Crow laws, as experienced by black science fiction fan Atticus Turner and his family. It was published by Harper Collins.
    Reception[edit]
    Publishers Weekly commended Ruff for his "impressive grasp of classic horror themes", and noted that the book's "most unsettling" aspect is the constant bigotry experienced by the characters,[1] while Kirkus Reviews considered it a "series of bizarre chimerical adventures" and a "merrily macabre pastiche", comparing it favorably to Ruff's previous works.[2]
    At BoingBoing, Cory Doctorow described the characters as "active protagonists (with) lives, (...) dignity, and (...) indomitable spirit", and observed that because of their constant experiences with "harassment, violence, expropriation, and the legacy of slavery", they "don't need Elder Gods to experience horror",[3] while at Tor.com, Alex Brown judged that the book "thoroughly and effectively marries race and horror" and called it as "a tense thriller, a terrifying nightmare, a heartbreaking tragedy, and a tale of holding onto aspiration and optimism even while being chased through the woods by a hellbeast from another dimension".[4]
    Adaptation[edit]
    In 2017, HBO announced that they were preparing an adaptation of the novel, with Jordan Peele and J. J. Abrams as executive producers and Misha Green as showrunner
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovecraft_Country_(novel)

    "Shoggoths in Bloom" is a science fiction novelette by Elizabeth Bear, originally published in the March 2008 issue of American magazine Asimov's Science Fiction, and subsequently republished in Bear's 2012 collection "Shoggoths in Bloom".[1]


    In 1938, Paul Harding is a black college professor who has come to a coastal Maine village to study the wild shoggoths. As news reports of Kristallnacht appear in the background, Harding discovers the unexpected truth about shoggoths, and is faced with a difficult decision.
    Reception[edit]
    "Shoggoths" was the winner of the 2009 Hugo Award for Best Novelette.[2] Tor.com called it a "stand-out".[3]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoggoths_in_Bloom

    “Shoggoths in Bloom” might be the single most pointless thing I have ever seen in print. Worse still, I read it before understanding that SF had been conquered by virtue-signaling twits, so I thought a Hugo meant something.

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  55. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @AndrewR
    I think many whites and perhaps some blacks voted for Obama (in 2008) because they thought he was uniquely positioned to be a racial uniter. Obviously his ethnic background was an inherent part of this. And probably some whites and many blacks voted for him BECAUSE he was "of color." So arguably the majority of his initial support was in some way tied to his ethnicity, although the awfulness of McCain/Palin must not be downplayed.

    I'm not so sure about his second term win. In hindsight, Romney/Ryan, as awful as they are, were not as horrifying a prospect as McCain/Palin were, at least to me. And Obama had clearly bursted any sane person's hope of racial reconciliation by November 2012. Of course other factors were at play. I'd be interested in reading cogent analyses of the 2012 election with five years hindsight.

    It's clear that many Trump voters had voted for Obama at least once. For some of these folks, race was never much of an issue to begin with. For others, race was always a big issue but the realities/perceptions of race had changed.

    Certainly, Trump appealed to me and many others insofar as he wasn't openly anti-white like virtually the entire left and much of the cuckservatariat. It's a big stretch to say that not being explicitly anti-white is the same as white supremacism, but it is the current year, after all.

    I voted third party in 2008 and 2012, because I live in a state that is not in play, and when an election is genuinely not in play my policy is always to vote third party. However, I would have never cast a ballot for McCain and Palin on the grounds that McCain is genuinely insane, whereas I would have held my nose and voted for Romney in 2012 had mine been possibly the deciding vote. He’s a cuck, but not a madman.

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  56. Humbles says:
    @Anonymous
    Every time I see references to him here, I can never tolerate more than skimming his writings. (I think a comment a few threads back raised a challenge on this, and I fail...) But he seems... at least contrasted with some people... to be a decent guy at heart, albeit a guy who is way over-promoted and now trapped in a gilded cage. Maybe in reality he's just into swords and sorcery fantasy and never had any real desire to truly "be" a "real black man" or whatever he is posturing as. Why can't he just try writing fantasy novels under an assumed name? Maybe he just wants to write straight old-school fantasy novels, not some SJW stuff. He doesn't even need to "abandon" his real self, he can just translate his own experiences into that realm without trying to politicize things. No one would even know. If he tried this, his prose style would probably improve greatly, since much of its current badness seems to result from a drive to posture and "prove" himself. Or if he doesn't want to write under a pseudonym, maybe he could frame his move into old-school fantasy as a bold move: here he is, a real black man, writing a real fantasy book, not some tendentious SJWized simulacrum of fantasy. Just go for it, dude! You'll make less money and you'll be less famous, but you might enjoy it and have more self-respect.

    Ta-Nehisi Coates was raised by hardcore black power parents in central Baltimore, to be a Great Black Knight for the cause. He is moderately bookish (exceptionally bookish for a black guy) and so the Establishment has been happy to cast him as the New James Baldwin. But his racial polemics are overblown and weak. I feel like his heart really isn’t into being a Professional Angry Black Man. Even his book was mainly just about how awful it is to grow up in a black community, surrounded by violent, irresponsible, anti-intellectual black people. Maybe he will finish up by being a moderately successful fantasy writer.

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  57. Humbles says:
    @Intelligent Dasein
    It looks to me as if Coates is employing a well-worn pedant bluffing technique: Use an obscure term that you are only vaguely familiar with but one that is catchy enough such that, if noticed, would signal your acquaintance with a whole vast body of esoteric knowledge, and use it confidently and casually enough that your readers and critics will be overawed by your prowess and will be too embarrassed to admit that they barely know what the hell it means, either.

    Intelligent Dasein wins in the clever handle category.

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    He might be planning on completing the program of German Idealism, who knows.
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  58. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Cloudbuster
    Should I know who this is? Eleven subscribers. No likes/dislikes or comments on a week-old video?

    Her name is Natalie Hynde, the oh so British sounding offspring of Sir Ray Davies and Chrissie Hynde.

    She is of some (although as time goes on, I’d say limited) interest for having espoused a certain level of immigration-skeptical commentary. Girls getting raped for simply not wearing a burka sits poorly with her. She isn’t stupid, but she is a little bit of a mess, like most offspring of wealthy parents who don’t have jobs or families of their own.

    Her mother Chrissie Hynde is an odd case on her own of course. I’ve always suspected she has more knowledge of and agreement with Savitri Devi than she’d dare admit (Devi being one of the prime intellectual influences on post-1945 National Socialism).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cortes
    So there are kinks in her background?
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  59. El Dato says:
    @ic1000
    One admirable thing about Ta-Nehisi Coates is that he uses his writing to communicate what he thinks and feels. Thus, interested parties don't have to guess, all they have to do is read.

    The first 150 1/2 pages of TNC's greatest book, "Between the World and Me," are about being black (awesome and difficult), being around other black people (awesome and complicated), being around "people who believe they are white" (generally awful), and having to share space with people who believe they are white and American, known to him as Dreamers (the worst).

    At that point, TNC wraps it up by abruptly picking up an environmentalist cudgel. The book’s penultimate paragraph:

    Once, the Dream's parameters were caged by technology and by the limits of horsepower and wind. But the Dreamers have improved themselves, and the damming of seas for voltage [sic], the extraction of coal, the transmuting of oil into food, have enabled an expansion in plunder with no known precedent. Ant this revolution has freed the Dreamers to plunder not just the bodies of humans but the body of the Earth itself. The Earth is not our creation. It has no respect for us. It has no use for us. And its vengeance is not the fire in the cities but the fire in the sky. Something more fierce than Marcus Garvey is riding on the whirlwind. Something more awful than all our African ancestors is rising with the seas. The two phenomena are known to each other. It was the cotton that passed through our chained hands that inaugurated this age. It is the flight from us that sent them sprawling into the subdivided woods. And the methods of transport through these new subdivisions, across the sprawl, is the automobile, the noose around the neck of the earth, and ultimately, the Dreamers themselves.
     
    It's hard to see much affection on Coates' part for the 86% of his fellow citizens who aren't African-American (or, these days, Recent-African-Immigrant-Americans).

    Coates writing to The Atlantic's audience isn't disavowing his trademark mix of schadenfreude and disgust, he's building on it.

    I can see his black readers eating this stuff up, and it's virtue-signalling grist for the SJW mill. Still, I can't help but wonder whether the middlebrow liberals who contribute the most clicks to the magazine's top line really understand what they're consuming. The waiter spitting in the food before bringing it to the table, and all that.

    And in the Current Year's furore over DACA, the scorn that drips from Coates' use of the moniker "Dreamers" is amusing.

    In a parallel world described by PKD in “The Man in the High Castle”, the Dreamer has awoken:

    Frink shut the radio off. Then, calmer, he turned it back on.

    Christ on the crapper, he thought. Africa. For the ghosts of dead tribes. Wiped out to make a land of – what? Who knew? Maybe even the master architects in Berlin did not know. Bunch of automatons, building and toiling away. Building? Grinding down. Ogres out of a paleontology exhibit, at their task of making a cup from an enemy’s skull, the whole family industriously scooping out the contents – the raw brains – first, to eat. Then useful utensils of men’s leg bones. Thrifty, to think not only of eating the people you did not like, but eating them out of their own skull. The first technicians! Prehistoric man in a sterile white lab coat in some Berlin university lab, experimenting with uses to which other people’s skull, skin, ears, fat could be put to. Ja, Herr Doktor. A new use for the big toe; see, one can adapt the joint for a quick-acting cigarette lighter mechanism. Now, if only Herr Krupp can produce it in quantity . . .

    It horrified him, this thought: the ancient gigantic cannibal near-man flourishing now, ruling the world once more. We spent a million years escaping him, Frink thought, and now he’s back. And not merely as the adversary . . . but as the master.

    ‘. . . we can deplore,’ the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. ‘. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.’ They, the Japs, were so strong on law. ‘. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: ‘What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?” The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.

    Mwahaha.

    We were talking about eldritch?

    Lovecraft used it a lot in early 20th century:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=%3Adagonbytes.com+eldritch&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    ‘. . . we can deplore,’ the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. ‘. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.’ They, the Japs, were so strong on law. ‘. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: ‘What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?” The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.
     
    The weakest part of Dick's Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese. One can only assume that PKD was largely ignorant of such things as the activities of Unit 731 and The Three Alls Policy.....


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Alls_Policy
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  60. El Dato says:
    @Humbles
    Intelligent Dasein wins in the clever handle category.

    He might be planning on completing the program of German Idealism, who knows.

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  61. Tex says:
    @al-Gharaniq
    What we are seeing here is the underground civil war among liberals: the non-Harry Potter fantasy supporters vs. the Harry Potter fantasy supporters.

    Also: I predict "coruscate" will be the next under-used word made famous.

    Also: I predict “coruscate” will be the next under-used word made famous.

    I was wondering when A. Merritt would get a look-in.

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  62. sayless says:
    @Lurker
    Is there anything on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal?

    Is there anything on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal?

    No, dear one. There is nothing on earth stupider than a stupid white liberal.

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  63. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    Read More
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  64. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @syonredux

    I thought Lovecraft had been banished to the outer darkness of white supremacism… why is Genius T. Coates referencing him?
     
    HPL endures as that-which-must-be-hated. Cf how SJWs have made a cottage industy out of writing WOKE Lovecraftian tales:

    http://www.npr.org/2016/02/29/468558238/the-ballad-of-black-tom-offers-a-tribute-and-critique-of-lovecraft

    http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/lovecraftian-horror-creeps-into-amcs-the-ballad-of-black-tom

    Lovecraft Country is a 2016 dark fantasy horror novel by Matt Ruff, exploring the conjunction between the horror fiction of H.P. Lovecraft and racism in the United States during the era of Jim Crow laws, as experienced by black science fiction fan Atticus Turner and his family. It was published by Harper Collins.
    Reception[edit]
    Publishers Weekly commended Ruff for his "impressive grasp of classic horror themes", and noted that the book's "most unsettling" aspect is the constant bigotry experienced by the characters,[1] while Kirkus Reviews considered it a "series of bizarre chimerical adventures" and a "merrily macabre pastiche", comparing it favorably to Ruff's previous works.[2]
    At BoingBoing, Cory Doctorow described the characters as "active protagonists (with) lives, (...) dignity, and (...) indomitable spirit", and observed that because of their constant experiences with "harassment, violence, expropriation, and the legacy of slavery", they "don't need Elder Gods to experience horror",[3] while at Tor.com, Alex Brown judged that the book "thoroughly and effectively marries race and horror" and called it as "a tense thriller, a terrifying nightmare, a heartbreaking tragedy, and a tale of holding onto aspiration and optimism even while being chased through the woods by a hellbeast from another dimension".[4]
    Adaptation[edit]
    In 2017, HBO announced that they were preparing an adaptation of the novel, with Jordan Peele and J. J. Abrams as executive producers and Misha Green as showrunner
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lovecraft_Country_(novel)

    "Shoggoths in Bloom" is a science fiction novelette by Elizabeth Bear, originally published in the March 2008 issue of American magazine Asimov's Science Fiction, and subsequently republished in Bear's 2012 collection "Shoggoths in Bloom".[1]


    In 1938, Paul Harding is a black college professor who has come to a coastal Maine village to study the wild shoggoths. As news reports of Kristallnacht appear in the background, Harding discovers the unexpected truth about shoggoths, and is faced with a difficult decision.
    Reception[edit]
    "Shoggoths" was the winner of the 2009 Hugo Award for Best Novelette.[2] Tor.com called it a "stand-out".[3]
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shoggoths_in_Bloom
    Read More
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  65. syonredux says:
    @El Dato
    In a parallel world described by PKD in "The Man in the High Castle", the Dreamer has awoken:

    Frink shut the radio off. Then, calmer, he turned it back on.

    Christ on the crapper, he thought. Africa. For the ghosts of dead tribes. Wiped out to make a land of - what? Who knew? Maybe even the master architects in Berlin did not know. Bunch of automatons, building and toiling away. Building? Grinding down. Ogres out of a paleontology exhibit, at their task of making a cup from an enemy's skull, the whole family industriously scooping out the contents - the raw brains - first, to eat. Then useful utensils of men's leg bones. Thrifty, to think not only of eating the people you did not like, but eating them out of their own skull. The first technicians! Prehistoric man in a sterile white lab coat in some Berlin university lab, experimenting with uses to which other people's skull, skin, ears, fat could be put to. Ja, Herr Doktor. A new use for the big toe; see, one can adapt the joint for a quick-acting cigarette lighter mechanism. Now, if only Herr Krupp can produce it in quantity . . .

    It horrified him, this thought: the ancient gigantic cannibal near-man flourishing now, ruling the world once more. We spent a million years escaping him, Frink thought, and now he's back. And not merely as the adversary . . . but as the master.

    '. . . we can deplore,' the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. '. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.' They, the Japs, were so strong on law. '. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: 'What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?'' The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.
     
    Mwahaha.

    We were talking about eldritch?

    Lovecraft used it a lot in early 20th century:

    https://www.google.com/search?q=%3Adagonbytes.com+eldritch&ie=utf-8&oe=utf-8

    ‘. . . we can deplore,’ the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. ‘. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.’ They, the Japs, were so strong on law. ‘. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: ‘What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?” The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.

    The weakest part of Dick’s Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese. One can only assume that PKD was largely ignorant of such things as the activities of Unit 731 and The Three Alls Policy…..

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Alls_Policy

    Read More
    • Replies: @cthulhu

    The weakest part of Dick’s Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese.

     

    Neal Stephenson's "Cryptonomicon", which is a terrific read with some amount of HBD hiding in there, has two time-tracks: one in the near-present day (late 20th century), and one in WW2; Stephenson does some really-not-politically-correct brutal characterization of the Japanese (who he calls, more correctly, Nipponese) that I still can't believe he got away with. There's also some great satire of postmodernism and what is called White Privilege nowadays. Recommended.
    , @guest
    Didn't the book portray the Japanese as, in addition to having the Wisdom of the East and a neato religio-philosophical system, being superficial with a juvenile interest in pop culture? I wrote off the I-ching stuff as unavoidable in hippy literature of the 60s. Aside from that, they're only romantic in the sense of not being as evil as the Nazis.

    Though I suppose the very fact that they're ruling half our country and Dick doesn't portray much righteous patriotic anger at them says something. (Anti-Nazi indignation, on the other hand, beams out from every page.) You get the feeling that the U.S. just laid back and let itself be violated. They don't particularly enjoy Japanese rule, but eh, what are you gonna do? Besides have a little resistance here and there, and read alternate-history books written by some guy in the Rockies, that is.


    -----


    The weakest part of Man in the High Castle for me is the idea that the Axis powers actually wanted to conquer the world. And that somehow they were able to conquer U.S. (and Russia, but without Lend-Lease I suppose that's possible), how? FDR dies early. That's the big difference. Without FDR, not only do we not jump into the European and Pacific wars, we get conquered and apparently like it. Or like it enough to sit there and take it with minimal resistance.

    At least on the tv show they gave the Germans the Bomb. I don't remember that being mentioned in the book, though they do eventually develop the H-bomb.

    That's just the premise, I realize. I can accept implausible premises in regular sci-fi or fantasy stories, but this is an alternate-history story, which have different standards.

    , @Cortes
    Like all of Dick's work "The Man in the High Castle " is shit.

    Truly wonderful US writers like Ray Bradbury, the original Thomas Wolfe, James Leo Herlihy (anyone? No! ¿ANYONE?) or the minor lights like Wambaugh, Sandford, Block and Max Allan Collins of the Quarry novels are ignored.

    As for John Dos Passos...

    Hey!

    I'm just a crazy Scottish guy...

    NB: for the avoidance of doubt a couple of weeks ago I re read Huckleberry Finn. And I read and loved "Uncle Tom's Cabin."

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  66. cthulhu says:
    @syonredux

    ‘. . . we can deplore,’ the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. ‘. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.’ They, the Japs, were so strong on law. ‘. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: ‘What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?” The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.
     
    The weakest part of Dick's Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese. One can only assume that PKD was largely ignorant of such things as the activities of Unit 731 and The Three Alls Policy.....


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Alls_Policy

    The weakest part of Dick’s Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese.

    Neal Stephenson’s “Cryptonomicon”, which is a terrific read with some amount of HBD hiding in there, has two time-tracks: one in the near-present day (late 20th century), and one in WW2; Stephenson does some really-not-politically-correct brutal characterization of the Japanese (who he calls, more correctly, Nipponese) that I still can’t believe he got away with. There’s also some great satire of postmodernism and what is called White Privilege nowadays. Recommended.

    Read More
    • Replies: @El Dato
    Yes, my personal "best book of 1999".
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  67. @backup
    There are a number of articles and books which go wrong right in the first sentence. You immediately know that reading it is a waste of time. Take for instance the Communist Manifesto:

    The history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles.
     
    This article has such an opening sentence:

    It is insufficient to state the obvious of Donald Trump: that he is a white man who would not be president were it not for this fact.

     

    This is true for Obama, who was clearly elected because of his skin colour. It is not true for Trump. So I read a bit of it. It is the usual word dropping: Original Sin, White Supremacy. Blah blah.

    His strategy seems to be to pack so much high-concept horsefeathers into such a tight space that you become too lazy to think it through and assume it’s brilliant.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    You've just hit on the secret of modern literature. (All modern art, too, maybe.) Except in addition to high-concept horsefeathers, there's also grossly low and disgusting matter. As well as all manner of stuff the audience consciously knows is wrong and accepts in the interest of false superiority or for ritual humiliation. Take your pick.

    The point is that you don't think it through. Unless you're a college professor who's paid to do so, but even then you probably fake it.
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  68. @Jason Liu
    Coates' entire schtick is to recreate the Civil Rights era atmosphere for nice white liberals using elaborate, sensationalist language that makes them feel like they're bearing witness to momentous historical events.

    Its the kinda vapidness that makes your daughters go "That's so inspirational!" He is the literary equivalent of a quote superimposed over a Neil deGrasse Tyson picture.

    For normal people, his verbose yet obvious thesis can be summed up in one sentence: The Republican party is the party of white tribalism.

    "Eldritch" is a cool word, though.

    Coates’ entire schtick is to recreate the Civil Rights era atmosphere for nice white liberals using elaborate, sensationalist language that makes them feel like they’re bearing witness to momentous historical events.

    Its the kinda vapidness that makes your daughters go “That’s so inspirational!” He is the literary equivalent of a quote superimposed over a Neil deGrasse Tyson picture.

    “Vapid” is exactly the word. “Tedious” is the other–the feeling that wells up in me when I–very occasionally–follow one of the links and try to read him.

    But “daughters” isn’t the weird thing here. The weird thing is all these young lefty–heavily Jewish–men who absolutely swoon over the guy with “you must read him”, “the best explanation ever”, “must read”.

    If it wasn’t already so obvious that our establishment is bat-shit crazy insane, the swooning and fawning over this guy’s tedious oh-poor-me drivel would be sufficient to raise concern.

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  69. El Dato says:
    @cthulhu

    The weakest part of Dick’s Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese.

     

    Neal Stephenson's "Cryptonomicon", which is a terrific read with some amount of HBD hiding in there, has two time-tracks: one in the near-present day (late 20th century), and one in WW2; Stephenson does some really-not-politically-correct brutal characterization of the Japanese (who he calls, more correctly, Nipponese) that I still can't believe he got away with. There's also some great satire of postmodernism and what is called White Privilege nowadays. Recommended.

    Yes, my personal “best book of 1999″.

    Read More
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  70. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Meretricious
    I think we can all agree that the clever Genius T Coates has been topped by Tennessee Coates. Tennessee it is. What we need to do is get at the essence of Tennessee's, and his fellow race hustlers', raison d'etre, which is creating excuses for black failure and especially black parasitism--affirmative action, crime control (fact: economic cost of 1 murder is about $17M), transfer payments, land degradation, incivility, "education"--blah blah blah. Reread Tennessee's article in this light; you'll see I'm correct.

    Tennessee as spoken by a slurring drunkard… TaNe (hic!) hisi. The capitalized TN gives the intentions of his equally literate mother.

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  71. Felix M says:

    Apparently “eldrich” dates back to the early 16th century and was originally Scots.

    https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/eldritch

    And apparently it appears in Robbie Burns’ Tam O’Shanter (1790) and in Nathaniel Hawthorn’s The Scarlet Letter, ch vii (1850).

    https://en.m.wiktionary.org/wiki/eldritch

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  72. Is it still possible in the Curent Year for bored identity to be a Genius Grant Denier, or Nobel Prize in Literature Denier without being tarred & feathered ?

    There Have Been Many Heartrending Holocaust Books.
    But Few As Powerful As This New Memoir By A Ballet Dancer Still Haunted To This Day.

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4863598/Holocaust-survivor-ballet-dancer-publishes-memoirs.html

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  73. guest says:
    @syonredux

    ‘. . . we can deplore,’ the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. ‘. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.’ They, the Japs, were so strong on law. ‘. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: ‘What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?” The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.
     
    The weakest part of Dick's Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese. One can only assume that PKD was largely ignorant of such things as the activities of Unit 731 and The Three Alls Policy.....


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Alls_Policy

    Didn’t the book portray the Japanese as, in addition to having the Wisdom of the East and a neato religio-philosophical system, being superficial with a juvenile interest in pop culture? I wrote off the I-ching stuff as unavoidable in hippy literature of the 60s. Aside from that, they’re only romantic in the sense of not being as evil as the Nazis.

    Though I suppose the very fact that they’re ruling half our country and Dick doesn’t portray much righteous patriotic anger at them says something. (Anti-Nazi indignation, on the other hand, beams out from every page.) You get the feeling that the U.S. just laid back and let itself be violated. They don’t particularly enjoy Japanese rule, but eh, what are you gonna do? Besides have a little resistance here and there, and read alternate-history books written by some guy in the Rockies, that is.

    —–

    The weakest part of Man in the High Castle for me is the idea that the Axis powers actually wanted to conquer the world. And that somehow they were able to conquer U.S. (and Russia, but without Lend-Lease I suppose that’s possible), how? FDR dies early. That’s the big difference. Without FDR, not only do we not jump into the European and Pacific wars, we get conquered and apparently like it. Or like it enough to sit there and take it with minimal resistance.

    At least on the tv show they gave the Germans the Bomb. I don’t remember that being mentioned in the book, though they do eventually develop the H-bomb.

    That’s just the premise, I realize. I can accept implausible premises in regular sci-fi or fantasy stories, but this is an alternate-history story, which have different standards.

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  74. guest says:
    @Antlitz Grollheim
    His strategy seems to be to pack so much high-concept horsefeathers into such a tight space that you become too lazy to think it through and assume it's brilliant.

    You’ve just hit on the secret of modern literature. (All modern art, too, maybe.) Except in addition to high-concept horsefeathers, there’s also grossly low and disgusting matter. As well as all manner of stuff the audience consciously knows is wrong and accepts in the interest of false superiority or for ritual humiliation. Take your pick.

    The point is that you don’t think it through. Unless you’re a college professor who’s paid to do so, but even then you probably fake it.

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  75. Cortes says:
    @Anonymous
    Her name is Natalie Hynde, the oh so British sounding offspring of Sir Ray Davies and Chrissie Hynde.

    She is of some (although as time goes on, I'd say limited) interest for having espoused a certain level of immigration-skeptical commentary. Girls getting raped for simply not wearing a burka sits poorly with her. She isn't stupid, but she is a little bit of a mess, like most offspring of wealthy parents who don't have jobs or families of their own.

    Her mother Chrissie Hynde is an odd case on her own of course. I've always suspected she has more knowledge of and agreement with Savitri Devi than she'd dare admit (Devi being one of the prime intellectual influences on post-1945 National Socialism).

    So there are kinks in her background?

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  76. Cortes says:
    @syonredux

    ‘. . . we can deplore,’ the radio, the voice of the little yellow-bellies from Tokyo was saying. God, Frink thought; and we called them monkeys, these civilized bandy-legged shrimps who would no more set up gas ovens than they would melt their wives into sealing wax. ‘. . . and we have deplored often in the past the dreadful waste of humans in this fanatical striving which sets the broader mass of men wholly outside the legal community.’ They, the Japs, were so strong on law. ‘. . . To quote a Western saint familiar to all: ‘What profit it a man if he gain the whole world but in this enterprise lose his soul?” The radio paused. Frink, tying his tie, also paused. It was the morning ablution.
     
    The weakest part of Dick's Man In The High Castle is how it romanticizes the Japanese. One can only assume that PKD was largely ignorant of such things as the activities of Unit 731 and The Three Alls Policy.....


    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Unit_731

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Three_Alls_Policy

    Like all of Dick’s work “The Man in the High Castle ” is shit.

    Truly wonderful US writers like Ray Bradbury, the original Thomas Wolfe, James Leo Herlihy (anyone? No! ¿ANYONE?) or the minor lights like Wambaugh, Sandford, Block and Max Allan Collins of the Quarry novels are ignored.

    As for John Dos Passos…

    Hey!

    I’m just a crazy Scottish guy…

    NB: for the avoidance of doubt a couple of weeks ago I re read Huckleberry Finn. And I read and loved “Uncle Tom’s Cabin.”

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  77. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    LOL, that phrasing is almost EXACTLY word-for-word the description of the uncommon magic item ‘elemental gem’ in 5th edition Dungeons and Dragons.

    Looks like someone was pissed they got a POS roll on Magic Item Table B and couldn’t keep the butthurt out of their NYT article.

    But I get it. The elemental gem sucks a lot. 1 temporary conjuring of an elemental for 500 gp? GTFO

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