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The Latest Frontier for White Gentrifiers: The South Bronx
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From the New York Times:

The South Bronx Beckons
By RONDA KAYSEN SEPT. 17, 2015

Anne Stewart, 43, left, and Katie Rubright, 34, on the roof deck of their two-bedroom apartment in the Mott Haven-Port Morris area. Credit Byron Smith for The New York Times

… The couple’s story is becoming more common. In the never-ending quest for reasonable rents and tolerable commutes, New Yorkers are branching out in new directions. And the Bronx, it seems, is having a moment.

In the past, the Bronx was often dismissed by outsiders, largely because of a reputation rooted in urban decay. But both the borough and its reputation are changing. With prices in Manhattan, Brooklyn and parts of Queens now out of reach for many renters and buyers, the Bronx, particularly the South Bronx, has assumed the mantle of next frontier. In the last six months, listings for co-ops in the Grand Concourse Historic District have turned into bidding wars, with buyers from Brooklyn and Manhattan laying out all-cash offers.

“People are looking for the next hot spot, and the Bronx is this hub. It’s very close to Manhattan,” …

But nearly 40 percent of residents in the South Bronx live below the poverty line, and community activists worry that the area’s most vulnerable residents could be left behind in the rush to develop.

“We’ve watched what happened in other neighborhoods and seen how this has priced out existing residents,” said Mychal Johnson, a founder of South Bronx Unite, an advocacy group. “We are trying to find ways to make sure that the residents who suffered through the really harsh times are able to stay.”

On the face of it, the city’s northernmost borough, particularly its southern tier, is a natural alternative to Manhattan. The South Bronx offers a shorter commute to Midtown than many parts of Brooklyn and Queens, and has abundant housing, with an eclectic mix of Art Deco prewar buildings, historic rowhouses and single-family houses. But for decades, the lower part of the Bronx remained off the radar.

More than any other area in New York City, the South Bronx suffered the brunt of the white flight of the 1970s and 1980s. Even as the city and community groups made strides to reduce blight, the borough struggled to shed the unforgiving tagline from the late 1970s — “the Bronx is burning.”

If you are wondering why the New York – Washington elites have been in such a frenzy lately to crush the slightest hints of local resistance to black or Latino takeovers of unfashionable suburbs and Flyover burghs, well, the current residents of the South Bronx have to have somewhere to go, don’t they? And the quicker they leave, the bigger the Return on Investment.

 
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  1. A lesbian named “Rubright”?

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    • Replies: @David
    Nice observation. The present EU minister of immigration is Asselborn. From Birnam wood no doubt.
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  2. Meanwhile…

    http://www.wsj.com/articles/obama-wants-to-pick-the-clintons-neighbors-1434494645

    Let’s hope our next chief executive loves the suburbs just the way they are.

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  3. The South Bronx offers a shorter commute to Midtown than many parts of Brooklyn and Queens

    So does Hackensack, NJ, where I live. Many parts of Brooklyn and Queens are a long way away from Midtown Manhattan, even by subway.

    Reading about Grand Concourse reminds me of Tom Wolfe’s description of the neighborhood near the courthouse, where it was so dangerous that the court officers had to convoy everyone to their cars, and lunch was always sandwiches ordered.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    Reading about Grand Concourse reminds me of Tom Wolfe’s description of the neighborhood near the courthouse, where it was so dangerous that the court officers had to convoy everyone to their cars, and lunch was always sandwiches ordered.
     
    I used to have to go to board meetings at the top of a building in downtown Newark. Ugh. It was like driving into Port-au-Prince, Haiti and then taking an elevator to Greenwich, Connecticut.
    , @Anonymous
    Yeah, but it's Jersey....
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  4. @Dave Pinsen
    The South Bronx offers a shorter commute to Midtown than many parts of Brooklyn and Queens

    So does Hackensack, NJ, where I live. Many parts of Brooklyn and Queens are a long way away from Midtown Manhattan, even by subway.

    Reading about Grand Concourse reminds me of Tom Wolfe's description of the neighborhood near the courthouse, where it was so dangerous that the court officers had to convoy everyone to their cars, and lunch was always sandwiches ordered.

    Reading about Grand Concourse reminds me of Tom Wolfe’s description of the neighborhood near the courthouse, where it was so dangerous that the court officers had to convoy everyone to their cars, and lunch was always sandwiches ordered.

    I used to have to go to board meetings at the top of a building in downtown Newark. Ugh. It was like driving into Port-au-Prince, Haiti and then taking an elevator to Greenwich, Connecticut.

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    • Agree: (((Owen)))
    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    But the Ironbound district is not far away, and it's wonderful.
    , @Marc
    I drove around Newark on a Friday night in 2010 just see if it was as described, and the first place that came to mind was a bad neighborhood in Santo Domingo.
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  5. @Dave Pinsen
    The South Bronx offers a shorter commute to Midtown than many parts of Brooklyn and Queens

    So does Hackensack, NJ, where I live. Many parts of Brooklyn and Queens are a long way away from Midtown Manhattan, even by subway.

    Reading about Grand Concourse reminds me of Tom Wolfe's description of the neighborhood near the courthouse, where it was so dangerous that the court officers had to convoy everyone to their cars, and lunch was always sandwiches ordered.

    Yeah, but it’s Jersey….

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  6. It’s funny how within the same article People of Color are victimized both when whites move out of the Bronx and when whites move into the Bronx.

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    • Agree: EriK
    • Replies: @DJF
    Whites are always guilty

    If they don’t move out to make room for diversity its segregation

    If the do move out its ‘White Flight”

    If they move back in its “Gentrification”
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  7. Displaced (Hispanic) people from the Bronx seemed to be the majority of those that took part in the Alexian Lien beating.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexian_Lien_beating

    They form motorcycle gangs in the exurbs like Scranton PA and ride into NYC.

    I don’t think there is much resistance in places like Allentown PA except maybe to some section 8 projects.

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    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    Or here

    http://www.trulia.com/voices/Crime_and_Safety/Is_the_presence_of_crime_and_gangs_in_Pocono_Count-391897
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  8. @Paul Walker Most beautiful man ever...
    A lesbian named "Rubright"?

    Nice observation. The present EU minister of immigration is Asselborn. From Birnam wood no doubt.

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  9. Cute couple. All I can say is it looks a lot better than the Bronx I saw in the mid 80′s. Has the nicening of the Bronx turned the outer outer NY area into a corresponding hell hole. If not, I’d say it looks like a win all around.

    That said, that area is fubar in ways unto itself.

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  10. Notably, New York’s white population has declined proportionally since the Giuliani years. Of course, these are just “badwhites” – wholesome families seeking to bring up their kids in the Church and maybe (GASP) vote Republican – so who cares.

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  11. @george
    Displaced (Hispanic) people from the Bronx seemed to be the majority of those that took part in the Alexian Lien beating.
    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alexian_Lien_beating

    They form motorcycle gangs in the exurbs like Scranton PA and ride into NYC.

    I don't think there is much resistance in places like Allentown PA except maybe to some section 8 projects.
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  12. White anti-Whites follow an old tradition: child sacrifice.

    For thousands of years, certain people would offer up their kids for brutal sacrifice as long as they (the parents) were spared. It’s an ugly part of our deep history.

    The same liberal crowd that forces misery on millions of White children in America and increasingly Europe, work to live a pleasant life for themselves.

    There is nothing sicker.

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    • Replies: @HHSIII
    I had gone to integrated schools all my life but got bused to a poorer section of my hometown in 8th grade in 1977-78. This was in Montclair, NJ, about 3 towns over from Newark (and the poor part of town was the one closer to Newark). I remember the first day our bus was surrounded by the kids from the neighborhood at the school saying "You rednecks in n**** territory now." Of course I only lived less than 1/2 a mile away and played basketball at the local Y so it's not like this was alien territory. That was a rough year. Even a black girl that got bused with me told me years later she was afraid. You never told your parents much about it. Code of the kids.

    Anyway, born in 1964, so right around the Civil Rights Act. All my life I went to integrated schools, black teachers, black principals, black professors, black bosses. But I think there's way more media coverage devoted to "discrimination" than there was 30-40 years ago. Whether it's blacks, women, hispanics, gays, transgender.

    There was an article in the Times about how we miss the '70s, and the author was talking about the arts community of the time, and he mentioned how the gays had grown up during the repressive Eisenhower and Nixon regimes (no mention of the intervening Johnson etc). A friend of my father's whom we called Uncle although unrelated had an actual uncle of his own, whom we also called Uncle. Uncle Julius. He was Julius Monk, an impresario from 1950s-60s New York. I knew he was gay in the early '70s. he had a black "husband." He was flamboyantly gay. He didn't seem repressed. Admittedly it's not like he was working at IBM. But i knew gay guys in college in the mid-80s. some were out, some only came out years later. And these were fraternity guys at a southern state university. Sure, they may have been teased growing up, or maybe didn't want to come out due to what they'd be ostracized, but it just didn't seem to matter.

    Anyway many of them are big law firm partners or investment bankers. Some out. Some i think are still closeted. But it hasn't hurt them marching up the food chain. Dick Jenrette, who was a fraternity brother before my time, was pretty well-known to be a "confirmed bachelor" and the Lavender Prince of Wall Street. Didn't hurt him either.

    So yeah, anyway, off on a tangent here, but discrimination, I didn't really notice it since it all seemed normal to me growing up. And I remember thinking when I got bused to that school why were they doing it; these people don't even want us here.
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  13. If you are wondering why the New York – Washington elites have been in such a frenzy lately to crush the slightest hints of local resistance to black or Latino takeovers of unfashionable suburbs and Flyover burghs, well, the current residents of the South Bronx have to have somewhere to go, don’t they?

    Yes, this has already been planned out and announced: Westchester.

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  14. An analogous place in Chicago to the Bronx would be the West Side. Areas of the West Side that have been hellholes for years are now starting to be looked at by gentrifiers. East Garfield Park is one area where this is happening.

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  15. I have relatives that grew up in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. It was nice back then and from what I hear is still nice now. I also remember it from “Bonfire” in that the DA in the McCoy case was obsessed with impressing a hot female juror from Riverdale.

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    • Replies: @HHSIII
    Yes, Riverdale is a decent neighborhood. Very jewish. That's not the South Bronx, though.

    I remember going to the last game of the 1976 World Series at Yankee Stadium. I was just a kid but all the stuff about the Bronx was in the news. The blackout and Son of Sam was the next year.

    Gentrifying is one thing but more upscale families with kids can't move there unless they can afford private school. The public schools in the South Bronx are still dicey. Even the Brooklyn neighborhoods that have gentrified or are gentrifying don't really attract young families unless they can afford private school. Bed-Stuy etc is great for 20 somethings or singles or gay couples, but you have to be in a different hood if you want to send your kids to a decent public school.

    , @Reg Cæsar

    …a hot female juror from Riverdale.
     
    Betty or Veronica?
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  16. @Superman
    It's funny how within the same article People of Color are victimized both when whites move out of the Bronx and when whites move into the Bronx.

    Whites are always guilty

    If they don’t move out to make room for diversity its segregation

    If the do move out its ‘White Flight”

    If they move back in its “Gentrification”

    Read More
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  17. @Buzz Mohawk

    Reading about Grand Concourse reminds me of Tom Wolfe’s description of the neighborhood near the courthouse, where it was so dangerous that the court officers had to convoy everyone to their cars, and lunch was always sandwiches ordered.
     
    I used to have to go to board meetings at the top of a building in downtown Newark. Ugh. It was like driving into Port-au-Prince, Haiti and then taking an elevator to Greenwich, Connecticut.

    But the Ironbound district is not far away, and it’s wonderful.

    Read More
    • Replies: @HHSIII
    Yeah, the Ironbound, or Down Neck as some of the locals say. Portuguese community. I used to work in Newark. And in the '70s as a teen we would take a bus to Newark for 60 cents, get a transfer to ride the Newark subway, then take the PATH train to the World Trade Center or the Village for 30 cents.

    A black guy I knew from grade school was a corrections officer. he always posts on facebook about the latest shootings in Essex County. a guy commented that he went to jazz clubs in Newark in the '50s and '60s and you could walk drunk to your car a few blocks and you'd be fine. Now he says you wouldn't make it a block.
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  18. seems like typical “gentrifiers” , they will most likely never have children…even areas which have been gentrified for a generation continue to have poor schools and the whites tend to leave soon after they have children, which often forces them into the exurbs to find “good schools”

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    • Replies: @Jimi
    in NYC gentrifiers are more likely to have children. They will leave when their oldest child is school age or they will opt for private school or selective public schools.
    , @HHSIII
    I should have read ahead. Yup.
    , @International Jew
    That won't be a problem for the Lesbian couple featured here.
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  19. I much prefer the Bronx portrayed in movies like “The French Connection” and “Serpico”. Of course I imagine that’s a drag for New Yorkers, however their inconvenience is a price I’m willing to pay for the sake of good cinema.

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    • Replies: @HHSIII
    I don't think any scenes in The French Connection are in The Bronx.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067116/locations

    http://onthesetofnewyork.com/thefrenchconnection.html

    The train chase is New Utrecht near Bensonhurst in Brooklyn and there are scenes on Ward's Island, in Ridgewood Queens (also gentrifying-I am involved in a bankruptcy case where an Israeli Investor is offering 10.2 fro 6 6 units buildings with numerous housing code violations), and stakeouts in Manhattan (I love the scene where Popeye is out in the cold with bad coffee and pizza and Fernando Rey is having a lavish meal at La Copain).

    BTW, there's a line from some movie I forget which where some cop goes "Why is it The Bronx? It's not The Brooklyn or The Queens? I bet some people named Bronk lived there and people would go let's go to the Bronk's."
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  20. “[U]nforgiving tagline…”??? Ugh.

    Nevertheless, when they repeal the Sullivan Act, give me a call …

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  21. @Buzz Mohawk

    Reading about Grand Concourse reminds me of Tom Wolfe’s description of the neighborhood near the courthouse, where it was so dangerous that the court officers had to convoy everyone to their cars, and lunch was always sandwiches ordered.
     
    I used to have to go to board meetings at the top of a building in downtown Newark. Ugh. It was like driving into Port-au-Prince, Haiti and then taking an elevator to Greenwich, Connecticut.

    I drove around Newark on a Friday night in 2010 just see if it was as described, and the first place that came to mind was a bad neighborhood in Santo Domingo.

    Read More
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  22. I hear there might a gentrification to move minorities out of the area in DC that is located between Executive and 15th St NW, and north of East St, NW towards Lafeyette Square. There is a house there that with a good steam cleaning to get the smell of Jheri Curl out, maybe some paint, new toilet seats, the grass cut, might serve its new tenants very well for the next 8 years.

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  23. I suppose we know where the bike riding classes pushed out of Brooklyn by traders are going.

    There are definitely buyouts going on in our community,” said Mr. Johnson, referring to landlords who offer rent-regulated tenants cash to leave their apartments. Brokers have been approaching homeowners, he said, asking if they might sell their one- or two-family homes.

    A court case gets rid of a old tenant who is non-voucher. They can’t get rid of section 8 people so easy, their lawyers are free.

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  24. One nice thing about the ghetto folks, they never destroyed the amazing waterways of the South Bronx. Tons of litter, yes – but that’s just an opportunity for bringing back Chain Gangs to pick it up.

    SUNY Maritime College doesn’t like to admit that they’re in the Bronx. They label themselves as being in “Fort Schuyler, NY”.

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  25. I was up in Central Harlem a few weeks ago. The gentrification there is proceeding at a great clip. A Whole Foods branch is even going up. Whole Foods in Harlem!

    http://ny.curbed.com/archives/2015/04/07/harlems_longawaited_whole_foods_is_finally_on_the_rise.php

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  26. OT: ‘Black Bear Lives Matter’ signs stir controversy

    http://www.wesh.com/news/black-bear-lives-matter-signs-stir-controversy/35362056

    For more than a year, the Black Lives Matter movement has swept the nation. Thousands have spoken out, protesting the deaths of African Americans.

    Controversy surrounds signs meant to protest the upcoming bear hunt, but make a pun on the movement’s name. The signs read: “Black Bear Lives Matter.” It’s a message Viviana Hoge proudly displays. It’s a twist on “Black Lives Matter” that is meant to protest legalized bear hunting.

    “I think it’s uncalled for. There’s no reason to kill them,” Hoge said. Hoge said the message is harmless. “It’s kind of a humorous sign against what’s going on right now. It’s something that people can smile at,” Hoge said.

    But not everyone is smiling. Lawanna Gelzer is with the National Action Network and a Black Lives Matter activist. She said the slogan is in poor taste.

    “If you’re equating the lives of African Americans who are being killed by law enforcement to a bear, that is wrong, and that is not funny,” Gelzer said…

    “We’re passionate about the bears. We don’t want them killed, but in no way did we mean for it to be offensive to anybody,” Burtner said…

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    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Black Bear Lives Matter? Maybe they mean EXTRA-large, gay black men?
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  27. Newark is interesting. They have a beautiful downtown. On evenings you will see men in tuxes and women in cocktail dresses in Symphony Hall attending concerts. 5 blocks away it looks like a warzone. Worse than any neighborhood in NYC I have seen.

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  28. @Hapalong Cassidy
    I have relatives that grew up in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. It was nice back then and from what I hear is still nice now. I also remember it from "Bonfire" in that the DA in the McCoy case was obsessed with impressing a hot female juror from Riverdale.

    Yes, Riverdale is a decent neighborhood. Very jewish. That’s not the South Bronx, though.

    I remember going to the last game of the 1976 World Series at Yankee Stadium. I was just a kid but all the stuff about the Bronx was in the news. The blackout and Son of Sam was the next year.

    Gentrifying is one thing but more upscale families with kids can’t move there unless they can afford private school. The public schools in the South Bronx are still dicey. Even the Brooklyn neighborhoods that have gentrified or are gentrifying don’t really attract young families unless they can afford private school. Bed-Stuy etc is great for 20 somethings or singles or gay couples, but you have to be in a different hood if you want to send your kids to a decent public school.

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  29. @Travis
    seems like typical "gentrifiers" , they will most likely never have children...even areas which have been gentrified for a generation continue to have poor schools and the whites tend to leave soon after they have children, which often forces them into the exurbs to find "good schools"

    in NYC gentrifiers are more likely to have children. They will leave when their oldest child is school age or they will opt for private school or selective public schools.

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  30. There is still way to much of that Puerto Rican/Dominican riff-raff to suit me.

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  31. @Jason
    White anti-Whites follow an old tradition: child sacrifice.

    For thousands of years, certain people would offer up their kids for brutal sacrifice as long as they (the parents) were spared. It's an ugly part of our deep history.

    The same liberal crowd that forces misery on millions of White children in America and increasingly Europe, work to live a pleasant life for themselves.


    There is nothing sicker.

    I had gone to integrated schools all my life but got bused to a poorer section of my hometown in 8th grade in 1977-78. This was in Montclair, NJ, about 3 towns over from Newark (and the poor part of town was the one closer to Newark). I remember the first day our bus was surrounded by the kids from the neighborhood at the school saying “You rednecks in n**** territory now.” Of course I only lived less than 1/2 a mile away and played basketball at the local Y so it’s not like this was alien territory. That was a rough year. Even a black girl that got bused with me told me years later she was afraid. You never told your parents much about it. Code of the kids.

    Anyway, born in 1964, so right around the Civil Rights Act. All my life I went to integrated schools, black teachers, black principals, black professors, black bosses. But I think there’s way more media coverage devoted to “discrimination” than there was 30-40 years ago. Whether it’s blacks, women, hispanics, gays, transgender.

    There was an article in the Times about how we miss the ’70s, and the author was talking about the arts community of the time, and he mentioned how the gays had grown up during the repressive Eisenhower and Nixon regimes (no mention of the intervening Johnson etc). A friend of my father’s whom we called Uncle although unrelated had an actual uncle of his own, whom we also called Uncle. Uncle Julius. He was Julius Monk, an impresario from 1950s-60s New York. I knew he was gay in the early ’70s. he had a black “husband.” He was flamboyantly gay. He didn’t seem repressed. Admittedly it’s not like he was working at IBM. But i knew gay guys in college in the mid-80s. some were out, some only came out years later. And these were fraternity guys at a southern state university. Sure, they may have been teased growing up, or maybe didn’t want to come out due to what they’d be ostracized, but it just didn’t seem to matter.

    Anyway many of them are big law firm partners or investment bankers. Some out. Some i think are still closeted. But it hasn’t hurt them marching up the food chain. Dick Jenrette, who was a fraternity brother before my time, was pretty well-known to be a “confirmed bachelor” and the Lavender Prince of Wall Street. Didn’t hurt him either.

    So yeah, anyway, off on a tangent here, but discrimination, I didn’t really notice it since it all seemed normal to me growing up. And I remember thinking when I got bused to that school why were they doing it; these people don’t even want us here.

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    • Replies: @Jason

    You never told your parents much about it. Code of the kids.
     
    Yeah the kids naturally stay silent about the Hell they are going through as a result of forced integration. And the White parents are all too willing not to ask questions about the pain their children are enduring.
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  32. @WhatEvvs
    But the Ironbound district is not far away, and it's wonderful.

    Yeah, the Ironbound, or Down Neck as some of the locals say. Portuguese community. I used to work in Newark. And in the ’70s as a teen we would take a bus to Newark for 60 cents, get a transfer to ride the Newark subway, then take the PATH train to the World Trade Center or the Village for 30 cents.

    A black guy I knew from grade school was a corrections officer. he always posts on facebook about the latest shootings in Essex County. a guy commented that he went to jazz clubs in Newark in the ’50s and ’60s and you could walk drunk to your car a few blocks and you’d be fine. Now he says you wouldn’t make it a block.

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    • Replies: @WhatEvvs
    The Ironbound is better than ever. Weird, isn't it? You walk down (or up, or east or west, not sure) to the train station - then you walk towards the center of town past the official stuff and you are in, ahem, Nairobi. The stores are still grand old structures, though, and they are monuments to the past. I was very taken by one of the old department stores whose gorgeous building still stands. Can't remember the name.
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  33. @Travis
    seems like typical "gentrifiers" , they will most likely never have children...even areas which have been gentrified for a generation continue to have poor schools and the whites tend to leave soon after they have children, which often forces them into the exurbs to find "good schools"

    I should have read ahead. Yup.

    Read More
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  34. @Mr. Anon
    I much prefer the Bronx portrayed in movies like "The French Connection" and "Serpico". Of course I imagine that's a drag for New Yorkers, however their inconvenience is a price I'm willing to pay for the sake of good cinema.

    I don’t think any scenes in The French Connection are in The Bronx.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067116/locations

    http://onthesetofnewyork.com/thefrenchconnection.html

    The train chase is New Utrecht near Bensonhurst in Brooklyn and there are scenes on Ward’s Island, in Ridgewood Queens (also gentrifying-I am involved in a bankruptcy case where an Israeli Investor is offering 10.2 fro 6 6 units buildings with numerous housing code violations), and stakeouts in Manhattan (I love the scene where Popeye is out in the cold with bad coffee and pizza and Fernando Rey is having a lavish meal at La Copain).

    BTW, there’s a line from some movie I forget which where some cop goes “Why is it The Bronx? It’s not The Brooklyn or The Queens? I bet some people named Bronk lived there and people would go let’s go to the Bronk’s.”

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    • Replies: @Hibernian
    I think that's close to what really happened but the (Dutch) name was spelled "Bronck." IIRC the Bronx River was named after them and then the Borough (and County) took the name of the river.
    , @WhatEvvs
    I think the Bronx will always be a little bit off the beaten track, NYC-wise, because it's way off the end of several subway lines going north. Brooklyn is right in the middle of Manhattan & Queens. It's small, flat and accessible. The Bronx is a handsome borough despite its somewhat undeserved rep, with lots of hills and rock formations. It's physically more like Westchester than its is like Manhattan.
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  35. Any part of the five boroughs adjacent to Manhattan is undergoing gentrification. It’s no surprise the Eric Garner case was hyped up: it took place in Staten Island. Staten Island is in the early stages of gentrification.

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    • Replies: @Hibernian
    Aside from the landfills on its western edge (which are extensive) S.I. is beautiful IMHO.
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  36. @Travis
    seems like typical "gentrifiers" , they will most likely never have children...even areas which have been gentrified for a generation continue to have poor schools and the whites tend to leave soon after they have children, which often forces them into the exurbs to find "good schools"

    That won’t be a problem for the Lesbian couple featured here.

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  37. The 2010 census showed that Mott Haven in the south Bronx was still only 1.6 percent white and 72 percent Hispanic. The south Bronx has some of the best architecture in the outer boroughs IMO. I’m glad to see that it’s being gentrified. I suspect Westchester County will bear the brunt of it though.

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  38. @HHSIII
    I don't think any scenes in The French Connection are in The Bronx.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067116/locations

    http://onthesetofnewyork.com/thefrenchconnection.html

    The train chase is New Utrecht near Bensonhurst in Brooklyn and there are scenes on Ward's Island, in Ridgewood Queens (also gentrifying-I am involved in a bankruptcy case where an Israeli Investor is offering 10.2 fro 6 6 units buildings with numerous housing code violations), and stakeouts in Manhattan (I love the scene where Popeye is out in the cold with bad coffee and pizza and Fernando Rey is having a lavish meal at La Copain).

    BTW, there's a line from some movie I forget which where some cop goes "Why is it The Bronx? It's not The Brooklyn or The Queens? I bet some people named Bronk lived there and people would go let's go to the Bronk's."

    I think that’s close to what really happened but the (Dutch) name was spelled “Bronck.” IIRC the Bronx River was named after them and then the Borough (and County) took the name of the river.

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  39. @Victor
    Any part of the five boroughs adjacent to Manhattan is undergoing gentrification. It's no surprise the Eric Garner case was hyped up: it took place in Staten Island. Staten Island is in the early stages of gentrification.

    Aside from the landfills on its western edge (which are extensive) S.I. is beautiful IMHO.

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  40. I’ve lived my whole life in all the boros except the bronx. The transformation of Manhattan and brooklyn since the 70s has been incredible: building brooklyn bridge park replacing shipping piers would have been unthinkable then, it needed to be made safe for the swpls and that criticsl mass didn’t exist back then although brooklyn heights just above was a good neighborhood. You knew then putting money into parks made no sense cos the riff raff would trash them. Nyc was on the verge of bankruptcy then anyway.

    As someone noted above, even my native staten island has improved, although I believe parts are serving as dumping grounds for nams displaced by gentrification elsrwhere. My parents fixed up and lived in a couple house in stapleton hoping for improvement in value which affected the stately Victorians on the hill behind them. Their hopes were dashed but now there seems to be some progress, the building next door, once the residence of one of the lesser vanderbilts, then set ion 8 housing, is now an art gsllery. Some progress…too bad my dad didn’t live to see it. Plus a few blocks away near the eric garner crime scene, there’s a microbrewery. Crazy changes i never thought i’d see.

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  41. Another thing about staten island is that it full of salt of the earth types. The island, especially the converted bungalow areas occupied by poorer Italians and hispanics, was absolutely hammered by sandy. People pulled together and helped one another. These folks are the ones you want around in an emergency, not some entitled swpl.

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  42. @HHSIII
    I had gone to integrated schools all my life but got bused to a poorer section of my hometown in 8th grade in 1977-78. This was in Montclair, NJ, about 3 towns over from Newark (and the poor part of town was the one closer to Newark). I remember the first day our bus was surrounded by the kids from the neighborhood at the school saying "You rednecks in n**** territory now." Of course I only lived less than 1/2 a mile away and played basketball at the local Y so it's not like this was alien territory. That was a rough year. Even a black girl that got bused with me told me years later she was afraid. You never told your parents much about it. Code of the kids.

    Anyway, born in 1964, so right around the Civil Rights Act. All my life I went to integrated schools, black teachers, black principals, black professors, black bosses. But I think there's way more media coverage devoted to "discrimination" than there was 30-40 years ago. Whether it's blacks, women, hispanics, gays, transgender.

    There was an article in the Times about how we miss the '70s, and the author was talking about the arts community of the time, and he mentioned how the gays had grown up during the repressive Eisenhower and Nixon regimes (no mention of the intervening Johnson etc). A friend of my father's whom we called Uncle although unrelated had an actual uncle of his own, whom we also called Uncle. Uncle Julius. He was Julius Monk, an impresario from 1950s-60s New York. I knew he was gay in the early '70s. he had a black "husband." He was flamboyantly gay. He didn't seem repressed. Admittedly it's not like he was working at IBM. But i knew gay guys in college in the mid-80s. some were out, some only came out years later. And these were fraternity guys at a southern state university. Sure, they may have been teased growing up, or maybe didn't want to come out due to what they'd be ostracized, but it just didn't seem to matter.

    Anyway many of them are big law firm partners or investment bankers. Some out. Some i think are still closeted. But it hasn't hurt them marching up the food chain. Dick Jenrette, who was a fraternity brother before my time, was pretty well-known to be a "confirmed bachelor" and the Lavender Prince of Wall Street. Didn't hurt him either.

    So yeah, anyway, off on a tangent here, but discrimination, I didn't really notice it since it all seemed normal to me growing up. And I remember thinking when I got bused to that school why were they doing it; these people don't even want us here.

    You never told your parents much about it. Code of the kids.

    Yeah the kids naturally stay silent about the Hell they are going through as a result of forced integration. And the White parents are all too willing not to ask questions about the pain their children are enduring.

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  43. WhatEvvs [AKA "Danuta Tramp"] says:
    @HHSIII
    Yeah, the Ironbound, or Down Neck as some of the locals say. Portuguese community. I used to work in Newark. And in the '70s as a teen we would take a bus to Newark for 60 cents, get a transfer to ride the Newark subway, then take the PATH train to the World Trade Center or the Village for 30 cents.

    A black guy I knew from grade school was a corrections officer. he always posts on facebook about the latest shootings in Essex County. a guy commented that he went to jazz clubs in Newark in the '50s and '60s and you could walk drunk to your car a few blocks and you'd be fine. Now he says you wouldn't make it a block.

    The Ironbound is better than ever. Weird, isn’t it? You walk down (or up, or east or west, not sure) to the train station – then you walk towards the center of town past the official stuff and you are in, ahem, Nairobi. The stores are still grand old structures, though, and they are monuments to the past. I was very taken by one of the old department stores whose gorgeous building still stands. Can’t remember the name.

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  44. WhatEvvs [AKA "Danuta Tramp"] says:
    @HHSIII
    I don't think any scenes in The French Connection are in The Bronx.

    http://www.imdb.com/title/tt0067116/locations

    http://onthesetofnewyork.com/thefrenchconnection.html

    The train chase is New Utrecht near Bensonhurst in Brooklyn and there are scenes on Ward's Island, in Ridgewood Queens (also gentrifying-I am involved in a bankruptcy case where an Israeli Investor is offering 10.2 fro 6 6 units buildings with numerous housing code violations), and stakeouts in Manhattan (I love the scene where Popeye is out in the cold with bad coffee and pizza and Fernando Rey is having a lavish meal at La Copain).

    BTW, there's a line from some movie I forget which where some cop goes "Why is it The Bronx? It's not The Brooklyn or The Queens? I bet some people named Bronk lived there and people would go let's go to the Bronk's."

    I think the Bronx will always be a little bit off the beaten track, NYC-wise, because it’s way off the end of several subway lines going north. Brooklyn is right in the middle of Manhattan & Queens. It’s small, flat and accessible. The Bronx is a handsome borough despite its somewhat undeserved rep, with lots of hills and rock formations. It’s physically more like Westchester than its is like Manhattan.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    It’s small, flat and accessible.
     
    I was going to say something about Paris Hilton, but she's 5'8".
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  45. @E. Rekshun
    OT: 'Black Bear Lives Matter' signs stir controversy

    http://www.wesh.com/news/black-bear-lives-matter-signs-stir-controversy/35362056

    For more than a year, the Black Lives Matter movement has swept the nation. Thousands have spoken out, protesting the deaths of African Americans.

    Controversy surrounds signs meant to protest the upcoming bear hunt, but make a pun on the movement's name. The signs read: "Black Bear Lives Matter." It's a message Viviana Hoge proudly displays. It's a twist on "Black Lives Matter" that is meant to protest legalized bear hunting.

    "I think it's uncalled for. There's no reason to kill them," Hoge said. Hoge said the message is harmless. "It's kind of a humorous sign against what's going on right now. It's something that people can smile at," Hoge said.

    But not everyone is smiling. Lawanna Gelzer is with the National Action Network and a Black Lives Matter activist. She said the slogan is in poor taste.

    "If you're equating the lives of African Americans who are being killed by law enforcement to a bear, that is wrong, and that is not funny," Gelzer said...

    "We're passionate about the bears. We don't want them killed, but in no way did we mean for it to be offensive to anybody," Burtner said...

    Black Bear Lives Matter? Maybe they mean EXTRA-large, gay black men?

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  46. @Hapalong Cassidy
    I have relatives that grew up in the Riverdale section of the Bronx. It was nice back then and from what I hear is still nice now. I also remember it from "Bonfire" in that the DA in the McCoy case was obsessed with impressing a hot female juror from Riverdale.

    …a hot female juror from Riverdale.

    Betty or Veronica?

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  47. @WhatEvvs
    I think the Bronx will always be a little bit off the beaten track, NYC-wise, because it's way off the end of several subway lines going north. Brooklyn is right in the middle of Manhattan & Queens. It's small, flat and accessible. The Bronx is a handsome borough despite its somewhat undeserved rep, with lots of hills and rock formations. It's physically more like Westchester than its is like Manhattan.

    It’s small, flat and accessible.

    I was going to say something about Paris Hilton, but she’s 5’8″.

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