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The Latest Conspiracy

The current rumor is that the CEO of ExxonMobil, Rex Tillerson, will be nominated for Secretary of State. One of the less unhinged reactions came from Nate Silver:

Screenshot 2016-12-10 14.24.13

Nate Silver is a sensible guy, but there’s nothing that triggers atavistic, unexamined emotions of fear and loathing more in Jewish-American pundits than:

A) Texas oilmen

B) Czars

Due to the ban on critical thinking regarding Jewish tendencies, contemporary Jewish media personalities are remarkably lacking in self-awareness, so even something as stereotypically funny as this simply doesn’t register.

 
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273 Comments to "The Latest Conspiracy"
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  1. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    ‘Fake News’, aka independent gentile news, are info-cossacks pillaging the Real News of Globalist Propaganda.

    ‘Fake News’ is the new pogrom against the Narrative, the only Truth that is permissible.

    Putin must be behind these news pogroms that mess with Globalist News Programs….

    just like the Tsar was behind the old pogroms. He was, he was indeed, he was very much so… because we want to believe it to be so so so very true.

    http://mondoweiss.net/2014/02/explodes-american-massacre/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Big Bill
    Judging by the inflection point on Google Trends, the "fake news" meme was ginned up about two weeks before Hillary's loss. Amazing how fast it has exploded in the last four weeks:

    https://www.google.com/trends/explore?q=%22fake%20news%22

    I wonder why they didn't spread it sooner. Hubris? Overconfidence?
    , @Olorin
    Just a note:

    "Fake news" is a time-tested tool of the propaganda arts. It isn't a "new meme."

    Look up statistics on how much "news" content from the 1970s on was in fact press releases from various establishment players, posing as news, published by the outlets because it was cheaper than reporters, and better for ad revenue as well. (Hint: it was a high percentage, and got higher as the century went on.)

    Are there any J-schools at all today that haven't been pulled into their institutions' MarComm departments?

    , @Alden
    The "Russian progroms" were and are a myth created by Jews. The archives of the State and Foreign departments of the USA, Argentina, Brazil, Mexico and other S. American countries, Canada, Australia, England, Germany, France, Italy, Spain and other European countries are full of reports made by diplomatic representatives actually present in Russia during the 19th century.
    Those reports one and all state that there was no prosecution, there were no progroms and that the Jews were creating the stories to breach the immigration laws of so as to allow Jewish immigration.

    The congressional records cerca 1880 to 1920 are full of these reports from our own diplomats
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  2. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    You think its a coincidence that Trump has surrounded himself with former generals? It’s like bodyarmor for him. The former usurper elite have been usurped themselves, and unlike those whom they previously displaced(who ceded with grace), this elite is anything but graceful.

    They will try to stage a coup if they can. Problem for them is that in any coup, the armed forces hold the key. Trump is beloved among the army and he is now consolidating the brass around him. Yet, the Deep State hasn’t given up hope.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Agreed; the CIA and FBI have shown signs just this year of being openly hostile to Trump---the CIA in the last few days implicating Russia, and the FBI/Comey in covering up Hillary's crimes. A coup attempt by those agencies acting jointly is not out of the question, especially since Holder's ATFE also is likely to be on their side (the ATFE ran guns for Holder, in the infamous Fast and Furious scandal).

    Unfortunately, the armed forces throughout history has not been a strong bulkwark against coups. Military men usually fall into line after a changing of the guard; whether that's from the personalities of soldiers (duty to the leader, whoever he is) or just the self-preservation tactics of military leaders, that's for others to figure out.

    The Roman army did nothing to stop the various palace coups that went on during the empire, merely switching allegiances to whoever was in power. Sometimes they'd run their own coups as well, but they'd never stop a coup.

    And then the Soviets and Nazis and Spanish had their secret police keep the armies from revolting during their coups and purges.

    In short, don't trust our armies to protect us from our secret police; it just never pans out that way, sadly.

    , @Marat
    Boy Wonder Evan McMullin is the poster boy of coup planning. But who and what are lurking behind him?
    , @Lugash
    I don't think the American Deep State has the balls or ability to pull off a hard coup. They woke up waaaay too late to the Trump threat. All they can do now is bleat about how Putin threw the election.

    Of course, the recent Gulenist coup shows how big a risk they are willing to take if they feel their backs are up against the wall. Hell, it might be fun to watch them try.
    , @anonguy
    Remember when I told you guys that women love Trump and I was so right and everyone was so wrong?

    Anyhow, Marines love Trump, like women do, and the other armed forces follow the sensibility of the Corps when it comes to manhood and hence political issues.

    Done deal with those guys, and Mattis/Dunford/Kelly are an iron lock, two of them being officially Deplorables, Dunford kind of skated through somehow but he is an ok guy, if a little more oily political than Mattis/Kelly

    Anyhow, anyone who loves Marines and whom Marines love is totally a winner because USMC always wins, always. And women love Marines, or ex Marines at least.

    Trump knows what he is doing, which star to hitch to, USMC is one of the best brands out there, name a better one if you've got it.

    , @Rod1963
    Not just generals but fellow oligarchs. I don't care squat about the generals as they are the equivalent of obedient poodles - you don't make general unless you sell your soul and manhood to the political establishment. But surrounding himself with a bunch of oligarchs who part of the establishment and status-quo worries me. These sorts are not reformers.

    But we won't know for sure until he's been in office for four or so months to figure out what his agenda really is.
  3. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Tillerson was recommended by a couple of real goys, Robert Gates and Condi Rice.

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  4. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Tillerson

    Look at the pictures his wiki has been stashed with. As many pictures of him with Putin as possible. I doubt it was like this just a week ago. Anyone knows if there is a way to compare previous edits of the wikipage?

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    • Replies: @res
    Use the View History link. From there you can click on the various prev links to show the diffs from the current page along with the full old page.

    The Putin pictures are new as you suspected (surprise).

    I found the edit history interesting. A change was made 12/7 regarding Trump's cabinet, but things were pretty quiet until late yesterday and today (12/10).

    One more interesting bit of trivia. If you look at the link of the current first picture the filename has his name in Russian: Рекс_Тиллерсон
    , @Jack D
    They are back down to only 1 photo of him with Putin, but the word "Putin" appears 9 times in his article (including the footnotes).

    Wikipedia is still OK for learning the rudiments of how a steam engine works and stuff like that, but at this point you can assume that anything with any possible political dimension will be edited to reflect the leftist POV and cannot be relied upon. By the time they were done with Alicia Machado's article it had been scrubbed so clean that she could have been a candidate for sainthood.
  5. Steve is doing some amazing work these days (and that’s been the case since I started reading him four or five years ago). I hope many of us can find the time and money in the next few weeks (better before or after 2016, I dunno?) to give recognition and support.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Steve is doing some amazing work these days (and that’s been the case since I started reading him four or five years ago). I hope many of us can find the time and money in the next few weeks (better before or after 2016, I dunno?) to give recognition and support.
     
    In this coup scenario, I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on. I hope Sailer changes up his location and is not a sitting duck. He needs to grab his laptop and head over and work on his blog while sitting in the food court of his local mall (the one in Fast Times at Ridgemont High or the one from Jackie Brown?). He and Unz need to develop some secret code for their communications. I'm sure Unz could probably develop something in 48 hours that Alan Turing couldn't break. Steve's kind of care-free life could quickly become like Joe Turner in Three Days of the Condor.

    "What do you do and why does the CIA want you dead?"
    "I don't know, I write blog pieces on sabermatics and PISA scores. That aside, is it safe?"

  6. Nah. If Trump were a liberal Democrat Silver et al. would now be singing hosannas to Putin ,Texas oilmen, or anyone else who supposedly helped electing him.

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  7. On some level, I don’t even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren’t Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won’t support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn’t entirely approve of them, and that’s very hurtful of the Russians?

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    • Replies: @Randal

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won’t support gay marriage?
     
    Amazingly, for many US sphere establishment types, it actually does seem to be mainly that.

    I think it's a bit broader, though, fundamentally - the Russian nation and state are not safely under the control of socially liberal anti-nationalists as the countries of the US sphere are, and the existence of any powerful state outside their ideological grip terrifies them, just as they tolerate no real dissent in their own countries, in case it gives our own people ideas. At least the Chinese are culturally and racially different enough to be less of a threat to them, but they are in the sights as well.
    , @Jeff Albertson
    The neocons, the Harvard boys, the CIA and soros hurt the Russians badly in the 90's, and they would like to finish the job before Russia gets completely back on its feet, and they know time is tight, hence the desperation and panic to get Trump on side, neutralized, or eliminated. IMO, it is already too late, as Russia and china know what the deal is. The saker has a very good explanation of the scam up, by William Engdahl

    http://thesaker.is/chubais-the-next-neoliberal-head-to-roll-in-russia/

    We need to pay close attention, because the same bastards are running the same scam here. Watch the master work his magic and hope Trump is taking notes. Putin is the Lord, and moldbug is his prophet, pbuh...
    , @Neil Templeton
    I've never really gotten this either. My current theory is that Russia is feared because they are a regional and even global power with a minor, but significant, strongly anti-Semitic demographic. This theory explains the fact that the most virulent Russophobes appear to be Zionist. Not a problem, of course, but interesting.
    , @Olorin
    My view aligns with Randal's...and I was raised with deep antipathy to Russia and Communism.

    Certain kinds of power blocs need an enemy to define themselves in contradistinction to. They need this enemy as they create tests of oppositional faith and practice. They need it as the resistance factor, the deadweight, in their muscle-flexing regimens. They count on propaganda about this enemy as a unifying force in their political goals or ideological beliefs.

    See the old Outer Limits episode, "The Architects of Fear."

    For most of my life the US liberal establishment succeeded in defining our own nation's whites, and particularly white men, as that enemy. Then institutionalizing that.

    They just got the first hefty, organized, politically significant, power-shifting pushback in my lifetime.

    They need a new enemy, or more accurately a reboot (ha!) of the old one. What better choice than a highly white male society with an epically classically white male leader?

    With Russia/Putin as the enemy they can rebuke the American renaissance while projecting a fashionably retro reactionary 1950s stance: hating on Communism, albeit 60 years late to the game. This further serves to let them project denial of how Bolshie they are.

    As Michel Foucault like to say, paraphrasing Nietzsche, the left never realized just how true it is that one becomes what one fervently opposes.

    And there are likely enough useful idiots that they will get SOME traction out of this in rejecting the results of an election they don't like (i.e. that threatens to break up their power with democratic exercise of republican Constitutional process)...while claiming they are the real democrats.

    , @Anonymous Nephew
    They're white - as our countries used to be. They're Christian - as our countries used to be. And they don't believe in deliberately dividing their population by race, sex (sorry, 'gender'), sexuality in order that a relatively small and cohesive elite can farm them for fun and profit.

    I imagine the Putin administration might even be concerned about increasing national unity, not decreasing it - which makes them just like most countries throughout history, but not like the West over the last 50 years.

    The only other white, Christian countries with such ideas of national unity are the recent EU entrants, formerly Warsaw Pact countries like Poland and Hungary. But Western elites don't see them as much of a threat - calculating, probably correctly, that a combination of EU gimmedats and the threat of the Big Bad Bear will ensure their compliance and eventual absorption into post-Christian, multi-ethnic Europe. After all, Greece knuckled under when faced with leaving the Euro. The southern European economies have been devastated since 2008, massive youth unemployment, GDP falls - yet they "held on tight to Nurse, for fear of finding something Worse".

    This happy (for our elites) scenario is threatened by things like Brexit, 'populism' and the Italy vote, which is why they'll fight dirty, and why it's so important to nourish the 'populists'.
    , @SFG
    I don't think Putin's up to anything nefarious per se. Putin wants to expand his sphere of influence. This will help protect Russia from invasion, which has happened on multiple occasions. Remember, we have NATO on their border in the Baltics. Imagine if Putin had a military alliance with Mexico.

    Whether it's good for the USA to let him do it is another question.
    , @Chrisnonymous
    Randal has got this one right. The Russians aren't on board with the agenda of the western elites.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/global-opinions/wp/2016/12/10/lets-get-the-facts-right-on-foreign-involvement-in-our-elections/
    , @Chrisnonymous
    The WaPo published the phrase "Illiberal International".

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/global-opinions/wp/2016/12/10/lets-get-the-facts-right-on-foreign-involvement-in-our-elections/
  8. I keep pointing out that the conspiracy theory about Russia “hacking” the election amounts to claiming that Russia made Hillary and the Democrats look crooked and incompetent… by leaking their own emails showing they’re crooked and incompetent. How devious!

    Also, by the same token, Iran “manipulated” the 1980 election to elect Reagan by waiting to release the hostages until the day after the election. Not sure it exactly worked out well for them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @D. K.
    ERRATUM: The hostages were released on the following Inauguration Day, shortly after Ronald Reagan had taken the oath of office and replaced Jimmy Carter. (Election Day 1980 actually was the first anniversary of the storming of the American embassy by Iranian students-- or militants, or whatever they actually were!?!)
    , @Glossy
    Essentially the Dems are accusing Putin of trying to bring Glasnost to America.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glasnost
    , @Marat
    Some people thought that the special timing of the hostage release was the work of GHW Bush.
  9. @Anon
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Tillerson

    Look at the pictures his wiki has been stashed with. As many pictures of him with Putin as possible. I doubt it was like this just a week ago. Anyone knows if there is a way to compare previous edits of the wikipage?

    Use the View History link. From there you can click on the various prev links to show the diffs from the current page along with the full old page.

    The Putin pictures are new as you suspected (surprise).

    I found the edit history interesting. A change was made 12/7 regarding Trump’s cabinet, but things were pretty quiet until late yesterday and today (12/10).

    One more interesting bit of trivia. If you look at the link of the current first picture the filename has his name in Russian: Рекс_Тиллерсон

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chriscom
    As of 11:18 p.m. U.S. East Coast time, there are only three photos: One head shot, two with Putin.

    There were *lots* of edits starting mainly around Dec. 3--a trickle--and then really taking off around the 10th. About 150 edits in that tranche. I don't know how reliable the editing comments are; most say routine stuff like combining paragraphs, but there are several "possible BLP [biographies of living person] issue or vandalism." I don't see any special tag for photos but could be missing it.
  10. @Anon
    You think its a coincidence that Trump has surrounded himself with former generals? It's like bodyarmor for him. The former usurper elite have been usurped themselves, and unlike those whom they previously displaced(who ceded with grace), this elite is anything but graceful.

    They will try to stage a coup if they can. Problem for them is that in any coup, the armed forces hold the key. Trump is beloved among the army and he is now consolidating the brass around him. Yet, the Deep State hasn't given up hope.

    Agreed; the CIA and FBI have shown signs just this year of being openly hostile to Trump—the CIA in the last few days implicating Russia, and the FBI/Comey in covering up Hillary’s crimes. A coup attempt by those agencies acting jointly is not out of the question, especially since Holder’s ATFE also is likely to be on their side (the ATFE ran guns for Holder, in the infamous Fast and Furious scandal).

    Unfortunately, the armed forces throughout history has not been a strong bulkwark against coups. Military men usually fall into line after a changing of the guard; whether that’s from the personalities of soldiers (duty to the leader, whoever he is) or just the self-preservation tactics of military leaders, that’s for others to figure out.

    The Roman army did nothing to stop the various palace coups that went on during the empire, merely switching allegiances to whoever was in power. Sometimes they’d run their own coups as well, but they’d never stop a coup.

    And then the Soviets and Nazis and Spanish had their secret police keep the armies from revolting during their coups and purges.

    In short, don’t trust our armies to protect us from our secret police; it just never pans out that way, sadly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Spanish? Please explain.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to 'the world' for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.

    The Romans had none of this.
    , @reiner Tor
    As long as the rightful leader is alive, he can use the military to protect himself and crush the coup, or crush non-military deep state actors suspected of planning a coup. Major Remer during the July 20 coup* and Marshal Zhukov during both the arrest of Beria and the defeat of the "Anti-Party Group"** come to mind from recent totalitarian history.

    *Which was a military coup and yet the army units switched back allegiance the moment they were convinced the rightful leadership was still in place.

    **A Politburo coup attempt against Khrushchev.
    , @Alden
    The USA has never had a coup. Our Presidential and governor elections always involve a constitutional reasonably honest non violent election and a peaceful change of power. There have been some rather nasty recount and electors problems such as the Hayes Tilden election where in the southern states traded electoral votes for Hayes in return for the withdrawal of the federal army and the Gore Bush recount which was brought to a close by the federal courts for once doing something right and decent.

    So discussion of other coups centuries ago is not comparable to what might happen in a coup in today's America. But you are right, armies and police usually just go along with the winner. In fact in many countries as soon as a coup is underway the police and military higher ups order their troops and police to "return to barracks" and wait it out.
  11. If true, Trump’s best Cabinet pick yet, in my opinion.

    And his first “Rockefeller Republican” pick, which I have been waiting for.

    Trump as the New Nelson Rockefeller

    Last year Michael Barone suggested that Trump’s precedent was liberal Republican and big spender / big builder Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959-1973, three time candidate for the GOP presidential nomination, and VP under Gerald Ford

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/trump-as-the-new-nelson-rockefeller/

    And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming; but I still feel this is his best pick yet… if true.

    A relief – if true – after his “Cabinet of Horrors” picks, starting with his selection of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education: http://www.unz.com/isteve/donald-trump-messiah-of-american-education/#comment-1661444 & http://www.unz.com/isteve/donald-trump-messiah-of-american-education/#comment-1662808

    Understanding Time of Observation Bias

    http://www.skepticalscience.com/understanding-tobs-bias.html

    Zeke Hausfather Full Interview UQx Denial101x


    Published on Feb 28, 2016

    Hausfather explains the surface temperature record and some of the groups and individuals that have independently come to similar results. He also discusses how to communicate with a highly technical audience when they don’t have specific expertise in your field.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming
     
    Your dollar is under your pillow courtesy of the tooth fairy, and your presents will be provided by Santa Claus again.

    By the way, you should be FKA Min instead of FKA Max.
    , @Anon
    "And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming."

    Science is only as as good as the data it collects. If the data is junk, the science is junk. There are a lot of problems with the measuring stations used to collect temperatures around the United States. Look up 'heat islands,' and start from there. The measuring stations being used to support the notion that global warming exists are disproportionately city-based, and not rural-based.

    Cities are 'heat islands' because concrete absorbs sunlight and radiates it back out, which helps keep their temperatures at a higher level while the surrounding temperature cools. For example, if you're familiar with how hot big cities are around 9 pm to 3 am at night in summer, you'll see the effect. Houses in summer show the same properties. They'll roast you on a summer night without air conditioning or good ventilation to move the trapped heat outside the house.

    The use of 'heat islands' will warp the data collected because they give you artificially inflated temperatures. 'Heat islands' are only a tiny portion of the total global mass, and their effect is minimal on overall temperature averages. The data from rural areas doesn't support the notion that the globe is warming.

    'Belief' is claptrap when it comes to science. You need good quality data, and that alone.

  12. @Thomas
    I keep pointing out that the conspiracy theory about Russia "hacking" the election amounts to claiming that Russia made Hillary and the Democrats look crooked and incompetent... by leaking their own emails showing they're crooked and incompetent. How devious!

    Also, by the same token, Iran "manipulated" the 1980 election to elect Reagan by waiting to release the hostages until the day after the election. Not sure it exactly worked out well for them.

    ERRATUM: The hostages were released on the following Inauguration Day, shortly after Ronald Reagan had taken the oath of office and replaced Jimmy Carter. (Election Day 1980 actually was the first anniversary of the storming of the American embassy by Iranian students– or militants, or whatever they actually were!?!)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Busby
    What we did not know then, was that the Carter administration had been negotiating the release of the hostages since Sept. And that the date of release was an Iranian snub of Carter.
  13. Next to Sessions, Tillerson is my favorite Trump pick so far.

    For starters, Exxon Mobil is a super-competent company, and should have more alumni in government.

    Tillerson has a ton of foreign affairs experience, negotiating deals with governments from Yemen to Russia.

    And Exxon has a history of prudence in foreign relations. That’s something that came through in Steve Coll’s Exxon book from a years back. Exxon wasn’t enthusiastic about the Iraq War, and there and elsewhere, it resisted attempts to get sucked into nation building.

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    • Replies: @JohnnyD
    @Dave Pinsen
    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil. They loathe regime change/nation building because they need someone in charge to do business.
    , @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.
  14. @Dave Pinsen
    Next to Sessions, Tillerson is my favorite Trump pick so far.

    For starters, Exxon Mobil is a super-competent company, and should have more alumni in government.

    Tillerson has a ton of foreign affairs experience, negotiating deals with governments from Yemen to Russia.

    And Exxon has a history of prudence in foreign relations. That's something that came through in Steve Coll's Exxon book from a years back. Exxon wasn't enthusiastic about the Iraq War, and there and elsewhere, it resisted attempts to get sucked into nation building.


    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil. They loathe regime change/nation building because they need someone in charge to do business.

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    • Replies: @Lot

    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil.
     
    Not really. They benefit from mideast instability, which raises the price of oil. Knocking out Iraq and Libya's production was a big boon to oil companies. The oil majors are relatively light on Mideast oil, which is easy to extract and is mostly done by the local state owned companies (with non-Muslim technical labor of course).

    The private oil majors gets their oil from more difficult and expensive areas, like offshore, SS Africa, the Caucuses, etc.
    , @DIscharged EE
    I, too, saw John Mearsheimer argue on CSPAN in 2007 when his book on the Lobby came out, that the oil companies do not lobby on foreign policy.
    , @SF
    Exactly the comment I was going to make. It has been a while, but I think "The Israeli Lobby" devoted a couple of pages to arguing that the major oil companies were not enthusiastic about the invasion, and would have preferred a normalization of relations with Saddam, in order to compete for oil concessions.
  15. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won’t support gay marriage?

    Amazingly, for many US sphere establishment types, it actually does seem to be mainly that.

    I think it’s a bit broader, though, fundamentally – the Russian nation and state are not safely under the control of socially liberal anti-nationalists as the countries of the US sphere are, and the existence of any powerful state outside their ideological grip terrifies them, just as they tolerate no real dissent in their own countries, in case it gives our own people ideas. At least the Chinese are culturally and racially different enough to be less of a threat to them, but they are in the sights as well.

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  16. “Atavistic” and “fear and loathing” in the same sentence…you’ve gotten into the ether.

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  17. 1/ Nobody here can look on the bright side of what Steve says.

    Which of course was a big export property for the US. Sadly what Steve says has weakened considerably since 1978. But it sure benefited the US when it was strong.

    2/ People here really better hope there’s no Global Warming.

    3/ Its going to be fun reading about ‘dual loyalty’ here for the next four years.

    Read More
  18. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

    The neocons, the Harvard boys, the CIA and soros hurt the Russians badly in the 90′s, and they would like to finish the job before Russia gets completely back on its feet, and they know time is tight, hence the desperation and panic to get Trump on side, neutralized, or eliminated. IMO, it is already too late, as Russia and china know what the deal is. The saker has a very good explanation of the scam up, by William Engdahl

    http://thesaker.is/chubais-the-next-neoliberal-head-to-roll-in-russia/

    We need to pay close attention, because the same bastards are running the same scam here. Watch the master work his magic and hope Trump is taking notes. Putin is the Lord, and moldbug is his prophet, pbuh…

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  19. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    http://www.barenakedislam.com/2016/12/10/sweden-chaos-boils-over-with-more-cars-going-up-in-flame-as-violent-muslim-invaders-attack-police-officers/

    This is truly awesome Muslim contribution to society.

    Sweden is having a very cold winter, but these wonderful migrants found a way to keep the whole nation warm.

    Dumb Europeans think cars are only for driving. But cars can heat up entire cities if you set them on fire.

    Thanks Muslims.

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  20. Meh. Tillerson would be right at home in a Kasich cabinet. His political stripe is w/o courage or depth. Nothing but consumerism. The odds of him scuttling the left’s cherished refugee program are about 1 in 5. Close to being a garden variety Cuckservative.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Pretty sure Tillerson would have avoided getting us sucked into Libya or Iraq.

    Trump can set the agenda on refugees.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Are you speaking from your conversations with Tillerson? Maybe Tillerson isn't the imbecile you take him for.
  21. I know that Turkey has been mentioned here as a conspiracy theory rich nation, but surely no nation can beat America. The left wingers have become as conspiracy theory prone as the people they kept on mocking for being conspiracy theorists. What the underlying cause of this is truly a mystery to me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    This is a recent phenomenon. The left used to be outraged all the time, but not paranoid. The paranoia comes from losing their grip on power, and they're going haywire. Leftists, like many immature people, have little emotional resilience in the face of setbacks. If they had more emotional resilience, they'd be conservatives.

    Conservatives think you shouldn't depend on other people to get ahead in life, and that you should pull yourself up by your bootstraps, and this philosophy is based on the possession of psychological resilience. Conservatives also believe that what doesn't kill you makes you stronger. In contrast, liberals act like the perpetual walking wounded, and their whole political philosophy is based on the outrage of being injured by something or other.

  22. It’s also going to be fun to watch various left websites like Counterpunch and Globalresearch applaud the choice of Exxon’s CEO to be SoS.

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  23. @Thomas
    I keep pointing out that the conspiracy theory about Russia "hacking" the election amounts to claiming that Russia made Hillary and the Democrats look crooked and incompetent... by leaking their own emails showing they're crooked and incompetent. How devious!

    Also, by the same token, Iran "manipulated" the 1980 election to elect Reagan by waiting to release the hostages until the day after the election. Not sure it exactly worked out well for them.

    Essentially the Dems are accusing Putin of trying to bring Glasnost to America.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glasnost

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  24. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Meh. Tillerson would be right at home in a Kasich cabinet. His political stripe is w/o courage or depth. Nothing but consumerism. The odds of him scuttling the left's cherished refugee program are about 1 in 5. Close to being a garden variety Cuckservative.

    Pretty sure Tillerson would have avoided getting us sucked into Libya or Iraq.

    Trump can set the agenda on refugees.

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    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    God willing DJT will set a VERY restrictive refugee policy going fwd, but it is his Sec of State who must enforce it, implement it (& the bureaucracy will stall this for sure....)

    It is encouraging that Tillerson has non-interventionist instincts, but he is ominously vague about his position on border security, refugee policy, foreign aid, and how liberally the military should be used as a glorified daycare service. For example, with refugee repatriation, it simply shouldn't matter whether a "state" like Somlia will accept back its terrorists or similar. We should fly in there, push them out of the place onto the runway with a day's provisions. Wish them well, then say Buh Bye. End of story.

    With Bolton as Tillerson's #2, it will come down to how much Neocon lobbying can be resisted until Tillerson caves. If Tillerson is milquetoast, will o the wisp in the strength of his beliefs, the policy thrust will revert to Neocon status quo after 6 months.
  25. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    So, the Exxon CEO at State. Yeah, because McNamara worked out real well in Defense.

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  26. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @whorefinder
    Agreed; the CIA and FBI have shown signs just this year of being openly hostile to Trump---the CIA in the last few days implicating Russia, and the FBI/Comey in covering up Hillary's crimes. A coup attempt by those agencies acting jointly is not out of the question, especially since Holder's ATFE also is likely to be on their side (the ATFE ran guns for Holder, in the infamous Fast and Furious scandal).

    Unfortunately, the armed forces throughout history has not been a strong bulkwark against coups. Military men usually fall into line after a changing of the guard; whether that's from the personalities of soldiers (duty to the leader, whoever he is) or just the self-preservation tactics of military leaders, that's for others to figure out.

    The Roman army did nothing to stop the various palace coups that went on during the empire, merely switching allegiances to whoever was in power. Sometimes they'd run their own coups as well, but they'd never stop a coup.

    And then the Soviets and Nazis and Spanish had their secret police keep the armies from revolting during their coups and purges.

    In short, don't trust our armies to protect us from our secret police; it just never pans out that way, sadly.

    Spanish? Please explain.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Orwell wrote Animal Farm not merely about the Stalin and Hitler, but about Franco and the Spanish Civil War. Orwell served during the Spanish Civil War and saw first (and later second) hand how Franco's police state rose.
  27. I like that Rex Tillerson has been the chief diplomat for the nation of Exxon/Mobil. He doesn’t need much of what State has to offer as “services” unlike Clinton and Kerry.

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  28. @Dave Pinsen
    Next to Sessions, Tillerson is my favorite Trump pick so far.

    For starters, Exxon Mobil is a super-competent company, and should have more alumni in government.

    Tillerson has a ton of foreign affairs experience, negotiating deals with governments from Yemen to Russia.

    And Exxon has a history of prudence in foreign relations. That's something that came through in Steve Coll's Exxon book from a years back. Exxon wasn't enthusiastic about the Iraq War, and there and elsewhere, it resisted attempts to get sucked into nation building.

    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:

    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public

    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

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    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    I agree that global warming would be good for the US (and Russia and Canada) were it to happen, but like most liberal visions of the future, this is all empty promises. Most years there is no warming or just cooling. Yet according to Those Who Must Not Be Gainsaid, we were all supposed to be under water and boiled alive by now.
    , @Anonymous
    Two words: "climate refugees".
    , @Opinionator
    Whether or not you care about their fates, it means more of them will be heading to Europe and the United States.
    , @jesse helms think-alike
    Please Please Please

    AGW is a hoax

    Only true believers in the cult of Liberalism - Marxism refuse to see what their lying eyes tell them.

    The same prophets who are so concerned about climate catastrophe caused by wealthy western lifestyle have no problem with Chinese factories spewing pollution into the atmosphere or turd worlders breeding at rates that will replicate the death phase of a bacterial culture.
    , @Bill Jones
    In what way is Iran an "actual enemy"

    How are they a threat to the American people?
    , @JackStraw
    Isn't the fundamental issue not whether increased CO2 in the atmosphere causes warming (it does), but how much the current warming is specifically caused by CO2 and how much is natural climate variation?
    , @Olorin

    But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest.

     

    I cringe at your ignorance of large-scale stochastics.
  29. Here is an article with a CIA guy outlining a three step plan to harm Russia. Among the options is to provide heavier weapons to Ukraine and to begin having the US supply Europe with natural gas. This has been the policy of the globalist/neocons since Nuland et al around the time of the Winter Olympics. I guess the globalist just can’t give up, even though the gas pipeline ain’t going through Syria after the face plant we have taken there, so they persist in trying to create a war on Russia’s border.

    There is an enormous fissure between dualing elites in this county. Dangerous times.

    http://money.cnn.com/2016/12/09/technology/trump-russia-hackers-cia/index.html

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    • Replies: @anon
    Muse .... God. This sucks. This 'fact based' narrative consists of facts that are inherently unfalsifiable.

    The hacking bears the 'hallmarks of Russian cyber activity' including the use of 'tools' known to be commonly used by Russian hackers. Thank you non fake news people, quoting the trustworthy James Clapper.

    The only good news is that this is the same shit they have been pushing for months. Nothing new. We have already tried to mess up the Russian economy. There is nothing more we can do to impact oil prices. Other than raise them - possibly -- by reducing US fracking. And arm Ukraine? That dog not only won't hunt, he has died.
  30. @JohnnyD
    @Dave Pinsen
    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil. They loathe regime change/nation building because they need someone in charge to do business.

    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil.

    Not really. They benefit from mideast instability, which raises the price of oil. Knocking out Iraq and Libya’s production was a big boon to oil companies. The oil majors are relatively light on Mideast oil, which is easy to extract and is mostly done by the local state owned companies (with non-Muslim technical labor of course).

    The private oil majors gets their oil from more difficult and expensive areas, like offshore, SS Africa, the Caucuses, etc.

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  31. I was going to post something really brilliant, but then there were these Russian hackers, and I was all like, “NO!” and they were all like “XA xa XA xa XA XA xa XAAAA!”

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  32. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    It makes sense in a bizarre sort of way. Hire the guy that got the best deal with the Russians among the major integrated oil companies.

    The left’s ideas about oil tend to be universally idiotic. Once there is a global market, then it doesn’t matter who is in power in a country. It never really did. But now, less than ever.

    Oil is huge in the USA, but its main political force is the local, tight oil business, which barely overlap with the major integrated oil companies. The US is the only country I know of where individual land owners own their property to the center of the earth. Individuals can and do own royalty interests. That’s why we were able to invent fracking. http://www.naro-us.org

    This is very decentralized. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aubrey_McClendon

    Another reason Trump may have beat expectations in Pennsylvania. Lots of people make and made money in this business, in spite of Hollywood and environmentalist fantasy.

    And, for the clean/green crowd, natural gas is the cleanest burning hydrocarbon. And considered a bridge to the renewable future. http://www.nlaurell.com/natural-gas-overview-why-is-methane-a-clean-fuel/

    Naturally, radical environmentalists will argue the point endlessly, but normal people aren’t ready to trade cars or bicycles yet. The rational narrative is to use methane as the transition fuel until we get to solar/wind and the next renewable.

    I don’t know this for sure, but I think the domestic industry isn’t particularly fond of Exxon.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "The rational narrative is to use methane as the transition fuel until we get to solar/wind and the next renewable."

    And just what is "the next renewable"? Zero-point energy? Orgone energy? Grrl Power?
  33. @anon
    Spanish? Please explain.

    Orwell wrote Animal Farm not merely about the Stalin and Hitler, but about Franco and the Spanish Civil War. Orwell served during the Spanish Civil War and saw first (and later second) hand how Franco’s police state rose.

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    • Replies: @David
    If the pigs were Franco wouldn't they support the humans? I can't see how his rise to power can be seen in Animal Farm. The corruption of power Orwell had the closest experience with was of the communists he fought alongside of.
    , @Anonymous Nephew
    I think it was more the treatment of POUM, the independent non-Stalinist communist group that Orwell was fighting with, by the Soviet-backed Communists, that was turned into Animal Farm. Orwell was convinced that the Communists were above all dedicated to keeping control of the Revolution, even at the cost of military setbacks - for example, starving Orwell's front of weapons because the command there was not Communist. POUM was eventually outlawed by the Communists and its leadership 'liquidated'. Orwell had first hand knowledge of his side of the frontlines, not of Franco's side.

    "I have described how we were armed, or not armed, on the Aragon front. There is very little doubt that arms were deliberately withheld lest too many of them should get into the hands of the Anarchists, who would afterwards use them for a revolutionary purpose; consequently the big Aragon offensive which would have made Franco draw back from Bilbao, and possibly from Madrid, never happened."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_Days


    The climate of distrust and confrontation was present not only among republican institutions and workers organizations, but even between these organizations, especially among anarchists, on the one hand, and Socialists, Communists and Catalan nationalists on the other. On the one hand the communist PCE and PSUC, following the official doctrine of the Soviet Union, as well as being supporters of the usual order of the Second Spanish Republic. The PCE PCE was the major communist party in the country while the PSUC was the main communist organization in Catalonia. At the other extreme, in radical opposition to Stalin, the dissident Marxist POUM; who believed, like the anarchists, that war and social revolution were inseparable. This being the chief motivation for those actually doing the fighting, the overwhelming majority of whom were trade unionists and/or had been members of libertarian organisations before the war.

    The tension was rising due a chain of events taking place during the winter that heated the political climate and paved the way for what would take place later. The PCE had taken a decision to liquidate the POUM during a conference with Comintern officials and Soviet agents in Valencia. During that conference the POUM leaders were accused of being Nazi agents, part of a plot devised by Leon Trotsky, who was alleged to be conspiring with the fascists to overthrow Stalin - supported by the 'evidence' of the show trials of the leaders of the Russian Revolution that had taken place in Moscow the previous year. The POUM had come to propose an invitation to Trotsky to reside in Catalonia, despite their differences with him. The POUM leaders were becoming increasingly wary as they moved to the spring of 1937. Tension in the streets of Barcelona was becoming evident of the arrival of a hot spring: uncontrollable Civil Guards and Soviet agents continued to arbitrarily arrest and murder Confederals.
     

    , @schmenz
    Franco can not be placed alongside of Stalin and Hitler unless one throws history to the winds. I find that most people who characterize Franco in this way have drunk too deeply of the Black Legend against Spain which precludes them from forming a more objective opinion.

    The Spanish Communists began their church burnings and murders and chaos in 1931, years before Franco finally acted to restore order. He had to, since the government in power did nothing to put an end to it.

    You might be interested to know how Franco dealt with Hitler. He sidelined him at every opportunity and Hitler got nowhere with him. He did much to preserve Spanish culture in art and music as well. But the Left (and some poorly-educated Rightists) still cling to the anti-Franco fairy tales.

    By the way, the police state you refer to was not Franco's but his predecessor's. You really owe it to yourself to take a glance at the other side's point of view.

  34. @JohnnyD
    @Dave Pinsen
    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil. They loathe regime change/nation building because they need someone in charge to do business.

    I, too, saw John Mearsheimer argue on CSPAN in 2007 when his book on the Lobby came out, that the oil companies do not lobby on foreign policy.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    The American oil companies were mostly anti-Israel in 1947, but I don't know how vociferously.

    My vague impression is they were against the Iraq Attaq in 2003, but mostly kept their heads down.

  35. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Opinionator
    Steve is doing some amazing work these days (and that's been the case since I started reading him four or five years ago). I hope many of us can find the time and money in the next few weeks (better before or after 2016, I dunno?) to give recognition and support.

    Steve is doing some amazing work these days (and that’s been the case since I started reading him four or five years ago). I hope many of us can find the time and money in the next few weeks (better before or after 2016, I dunno?) to give recognition and support.

    In this coup scenario, I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on. I hope Sailer changes up his location and is not a sitting duck. He needs to grab his laptop and head over and work on his blog while sitting in the food court of his local mall (the one in Fast Times at Ridgemont High or the one from Jackie Brown?). He and Unz need to develop some secret code for their communications. I’m sure Unz could probably develop something in 48 hours that Alan Turing couldn’t break. Steve’s kind of care-free life could quickly become like Joe Turner in Three Days of the Condor.

    “What do you do and why does the CIA want you dead?”
    “I don’t know, I write blog pieces on sabermatics and PISA scores. That aside, is it safe?”

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    • Replies: @Karl
    > I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on

    I heard that Ivanka introduced him to Rabbi Lookstein.

    hey iSteve, there's a lot of Anglos in Ramat Beit Shemesh. And it's an well-guarded place.

    i'll get your wife a deal on a kitchen. The Finish moshav (Yad ha-Shomneh) isn't too far away, so fresh pork is right at hand.

    If you prefer sun & fun at the beach, the French Jews are turning Netanya into one big outdoor cafe. Strong coffee, fresh baguettes, and gossip up the ying-yang about how stuck up English-speaking Jews are.
    , @Desiderius

    In this coup scenario, I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on.
     
    Sailer's like their GPS so they can tell where reality is when they need it. Without him, they'd really be lost.
  36. @Lot

    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil.
     
    Not really. They benefit from mideast instability, which raises the price of oil. Knocking out Iraq and Libya's production was a big boon to oil companies. The oil majors are relatively light on Mideast oil, which is easy to extract and is mostly done by the local state owned companies (with non-Muslim technical labor of course).

    The private oil majors gets their oil from more difficult and expensive areas, like offshore, SS Africa, the Caucuses, etc.

    I hate to agree with you, but in this you are right.

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  37. @FKA Max
    If true, Trump's best Cabinet pick yet, in my opinion.

    And his first ``Rockefeller Republican'' pick, which I have been waiting for.

    Trump as the New Nelson Rockefeller

    Last year Michael Barone suggested that Trump’s precedent was liberal Republican and big spender / big builder Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959-1973, three time candidate for the GOP presidential nomination, and VP under Gerald Ford
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/trump-as-the-new-nelson-rockefeller/

    And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming; but I still feel this is his best pick yet... if true.

    A relief - if true - after his ``Cabinet of Horrors'' picks, starting with his selection of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education: http://www.unz.com/isteve/donald-trump-messiah-of-american-education/#comment-1661444 & http://www.unz.com/isteve/donald-trump-messiah-of-american-education/#comment-1662808

    Understanding Time of Observation Bias

    http://www.skepticalscience.com/understanding-tobs-bias.html

    Zeke Hausfather Full Interview UQx Denial101x

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maMEjDWgVmI

    Published on Feb 28, 2016


    Hausfather explains the surface temperature record and some of the groups and individuals that have independently come to similar results. He also discusses how to communicate with a highly technical audience when they don't have specific expertise in your field.

    And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming

    Your dollar is under your pillow courtesy of the tooth fairy, and your presents will be provided by Santa Claus again.

    By the way, you should be FKA Min instead of FKA Max.

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    • Replies: @Olorin
    You don't have enough calculus to form this opinion, never mind lavish it upon others.
  38. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Meh. Tillerson would be right at home in a Kasich cabinet. His political stripe is w/o courage or depth. Nothing but consumerism. The odds of him scuttling the left's cherished refugee program are about 1 in 5. Close to being a garden variety Cuckservative.

    Are you speaking from your conversations with Tillerson? Maybe Tillerson isn’t the imbecile you take him for.

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  39. Read More
  40. “atavistic, unexamined emotions of fear and loathing more in Jewish-American pundits than: A) Texas oilmen”

    I don’t get the reference. What did Texas oilmen ever do to Jews?

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    • Agree: NOTA
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "I don’t get the reference. What did Texas oilmen ever do to Jews?"

    JR blames the Jews for him being shot in 1980, so the relationship between Texas oilmen and Jews have been rocky since than.
  41. Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don’t see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain’t good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He’s supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn’t get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian.
     
    And just how do we know this?
    , @anon
    In what way do our interests run counter to Russia's? Before the Cold War they were our traditional ally, and they're smaller now than they were then.
    , @Almost Missouri

    "in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain’t good for the USA, just like China."
     
    For at least five decades, the US policy in Eurasia has been much like the British policy in continental Europe: hobble the strongest payer by supporting its nearest rival. In the Cold War, the USSR was strongest, so we backed China in spite of their avowed Communism and terrible human rights record (arguably worse than the contemporary USSR). Now China is strongest, so we suddenly have a common interest with Russia.

    So learn to stop worrying and love the bomb!
    , @Anonym
    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump

    Where is the evidence for this? To my mind, the evidence points to Washington. And to Seth Rich for the DNC leaks. Comrade.

    http://www.infowars.com/former-british-ambassador-podesta-emails-leaked-by-washington-insider-not-russians/

    , @Mr. Anon
    "Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump,......"

    And how do we know this? I hear this claim being confidently asserted in the media, but I have not heard described any evidence for it.

    "I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course)."

    I don't know about defending the white race, although my guess would be that Putin is at least a race realist. As to defending traditional values, he might be interested in that; he's an older guy who came of age in a relatively buttoned down society, and he probably views western degeneracy as corrupting and undesirable. I agree with you that his primary aim is probably the maintenance of his regime, and that he is untrustworthy.
    , @Opinionator
    Dude come on.

    https://kakistocracyblog.wordpress.com/2016/12/11/fake-russians-and-real-news/
    , @syonredux

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course).
     
    Yeah. Near as I can tell, Putin's politics are essentially a Russian version of civic nationalism.
    , @Jefferson
    "I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race"

    Since when did Vladimir Putin ever claim to be White first and Russian second?

    Vladimir Putin does not give a damn if a WASP in Detroit for example is mugged at gunpoint by a Black or if a WASP in Detroit is racemixing with a Black.

    Vladimir Putin's tribalism mentality does not extend beyond the Russian people. Vladimir Putin does not see Anglo Saxon Protestants as his people. Vladimir Putin is a Russian nationalist, not a White nationalist.
    , @Hunsdon
    Dude, the idea of Putin as God-Emperor is so 2014. He can be Tsarskii Bog Bsey Rossii, we've got our own.

    We've gotten used to Russia being weak, but that was situational. Russia's getting stronger. We can either accommodate ourselves to that, or oppose it, but if we're going to oppose it, we should have a damn good reason to be looking for a fight with a nuclear armed superpower.
    , @Difference maker

    we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian
     
    Hahaha.. Successfully gas lighted. I can tell you right now that it doesn't matter
    , @ben tillman

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian.
     
    And why would that be a problem? If Russia's government acted in a pro-American way, as you allege, surely it's appropriate for the American government to reciprocate. God forbid two nuclear superpowers should be friendly and cooperate!
    , @Anonym
    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He’s supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=zv5stOZU9uk

    I see elements of both here. Putin is an intelligent man. He is not permitted to see the overall weakening of the white man through divide and conquer, and be perturbed about the situation? It is kind of dumb for us to be bickering among ourselves while the non-whites colonize us and grow economically, demographically and militarily stronger. We are only about 16% of world population.

    http://www.sciencechatforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=82&t=16165
    , @Gabriel M
    Among Putin's less virtuous moves has been supporting socialism in Venezuala which just gets more and more bizarre.

    http://www.breitbart.com/national-security/2016/10/13/cannibalism-in-venezuela/

    That doesn't mean he's evil exactly, though he should do penance of some sort. Soundness is process; Putin's trying to find his way out of the rabbit-hole of universalist liberalism just like the rest of us and, since he's a practical man, and a busy one, he's probably thought things through a lot less than the average isteve commentator.
  42. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    ‘Russian Influence’?

    Dog-whistling.

    When Glob media say ‘Russian Influence’, it sounds like, ALARM ALARM, “white gentile power” since Russia managed to wrest control from the globo-oligarchs(at least to some extent).

    The great irony of this warning about Russian Influence is that it interferes with another Alien Influence, that of Globalism that is anti-nationalist.

    US is so far gone with crazy globalism that Russianism is the like the new patriotism among white Americans(even if most Trump voters are not conscious of this).

    Russianism means Russia for Russians. The implication of this for white Americans is that White Americans should be for their own interests… just like Zionists are for Zionism and blacks are for black nationalism.

    Indeed, what are the parallels between US and Russia?

    Both came under Zionst-globalist influence.
    Russia went through economic hell but found a leader in Putin who restored some degree of nationalism and sovereignty. Russia of 90s and Russia of today make for stark parallel and validates the power of nationalism.
    Both periods were times of severe economic duress for Russia. In the 90s, the shock therapy destroyed the Russian economy. Following Sochi Olympics, globalist dirty tricks in Ukraine led to tough sanctions on Russia and severe economic duress. Yet, if Russians were totally lost in the 90s, they stood firm in recent yrs because of national unity and pride. That’s what inspired leadership and nationalism can do in the worst of times. FDR proved it in the 30s and 40s.

    Unlike Russia in the 90s, US greatly prospered under globalism but not evenly. Huge portions of the population, esp white working class, fell through the cracks, and worse, these ‘deplorables’ were dehumanized by media and academia as subhuman trash. And some of these people supported Trump as leader of a new path.

    Now, Jews may argue that Jewish-American influence is as American as apple pie.. or bagel and cream cheese whereas Russian influence is foreign and alien.
    But to the extent that Russianism stands for white majority power, it has more parallels with white Americanism than Zionist-globalism does. After all, globalism only favors the elite minorities and cosmopolitans in cities interconnected with one another and positioned the play the entire world for maximum profits.

    So, when the Zionist elites and their cuckeroos denounce ‘Russian influence’, they are dogwhistling that any white gentile consciousness is evil and un-American. It is ‘Russian’. But white Americans need to understand… Russians are allowed to feel great pride as Russians in Russia.. whereas Zionist-globalists revile any white American who cares about his identity and culture.
    What is the better model for white Americans? Putin’s Russianism or Ron Rosenbaum’s I-hate-white-turkey-meat-and-white-bread-cuz-white-people-suck?

    Read More
  43. @Anonymous
    (((Jennifer Rubin)))'s reaction: https://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/right-turn/wp/2016/12/07/tillerson-might-be-the-worst-one-on-trumps-list/

    If Jennifer Rubin thinks Tillerson is the worst, he must be the best.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    If Jennifer Rubin thinks Tillerson is the worst, he must be the best.
     
    I'll wait till I've heard from Ms. Nudelman.
  44. @Dave Pinsen
    Pretty sure Tillerson would have avoided getting us sucked into Libya or Iraq.

    Trump can set the agenda on refugees.

    God willing DJT will set a VERY restrictive refugee policy going fwd, but it is his Sec of State who must enforce it, implement it (& the bureaucracy will stall this for sure….)

    It is encouraging that Tillerson has non-interventionist instincts, but he is ominously vague about his position on border security, refugee policy, foreign aid, and how liberally the military should be used as a glorified daycare service. For example, with refugee repatriation, it simply shouldn’t matter whether a “state” like Somlia will accept back its terrorists or similar. We should fly in there, push them out of the place onto the runway with a day’s provisions. Wish them well, then say Buh Bye. End of story.

    With Bolton as Tillerson’s #2, it will come down to how much Neocon lobbying can be resisted until Tillerson caves. If Tillerson is milquetoast, will o the wisp in the strength of his beliefs, the policy thrust will revert to Neocon status quo after 6 months.

    Read More
  45. @whorefinder
    Agreed; the CIA and FBI have shown signs just this year of being openly hostile to Trump---the CIA in the last few days implicating Russia, and the FBI/Comey in covering up Hillary's crimes. A coup attempt by those agencies acting jointly is not out of the question, especially since Holder's ATFE also is likely to be on their side (the ATFE ran guns for Holder, in the infamous Fast and Furious scandal).

    Unfortunately, the armed forces throughout history has not been a strong bulkwark against coups. Military men usually fall into line after a changing of the guard; whether that's from the personalities of soldiers (duty to the leader, whoever he is) or just the self-preservation tactics of military leaders, that's for others to figure out.

    The Roman army did nothing to stop the various palace coups that went on during the empire, merely switching allegiances to whoever was in power. Sometimes they'd run their own coups as well, but they'd never stop a coup.

    And then the Soviets and Nazis and Spanish had their secret police keep the armies from revolting during their coups and purges.

    In short, don't trust our armies to protect us from our secret police; it just never pans out that way, sadly.

    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to ‘the world’ for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.

    The Romans had none of this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Our Constitution is so poorly written that it can be interpreted to mean anything.
    , @whorefinder

    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to ‘the world’ for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.
     
    You're dreaming if you think an oath will keep them from rolling over. Other nations had oaths to the Republic, the people, etc. and it never prevented multiple coups and the army simply following orders.

    Personalities and armies haven't changed.
    , @RW
    Actually, Rome fell after it started giving away citizenship like candy. People no longer felt pride at being Roman. There was likely a coup or two around a time of radical change like that.
  46. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian.

    And just how do we know this?

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    The CIA seems to think so. Remember 'Fancy Bear' and 'Cozy Bear'? And Wikileaks seemed to be mostly be hurting the Democrats.

    I don't think we should have voted for Hillary and let millions of new immigrants in--politics is the lesser of two evils. But we should be aware of Trump's weak points. The Democrats will certainly be.
  47. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    In what way do our interests run counter to Russia’s? Before the Cold War they were our traditional ally, and they’re smaller now than they were then.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Busby
    Not really. Czarist Russia was never an ally. Although they sold us Alaska. We invaded Russia in 1918 at the behest of Britain and Japan. FDR did not recognize the USSR until 1935.
    Arguably our alliance with them lasted from December of 1941 through September of 1945. Certainly no later than the Berlin Airilft.
  48. Actually the fear of the czars is not entirely
    irrational. Let’s not forget that the “Russian”
    czars have been heavily German. The Romanov
    dynasty rulers (1613-1761) intermarried with the
    German aristocracy, and the Holstein-Gottorp-
    Romanov dynasty (1761-1917) was directly German,
    e.g., Catherine the Great, who is still highly admired,
    was German by birth.

    As we know, the Jews were expelled from England,
    France, Italy, Spain, often repeatedly. But in Germany
    (i.e., the German states within the Holy Roman
    Empire) they were not just expelled but slaughtered.
    Many historians regard the Rhineland massacres of the
    Jews in 1096 as the first manifestation of German
    antisemitism that ultimately culminated in the Holocaust.

    So how did the Jews end up in Russia? After they were mostly
    expelled from Western Europe, they went east to the Polish-
    Lithuanian Commonwealth which comprised not just eastern
    Poland but also Lithuania, what is today known as Belarus,
    and western Ukraine (Putin keeps referring to Lvov as a Polish
    city). The Commonwealth (or Republic) prized itself on
    religious liberty – when you examine the history of Poland
    you note that even though the Polish are culturally Christian,
    theologically they tend to be somewhat Unitarian and hence
    Poland never engaged in religious wars that plagued Western
    Europe.

    Then in 1772 Catherine the Great, the German ruler in charge
    of Russia, annexed some of the eastern parts of the Commonwealth
    and with them the Jewish population that lived there. However,
    even then the Jews were confined to the Pale of Settlement (mostly
    Poland, etc) and not allowed to live in Moscow or St. Petersburg.
    This only gradually changed throughout the 19th century. Until
    1772 the Jews were prohibited from settling in Russia

    Read More
    • Replies: @Laugh Track
    Nice text carving!
    , @Thirdeye

    Many historians regard the Rhineland massacres of the Jews in 1096 as the first manifestation of German antisemitism that ultimately culminated in the Holocaust.
     
    That wouldn't have anything to do with the rampage of the Vatican started under Pope Urban II the previous year, would it? Naaaah.....

    ......when you examine the history of Poland you note that even though the Polish are culturally Christian, theologically they tend to be somewhat Unitarian and hence Poland never engaged in religious wars that plagued Western Europe.
     
    They are the most Catholic of Catholic nations and they did wage religious wars, just against Orthodox Christians instead of against Protestants like the Catholics of western Europe. The religious tolerance within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth didn't last long.

    Frankly, your whole thesis about Russian antisemitism being due to Germanic influences is garbage. It's a homegrown product going back to the church-state combine established under Peter the Great and the ethno-religious nationalist ideology espoused by the Czars right up to 1917. It was embraced by misty-eyed Russian romantics. Dostoevsky wrote of a desire to exterminate Jews. The Protocols of the Elders of Zion hoax has been traced to the Russian Ukraine. The Aufbau Vereinigung, centered on exiled Czarists, introduced apocalyptic Russian-style antisemitism and the PEZ hoax to Germany.

    (Putin keeps referring to Lvov as a Polish city)
     
    That's the most informative and interesting part of your whole post. Is Vlad just trolling the Ukrainians or making a serious signal to Poland?
  49. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Tillerson is a huge globalist! Loves common core for everybody else’s children. Rejects American energy independence as a policy goal. Yuck.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/10/carbon-tax-climate-trade-education-policy-concerns-arise-with-trumps-

    likely-secretary-of-state-selection-tillerson/

    His statements in this article are disturbing but also a few years old.

    Reading Breitbart headline tonight on Puzder changing his tune on immigration: apparently all of these Jeb Bush approved cabinet picks are going to dance to Trump’s tune — even though they are emotionally alienated from Trump’s politics, positions, platform.

    Does anyone really believe this will happen? It looks like a cabinet perfectly staged for a cuckservative like Mike Pence to run once Trump is out of the picture.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Trump isn't nominating him to be Secretary of Energy or Education.
    , @ben tillman

    Tillerson is a huge globalist! Loves common core for everybody else’s children. Rejects American energy independence as a policy goal.
     
    Fossil fuels are vastly underpriced. The smart decision is to import fossil fuels and save one's own for the time when the price catches up to the value.
  50. @Anon
    You think its a coincidence that Trump has surrounded himself with former generals? It's like bodyarmor for him. The former usurper elite have been usurped themselves, and unlike those whom they previously displaced(who ceded with grace), this elite is anything but graceful.

    They will try to stage a coup if they can. Problem for them is that in any coup, the armed forces hold the key. Trump is beloved among the army and he is now consolidating the brass around him. Yet, the Deep State hasn't given up hope.

    Boy Wonder Evan McMullin is the poster boy of coup planning. But who and what are lurking behind him?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Amasius
    The Mormon Mafia.

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/28/politics/evan-mcmullin-mormon-mafia/index.html

    Webster Tarpley promoted the theory back in 2012 that Benghazi was an attempted coup of sorts by Mormons to get Romney in.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDAE-42Xeiw

    http://occupywallst.org/forum/what-is-the-mormon-mafia/

    I don't have any opinion as to whether it's true or how true it is. I mostly just like the idea of a "Mormon Mafia." It makes me laugh. Sounds cool too. Mormons ARE weird enough to be involved in something like this, so who knows.

  51. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    “in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain’t good for the USA, just like China.”

    For at least five decades, the US policy in Eurasia has been much like the British policy in continental Europe: hobble the strongest payer by supporting its nearest rival. In the Cold War, the USSR was strongest, so we backed China in spite of their avowed Communism and terrible human rights record (arguably worse than the contemporary USSR). Now China is strongest, so we suddenly have a common interest with Russia.

    So learn to stop worrying and love the bomb!

    Read More
  52. @Thomas
    I keep pointing out that the conspiracy theory about Russia "hacking" the election amounts to claiming that Russia made Hillary and the Democrats look crooked and incompetent... by leaking their own emails showing they're crooked and incompetent. How devious!

    Also, by the same token, Iran "manipulated" the 1980 election to elect Reagan by waiting to release the hostages until the day after the election. Not sure it exactly worked out well for them.

    Some people thought that the special timing of the hostage release was the work of GHW Bush.

    Read More
  53. @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

    I agree that global warming would be good for the US (and Russia and Canada) were it to happen, but like most liberal visions of the future, this is all empty promises. Most years there is no warming or just cooling. Yet according to Those Who Must Not Be Gainsaid, we were all supposed to be under water and boiled alive by now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    So far, I can not think of one concrete predictioin made by the anthropogenic global warming crowd that has come true. Can you? Usually when a scientific model is so unsuccessful at predicting observable phenomena, it is junked. That does not seem to be the case with manmade climate change.
  54. @Almost Missouri

    "in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain’t good for the USA, just like China."
     
    For at least five decades, the US policy in Eurasia has been much like the British policy in continental Europe: hobble the strongest payer by supporting its nearest rival. In the Cold War, the USSR was strongest, so we backed China in spite of their avowed Communism and terrible human rights record (arguably worse than the contemporary USSR). Now China is strongest, so we suddenly have a common interest with Russia.

    So learn to stop worrying and love the bomb!

    “payer” should be “player”.

    Read More
  55. OT, but for all the complaints about Trump’s choice for Secretary of Labor, his statement seems perfectly in tune with Trump’s message:

    And for all the complaints about the “incoherence” of Trump’s policies and views, they seem, in fact, to be far more consistent than any set of issues put forward by standard politicians, pundits, or intellectuals. It’s remarkable how much policy falls directly out of the single imperative that the reigning purpose of American government must be to serve the interests of the American people.

    Read More
    • Agree: Antonymous
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    But as a restaurant chain conglomerate CEO is he at risk of transforming illegal food-pickers and restaurant staff into Americans that fall under the America First purview (since if he doesn't increase the minimum wage there won't be such a dire need for illegals to remain illegal)? Those are his interests, and that's his history. Trump hasn't mentioned him in speeches.
    , @Desiderius

    It’s remarkable how much policy falls directly out of the single imperative that the reigning purpose of American government must be to serve the interests of the American people.
     
    Yup.

    We've forgotten what it's like to have a President of the United States of America, rather than a half-assed Emperor of the Free World.
    , @anon
    Just curious if anyone knows it either Trump or this guy Puzder actually used e-verify in their extensive business history.

    And I mean without the bs 'outsourcing' to 'contractors' who then ignore e-verify.

    I've noticed a reluctance of everyone to dig into who is/was using it and who avoided it.

    I no longer care what Trump did or didn't do -- he won. But I am also baffled regarding why it has been so unsuccessful.
    , @snorlax
    It seems that many of us have misjudged Puzder; he's not an open-borders true believer, but instead, like many corporate execs, he just sings whatever tune those in power want him to.
  56. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

    Two words: “climate refugees”.

    Read More
  57. @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

    Whether or not you care about their fates, it means more of them will be heading to Europe and the United States.

    Read More
  58. Oddly, Israel gets along well with Putin and with Texas oilmen. Noble Energy of Houston found Israel’s off shore gas deposits.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    "Noble Energy of Houston found Israel’s off shore gas deposits."

    You mean, of course Palestine's off shore gas deposits.

  59. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @candid_observer
    OT, but for all the complaints about Trump's choice for Secretary of Labor, his statement seems perfectly in tune with Trump's message:

    https://twitter.com/LPDonovan/status/807777669979000833

    And for all the complaints about the "incoherence" of Trump's policies and views, they seem, in fact, to be far more consistent than any set of issues put forward by standard politicians, pundits, or intellectuals. It's remarkable how much policy falls directly out of the single imperative that the reigning purpose of American government must be to serve the interests of the American people.

    But as a restaurant chain conglomerate CEO is he at risk of transforming illegal food-pickers and restaurant staff into Americans that fall under the America First purview (since if he doesn’t increase the minimum wage there won’t be such a dire need for illegals to remain illegal)? Those are his interests, and that’s his history. Trump hasn’t mentioned him in speeches.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Who knows full well that inside of 5 years, half of his employees will be replaced by machines.
  60. @anon
    It makes sense in a bizarre sort of way. Hire the guy that got the best deal with the Russians among the major integrated oil companies.

    The left's ideas about oil tend to be universally idiotic. Once there is a global market, then it doesn't matter who is in power in a country. It never really did. But now, less than ever.

    Oil is huge in the USA, but its main political force is the local, tight oil business, which barely overlap with the major integrated oil companies. The US is the only country I know of where individual land owners own their property to the center of the earth. Individuals can and do own royalty interests. That's why we were able to invent fracking. http://www.naro-us.org

    This is very decentralized. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aubrey_McClendon

    Another reason Trump may have beat expectations in Pennsylvania. Lots of people make and made money in this business, in spite of Hollywood and environmentalist fantasy.

    And, for the clean/green crowd, natural gas is the cleanest burning hydrocarbon. And considered a bridge to the renewable future. http://www.nlaurell.com/natural-gas-overview-why-is-methane-a-clean-fuel/

    Naturally, radical environmentalists will argue the point endlessly, but normal people aren't ready to trade cars or bicycles yet. The rational narrative is to use methane as the transition fuel until we get to solar/wind and the next renewable.

    I don't know this for sure, but I think the domestic industry isn't particularly fond of Exxon.

    “The rational narrative is to use methane as the transition fuel until we get to solar/wind and the next renewable.”

    And just what is “the next renewable”? Zero-point energy? Orgone energy? Grrl Power?

    Read More
    • LOL: ben tillman
    • Replies: @CK
    3500 calories in a pound of human fat
    31,500 calories in a gallon of gasoline
    9# of obesity = 1 gallon of gasoline.
    140.43 billion gallons of gasoline per year used in the USA
    That is the equivalent of 1263.87 billion pounds of human fat
    72% of Americans are overweight, obese or grossly obese.
    325,100,000 Americans
    So the next renewable energy resource is?
  61. @Almost Missouri
    I agree that global warming would be good for the US (and Russia and Canada) were it to happen, but like most liberal visions of the future, this is all empty promises. Most years there is no warming or just cooling. Yet according to Those Who Must Not Be Gainsaid, we were all supposed to be under water and boiled alive by now.

    So far, I can not think of one concrete predictioin made by the anthropogenic global warming crowd that has come true. Can you? Usually when a scientific model is so unsuccessful at predicting observable phenomena, it is junked. That does not seem to be the case with manmade climate change.

    Read More
    • Replies: @5371
    How about rising global temperatures? I had to look long and hard to come up with that one.
  62. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @neutral
    I know that Turkey has been mentioned here as a conspiracy theory rich nation, but surely no nation can beat America. The left wingers have become as conspiracy theory prone as the people they kept on mocking for being conspiracy theorists. What the underlying cause of this is truly a mystery to me.

    This is a recent phenomenon. The left used to be outraged all the time, but not paranoid. The paranoia comes from losing their grip on power, and they’re going haywire. Leftists, like many immature people, have little emotional resilience in the face of setbacks. If they had more emotional resilience, they’d be conservatives.

    Conservatives think you shouldn’t depend on other people to get ahead in life, and that you should pull yourself up by your bootstraps, and this philosophy is based on the possession of psychological resilience. Conservatives also believe that what doesn’t kill you makes you stronger. In contrast, liberals act like the perpetual walking wounded, and their whole political philosophy is based on the outrage of being injured by something or other.

    Read More
  63. @candid_observer
    OT, but for all the complaints about Trump's choice for Secretary of Labor, his statement seems perfectly in tune with Trump's message:

    https://twitter.com/LPDonovan/status/807777669979000833

    And for all the complaints about the "incoherence" of Trump's policies and views, they seem, in fact, to be far more consistent than any set of issues put forward by standard politicians, pundits, or intellectuals. It's remarkable how much policy falls directly out of the single imperative that the reigning purpose of American government must be to serve the interests of the American people.

    It’s remarkable how much policy falls directly out of the single imperative that the reigning purpose of American government must be to serve the interests of the American people.

    Yup.

    We’ve forgotten what it’s like to have a President of the United States of America, rather than a half-assed Emperor of the Free World.

    Read More
  64. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump

    Where is the evidence for this? To my mind, the evidence points to Washington. And to Seth Rich for the DNC leaks. Comrade.

    http://www.infowars.com/former-british-ambassador-podesta-emails-leaked-by-washington-insider-not-russians/

    Read More
  65. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

    I’ve never really gotten this either. My current theory is that Russia is feared because they are a regional and even global power with a minor, but significant, strongly anti-Semitic demographic. This theory explains the fact that the most virulent Russophobes appear to be Zionist. Not a problem, of course, but interesting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Russia is relatively independent of the globalist regime.
  66. @res
    Use the View History link. From there you can click on the various prev links to show the diffs from the current page along with the full old page.

    The Putin pictures are new as you suspected (surprise).

    I found the edit history interesting. A change was made 12/7 regarding Trump's cabinet, but things were pretty quiet until late yesterday and today (12/10).

    One more interesting bit of trivia. If you look at the link of the current first picture the filename has his name in Russian: Рекс_Тиллерсон

    As of 11:18 p.m. U.S. East Coast time, there are only three photos: One head shot, two with Putin.

    There were *lots* of edits starting mainly around Dec. 3–a trickle–and then really taking off around the 10th. About 150 edits in that tranche. I don’t know how reliable the editing comments are; most say routine stuff like combining paragraphs, but there are several “possible BLP [biographies of living person] issue or vandalism.” I don’t see any special tag for photos but could be missing it.

    Read More
  67. Nothing exemplifies that conservatives are in over their heads in the culture wars better than that none of hem have asked where all this new nationalism has come from. Didn’t we just have half a century of finger-wagging and tut-tutting about the poisonous masculinity of the red scare?

    Didn’t the same people sing the praises of internationalism and cultural relaSQUIRREL!

    Read More
  68. I have no clue if global warming is real or not. But as Instapundit likes to say, I’ll start believing it’s a crisis when people like Gore, Dicaprio, etc start acting like it’s a crisis. And then there’s the question of what, if anything, we can reasonably do about it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NOTA
    There is a lot we can do to address global warming, as long as we start with the recognition that substantially lowering the standard of living anywhere is a non-starter, and we have to move gradually to avoid some kind of economy-wrecking shock.

    Build nuclear plants. Specifically, put federal money and regulatory muscle into replacing coal power plants with nuclear plants, since coal plants are an environmental nightmare all around.

    Build those high efficiency underground DC lines to move power from where the wind is blowing to where it isn't. Better power transmission will make everything work better, including making solar and wind a lot more practical.

    Impose a carbon tax, but start it out very low--the goal is to get the bugs worked out before we start having a big impact on the core of the economy. To keep the books balanced, make the carbon tax revenue neutral by lowering income tax rates or increasing the EITC to cover the extra revenue--or just refund the money taken in to taxpayers directly.

    Come up with some kind of way to help out the coal mining parts of the country, because we will eventually need to stop using coal for electricity. That's a way of life that needs to go away, and preserving it would be stupid, but we need to give the people mining coal and the people living in those communities some alternative so they don't get screwed too badly.

    Raise the gas tax a bit each year to encourage people to buy higher efficiency cars. Phase out the CAFE standards in favor of a gas tax, which creates the right incentives and doesn't allow for gaming the system.

    Stop dicking around with corn ethanol, because it's a boondoggle intended to buy votes, not any part of a sensible energy policy.

    And so on.
  69. I don’t have a problem with any of Trump’s particular cabinet picks.

    What is disappointing about them is that collectively there is no sign he is moving in a new direction on economic policy.

    Trump lost the popular vote by a solid 2 points, and his winning margin was less than 100,000 total in PA, MI, and WI.

    He did that by flipping areas that were solidly democrat for many decades, places that preferred Obama over Romney and McCain, and Kerry and Gore over Bush, by solid margins. He repudiated Bush, calling out Iraq as a disaster and dumping on plan that Bush and Ryan put together to privatize and cut Social Security (which led to large Democratic gains in 2006, but remains a favorite of the GOP establishment).

    It is really only Bannon who shows any sign of economic populism, but so far this does not look like his cabinet, it looks like Chris Christie’s. It features Wilbur Ross but not Kobach, not Heather MacDonald, not Tancredo.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    It is really only Bannon who shows any sign of economic populism, but so far this does not look like his cabinet, it looks like Chris Christie’s. It features Wilbur Ross but not Kobach, not Heather MacDonald, not Tancredo.

    I have a sense of disquiet about Trump's cabinet picks. I would love to be proven wrong, but personnel is policy. Jeff Sessions as AG is great. The rest? We'll see. 1 term or 2, the ball's in your court, Trump.
    , @candid_observer
    I have a hunch that people are judging Trump by the wrong metric.

    They think of Presidents of the recent past, and think of how much they simply delegate to their cabinet members, who have great independence in implementation of their duties.

    But all recent Presidents were fundamentally politicians before they became President, and came to the executive role with the sort of management style customary for politicians.

    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don't think there's going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    I suspect that the usual assertion, personnel is policy, is not going to be true under Trump in the usual sense -- Trump will see to it that his personnel does his policy.

    I might be wrong about this, of course, but this would be my guess as to what to expect going forward from Trump and his appointees: he and they won't follow the usual pattern of how the Executive Branch operates.

    , @Alden
    its true that Hildabeast won the popular vote. BUT out of 3, 141 counties in the entire country she won only 57 counties. What were those counties? Wayne county (Detroit and its dysfunctional black suburbs) Cook County Ill (Chicago and its black suburbs) Other than Los Angeles County and New York County, ( Manhattan) most of the counties Clinton won such as Bronx County New York, are hell holes of black criminals welfare receipients and violent crime.

    Los Angeles and New York counties have the highest income disparities and highest numbers of home less in the country along with Kings County (Seattle) WA.

    So a mere 57 counties out of 3, 141 is a much, much worse loss than 306 electoral votes to 232 electoral votes. If one looks at the counties she won, black and brown population, welfare poverty highest crime in the country, vast populations of illegals it shows that only the multi billlionaries of ManHattan, Seattle, Los Angles and Silicon Valley and their army of black and brown criminal welfare dreck wanted her

  70. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    WTF is it with John Bolton

    PNAC. Neocon.

    WASHINGTON (December 10, 2016)—President-elect Donald Trump reportedly will nominate John Bolton for assistant secretary of state—a move that would hurt U.S. leadership in the world and weaken Americans’ security, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

    Below is a statement by David Wright, senior scientist and co-director of the Global Security Program at UCS.

    “John Bolton’s past statements and government experience demonstrate that he lacks the judgment, diplomatic skills, and global view of important international issues that he would need to be an effective representative for the United States.

    I hope this is just the usual rumor BS.

    But:

    He will also be paired with former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton as his deputy secretary of state, one of the sources added, with Bolton handling day-to-day management of the department.

    The sources cautioned that nothing is final until the president-elect officially announces it, which could happen as early as next week.

    Don’t let this asshole anywhere near foreign policy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Other than Sessions, is there anyone a President Chris Christie would not have appointed?
    , @Mr. Anon
    "Below is a statement by David Wright, senior scientist and co-director of the Global Security Program at UCS.

    “John Bolton’s past statements and government experience demonstrate that he lacks the judgment, diplomatic skills, and global view of important international issues that he would need to be an effective representative for the United States. "

    Then again, if the Union of Concerned Scientists doesn't like him, maybe he's not all bad.
  71. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    “Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump,……”

    And how do we know this? I hear this claim being confidently asserted in the media, but I have not heard described any evidence for it.

    “I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course).”

    I don’t know about defending the white race, although my guess would be that Putin is at least a race realist. As to defending traditional values, he might be interested in that; he’s an older guy who came of age in a relatively buttoned down society, and he probably views western degeneracy as corrupting and undesirable. I agree with you that his primary aim is probably the maintenance of his regime, and that he is untrustworthy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    We don't know it. Not even the NYT front page article today comes out and reports it as news.
    , @SFG
    Well, he's untrustworthy from the American point of view. He seems to be quite ably increasing the influence of Russia, which is his job. It's Putin's job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It's our job as Americans to resist that. We can still ally with him where useful, and certainly starting fights over junk like gay marriage is a waste of time and potentially dangerous.
  72. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @candid_observer
    OT, but for all the complaints about Trump's choice for Secretary of Labor, his statement seems perfectly in tune with Trump's message:

    https://twitter.com/LPDonovan/status/807777669979000833

    And for all the complaints about the "incoherence" of Trump's policies and views, they seem, in fact, to be far more consistent than any set of issues put forward by standard politicians, pundits, or intellectuals. It's remarkable how much policy falls directly out of the single imperative that the reigning purpose of American government must be to serve the interests of the American people.

    Just curious if anyone knows it either Trump or this guy Puzder actually used e-verify in their extensive business history.

    And I mean without the bs ‘outsourcing’ to ‘contractors’ who then ignore e-verify.

    I’ve noticed a reluctance of everyone to dig into who is/was using it and who avoided it.

    I no longer care what Trump did or didn’t do — he won. But I am also baffled regarding why it has been so unsuccessful.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Risk-averse businesses are worried that, if they use E-Verify, they'll be investigated for civil rights violations by the Justice Department. IIRC the Obama administration has already done so.

    You often used to see E-Verify posters on the wall of the HR department under Bush II, but not under Obama.
    , @JSM
    Sundance at The Conservative Treehouse explicates the damned-if-you-do-damned-if-you-don't
    situation that employers face re: e-verify. https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2016/12/08/why-donald-trump-and-american-workers-need-andrew-puzder-as-secretary-of-labor/
  73. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Muse
    Here is an article with a CIA guy outlining a three step plan to harm Russia. Among the options is to provide heavier weapons to Ukraine and to begin having the US supply Europe with natural gas. This has been the policy of the globalist/neocons since Nuland et al around the time of the Winter Olympics. I guess the globalist just can't give up, even though the gas pipeline ain't going through Syria after the face plant we have taken there, so they persist in trying to create a war on Russia's border.

    There is an enormous fissure between dualing elites in this county. Dangerous times.

    http://money.cnn.com/2016/12/09/technology/trump-russia-hackers-cia/index.html

    Muse …. God. This sucks. This ‘fact based’ narrative consists of facts that are inherently unfalsifiable.

    The hacking bears the ‘hallmarks of Russian cyber activity’ including the use of ‘tools’ known to be commonly used by Russian hackers. Thank you non fake news people, quoting the trustworthy James Clapper.

    The only good news is that this is the same shit they have been pushing for months. Nothing new. We have already tried to mess up the Russian economy. There is nothing more we can do to impact oil prices. Other than raise them – possibly — by reducing US fracking. And arm Ukraine? That dog not only won’t hunt, he has died.

    Read More
  74. “unexamined emotions of fear and loathing more in Jewish-American pundits than”

    Honestly, Steve, you know very well that it’s the right wing, not (just?) Jewish American pundits, who have an atavistic reaction whenever Russia comes up. Remember the mocking of Obama’s “reset” with Russia? Or Obama’s hot-mike comments about having more flexibility after the election? Remember Obama mocking Romney for his obsession with Russia? McCain backing Georgia in its confrontation with Russia?

    Republicans would have gone ballistic if someone like Tillerson, with his ties to Russia, had been nominated by a Democrat. In fact, if Trump does nominate him, I seriously doubt that Senate Republicans will accept it without a fight.

    Read More
  75. @Lot
    I don't have a problem with any of Trump's particular cabinet picks.

    What is disappointing about them is that collectively there is no sign he is moving in a new direction on economic policy.

    Trump lost the popular vote by a solid 2 points, and his winning margin was less than 100,000 total in PA, MI, and WI.

    He did that by flipping areas that were solidly democrat for many decades, places that preferred Obama over Romney and McCain, and Kerry and Gore over Bush, by solid margins. He repudiated Bush, calling out Iraq as a disaster and dumping on plan that Bush and Ryan put together to privatize and cut Social Security (which led to large Democratic gains in 2006, but remains a favorite of the GOP establishment).

    It is really only Bannon who shows any sign of economic populism, but so far this does not look like his cabinet, it looks like Chris Christie's. It features Wilbur Ross but not Kobach, not Heather MacDonald, not Tancredo.

    It is really only Bannon who shows any sign of economic populism, but so far this does not look like his cabinet, it looks like Chris Christie’s. It features Wilbur Ross but not Kobach, not Heather MacDonald, not Tancredo.

    I have a sense of disquiet about Trump’s cabinet picks. I would love to be proven wrong, but personnel is policy. Jeff Sessions as AG is great. The rest? We’ll see. 1 term or 2, the ball’s in your court, Trump.

    Read More
  76. @anon
    WTF is it with John Bolton

    PNAC. Neocon.

    WASHINGTON (December 10, 2016)—President-elect Donald Trump reportedly will nominate John Bolton for assistant secretary of state—a move that would hurt U.S. leadership in the world and weaken Americans’ security, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

    Below is a statement by David Wright, senior scientist and co-director of the Global Security Program at UCS.

    “John Bolton’s past statements and government experience demonstrate that he lacks the judgment, diplomatic skills, and global view of important international issues that he would need to be an effective representative for the United States.

     

    I hope this is just the usual rumor BS.

    But:

    He will also be paired with former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton as his deputy secretary of state, one of the sources added, with Bolton handling day-to-day management of the department.

    The sources cautioned that nothing is final until the president-elect officially announces it, which could happen as early as next week.
     
    Don't let this asshole anywhere near foreign policy.

    Other than Sessions, is there anyone a President Chris Christie would not have appointed?

    Read More
    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Hoping for the best, maintaining pressure w/ emails, but also bracing for possible train wreck. Other than Sessions, we've been put in a "wait n see" bind, hoping there is some hidden magic to these appnts. If Kobach, Tancredo & Rohrabacher are frozen out of the cabinet, there is a real poss that Pence is calling way more of the shots than expected. Ryan, McCain, Graham & McConnell were the main worries b4. Now the worry is them + 90% of the cabinet.
    , @Opinionator
    Trump is probably extracting commitments from some of these appointees.
    , @CJ
    Scott Pruitt to head the EPA looks like a great appointment. I doubt Chris Christie is on board with that one.

    Pruitt to Dismantle EPA Climate Agenda

    Off to your safe space, greenies! And stay there.

    I admit disappointment with some of these picks, particularly the Goldman Sachs operatives. OTOH the posters who say Trump will fire anybody who's not getting it done are probably right.

  77. @DIscharged EE
    I, too, saw John Mearsheimer argue on CSPAN in 2007 when his book on the Lobby came out, that the oil companies do not lobby on foreign policy.

    The American oil companies were mostly anti-Israel in 1947, but I don’t know how vociferously.

    My vague impression is they were against the Iraq Attaq in 2003, but mostly kept their heads down.

    Read More
  78. @Anon
    You think its a coincidence that Trump has surrounded himself with former generals? It's like bodyarmor for him. The former usurper elite have been usurped themselves, and unlike those whom they previously displaced(who ceded with grace), this elite is anything but graceful.

    They will try to stage a coup if they can. Problem for them is that in any coup, the armed forces hold the key. Trump is beloved among the army and he is now consolidating the brass around him. Yet, the Deep State hasn't given up hope.

    I don’t think the American Deep State has the balls or ability to pull off a hard coup. They woke up waaaay too late to the Trump threat. All they can do now is bleat about how Putin threw the election.

    Of course, the recent Gulenist coup shows how big a risk they are willing to take if they feel their backs are up against the wall. Hell, it might be fun to watch them try.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Karl
    > Of course, the recent Gulenist coup shows how big a risk they [the American Deep State] are willing to take if they feel their backs are up against the wall.

    The American Deep State took a risk with Gulen? Risk of what, losing their halvah imports?
  79. @Lot
    Other than Sessions, is there anyone a President Chris Christie would not have appointed?

    Hoping for the best, maintaining pressure w/ emails, but also bracing for possible train wreck. Other than Sessions, we’ve been put in a “wait n see” bind, hoping there is some hidden magic to these appnts. If Kobach, Tancredo & Rohrabacher are frozen out of the cabinet, there is a real poss that Pence is calling way more of the shots than expected. Ryan, McCain, Graham & McConnell were the main worries b4. Now the worry is them + 90% of the cabinet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Do you find Puzder's statement today a little more reassuring?

    https://mobile.twitter.com/LPDonovan/status/807777669979000833?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

  80. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    Read More
  81. @Lot
    Other than Sessions, is there anyone a President Chris Christie would not have appointed?

    Trump is probably extracting commitments from some of these appointees.

    Read More
  82. @Mr. Anon
    "Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump,......"

    And how do we know this? I hear this claim being confidently asserted in the media, but I have not heard described any evidence for it.

    "I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course)."

    I don't know about defending the white race, although my guess would be that Putin is at least a race realist. As to defending traditional values, he might be interested in that; he's an older guy who came of age in a relatively buttoned down society, and he probably views western degeneracy as corrupting and undesirable. I agree with you that his primary aim is probably the maintenance of his regime, and that he is untrustworthy.

    We don’t know it. Not even the NYT front page article today comes out and reports it as news.

    Read More
  83. @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Hoping for the best, maintaining pressure w/ emails, but also bracing for possible train wreck. Other than Sessions, we've been put in a "wait n see" bind, hoping there is some hidden magic to these appnts. If Kobach, Tancredo & Rohrabacher are frozen out of the cabinet, there is a real poss that Pence is calling way more of the shots than expected. Ryan, McCain, Graham & McConnell were the main worries b4. Now the worry is them + 90% of the cabinet.

    Do you find Puzder’s statement today a little more reassuring?

    https://mobile.twitter.com/LPDonovan/status/807777669979000833?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    Read More
    • Replies: @CrunchybutRealistCon
    Encouraging press release, but it seems a little too good to be true. The guy just casually sets aside years of wage suppression advocacy in return for this position? Whether his conversion is real, or just mumbled resentfully will be known soon enough. Give him 4 months to reveal true colors.
  84. @Marat
    Boy Wonder Evan McMullin is the poster boy of coup planning. But who and what are lurking behind him?

    The Mormon Mafia.

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/28/politics/evan-mcmullin-mormon-mafia/index.html

    Webster Tarpley promoted the theory back in 2012 that Benghazi was an attempted coup of sorts by Mormons to get Romney in.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDAE-42Xeiw

    http://occupywallst.org/forum/what-is-the-mormon-mafia/

    I don’t have any opinion as to whether it’s true or how true it is. I mostly just like the idea of a “Mormon Mafia.” It makes me laugh. Sounds cool too. Mormons ARE weird enough to be involved in something like this, so who knows.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    "The Mormon Mafia" sounds like a funny reality show. With Romney as the Don and McMullin as the maverick son.
    , @Pericles
    “Mormon Mafia.”

    Go read some of James Ellroy's later books (the trilogy before Perfidia). As I recall, there was plenty of Mormon organized crime in those. I was nonplussed.

    , @Jack Hanson
    Mormon Mafia is a well known term in Fed LE agencies where Mormons seem to get away with all sorts of nonsense that would get others chewed up.
  85. @kihowi
    Nothing exemplifies that conservatives are in over their heads in the culture wars better than that none of hem have asked where all this new nationalism has come from. Didn't we just have half a century of finger-wagging and tut-tutting about the poisonous masculinity of the red scare?

    Didn't the same people sing the praises of internationalism and cultural relaSQUIRREL!

    Where in your view did the nationalism come from?

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
    In the lifetime of most adults alive today, the US has gone from an 85% white country to a 60% white country. In this same time period, we have grown from a country of 180 million (again, with a white super-majority) to a country of 320 million, with around 80,000 more people moving in each month.

    That's where the nationalism came from, even if as a sub-conscious vibe or in the case of, say, Richard Spencer or Peter Brimelow or me, a conscious motivator. The current conflict is territorial and existential, not ideological, even if nobody's prepared to acknowledge it yet.
  86. @Neil Templeton
    I've never really gotten this either. My current theory is that Russia is feared because they are a regional and even global power with a minor, but significant, strongly anti-Semitic demographic. This theory explains the fact that the most virulent Russophobes appear to be Zionist. Not a problem, of course, but interesting.

    Russia is relatively independent of the globalist regime.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Russia needs foreign engineering talent (from Exxon, for example) to develop its arctic oil resources. Western sanctions have blocked that.
  87. @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

    Please Please Please

    AGW is a hoax

    Only true believers in the cult of Liberalism – Marxism refuse to see what their lying eyes tell them.

    The same prophets who are so concerned about climate catastrophe caused by wealthy western lifestyle have no problem with Chinese factories spewing pollution into the atmosphere or turd worlders breeding at rates that will replicate the death phase of a bacterial culture.

    Read More
  88. @anon
    WTF is it with John Bolton

    PNAC. Neocon.

    WASHINGTON (December 10, 2016)—President-elect Donald Trump reportedly will nominate John Bolton for assistant secretary of state—a move that would hurt U.S. leadership in the world and weaken Americans’ security, according to the Union of Concerned Scientists (UCS).

    Below is a statement by David Wright, senior scientist and co-director of the Global Security Program at UCS.

    “John Bolton’s past statements and government experience demonstrate that he lacks the judgment, diplomatic skills, and global view of important international issues that he would need to be an effective representative for the United States.

     

    I hope this is just the usual rumor BS.

    But:

    He will also be paired with former U.N. Ambassador John Bolton as his deputy secretary of state, one of the sources added, with Bolton handling day-to-day management of the department.

    The sources cautioned that nothing is final until the president-elect officially announces it, which could happen as early as next week.
     
    Don't let this asshole anywhere near foreign policy.

    “Below is a statement by David Wright, senior scientist and co-director of the Global Security Program at UCS.

    “John Bolton’s past statements and government experience demonstrate that he lacks the judgment, diplomatic skills, and global view of important international issues that he would need to be an effective representative for the United States. ”

    Then again, if the Union of Concerned Scientists doesn’t like him, maybe he’s not all bad.

    Read More
  89. Don’t know anything about Tillerson. My default position is to automatically distrust anyone who has reached the heights of big business.

    I do feel that civilization dodged two major bullets if the magic underwear man and the cross dresser are truly out of contention for Sec’y of State
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MBKu9OJ8Ltk

    Regarding D Frum’s twitter rant above: truly unhinged, hard to imagine this guy in his former roles. First as the great (neo-) conservative speechwriter elucidating Jorge Arbusto’s brilliant foreign policy and then as a budding Chas Krauthammer- clone telling cuckservative rubes what to think.

    Read More
  90. I have to wonder if part of what makes American Jews so bats over the idea of Russia playing power games and manipulating US politics is that that’s supposed to be their turf (concerning Israel, most specifically, but not exclusively). And, at the same time, they’re forced into denial or convoluted apologetics over this fact. Plus, they project onto Russia what they do. From what I’ve seen, they’re really the ones who are the most irrationally frazzled over the latest CIA-Russia-Trump story.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, there's a lot of projection by American Jews of concerns over Israel's behavior, such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea. Israel, of course, is full of Russians, such as Israel's foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.

    I predicted back in 2014 that as conservative Jews turn toward Russia, liberal Jews would turn back toward Germany. You are starting to see that with the Merkel worship in the papers.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    American Jews (...) playing power games and manipulating US politics (…) that’s supposed to be their turf (…) they project (…) what they do
     
    Paralled by their ‘mainstream media’ raging apoplectic about “fake news”— Hey, that’s our thing! You can’t do that!

    Some observers are realizing that yelling about fake news has already backfired:

    Spying an opportunity, right-wingers stopped ignoring the fake news discussion and began to co-opt the phrase as a synonym for liberal bias. A Twitter search for the term “fake news” on Tuesday suggested that it has by now crossed over from a liberal rallying cry to a conservative one.
     
  91. @whorefinder
    Orwell wrote Animal Farm not merely about the Stalin and Hitler, but about Franco and the Spanish Civil War. Orwell served during the Spanish Civil War and saw first (and later second) hand how Franco's police state rose.

    If the pigs were Franco wouldn’t they support the humans? I can’t see how his rise to power can be seen in Animal Farm. The corruption of power Orwell had the closest experience with was of the communists he fought alongside of.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Police states are police states are police states. Orwell got massively disillusioned from the Spanish Civil War as he recognized that both sides were keen to set up a repressive dictatorship. The methods are the same for all: the secret police runs the country, the army obeys the commands.
  92. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course).

    Yeah. Near as I can tell, Putin’s politics are essentially a Russian version of civic nationalism.

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  93. @Thomas
    I have to wonder if part of what makes American Jews so bats over the idea of Russia playing power games and manipulating US politics is that that's supposed to be their turf (concerning Israel, most specifically, but not exclusively). And, at the same time, they're forced into denial or convoluted apologetics over this fact. Plus, they project onto Russia what they do. From what I've seen, they're really the ones who are the most irrationally frazzled over the latest CIA-Russia-Trump story.

    Yeah, there’s a lot of projection by American Jews of concerns over Israel’s behavior, such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea. Israel, of course, is full of Russians, such as Israel’s foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.

    I predicted back in 2014 that as conservative Jews turn toward Russia, liberal Jews would turn back toward Germany. You are starting to see that with the Merkel worship in the papers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot

    such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea
     
    I believe both actions were well justified by law and morality.

    Israel’s foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman
     
    He was promoted in June to Defense Minister. Here is his attractive Ukraine-born replacement in the Knesset.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yulia_Malinovsky#/media/File:Yulia_Malinovsky.jpg

    many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.
     
    They seem to get along well

    After the 2011 Duma election, in which Russian President Vladimir Putin's party United Russia won, Lieberman was the first international politician to describe them as "absolutely fair, free and democratic". Putin has described Lieberman's own political career as "brilliant".
     
    , @Romanian
    Interestingly enough, Avigdor Lieberman was born in Chișinău (Kishinev to Russian speakers), which is the capital for the Republic of Moldova. Chișinău was full of Jews. I don't know how that affected his identity, but his love of Russian literature might indicate that he did identify culturally more with the Russians than with the majority population of the Soviet Republic he was born in.
    , @Thomas
    Of course, the cognitive dissonance and psychological projection hurts mainstream "journalists" too, which is why they're so rabid against Trump. They know, on some level, that they're now nothing more than PR hacks for the Democrat Party using the title "journalist," and that exposing the secrets and skullduggery of the powerful used to be their job back, for example, in the days of Watergate. It must hurt to now see others doing that job, with them being left as palace guardians to try to stop that.
  94. @Lot
    I don't have a problem with any of Trump's particular cabinet picks.

    What is disappointing about them is that collectively there is no sign he is moving in a new direction on economic policy.

    Trump lost the popular vote by a solid 2 points, and his winning margin was less than 100,000 total in PA, MI, and WI.

    He did that by flipping areas that were solidly democrat for many decades, places that preferred Obama over Romney and McCain, and Kerry and Gore over Bush, by solid margins. He repudiated Bush, calling out Iraq as a disaster and dumping on plan that Bush and Ryan put together to privatize and cut Social Security (which led to large Democratic gains in 2006, but remains a favorite of the GOP establishment).

    It is really only Bannon who shows any sign of economic populism, but so far this does not look like his cabinet, it looks like Chris Christie's. It features Wilbur Ross but not Kobach, not Heather MacDonald, not Tancredo.

    I have a hunch that people are judging Trump by the wrong metric.

    They think of Presidents of the recent past, and think of how much they simply delegate to their cabinet members, who have great independence in implementation of their duties.

    But all recent Presidents were fundamentally politicians before they became President, and came to the executive role with the sort of management style customary for politicians.

    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don’t think there’s going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    I suspect that the usual assertion, personnel is policy, is not going to be true under Trump in the usual sense — Trump will see to it that his personnel does his policy.

    I might be wrong about this, of course, but this would be my guess as to what to expect going forward from Trump and his appointees: he and they won’t follow the usual pattern of how the Executive Branch operates.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jack Hanson, 27 year old
    • Replies: @candid_observer
    In a way it is telling that Trump has chosen so many with military backgrounds. They get the idea of getting orders and following them. My guess is that that is what he is demanding of his appointees. Probably many of those he's interviewed and rejected haven't impressed him with their commitment to doing so.
    , @Anonym
    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don’t think there’s going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    And this is the only thing that prevents me from outright condemning his cabinet choices. Trump's got a good track record of changing out campaign managers whenever they no longer serve his purpose. My hope is that as soon as one of these cabinet members starts thinking he's in charge of policy, he gets swapped out like Manafort or Lewandowski.

    Coulter and Kaus are not so sanguine.

  95. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to 'the world' for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.

    The Romans had none of this.

    Our Constitution is so poorly written that it can be interpreted to mean anything.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jill
    Congress let that happen:

    "...jurisdiction-stripping (also called court-stripping or curtailment-of-jurisdiction), refers to Congress' constitutionally-granted authority to determine the jurisdiction of federal and state courts."


    "Congress may effectively eliminate any judicial review of certain federal legislative or executive actions and of certain state actions, or alternatively transfer the judicial review responsibility to state courts by "knocking [federal courts]...out of the game."

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jurisdiction_stripping
  96. @Anonymous
    Tillerson is a huge globalist! Loves common core for everybody else's children. Rejects American energy independence as a policy goal. Yuck.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/10/carbon-tax-climate-trade-education-policy-concerns-arise-with-trumps-
    likely-secretary-of-state-selection-tillerson/

    His statements in this article are disturbing but also a few years old.

    Reading Breitbart headline tonight on Puzder changing his tune on immigration: apparently all of these Jeb Bush approved cabinet picks are going to dance to Trump's tune -- even though they are emotionally alienated from Trump's politics, positions, platform.

    Does anyone really believe this will happen? It looks like a cabinet perfectly staged for a cuckservative like Mike Pence to run once Trump is out of the picture.

    Trump isn’t nominating him to be Secretary of Energy or Education.

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  97. @candid_observer
    I have a hunch that people are judging Trump by the wrong metric.

    They think of Presidents of the recent past, and think of how much they simply delegate to their cabinet members, who have great independence in implementation of their duties.

    But all recent Presidents were fundamentally politicians before they became President, and came to the executive role with the sort of management style customary for politicians.

    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don't think there's going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    I suspect that the usual assertion, personnel is policy, is not going to be true under Trump in the usual sense -- Trump will see to it that his personnel does his policy.

    I might be wrong about this, of course, but this would be my guess as to what to expect going forward from Trump and his appointees: he and they won't follow the usual pattern of how the Executive Branch operates.

    In a way it is telling that Trump has chosen so many with military backgrounds. They get the idea of getting orders and following them. My guess is that that is what he is demanding of his appointees. Probably many of those he’s interviewed and rejected haven’t impressed him with their commitment to doing so.

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  98. Jewish pundits also tend to loathe the WASP foreign policy “realists.” These are the guys who have the crazy idea that the Palestinians/Arabs have legitimate grievances, and that it’s ok to say no to Israel. James Baker III, George H.W. Bush’s Secretary of State, is a good example.

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  99. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

    My view aligns with Randal’s…and I was raised with deep antipathy to Russia and Communism.

    Certain kinds of power blocs need an enemy to define themselves in contradistinction to. They need this enemy as they create tests of oppositional faith and practice. They need it as the resistance factor, the deadweight, in their muscle-flexing regimens. They count on propaganda about this enemy as a unifying force in their political goals or ideological beliefs.

    See the old Outer Limits episode, “The Architects of Fear.”

    For most of my life the US liberal establishment succeeded in defining our own nation’s whites, and particularly white men, as that enemy. Then institutionalizing that.

    They just got the first hefty, organized, politically significant, power-shifting pushback in my lifetime.

    They need a new enemy, or more accurately a reboot (ha!) of the old one. What better choice than a highly white male society with an epically classically white male leader?

    With Russia/Putin as the enemy they can rebuke the American renaissance while projecting a fashionably retro reactionary 1950s stance: hating on Communism, albeit 60 years late to the game. This further serves to let them project denial of how Bolshie they are.

    As Michel Foucault like to say, paraphrasing Nietzsche, the left never realized just how true it is that one becomes what one fervently opposes.

    And there are likely enough useful idiots that they will get SOME traction out of this in rejecting the results of an election they don’t like (i.e. that threatens to break up their power with democratic exercise of republican Constitutional process)…while claiming they are the real democrats.

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  100. If oil execs were as Jewish as Wall St. execs, I bet a lot of liberal pundits would defend the oil industry.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    One of Exxon's main public faces for years was Ken Cohen, who started working at Exxon after law school and ended up running its public relations. He got plenty of crap from the press and lefty activists.
  101. @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

    In what way is Iran an “actual enemy”

    How are they a threat to the American people?

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    In what way is Iran an “actual enemy”

    How are they a threat to the American people?
     
    They want to run their own country. Isn't that enough?
  102. @Cwhatfuture
    Oddly, Israel gets along well with Putin and with Texas oilmen. Noble Energy of Houston found Israel's off shore gas deposits.

    “Noble Energy of Houston found Israel’s off shore gas deposits.”

    You mean, of course Palestine’s off shore gas deposits.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Cwhatfuture
    Don't tell me what I mean, clown. I mean the State of Israel, not Fakestine or Ruritania or Fredonia any other fantasy land. I mean the State of Israel which soon will achieve energy independence thanks to Noble Energy and that Israeli offshore gas. And they are building a pipeline to Europe for that Israeli gas. People seem to have forgotten all about Fakestine.
  103. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, there's a lot of projection by American Jews of concerns over Israel's behavior, such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea. Israel, of course, is full of Russians, such as Israel's foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.

    I predicted back in 2014 that as conservative Jews turn toward Russia, liberal Jews would turn back toward Germany. You are starting to see that with the Merkel worship in the papers.

    such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea

    I believe both actions were well justified by law and morality.

    Israel’s foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman

    He was promoted in June to Defense Minister. Here is his attractive Ukraine-born replacement in the Knesset.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yulia_Malinovsky#/media/File:Yulia_Malinovsky.jpg

    many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.

    They seem to get along well

    After the 2011 Duma election, in which Russian President Vladimir Putin’s party United Russia won, Lieberman was the first international politician to describe them as “absolutely fair, free and democratic”. Putin has described Lieberman’s own political career as “brilliant”.

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  104. @ATBOTL
    If oil execs were as Jewish as Wall St. execs, I bet a lot of liberal pundits would defend the oil industry.

    One of Exxon’s main public faces for years was Ken Cohen, who started working at Exxon after law school and ended up running its public relations. He got plenty of crap from the press and lefty activists.

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  105. @Opinionator
    Russia is relatively independent of the globalist regime.

    Russia needs foreign engineering talent (from Exxon, for example) to develop its arctic oil resources. Western sanctions have blocked that.

    Read More
  106. @Anon
    You think its a coincidence that Trump has surrounded himself with former generals? It's like bodyarmor for him. The former usurper elite have been usurped themselves, and unlike those whom they previously displaced(who ceded with grace), this elite is anything but graceful.

    They will try to stage a coup if they can. Problem for them is that in any coup, the armed forces hold the key. Trump is beloved among the army and he is now consolidating the brass around him. Yet, the Deep State hasn't given up hope.

    Remember when I told you guys that women love Trump and I was so right and everyone was so wrong?

    Anyhow, Marines love Trump, like women do, and the other armed forces follow the sensibility of the Corps when it comes to manhood and hence political issues.

    Done deal with those guys, and Mattis/Dunford/Kelly are an iron lock, two of them being officially Deplorables, Dunford kind of skated through somehow but he is an ok guy, if a little more oily political than Mattis/Kelly

    Anyhow, anyone who loves Marines and whom Marines love is totally a winner because USMC always wins, always. And women love Marines, or ex Marines at least.

    Trump knows what he is doing, which star to hitch to, USMC is one of the best brands out there, name a better one if you’ve got it.

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    • Replies: @SFG
    Trump did worse with women than men, though not as much as the lefties had hoped.

    USMC--oh yes.
  107. @Lot
    Other than Sessions, is there anyone a President Chris Christie would not have appointed?

    Scott Pruitt to head the EPA looks like a great appointment. I doubt Chris Christie is on board with that one.

    Pruitt to Dismantle EPA Climate Agenda

    Off to your safe space, greenies! And stay there.

    I admit disappointment with some of these picks, particularly the Goldman Sachs operatives. OTOH the posters who say Trump will fire anybody who’s not getting it done are probably right.

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  108. @Thomas
    I have to wonder if part of what makes American Jews so bats over the idea of Russia playing power games and manipulating US politics is that that's supposed to be their turf (concerning Israel, most specifically, but not exclusively). And, at the same time, they're forced into denial or convoluted apologetics over this fact. Plus, they project onto Russia what they do. From what I've seen, they're really the ones who are the most irrationally frazzled over the latest CIA-Russia-Trump story.

    American Jews (…) playing power games and manipulating US politics (…) that’s supposed to be their turf (…) they project (…) what they do

    Paralled by their ‘mainstream media’ raging apoplectic about “fake news”— Hey, that’s our thing! You can’t do that!

    Some observers are realizing that yelling about fake news has already backfired:

    Spying an opportunity, right-wingers stopped ignoring the fake news discussion and began to co-opt the phrase as a synonym for liberal bias. A Twitter search for the term “fake news” on Tuesday suggested that it has by now crossed over from a liberal rallying cry to a conservative one.

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  109. @Anonymous

    Steve is doing some amazing work these days (and that’s been the case since I started reading him four or five years ago). I hope many of us can find the time and money in the next few weeks (better before or after 2016, I dunno?) to give recognition and support.
     
    In this coup scenario, I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on. I hope Sailer changes up his location and is not a sitting duck. He needs to grab his laptop and head over and work on his blog while sitting in the food court of his local mall (the one in Fast Times at Ridgemont High or the one from Jackie Brown?). He and Unz need to develop some secret code for their communications. I'm sure Unz could probably develop something in 48 hours that Alan Turing couldn't break. Steve's kind of care-free life could quickly become like Joe Turner in Three Days of the Condor.

    "What do you do and why does the CIA want you dead?"
    "I don't know, I write blog pieces on sabermatics and PISA scores. That aside, is it safe?"

    > I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on

    I heard that Ivanka introduced him to Rabbi Lookstein.

    hey iSteve, there’s a lot of Anglos in Ramat Beit Shemesh. And it’s an well-guarded place.

    i’ll get your wife a deal on a kitchen. The Finish moshav (Yad ha-Shomneh) isn’t too far away, so fresh pork is right at hand.

    If you prefer sun & fun at the beach, the French Jews are turning Netanya into one big outdoor cafe. Strong coffee, fresh baguettes, and gossip up the ying-yang about how stuck up English-speaking Jews are.

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  110. @candid_observer
    I have a hunch that people are judging Trump by the wrong metric.

    They think of Presidents of the recent past, and think of how much they simply delegate to their cabinet members, who have great independence in implementation of their duties.

    But all recent Presidents were fundamentally politicians before they became President, and came to the executive role with the sort of management style customary for politicians.

    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don't think there's going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    I suspect that the usual assertion, personnel is policy, is not going to be true under Trump in the usual sense -- Trump will see to it that his personnel does his policy.

    I might be wrong about this, of course, but this would be my guess as to what to expect going forward from Trump and his appointees: he and they won't follow the usual pattern of how the Executive Branch operates.

    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don’t think there’s going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    And this is the only thing that prevents me from outright condemning his cabinet choices. Trump’s got a good track record of changing out campaign managers whenever they no longer serve his purpose. My hope is that as soon as one of these cabinet members starts thinking he’s in charge of policy, he gets swapped out like Manafort or Lewandowski.

    Coulter and Kaus are not so sanguine.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Coulter and Kaus have been predicting doom since the Pence pick and haven't let up. Its as tiresome as the doom masturbation here.
    , @Anonymous
    Supposedly it was Trump's kids that forced him to get rid of Lewandowski because he didn't have a good idea of what to do about Khan. And Manafort took himself out when his Russian connections were becoming a distraction.
  111. “…unexamined emotions of fear and loathing more in Jewish-American pundits than:

    A) Texas oilmen

    B) Czars”

    C) Eagles of Death Metal

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  112. @George
    "atavistic, unexamined emotions of fear and loathing more in Jewish-American pundits than: A) Texas oilmen"

    I don't get the reference. What did Texas oilmen ever do to Jews?

    “I don’t get the reference. What did Texas oilmen ever do to Jews?”

    JR blames the Jews for him being shot in 1980, so the relationship between Texas oilmen and Jews have been rocky since than.

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  113. @Amasius
    The Mormon Mafia.

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/28/politics/evan-mcmullin-mormon-mafia/index.html

    Webster Tarpley promoted the theory back in 2012 that Benghazi was an attempted coup of sorts by Mormons to get Romney in.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDAE-42Xeiw

    http://occupywallst.org/forum/what-is-the-mormon-mafia/

    I don't have any opinion as to whether it's true or how true it is. I mostly just like the idea of a "Mormon Mafia." It makes me laugh. Sounds cool too. Mormons ARE weird enough to be involved in something like this, so who knows.

    “The Mormon Mafia” sounds like a funny reality show. With Romney as the Don and McMullin as the maverick son.

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  114. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    “I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race”

    Since when did Vladimir Putin ever claim to be White first and Russian second?

    Vladimir Putin does not give a damn if a WASP in Detroit for example is mugged at gunpoint by a Black or if a WASP in Detroit is racemixing with a Black.

    Vladimir Putin’s tribalism mentality does not extend beyond the Russian people. Vladimir Putin does not see Anglo Saxon Protestants as his people. Vladimir Putin is a Russian nationalist, not a White nationalist.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Vladimir Putin does not see Anglo Saxon Protestants as his people. Vladimir Putin is a Russian nationalist, not a White nationalist.

    Do WASPs generally see any other European or European derived people as their folks either? Do WASPs even see other Anglo-Saxon Protestants as their own people, apart from their own family and immediate social circle? My lifetime of experience so far tells me "no" on both counts.

    , @Opinionator
    But he cares about the fate of other Whites.
  115. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

    They’re white – as our countries used to be. They’re Christian – as our countries used to be. And they don’t believe in deliberately dividing their population by race, sex (sorry, ‘gender’), sexuality in order that a relatively small and cohesive elite can farm them for fun and profit.

    I imagine the Putin administration might even be concerned about increasing national unity, not decreasing it – which makes them just like most countries throughout history, but not like the West over the last 50 years.

    The only other white, Christian countries with such ideas of national unity are the recent EU entrants, formerly Warsaw Pact countries like Poland and Hungary. But Western elites don’t see them as much of a threat – calculating, probably correctly, that a combination of EU gimmedats and the threat of the Big Bad Bear will ensure their compliance and eventual absorption into post-Christian, multi-ethnic Europe. After all, Greece knuckled under when faced with leaving the Euro. The southern European economies have been devastated since 2008, massive youth unemployment, GDP falls – yet they “held on tight to Nurse, for fear of finding something Worse”.

    This happy (for our elites) scenario is threatened by things like Brexit, ‘populism’ and the Italy vote, which is why they’ll fight dirty, and why it’s so important to nourish the ‘populists’.

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  116. @Lugash
    I don't think the American Deep State has the balls or ability to pull off a hard coup. They woke up waaaay too late to the Trump threat. All they can do now is bleat about how Putin threw the election.

    Of course, the recent Gulenist coup shows how big a risk they are willing to take if they feel their backs are up against the wall. Hell, it might be fun to watch them try.

    > Of course, the recent Gulenist coup shows how big a risk they [the American Deep State] are willing to take if they feel their backs are up against the wall.

    The American Deep State took a risk with Gulen? Risk of what, losing their halvah imports?

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  117. @whorefinder
    Orwell wrote Animal Farm not merely about the Stalin and Hitler, but about Franco and the Spanish Civil War. Orwell served during the Spanish Civil War and saw first (and later second) hand how Franco's police state rose.

    I think it was more the treatment of POUM, the independent non-Stalinist communist group that Orwell was fighting with, by the Soviet-backed Communists, that was turned into Animal Farm. Orwell was convinced that the Communists were above all dedicated to keeping control of the Revolution, even at the cost of military setbacks – for example, starving Orwell’s front of weapons because the command there was not Communist. POUM was eventually outlawed by the Communists and its leadership ‘liquidated’. Orwell had first hand knowledge of his side of the frontlines, not of Franco’s side.

    “I have described how we were armed, or not armed, on the Aragon front. There is very little doubt that arms were deliberately withheld lest too many of them should get into the hands of the Anarchists, who would afterwards use them for a revolutionary purpose; consequently the big Aragon offensive which would have made Franco draw back from Bilbao, and possibly from Madrid, never happened.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/May_Days

    The climate of distrust and confrontation was present not only among republican institutions and workers organizations, but even between these organizations, especially among anarchists, on the one hand, and Socialists, Communists and Catalan nationalists on the other. On the one hand the communist PCE and PSUC, following the official doctrine of the Soviet Union, as well as being supporters of the usual order of the Second Spanish Republic. The PCE PCE was the major communist party in the country while the PSUC was the main communist organization in Catalonia. At the other extreme, in radical opposition to Stalin, the dissident Marxist POUM; who believed, like the anarchists, that war and social revolution were inseparable. This being the chief motivation for those actually doing the fighting, the overwhelming majority of whom were trade unionists and/or had been members of libertarian organisations before the war.

    The tension was rising due a chain of events taking place during the winter that heated the political climate and paved the way for what would take place later. The PCE had taken a decision to liquidate the POUM during a conference with Comintern officials and Soviet agents in Valencia. During that conference the POUM leaders were accused of being Nazi agents, part of a plot devised by Leon Trotsky, who was alleged to be conspiring with the fascists to overthrow Stalin – supported by the ‘evidence’ of the show trials of the leaders of the Russian Revolution that had taken place in Moscow the previous year. The POUM had come to propose an invitation to Trotsky to reside in Catalonia, despite their differences with him. The POUM leaders were becoming increasingly wary as they moved to the spring of 1937. Tension in the streets of Barcelona was becoming evident of the arrival of a hot spring: uncontrollable Civil Guards and Soviet agents continued to arbitrarily arrest and murder Confederals.

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  118. Thank God we live in a country whose leaders, unlike Putin, keep out of the affairs of other countries and never seek to influence their politics or the outcome of their elections.

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  119. @Mr. Anon
    So far, I can not think of one concrete predictioin made by the anthropogenic global warming crowd that has come true. Can you? Usually when a scientific model is so unsuccessful at predicting observable phenomena, it is junked. That does not seem to be the case with manmade climate change.

    How about rising global temperatures? I had to look long and hard to come up with that one.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "How about rising global temperatures? I had to look long and hard to come up with that one."

    Yes, you're right. A consequence of global warming is global warming. Of coure, in the past, increases in temperature have preceded increases in CO2 concentration. The temperature record is itself a matter of some dispute, given that NOAA is continually fiddling with it. Of course a government agency would never cheat with that kind of thing. Next you'll be telling me that the CPI might not be trustworthy.

    I was mainly referring to other predictions made by AGW proponents in the early 00s - that the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes would increase, that snow would vanish from the British Isles, etc. These predictions were not made by Al Gore, but by actual climate scientists at reputable institutions.

    Back in 1988, James Hanson offered to Congress (and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research) three predictions of mean global temperature over the subsequent 20 years, under three assumptions: a.) No change in CO2 emissions or the growth of CO2 emissions, b.) moderate change, and c.) a more drastic change, essentially embodying what was targeted by the Kyoto protocol.

    Which prediction was most nearly correct by 2008? Option c, despite the fact that America never adopted Kyoto, and it was mostly abandoned. That was a state-of-the-art prediction of the latest GCMs back in the late 80s, which we were assured were highly reliable. Of course, the same kind of people (and in fact, many of the same actual people) assure us today that their new and improved GCMs are highly reliable.

    Is CO2 a "green-house" gas (i.e., a strong absorber in the far infrared) ? Yes. Does CO2 serve to insulate the Earth and cause it to be warmer than it otherwise would be? Yes. Is the global mean temperature of Earth increasing? Yes. Is it partly man-made? Probably yes. Is it wholly man-made? Nobody can truly say. Will it spell doom for us? Probably not.

  120. @whorefinder
    Agreed; the CIA and FBI have shown signs just this year of being openly hostile to Trump---the CIA in the last few days implicating Russia, and the FBI/Comey in covering up Hillary's crimes. A coup attempt by those agencies acting jointly is not out of the question, especially since Holder's ATFE also is likely to be on their side (the ATFE ran guns for Holder, in the infamous Fast and Furious scandal).

    Unfortunately, the armed forces throughout history has not been a strong bulkwark against coups. Military men usually fall into line after a changing of the guard; whether that's from the personalities of soldiers (duty to the leader, whoever he is) or just the self-preservation tactics of military leaders, that's for others to figure out.

    The Roman army did nothing to stop the various palace coups that went on during the empire, merely switching allegiances to whoever was in power. Sometimes they'd run their own coups as well, but they'd never stop a coup.

    And then the Soviets and Nazis and Spanish had their secret police keep the armies from revolting during their coups and purges.

    In short, don't trust our armies to protect us from our secret police; it just never pans out that way, sadly.

    As long as the rightful leader is alive, he can use the military to protect himself and crush the coup, or crush non-military deep state actors suspected of planning a coup. Major Remer during the July 20 coup* and Marshal Zhukov during both the arrest of Beria and the defeat of the “Anti-Party Group”** come to mind from recent totalitarian history.

    *Which was a military coup and yet the army units switched back allegiance the moment they were convinced the rightful leadership was still in place.

    **A Politburo coup attempt against Khrushchev.

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  121. @Lot

    such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea
     
    I believe both actions were well justified by law and morality.

    Israel’s foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman
     
    He was promoted in June to Defense Minister. Here is his attractive Ukraine-born replacement in the Knesset.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yulia_Malinovsky#/media/File:Yulia_Malinovsky.jpg

    many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.
     
    They seem to get along well

    After the 2011 Duma election, in which Russian President Vladimir Putin's party United Russia won, Lieberman was the first international politician to describe them as "absolutely fair, free and democratic". Putin has described Lieberman's own political career as "brilliant".
     

    That’s attractive? LOL

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  122. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to 'the world' for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.

    The Romans had none of this.

    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to ‘the world’ for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.

    You’re dreaming if you think an oath will keep them from rolling over. Other nations had oaths to the Republic, the people, etc. and it never prevented multiple coups and the army simply following orders.

    Personalities and armies haven’t changed.

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Your cynicism is worthy of John Derbyshire.

    But we aren't "Other nations." And "personalities and armies haven’t changed" is the voice of pessimism. If pessimism were the correct sentiment for the moment, then Trump would be licking his wounds and Britain would have voted remain.
  123. @Anon
    'Fake News', aka independent gentile news, are info-cossacks pillaging the Real News of Globalist Propaganda.

    'Fake News' is the new pogrom against the Narrative, the only Truth that is permissible.

    Putin must be behind these news pogroms that mess with Globalist News Programs....

    just like the Tsar was behind the old pogroms. He was, he was indeed, he was very much so... because we want to believe it to be so so so very true.

    http://mondoweiss.net/2014/02/explodes-american-massacre/

    Judging by the inflection point on Google Trends, the “fake news” meme was ginned up about two weeks before Hillary’s loss. Amazing how fast it has exploded in the last four weeks:

    https://www.google.com/trends/explore?q=%22fake%20news%22

    I wonder why they didn’t spread it sooner. Hubris? Overconfidence?

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  124. @David
    If the pigs were Franco wouldn't they support the humans? I can't see how his rise to power can be seen in Animal Farm. The corruption of power Orwell had the closest experience with was of the communists he fought alongside of.

    Police states are police states are police states. Orwell got massively disillusioned from the Spanish Civil War as he recognized that both sides were keen to set up a repressive dictatorship. The methods are the same for all: the secret police runs the country, the army obeys the commands.

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    In communist countries, the secret police didn't "run the country", it was merely an unthinking tool in the hands of the political leadership. It was the party that ran the country.
  125. @anon
    Just curious if anyone knows it either Trump or this guy Puzder actually used e-verify in their extensive business history.

    And I mean without the bs 'outsourcing' to 'contractors' who then ignore e-verify.

    I've noticed a reluctance of everyone to dig into who is/was using it and who avoided it.

    I no longer care what Trump did or didn't do -- he won. But I am also baffled regarding why it has been so unsuccessful.

    Risk-averse businesses are worried that, if they use E-Verify, they’ll be investigated for civil rights violations by the Justice Department. IIRC the Obama administration has already done so.

    You often used to see E-Verify posters on the wall of the HR department under Bush II, but not under Obama.

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  126. @candid_observer
    OT, but for all the complaints about Trump's choice for Secretary of Labor, his statement seems perfectly in tune with Trump's message:

    https://twitter.com/LPDonovan/status/807777669979000833

    And for all the complaints about the "incoherence" of Trump's policies and views, they seem, in fact, to be far more consistent than any set of issues put forward by standard politicians, pundits, or intellectuals. It's remarkable how much policy falls directly out of the single imperative that the reigning purpose of American government must be to serve the interests of the American people.

    It seems that many of us have misjudged Puzder; he’s not an open-borders true believer, but instead, like many corporate execs, he just sings whatever tune those in power want him to.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    This is what I've been saying, but there's a lot of people here who never miss an opportunity to break out the gimp suit.

    People were claiming "BETRAAAAAYED" when Nikki Haley was announced for the makework position at the UN. Some dudes can't get out of the gamma victim mentality.
  127. In Hollywood, Major Picture Studios are selling large chunks of ownership to movie companies in China that are controlled by the Chinese government. Going further, every major studio head says that before a particular movie gets the green-light, it is vetted to make sure it does not offend Chinese sensibilities. But that is not propaganda? [Nope, just good business sense.]

    Google, and Facebook filter search results and content in China so as to appease Chinese officials. Simultaneously, they filter news feeds in the US to be favorable to Hillary Clinton and the Left Agenda. But, again, there’s not a whiff of propaganda here. I guess, it’s because they are tech companies. Tech companies are always good.

    BTW: When is a person a ‘whistle-blower’ as opposed to a ‘propaganda plant’? Has there ever been a ‘whistle-blower’ exposing the crimes and corruption of the Left? I honestly can’t think of one.

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  128. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

    I don’t think Putin’s up to anything nefarious per se. Putin wants to expand his sphere of influence. This will help protect Russia from invasion, which has happened on multiple occasions. Remember, we have NATO on their border in the Baltics. Imagine if Putin had a military alliance with Mexico.

    Whether it’s good for the USA to let him do it is another question.

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    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    The Mexican military is in no condition to invade the United States, and it wasn't in the condition at the time of the Zimmerman telegram either.

    A better idea for the Russians would be to encourage separatism in Alaska and the Canadian Arctic territories. A long term project, but it has credible ethnic differences.
  129. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

    Randal has got this one right. The Russians aren’t on board with the agenda of the western elites.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/amphtml/news/global-opinions/wp/2016/12/10/lets-get-the-facts-right-on-foreign-involvement-in-our-elections/

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  130. @Mr. Anon
    "Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump,......"

    And how do we know this? I hear this claim being confidently asserted in the media, but I have not heard described any evidence for it.

    "I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course)."

    I don't know about defending the white race, although my guess would be that Putin is at least a race realist. As to defending traditional values, he might be interested in that; he's an older guy who came of age in a relatively buttoned down society, and he probably views western degeneracy as corrupting and undesirable. I agree with you that his primary aim is probably the maintenance of his regime, and that he is untrustworthy.

    Well, he’s untrustworthy from the American point of view. He seems to be quite ably increasing the influence of Russia, which is his job. It’s Putin’s job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It’s our job as Americans to resist that. We can still ally with him where useful, and certainly starting fights over junk like gay marriage is a waste of time and potentially dangerous.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Well, he’s untrustworthy from the American point of view.
     
    What happened to "trust, but verify"? There is a lot of positive sum potential that's been crowded out by our prior globalist/PC delusions. Once that low-hanging fruit gets picked we can worry about trustworthiness on the more difficult issues.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "It’s Putin’s job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It’s our job as Americans to resist that."

    I don't see Putin's Russia as being hostile to any real interest that I, as an american citizen, have, as distinct from the largely phony "national interests" that our talking heads and policy wonks gas on about. Putin wants to defend a former client regime in Syria, and make it a client regime again? He wants a compliant Ukraine, which has been under the russian thumb for centuries. I guess I don't much care. He wants markets for russian petroleum products, which are one of the only products they have to sell? I can understand that. It seems that America should be able to work with him, and not demonize him.

    By the way, I wonder if anyone in the American government has wondered what woud happen if we were to go to war with Iran and end up turning them into the kind of broken state that Iraq now is. Iraq served as a counterweight to and barrier between Iran. With Iran gone, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Gulf States now worry about Iran. And what is Iran a barrier too? Russia. That's why we backed the Shah in the first place. Is it really wise to incapacitate Iran? I don't think Iran would become like Iraq, as it has a more ethnically and religiously homogenous population. Never-the-less, the best kind of proxy state is the kind you don't have to run yourself.
    , @Anon 2
    Putin is increasing the influence of Russia?

    Perhaps but in the meantime Russia is in the
    second year of a major recession. The Russian
    ruble's drop has single-handedly driven out
    Russian tourists from Western Europe. Of
    course, the major reason is the drop in the
    price oil (and the sanctions don't help either).
    The say that the Russian self-confidence rises
    and falls with the price of oil. That's the price
    Russia pays for being a petrostate, and currently
    Brent oil hovers around $54 per barrel, which
    is still low. Russia needs oil to rise to $70 per
    barrel to balance its budget, and that's not likely
    to happen. Once oil rises to $55-60, the American
    shale oil kicks in and prevents it from rising further.
    Iranian oil is also having an effect. Basically, there
    is a continuing oil glut, and that's not good for Russia
    (or Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and Venezuela)
    , @Thirdeye

    It’s Putin’s job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It’s our job as Americans to resist that.
     
    The "Deadwood" philosophy of foreign policy that led to the debacles in Vietnam, Ukraine, and Syria.
  131. @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian.
     
    And just how do we know this?

    The CIA seems to think so. Remember ‘Fancy Bear’ and ‘Cozy Bear’? And Wikileaks seemed to be mostly be hurting the Democrats.

    I don’t think we should have voted for Hillary and let millions of new immigrants in–politics is the lesser of two evils. But we should be aware of Trump’s weak points. The Democrats will certainly be.

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  132. @Mr. Anon
    "The rational narrative is to use methane as the transition fuel until we get to solar/wind and the next renewable."

    And just what is "the next renewable"? Zero-point energy? Orgone energy? Grrl Power?

    3500 calories in a pound of human fat
    31,500 calories in a gallon of gasoline
    9# of obesity = 1 gallon of gasoline.
    140.43 billion gallons of gasoline per year used in the USA
    That is the equivalent of 1263.87 billion pounds of human fat
    72% of Americans are overweight, obese or grossly obese.
    325,100,000 Americans
    So the next renewable energy resource is?

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  133. @(((Joshua)))
    I have no clue if global warming is real or not. But as Instapundit likes to say, I'll start believing it's a crisis when people like Gore, Dicaprio, etc start acting like it's a crisis. And then there's the question of what, if anything, we can reasonably do about it.

    There is a lot we can do to address global warming, as long as we start with the recognition that substantially lowering the standard of living anywhere is a non-starter, and we have to move gradually to avoid some kind of economy-wrecking shock.

    Build nuclear plants. Specifically, put federal money and regulatory muscle into replacing coal power plants with nuclear plants, since coal plants are an environmental nightmare all around.

    Build those high efficiency underground DC lines to move power from where the wind is blowing to where it isn’t. Better power transmission will make everything work better, including making solar and wind a lot more practical.

    Impose a carbon tax, but start it out very low–the goal is to get the bugs worked out before we start having a big impact on the core of the economy. To keep the books balanced, make the carbon tax revenue neutral by lowering income tax rates or increasing the EITC to cover the extra revenue–or just refund the money taken in to taxpayers directly.

    Come up with some kind of way to help out the coal mining parts of the country, because we will eventually need to stop using coal for electricity. That’s a way of life that needs to go away, and preserving it would be stupid, but we need to give the people mining coal and the people living in those communities some alternative so they don’t get screwed too badly.

    Raise the gas tax a bit each year to encourage people to buy higher efficiency cars. Phase out the CAFE standards in favor of a gas tax, which creates the right incentives and doesn’t allow for gaming the system.

    Stop dicking around with corn ethanol, because it’s a boondoggle intended to buy votes, not any part of a sensible energy policy.

    And so on.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    There is a lot we can do to address global warming, as long as we start with
     
    You do better to start with some spokesmen who speak science rather than bullshit, and some scientists who act like scientists rather than political hacks.
    , @Opinionator
    No, the most important thing, by far, that we can do to curb global warming is to stop immigration the the West and incentivize the rest of the world to regulate its population growth.
  134. @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

    Isn’t the fundamental issue not whether increased CO2 in the atmosphere causes warming (it does), but how much the current warming is specifically caused by CO2 and how much is natural climate variation?

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  135. @Dave Pinsen
    Our Constitution is so poorly written that it can be interpreted to mean anything.

    Congress let that happen:

    “…jurisdiction-stripping (also called court-stripping or curtailment-of-jurisdiction), refers to Congress’ constitutionally-granted authority to determine the jurisdiction of federal and state courts.”

    “Congress may effectively eliminate any judicial review of certain federal legislative or executive actions and of certain state actions, or alternatively transfer the judicial review responsibility to state courts by “knocking [federal courts]…out of the game.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jurisdiction_stripping

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  136. @Opinionator
    Do you find Puzder's statement today a little more reassuring?

    https://mobile.twitter.com/LPDonovan/status/807777669979000833?ref_src=twsrc%5Etfw

    Encouraging press release, but it seems a little too good to be true. The guy just casually sets aside years of wage suppression advocacy in return for this position? Whether his conversion is real, or just mumbled resentfully will be known soon enough. Give him 4 months to reveal true colors.

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  137. @Amasius
    The Mormon Mafia.

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/28/politics/evan-mcmullin-mormon-mafia/index.html

    Webster Tarpley promoted the theory back in 2012 that Benghazi was an attempted coup of sorts by Mormons to get Romney in.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDAE-42Xeiw

    http://occupywallst.org/forum/what-is-the-mormon-mafia/

    I don't have any opinion as to whether it's true or how true it is. I mostly just like the idea of a "Mormon Mafia." It makes me laugh. Sounds cool too. Mormons ARE weird enough to be involved in something like this, so who knows.

    “Mormon Mafia.”

    Go read some of James Ellroy’s later books (the trilogy before Perfidia). As I recall, there was plenty of Mormon organized crime in those. I was nonplussed.

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  138. There is this whole thread of claims that Trump is beholden to Putin going around. It’s not a crazy thing to worry about. And if it is true, it’s important. and I’d like to know. My problem is that the prestige media have basically no credibility in reporting this stuff–they breathlessly reported the secret server communicating with Russia (it was running a spamming operation) and the list of websites and media that were in Putin’s employ (which appears to have been complete bullshit.). So how would we get a clear idea of whether Putin really does have an undue amount of influence with Trump?

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  139. @Anonymous

    Steve is doing some amazing work these days (and that’s been the case since I started reading him four or five years ago). I hope many of us can find the time and money in the next few weeks (better before or after 2016, I dunno?) to give recognition and support.
     
    In this coup scenario, I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on. I hope Sailer changes up his location and is not a sitting duck. He needs to grab his laptop and head over and work on his blog while sitting in the food court of his local mall (the one in Fast Times at Ridgemont High or the one from Jackie Brown?). He and Unz need to develop some secret code for their communications. I'm sure Unz could probably develop something in 48 hours that Alan Turing couldn't break. Steve's kind of care-free life could quickly become like Joe Turner in Three Days of the Condor.

    "What do you do and why does the CIA want you dead?"
    "I don't know, I write blog pieces on sabermatics and PISA scores. That aside, is it safe?"

    In this coup scenario, I see the deep state silencing Sailer pretty early on.

    Sailer’s like their GPS so they can tell where reality is when they need it. Without him, they’d really be lost.

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  140. In other news, the FBI may be catching upto Gulen. Hope they slam him for his charter school scam:
    http://nypost.com/2016/12/11/feds-raid-businessmen-linked-to-imam-blamed-for-turkey-coup/
    Does this mean the CIA is losing face in the inter-agency feud? Fighting to stay relevant? That may explain their desperation in Putinizing the election results….

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  141. @NOTA
    There is a lot we can do to address global warming, as long as we start with the recognition that substantially lowering the standard of living anywhere is a non-starter, and we have to move gradually to avoid some kind of economy-wrecking shock.

    Build nuclear plants. Specifically, put federal money and regulatory muscle into replacing coal power plants with nuclear plants, since coal plants are an environmental nightmare all around.

    Build those high efficiency underground DC lines to move power from where the wind is blowing to where it isn't. Better power transmission will make everything work better, including making solar and wind a lot more practical.

    Impose a carbon tax, but start it out very low--the goal is to get the bugs worked out before we start having a big impact on the core of the economy. To keep the books balanced, make the carbon tax revenue neutral by lowering income tax rates or increasing the EITC to cover the extra revenue--or just refund the money taken in to taxpayers directly.

    Come up with some kind of way to help out the coal mining parts of the country, because we will eventually need to stop using coal for electricity. That's a way of life that needs to go away, and preserving it would be stupid, but we need to give the people mining coal and the people living in those communities some alternative so they don't get screwed too badly.

    Raise the gas tax a bit each year to encourage people to buy higher efficiency cars. Phase out the CAFE standards in favor of a gas tax, which creates the right incentives and doesn't allow for gaming the system.

    Stop dicking around with corn ethanol, because it's a boondoggle intended to buy votes, not any part of a sensible energy policy.

    And so on.

    There is a lot we can do to address global warming, as long as we start with

    You do better to start with some spokesmen who speak science rather than bullshit, and some scientists who act like scientists rather than political hacks.

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  142. @Jefferson
    "I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race"

    Since when did Vladimir Putin ever claim to be White first and Russian second?

    Vladimir Putin does not give a damn if a WASP in Detroit for example is mugged at gunpoint by a Black or if a WASP in Detroit is racemixing with a Black.

    Vladimir Putin's tribalism mentality does not extend beyond the Russian people. Vladimir Putin does not see Anglo Saxon Protestants as his people. Vladimir Putin is a Russian nationalist, not a White nationalist.

    Vladimir Putin does not see Anglo Saxon Protestants as his people. Vladimir Putin is a Russian nationalist, not a White nationalist.

    Do WASPs generally see any other European or European derived people as their folks either? Do WASPs even see other Anglo-Saxon Protestants as their own people, apart from their own family and immediate social circle? My lifetime of experience so far tells me “no” on both counts.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    Do WASPs generally see any other European or European derived people as their folks either?
     
    The history of the 20th century suggests that there's not a great deal of solidarity among Europeans. European whites not only butchered each other, they demonised each other to the point where the mass slaughter of civilians was considered to be not only acceptable but laudable.

    When it comes to the crunch people will come down on the side of those they perceive to be their own people and they usually define that quite narrowly. People who speak the same language, share the same culture, share the same history. And there is no white language, nor is there a "white culture" - which is why white nationalism is nonsense.

    I'm an Australian. My loyalty is to Australia. I'm an Anglo-Celt so I have some emotional attachment to Britain. Beyond that, nothing.

    I have goodwill towards Americans, Canadians, Germans and Dutch but they're not my people and I'd be appalled by the thought of Australians being asked to sacrifice their lives to help Americans, Canadians, Germans or Dutch. I have goodwill towards the Japanese and the Chinese as well. To be honest I care as much for the Japanese as I do for Americans - if they were in trouble I'd be happy to offer them all assistance short of actual assistance.

    Nationalism makes sense to me. Anything else, including white nationalism or pan-Europeanism is just woolly-minded feel-good liberal internationalism .
    , @Alden
    You are right. WASPS never identified as WASPS. Unfortunately we are very individualistic and have no loyalty to each other and hardly any loyalty to friends relatives and neighbors.

    In their never ending search for cheap labor elite WASPS went all over the earth fron 17th century Africa to the jungles of 20th century oogabooda land.
    And the WASPS pushed out of the labor market whether by 21st century HI B Asians or 17th century Africans are totally despised by elite WASPS.
  143. @SFG
    Well, he's untrustworthy from the American point of view. He seems to be quite ably increasing the influence of Russia, which is his job. It's Putin's job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It's our job as Americans to resist that. We can still ally with him where useful, and certainly starting fights over junk like gay marriage is a waste of time and potentially dangerous.

    Well, he’s untrustworthy from the American point of view.

    What happened to “trust, but verify”? There is a lot of positive sum potential that’s been crowded out by our prior globalist/PC delusions. Once that low-hanging fruit gets picked we can worry about trustworthiness on the more difficult issues.

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  144. @snorlax
    It seems that many of us have misjudged Puzder; he's not an open-borders true believer, but instead, like many corporate execs, he just sings whatever tune those in power want him to.

    This is what I’ve been saying, but there’s a lot of people here who never miss an opportunity to break out the gimp suit.

    People were claiming “BETRAAAAAYED” when Nikki Haley was announced for the makework position at the UN. Some dudes can’t get out of the gamma victim mentality.

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  145. @Anonym
    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don’t think there’s going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    And this is the only thing that prevents me from outright condemning his cabinet choices. Trump's got a good track record of changing out campaign managers whenever they no longer serve his purpose. My hope is that as soon as one of these cabinet members starts thinking he's in charge of policy, he gets swapped out like Manafort or Lewandowski.

    Coulter and Kaus are not so sanguine.

    Coulter and Kaus have been predicting doom since the Pence pick and haven’t let up. Its as tiresome as the doom masturbation here.

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    • Agree: anonguy
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Keeping the pressure on from the right is of utmost importance, even when the narrative isn't strictly accurate. It's why we got that statement from Puzder, why the Romney and McCaul/homeland picks were quashed, why the "big immigration speech" was a doubling-down instead of a flip-flop, and so on.
  146. @Anonymous
    But as a restaurant chain conglomerate CEO is he at risk of transforming illegal food-pickers and restaurant staff into Americans that fall under the America First purview (since if he doesn't increase the minimum wage there won't be such a dire need for illegals to remain illegal)? Those are his interests, and that's his history. Trump hasn't mentioned him in speeches.

    Who knows full well that inside of 5 years, half of his employees will be replaced by machines.

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  147. @SFG
    I don't think Putin's up to anything nefarious per se. Putin wants to expand his sphere of influence. This will help protect Russia from invasion, which has happened on multiple occasions. Remember, we have NATO on their border in the Baltics. Imagine if Putin had a military alliance with Mexico.

    Whether it's good for the USA to let him do it is another question.

    The Mexican military is in no condition to invade the United States, and it wasn’t in the condition at the time of the Zimmerman telegram either.

    A better idea for the Russians would be to encourage separatism in Alaska and the Canadian Arctic territories. A long term project, but it has credible ethnic differences.

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  148. @Opinionator
    Where in your view did the nationalism come from?

    In the lifetime of most adults alive today, the US has gone from an 85% white country to a 60% white country. In this same time period, we have grown from a country of 180 million (again, with a white super-majority) to a country of 320 million, with around 80,000 more people moving in each month.

    That’s where the nationalism came from, even if as a sub-conscious vibe or in the case of, say, Richard Spencer or Peter Brimelow or me, a conscious motivator. The current conflict is territorial and existential, not ideological, even if nobody’s prepared to acknowledge it yet.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    You are quite right. The US is less white. Every formerly white country is less white. Drastically and visibly so. Minorities have told us for years that it sucks to be a minority. I believe 'em. So why would I want to be made a minority in my own country?

    This is the origin of white nationalism.
  149. @D. K.
    ERRATUM: The hostages were released on the following Inauguration Day, shortly after Ronald Reagan had taken the oath of office and replaced Jimmy Carter. (Election Day 1980 actually was the first anniversary of the storming of the American embassy by Iranian students-- or militants, or whatever they actually were!?!)

    What we did not know then, was that the Carter administration had been negotiating the release of the hostages since Sept. And that the date of release was an Iranian snub of Carter.

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  150. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    Dude, the idea of Putin as God-Emperor is so 2014. He can be Tsarskii Bog Bsey Rossii, we’ve got our own.

    We’ve gotten used to Russia being weak, but that was situational. Russia’s getting stronger. We can either accommodate ourselves to that, or oppose it, but if we’re going to oppose it, we should have a damn good reason to be looking for a fight with a nuclear armed superpower.

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    • Replies: @SFG
    So I guess LGBT is Slaanesh (ambigender, pleasure) and Nurgle (disease), Jews are Tzeentch (manipulation, intelligence, subtlety), and NAMs are Khorne (war and violence)? Hey, Tzeentch was my favorite Chaos God. ;)

    There are ways to oppose a rival power without active war--we did in the Cold War, after all. Would you let Russia draw, say, Great Britain into its sphere of influence?
    , @Jack D
    Putin is like a poker player who is bluffing to convince you that his cards are a lot better than they really are. Russia's working population (half of ours) is declining, oil (just about their only export worthy product) is declining and their GDP is less than Canada's (even though Canada has 1/4 as many people) . They are not "getting stronger" by any reasonable measure.
    , @Anon 2
    Russia is not getting stronger. Putin has become
    more aggressive, taking advantage of Obama's
    passivity, and is trying to distract the Russian
    population from the economic troubles at home,
    namely the continuing recession and the major
    drop in the price of oil.

    This has had an interesting effect on Russia's
    immediate neighborhood. Belarus, which has
    been to a large extent economically integrated
    with Russia and was doing reasonably well compared
    to Ukraine, is, like Russia, experiencing economic
    problems, has recently made overtures to Poland,
    its immediate EU neighbor to the west. Poland
    currently hosts over a million Ukrainian men and
    women, typically on short-term work permits and
    student visas. Ukrainian women may also be looking
    for husbands in Poland. What's happening now is that
    increasingly also Belarusians are coming to Poland
    to ease the growing labor shortage.

    Belarus and western Ukraine used to be part of the
    vast Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Belarus
    to some extent was settled by the expanding Polish
    population in the 16-17th centuries, who often
    converted to Orthodox Christianity and effectively
    became Ruthenians. Many Polish still have relatives in
    Belarus, as well as Ukraine, and even Russia. It almost
    seems like geography is destiny and many Ukrainians
    and Belarusians, lured by the West, are drawn to Poland
    again, and the old federal Commonwealth is recreating
    itself
  151. @anon
    In what way do our interests run counter to Russia's? Before the Cold War they were our traditional ally, and they're smaller now than they were then.

    Not really. Czarist Russia was never an ally. Although they sold us Alaska. We invaded Russia in 1918 at the behest of Britain and Japan. FDR did not recognize the USSR until 1935.
    Arguably our alliance with them lasted from December of 1941 through September of 1945. Certainly no later than the Berlin Airilft.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Not really. Czarist Russia was never an ally. Although they sold us Alaska
     
    Relations were (relatively) warmish in the 19th Century due to similar situations vis-a-vis big dog Europe.

    http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1983-4/delehaye.htm

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/russian-us-relationship-goes-way-back-john-quincy-adams-180960600/

    We invaded Russia in 1918 at the behest of Britain and Japan.
     
    Had the Whites won that incursion might be remembered differently.
    , @utu
    Relationship with Russia was pretty good during Civil War. Russian Baltic Fleet was patrolling NYC harbor and Pacific Flees was patrolling San Francisco. Then there was talk to build first telegraph line going via Arctic to Russia and then to Europe. The selling of Alaska was also a part of this good relations. Since at least Tocqueville everybody knew that the future of the world belonged to America and Russia. England was very unhappy about these developments. Who knows wha role assassinations of Lincoln and then Alexander II played in undermining this relationship.

    This historical episode was pretty much forgotten only to be brought to used in 1940s as propaganda device to convince Americans that the WWII alliance with Russia had precedences.

    http://feefhs.org/members/blitz/1863-1864.html
    http://www.reformation.org/czar-alexander.html
    https://www.jstor.org/stable/1835544?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
    http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1983-4/delehaye.htm

    While in NYC Russian sailors made collection among themselves on behalf of the poor in NYC as they were struck with the level of poverty. On the other hand officers where treated to many parties and parades.
  152. @Hunsdon
    Dude, the idea of Putin as God-Emperor is so 2014. He can be Tsarskii Bog Bsey Rossii, we've got our own.

    We've gotten used to Russia being weak, but that was situational. Russia's getting stronger. We can either accommodate ourselves to that, or oppose it, but if we're going to oppose it, we should have a damn good reason to be looking for a fight with a nuclear armed superpower.

    So I guess LGBT is Slaanesh (ambigender, pleasure) and Nurgle (disease), Jews are Tzeentch (manipulation, intelligence, subtlety), and NAMs are Khorne (war and violence)? Hey, Tzeentch was my favorite Chaos God. ;)

    There are ways to oppose a rival power without active war–we did in the Cold War, after all. Would you let Russia draw, say, Great Britain into its sphere of influence?

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  153. @Jefferson
    "I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race"

    Since when did Vladimir Putin ever claim to be White first and Russian second?

    Vladimir Putin does not give a damn if a WASP in Detroit for example is mugged at gunpoint by a Black or if a WASP in Detroit is racemixing with a Black.

    Vladimir Putin's tribalism mentality does not extend beyond the Russian people. Vladimir Putin does not see Anglo Saxon Protestants as his people. Vladimir Putin is a Russian nationalist, not a White nationalist.

    But he cares about the fate of other Whites.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "But he cares about the fate of other Whites."

    Vladimir Putin only cares about Russians. He doesn't give a damn about my people the Italians for example. Which makes sense because most people only care about their immediate family and Russians are his immediate family, not the Italians or the Portuguese for example.

  154. @NOTA
    There is a lot we can do to address global warming, as long as we start with the recognition that substantially lowering the standard of living anywhere is a non-starter, and we have to move gradually to avoid some kind of economy-wrecking shock.

    Build nuclear plants. Specifically, put federal money and regulatory muscle into replacing coal power plants with nuclear plants, since coal plants are an environmental nightmare all around.

    Build those high efficiency underground DC lines to move power from where the wind is blowing to where it isn't. Better power transmission will make everything work better, including making solar and wind a lot more practical.

    Impose a carbon tax, but start it out very low--the goal is to get the bugs worked out before we start having a big impact on the core of the economy. To keep the books balanced, make the carbon tax revenue neutral by lowering income tax rates or increasing the EITC to cover the extra revenue--or just refund the money taken in to taxpayers directly.

    Come up with some kind of way to help out the coal mining parts of the country, because we will eventually need to stop using coal for electricity. That's a way of life that needs to go away, and preserving it would be stupid, but we need to give the people mining coal and the people living in those communities some alternative so they don't get screwed too badly.

    Raise the gas tax a bit each year to encourage people to buy higher efficiency cars. Phase out the CAFE standards in favor of a gas tax, which creates the right incentives and doesn't allow for gaming the system.

    Stop dicking around with corn ethanol, because it's a boondoggle intended to buy votes, not any part of a sensible energy policy.

    And so on.

    No, the most important thing, by far, that we can do to curb global warming is to stop immigration the the West and incentivize the rest of the world to regulate its population growth.

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  155. @Busby
    Not really. Czarist Russia was never an ally. Although they sold us Alaska. We invaded Russia in 1918 at the behest of Britain and Japan. FDR did not recognize the USSR until 1935.
    Arguably our alliance with them lasted from December of 1941 through September of 1945. Certainly no later than the Berlin Airilft.

    Not really. Czarist Russia was never an ally. Although they sold us Alaska

    Relations were (relatively) warmish in the 19th Century due to similar situations vis-a-vis big dog Europe.

    http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1983-4/delehaye.htm

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/russian-us-relationship-goes-way-back-john-quincy-adams-180960600/

    We invaded Russia in 1918 at the behest of Britain and Japan.

    Had the Whites won that incursion might be remembered differently.

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  156. @5371
    How about rising global temperatures? I had to look long and hard to come up with that one.

    “How about rising global temperatures? I had to look long and hard to come up with that one.”

    Yes, you’re right. A consequence of global warming is global warming. Of coure, in the past, increases in temperature have preceded increases in CO2 concentration. The temperature record is itself a matter of some dispute, given that NOAA is continually fiddling with it. Of course a government agency would never cheat with that kind of thing. Next you’ll be telling me that the CPI might not be trustworthy.

    I was mainly referring to other predictions made by AGW proponents in the early 00s – that the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes would increase, that snow would vanish from the British Isles, etc. These predictions were not made by Al Gore, but by actual climate scientists at reputable institutions.

    Back in 1988, James Hanson offered to Congress (and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research) three predictions of mean global temperature over the subsequent 20 years, under three assumptions: a.) No change in CO2 emissions or the growth of CO2 emissions, b.) moderate change, and c.) a more drastic change, essentially embodying what was targeted by the Kyoto protocol.

    Which prediction was most nearly correct by 2008? Option c, despite the fact that America never adopted Kyoto, and it was mostly abandoned. That was a state-of-the-art prediction of the latest GCMs back in the late 80s, which we were assured were highly reliable. Of course, the same kind of people (and in fact, many of the same actual people) assure us today that their new and improved GCMs are highly reliable.

    Is CO2 a “green-house” gas (i.e., a strong absorber in the far infrared) ? Yes. Does CO2 serve to insulate the Earth and cause it to be warmer than it otherwise would be? Yes. Is the global mean temperature of Earth increasing? Yes. Is it partly man-made? Probably yes. Is it wholly man-made? Nobody can truly say. Will it spell doom for us? Probably not.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    A consequence of global warming is global warming
     
    Global warming is bad because it causes global warming. It's a bit like diversity is good because it encourages diversity. Nationalism is bad because it leads to nationalism. Inequality is bad because it results in inequality. Race realism is bad because it leads to realism about race. Freedom of speech is dangerous because it allows freedom of speech.

    This pretty much sums up modern thought.
    , @5371
    So you will believe only research that no "government agency" had its filthy hands on? Presumably you will then reject any field of knowledge which enjoyed funding by any state. Indeed, if you are consistent the curse of the libertarian will fall upon you. Having forsworn all science and technology later than prehistory, you will end up by going about on hands and knees and eating grass as the beasts of the field.
  157. @The Anti-Gnostic
    In the lifetime of most adults alive today, the US has gone from an 85% white country to a 60% white country. In this same time period, we have grown from a country of 180 million (again, with a white super-majority) to a country of 320 million, with around 80,000 more people moving in each month.

    That's where the nationalism came from, even if as a sub-conscious vibe or in the case of, say, Richard Spencer or Peter Brimelow or me, a conscious motivator. The current conflict is territorial and existential, not ideological, even if nobody's prepared to acknowledge it yet.

    You are quite right. The US is less white. Every formerly white country is less white. Drastically and visibly so. Minorities have told us for years that it sucks to be a minority. I believe ‘em. So why would I want to be made a minority in my own country?

    This is the origin of white nationalism.

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  158. @SFG
    Well, he's untrustworthy from the American point of view. He seems to be quite ably increasing the influence of Russia, which is his job. It's Putin's job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It's our job as Americans to resist that. We can still ally with him where useful, and certainly starting fights over junk like gay marriage is a waste of time and potentially dangerous.

    “It’s Putin’s job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It’s our job as Americans to resist that.”

    I don’t see Putin’s Russia as being hostile to any real interest that I, as an american citizen, have, as distinct from the largely phony “national interests” that our talking heads and policy wonks gas on about. Putin wants to defend a former client regime in Syria, and make it a client regime again? He wants a compliant Ukraine, which has been under the russian thumb for centuries. I guess I don’t much care. He wants markets for russian petroleum products, which are one of the only products they have to sell? I can understand that. It seems that America should be able to work with him, and not demonize him.

    By the way, I wonder if anyone in the American government has wondered what woud happen if we were to go to war with Iran and end up turning them into the kind of broken state that Iraq now is. Iraq served as a counterweight to and barrier between Iran. With Iran gone, Israel, Saudi Arabia, and Gulf States now worry about Iran. And what is Iran a barrier too? Russia. That’s why we backed the Shah in the first place. Is it really wise to incapacitate Iran? I don’t think Iran would become like Iraq, as it has a more ethnically and religiously homogenous population. Never-the-less, the best kind of proxy state is the kind you don’t have to run yourself.

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  159. @Anonymous
    Tillerson was recommended by a couple of real goys, Robert Gates and Condi Rice.

    Gates and Rice recommended him? Oh great.

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  160. @Anon
    You think its a coincidence that Trump has surrounded himself with former generals? It's like bodyarmor for him. The former usurper elite have been usurped themselves, and unlike those whom they previously displaced(who ceded with grace), this elite is anything but graceful.

    They will try to stage a coup if they can. Problem for them is that in any coup, the armed forces hold the key. Trump is beloved among the army and he is now consolidating the brass around him. Yet, the Deep State hasn't given up hope.

    Not just generals but fellow oligarchs. I don’t care squat about the generals as they are the equivalent of obedient poodles – you don’t make general unless you sell your soul and manhood to the political establishment. But surrounding himself with a bunch of oligarchs who part of the establishment and status-quo worries me. These sorts are not reformers.

    But we won’t know for sure until he’s been in office for four or so months to figure out what his agenda really is.

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  161. @anon
    Just curious if anyone knows it either Trump or this guy Puzder actually used e-verify in their extensive business history.

    And I mean without the bs 'outsourcing' to 'contractors' who then ignore e-verify.

    I've noticed a reluctance of everyone to dig into who is/was using it and who avoided it.

    I no longer care what Trump did or didn't do -- he won. But I am also baffled regarding why it has been so unsuccessful.

    Sundance at The Conservative Treehouse explicates the damned-if-you-do-damned-if-you-don’t
    situation that employers face re: e-verify. https://theconservativetreehouse.com/2016/12/08/why-donald-trump-and-american-workers-need-andrew-puzder-as-secretary-of-labor/

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    • Replies: @jill
    Justice Department Partners with Mexico to Combat Employment Discrimination

    https://www.justice.gov/opa/pr/justice-department-partners-mexico-combat-employment-discrimination


    The federal government has signed agreements with three foreign countries — Mexico, Ecuador and the Philippines — to establish outreach programs to teach immigrants their rights to engage in labor organizing in the U.S.

    http://www.washingtonexaminer.com/u.s.-signed-agreement-with-mexico-to-teach-immigrants-to-unionize/article/2562215
  162. @whorefinder
    Orwell wrote Animal Farm not merely about the Stalin and Hitler, but about Franco and the Spanish Civil War. Orwell served during the Spanish Civil War and saw first (and later second) hand how Franco's police state rose.

    Franco can not be placed alongside of Stalin and Hitler unless one throws history to the winds. I find that most people who characterize Franco in this way have drunk too deeply of the Black Legend against Spain which precludes them from forming a more objective opinion.

    The Spanish Communists began their church burnings and murders and chaos in 1931, years before Franco finally acted to restore order. He had to, since the government in power did nothing to put an end to it.

    You might be interested to know how Franco dealt with Hitler. He sidelined him at every opportunity and Hitler got nowhere with him. He did much to preserve Spanish culture in art and music as well. But the Left (and some poorly-educated Rightists) still cling to the anti-Franco fairy tales.

    By the way, the police state you refer to was not Franco’s but his predecessor’s. You really owe it to yourself to take a glance at the other side’s point of view.

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    • Agree: dfordoom
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    And Franco could have made things very difficult for the Allies in WW2 if he'd let the Germans take Gibraltar.
  163. @Anon
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rex_Tillerson

    Look at the pictures his wiki has been stashed with. As many pictures of him with Putin as possible. I doubt it was like this just a week ago. Anyone knows if there is a way to compare previous edits of the wikipage?

    They are back down to only 1 photo of him with Putin, but the word “Putin” appears 9 times in his article (including the footnotes).

    Wikipedia is still OK for learning the rudiments of how a steam engine works and stuff like that, but at this point you can assume that anything with any possible political dimension will be edited to reflect the leftist POV and cannot be relied upon. By the time they were done with Alicia Machado’s article it had been scrubbed so clean that she could have been a candidate for sainthood.

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  164. Interesting irony: RUSSIAN INFLUENCE ELECTION=FAKE NEWS

    Anthropogenic global warming is bullshit on stilts. Even George Carlin got it.

    Trump tried to copyright “You’re fired! “. He’s going to call all the shots, for better or worse. Especially as he won with little help. He will have to answer to the voters , though. And he does want to be successful. He is 70 and a billionaire. What other motivation could he really have?

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  165. @Busby
    Not really. Czarist Russia was never an ally. Although they sold us Alaska. We invaded Russia in 1918 at the behest of Britain and Japan. FDR did not recognize the USSR until 1935.
    Arguably our alliance with them lasted from December of 1941 through September of 1945. Certainly no later than the Berlin Airilft.

    Relationship with Russia was pretty good during Civil War. Russian Baltic Fleet was patrolling NYC harbor and Pacific Flees was patrolling San Francisco. Then there was talk to build first telegraph line going via Arctic to Russia and then to Europe. The selling of Alaska was also a part of this good relations. Since at least Tocqueville everybody knew that the future of the world belonged to America and Russia. England was very unhappy about these developments. Who knows wha role assassinations of Lincoln and then Alexander II played in undermining this relationship.

    This historical episode was pretty much forgotten only to be brought to used in 1940s as propaganda device to convince Americans that the WWII alliance with Russia had precedences.

    http://feefhs.org/members/blitz/1863-1864.html
    http://www.reformation.org/czar-alexander.html
    https://www.jstor.org/stable/1835544?seq=1#page_scan_tab_contents
    http://www.loyno.edu/~history/journal/1983-4/delehaye.htm

    While in NYC Russian sailors made collection among themselves on behalf of the poor in NYC as they were struck with the level of poverty. On the other hand officers where treated to many parties and parades.

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  166. The Streetwise Professor (Craig Pirrong at the University of Houston) really knows the oil industry and much about Russia, too.

    He explains why concerns about Russian leverage over Rex Tillerson are completely misplaced:

    http://streetwiseprofessor.com/?p=10297

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  167. @whorefinder
    Police states are police states are police states. Orwell got massively disillusioned from the Spanish Civil War as he recognized that both sides were keen to set up a repressive dictatorship. The methods are the same for all: the secret police runs the country, the army obeys the commands.

    In communist countries, the secret police didn’t “run the country”, it was merely an unthinking tool in the hands of the political leadership. It was the party that ran the country.

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  168. @Anon
    'Fake News', aka independent gentile news, are info-cossacks pillaging the Real News of Globalist Propaganda.

    'Fake News' is the new pogrom against the Narrative, the only Truth that is permissible.

    Putin must be behind these news pogroms that mess with Globalist News Programs....

    just like the Tsar was behind the old pogroms. He was, he was indeed, he was very much so... because we want to believe it to be so so so very true.

    http://mondoweiss.net/2014/02/explodes-american-massacre/

    Just a note:

    “Fake news” is a time-tested tool of the propaganda arts. It isn’t a “new meme.”

    Look up statistics on how much “news” content from the 1970s on was in fact press releases from various establishment players, posing as news, published by the outlets because it was cheaper than reporters, and better for ad revenue as well. (Hint: it was a high percentage, and got higher as the century went on.)

    Are there any J-schools at all today that haven’t been pulled into their institutions’ MarComm departments?

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  169. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, there's a lot of projection by American Jews of concerns over Israel's behavior, such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea. Israel, of course, is full of Russians, such as Israel's foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.

    I predicted back in 2014 that as conservative Jews turn toward Russia, liberal Jews would turn back toward Germany. You are starting to see that with the Merkel worship in the papers.

    Interestingly enough, Avigdor Lieberman was born in Chișinău (Kishinev to Russian speakers), which is the capital for the Republic of Moldova. Chișinău was full of Jews. I don’t know how that affected his identity, but his love of Russian literature might indicate that he did identify culturally more with the Russians than with the majority population of the Soviet Republic he was born in.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    My guess is he was well educated and Russian literature was what they taught in the schools.

    And, well, it's Russian literature. I don't have time for doorstop novels, but people who do tell me it's very, very good.
    , @IHTG
    Lieberman has a Eastern Bloc affectation, but he was actually born to a quite oldschool Jewish family and spoke Yiddish before he did both Russian and Romanian.
  170. @SFG
    So I guess LGBT is Slaanesh (ambigender, pleasure) and Nurgle (disease), Jews are Tzeentch (manipulation, intelligence, subtlety), and NAMs are Khorne (war and violence)? Hey, Tzeentch was my favorite Chaos God. ;)

    There are ways to oppose a rival power without active war--we did in the Cold War, after all. Would you let Russia draw, say, Great Britain into its sphere of influence?

    Is this written in some sort of Pizzagate code?

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  171. @Charles Erwin Wilson

    And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming
     
    Your dollar is under your pillow courtesy of the tooth fairy, and your presents will be provided by Santa Claus again.

    By the way, you should be FKA Min instead of FKA Max.

    You don’t have enough calculus to form this opinion, never mind lavish it upon others.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Want to compare Calculus creds?
    , @Mr. Anon
    And how much math have you had?
  172. @Lot
    I agree with every word of this, I was about to say the same thing.

    The man went to public schools in the midwest and worked his way up to CEO of what was a few years ago the largest private company in the world.

    While I am not a Putin fan, that should not stop us from trying to have friendly relations with Russia, with whom we share a lot of interests. Pumping up Russian oil production will also harm the economies of our actual enemies, the Gulf states and Iran.

    Jennifer Rubin writes:


    And then there is the accusation that ExxonMobil engaged in a massive attempt to conceal global warming data from the public
     
    While completely true, just between us iStevers, yes global warming caused by fossil fuel burning is completely true, and yes the oil companies have tried to cover this up. But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest. As for the losers, there is Bangladesh, MENA, and Central Valley farmers. I find myself unable to shed a tear. And if they ever showed any inclination to care about the environment I missed it.

    But global warming is good for the United States. It means better crop yields, warming weather, and an expansion of growing seasons in the Midwest.

    I cringe at your ignorance of large-scale stochastics.

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  173. @Romanian
    Interestingly enough, Avigdor Lieberman was born in Chișinău (Kishinev to Russian speakers), which is the capital for the Republic of Moldova. Chișinău was full of Jews. I don't know how that affected his identity, but his love of Russian literature might indicate that he did identify culturally more with the Russians than with the majority population of the Soviet Republic he was born in.

    My guess is he was well educated and Russian literature was what they taught in the schools.

    And, well, it’s Russian literature. I don’t have time for doorstop novels, but people who do tell me it’s very, very good.

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  174. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah, there's a lot of projection by American Jews of concerns over Israel's behavior, such as annexing the Golan Heights, onto Russia for, say, annexing Crimea. Israel, of course, is full of Russians, such as Israel's foreign minister, Avigdor Lieberman, many of whom think Putin and Netanyahu are similarly admirable strong leaders.

    I predicted back in 2014 that as conservative Jews turn toward Russia, liberal Jews would turn back toward Germany. You are starting to see that with the Merkel worship in the papers.

    Of course, the cognitive dissonance and psychological projection hurts mainstream “journalists” too, which is why they’re so rabid against Trump. They know, on some level, that they’re now nothing more than PR hacks for the Democrat Party using the title “journalist,” and that exposing the secrets and skullduggery of the powerful used to be their job back, for example, in the days of Watergate. It must hurt to now see others doing that job, with them being left as palace guardians to try to stop that.

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  175. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @FKA Max
    If true, Trump's best Cabinet pick yet, in my opinion.

    And his first ``Rockefeller Republican'' pick, which I have been waiting for.

    Trump as the New Nelson Rockefeller

    Last year Michael Barone suggested that Trump’s precedent was liberal Republican and big spender / big builder Nelson Rockefeller, governor of New York from 1959-1973, three time candidate for the GOP presidential nomination, and VP under Gerald Ford
     
    - http://www.unz.com/isteve/trump-as-the-new-nelson-rockefeller/

    And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming; but I still feel this is his best pick yet... if true.

    A relief - if true - after his ``Cabinet of Horrors'' picks, starting with his selection of Betsy DeVos as Secretary of Education: http://www.unz.com/isteve/donald-trump-messiah-of-american-education/#comment-1661444 & http://www.unz.com/isteve/donald-trump-messiah-of-american-education/#comment-1662808

    Understanding Time of Observation Bias

    http://www.skepticalscience.com/understanding-tobs-bias.html

    Zeke Hausfather Full Interview UQx Denial101x

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=maMEjDWgVmI

    Published on Feb 28, 2016


    Hausfather explains the surface temperature record and some of the groups and individuals that have independently come to similar results. He also discusses how to communicate with a highly technical audience when they don't have specific expertise in your field.

    “And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming.”

    Science is only as as good as the data it collects. If the data is junk, the science is junk. There are a lot of problems with the measuring stations used to collect temperatures around the United States. Look up ‘heat islands,’ and start from there. The measuring stations being used to support the notion that global warming exists are disproportionately city-based, and not rural-based.

    Cities are ‘heat islands’ because concrete absorbs sunlight and radiates it back out, which helps keep their temperatures at a higher level while the surrounding temperature cools. For example, if you’re familiar with how hot big cities are around 9 pm to 3 am at night in summer, you’ll see the effect. Houses in summer show the same properties. They’ll roast you on a summer night without air conditioning or good ventilation to move the trapped heat outside the house.

    The use of ‘heat islands’ will warp the data collected because they give you artificially inflated temperatures. ‘Heat islands’ are only a tiny portion of the total global mass, and their effect is minimal on overall temperature averages. The data from rural areas doesn’t support the notion that the globe is warming.

    ‘Belief’ is claptrap when it comes to science. You need good quality data, and that alone.

    Read More
    • Replies: @FKA Max
    Thank you for your feedback!

    You are probably aware of this debate already...

    America’s First Great Global Warming Debate

    Thomas Jefferson and Noah Webster argue over conventional wisdom that lasted thousands of years

    Webster concluded by rejecting the crude warming theory of Jefferson and Williams in favor of a more subtle rendering of the data. The conversion of forests to fields, he acknowledged, has led to some microclimatic changes—namely, more windiness and more variation in winter conditions. But while snow doesn’t stay on the ground as long, that doesn’t necessarily mean the country as a whole gets less snowfall each winter: “We have, in the cultivated districts, deep snow today, and none tomorrow; but the same quantity of snow falling in the woods, lies there till spring….This will explain all the appearances of the seasons without resorting to the unphilosophical hypothesis of a general increase in heat.”
     

    - http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/americas-first-great-global-warming-debate-31911494/

    I participated in another discussion on this topic on a blog post by Vox Day titled ``Reforestation''. It might interest you. There is so much to learn, and there are so many different variables to take into account: http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/10/reforestation.html


    "Even well-managed forests today store less carbon than their natural counterparts in 1750," Kim Naudts, of the Laboratory of Climate Science and Environment in Gif-sur-Yvette, France and an author on the paper told the BBC. "Due to the shift to conifer species, there was a warming over Europe of almost 0.12 degrees; it is absolutely caused because the conifers are darker and absorb more solar radiation."
     
    - http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/10/reforestation.html#c5624024826883589271

    The following research supports your skepticism, since conifers produce aerosol more efficiently than deciduous trees above a certain temperature, which forms more clouds, and contributes to surface cooling [...]
    Could plants help to slow the march of global warming?

    It's possible, suggests a new study, which finds that as climates warm around the world, plants may respond by releasing more aerosol particles into the atmosphere.
     

    - http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/10/reforestation.html#c8606430294332016972
  176. @JohnnyD
    @Dave Pinsen
    I think John Mearsheimer argued that oil companies prefer stability in the Middle East, which it makes easier to extract the oil. They loathe regime change/nation building because they need someone in charge to do business.

    Exactly the comment I was going to make. It has been a while, but I think “The Israeli Lobby” devoted a couple of pages to arguing that the major oil companies were not enthusiastic about the invasion, and would have preferred a normalization of relations with Saddam, in order to compete for oil concessions.

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  177. @Anon 2
    Actually the fear of the czars is not entirely
    irrational. Let's not forget that the "Russian"
    czars have been heavily German. The Romanov
    dynasty rulers (1613-1761) intermarried with the
    German aristocracy, and the Holstein-Gottorp-
    Romanov dynasty (1761-1917) was directly German,
    e.g., Catherine the Great, who is still highly admired,
    was German by birth.

    As we know, the Jews were expelled from England,
    France, Italy, Spain, often repeatedly. But in Germany
    (i.e., the German states within the Holy Roman
    Empire) they were not just expelled but slaughtered.
    Many historians regard the Rhineland massacres of the
    Jews in 1096 as the first manifestation of German
    antisemitism that ultimately culminated in the Holocaust.

    So how did the Jews end up in Russia? After they were mostly
    expelled from Western Europe, they went east to the Polish-
    Lithuanian Commonwealth which comprised not just eastern
    Poland but also Lithuania, what is today known as Belarus,
    and western Ukraine (Putin keeps referring to Lvov as a Polish
    city). The Commonwealth (or Republic) prized itself on
    religious liberty - when you examine the history of Poland
    you note that even though the Polish are culturally Christian,
    theologically they tend to be somewhat Unitarian and hence
    Poland never engaged in religious wars that plagued Western
    Europe.

    Then in 1772 Catherine the Great, the German ruler in charge
    of Russia, annexed some of the eastern parts of the Commonwealth
    and with them the Jewish population that lived there. However,
    even then the Jews were confined to the Pale of Settlement (mostly
    Poland, etc) and not allowed to live in Moscow or St. Petersburg.
    This only gradually changed throughout the 19th century. Until
    1772 the Jews were prohibited from settling in Russia

    Nice text carving!

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  178. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Anonym
    Trump, though, has never been a politician, and has only been in an executive role in business, and indeed a private business, answerable to no one. This, I think, will incline him to judge his cabinet members by a simple measure: are they implementing the policies that I have told them they must? I don’t think there’s going to a lot of tolerance for a failure to follow his marching orders. I suspect he has made them quite aware of that fact, as a condition of their getting their jobs.

    And this is the only thing that prevents me from outright condemning his cabinet choices. Trump's got a good track record of changing out campaign managers whenever they no longer serve his purpose. My hope is that as soon as one of these cabinet members starts thinking he's in charge of policy, he gets swapped out like Manafort or Lewandowski.

    Coulter and Kaus are not so sanguine.

    Supposedly it was Trump’s kids that forced him to get rid of Lewandowski because he didn’t have a good idea of what to do about Khan. And Manafort took himself out when his Russian connections were becoming a distraction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @D. K.
    The Khan controversy arose during the Democratic National Convention, in late July. Corey Lewandowski had been unceremoniously fired by Donald Trump long before that.
    , @Anonym
    Supposedly it was Trump’s kids that forced him to get rid of Lewandowski because he didn’t have a good idea of what to do about Khan. And Manafort took himself out when his Russian connections were becoming a distraction.

    I think it's more reasonable to think that Trump hired Manafort because he needed that specific expertise to counter Cruz's delegate stealing. As far as Manafort leaving, often resigning is mutual or an intelligent thing to take as an employee when an employer wants you gone, for your own reputation. Yes, there was the Russian connection but post-convention Manafort had outlived his usefulness, and one can't argue with Bannon's success.

    Lewandowski = took Trump from start to leading candidate
    Manafort = sealed the deal at the convention, Trump nominee
    Bannon = defeated Hillary

    Of course, Trump himself had a lot to do with the outcomes but there was a different manager for each job.
  179. @Hunsdon
    Dude, the idea of Putin as God-Emperor is so 2014. He can be Tsarskii Bog Bsey Rossii, we've got our own.

    We've gotten used to Russia being weak, but that was situational. Russia's getting stronger. We can either accommodate ourselves to that, or oppose it, but if we're going to oppose it, we should have a damn good reason to be looking for a fight with a nuclear armed superpower.

    Putin is like a poker player who is bluffing to convince you that his cards are a lot better than they really are. Russia’s working population (half of ours) is declining, oil (just about their only export worthy product) is declining and their GDP is less than Canada’s (even though Canada has 1/4 as many people) . They are not “getting stronger” by any reasonable measure.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    Yes, and moreover, with the exception
    of France, Russia really has no friends
    in Europe. All the countries along its perimeter,
    Finland, Baltic countries, Poland, and Ukraine,
    exhibit varying levels of hatred and distrust toward
    Russia because they have bad memories of the
    Russian Empire and later the Soviet Union (for
    example, Communist Russia did not permit the
    members of the Soviet bloc to be beneficiaries of
    Marshall Plan aid and their children were forced
    to study Russian, a language of dubious importance
    compared to English). These negative attitudes were
    submerged for awhile, and then re-emerged with the
    annexation of Crimea and Russian aggression toward
    Ukraine.

    Do the Russians enjoy being disliked, even hated in some
    cases? I doubt it. Russia is the only country in Europe that
    still generates this kind of animosity and distrust. Of course,
    intelligent people make a distinction between the leadership
    and the rest of the population. The problem is that Putin
    continues to be immensely popular in Russia, and even Stalin
    still has a lot of fans. The Russians, in my experience, are very
    nostalgic about the 1880s -1890s when the Russian Empire was
    at the height of its power, and the Russian elites, brimming with self-
    confidence, were generating great literature and great music. Unfortunately,
    this was at the expense of the defeated countries around Russia that
    continue to have bad memories of that period. Funny how that works
  180. @SFG
    Well, he's untrustworthy from the American point of view. He seems to be quite ably increasing the influence of Russia, which is his job. It's Putin's job to subvert his rivals, like the USA. It's our job as Americans to resist that. We can still ally with him where useful, and certainly starting fights over junk like gay marriage is a waste of time and potentially dangerous.

    Putin is increasing the influence of Russia?

    Perhaps but in the meantime Russia is in the
    second year of a major recession. The Russian
    ruble’s drop has single-handedly driven out
    Russian tourists from Western Europe. Of
    course, the major reason is the drop in the
    price oil (and the sanctions don’t help either).
    The say that the Russian self-confidence rises
    and falls with the price of oil. That’s the price
    Russia pays for being a petrostate, and currently
    Brent oil hovers around $54 per barrel, which
    is still low. Russia needs oil to rise to $70 per
    barrel to balance its budget, and that’s not likely
    to happen. Once oil rises to $55-60, the American
    shale oil kicks in and prevents it from rising further.
    Iranian oil is also having an effect. Basically, there
    is a continuing oil glut, and that’s not good for Russia
    (or Saudi Arabia, Nigeria, and Venezuela)

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  181. @Romanian
    Interestingly enough, Avigdor Lieberman was born in Chișinău (Kishinev to Russian speakers), which is the capital for the Republic of Moldova. Chișinău was full of Jews. I don't know how that affected his identity, but his love of Russian literature might indicate that he did identify culturally more with the Russians than with the majority population of the Soviet Republic he was born in.

    Lieberman has a Eastern Bloc affectation, but he was actually born to a quite oldschool Jewish family and spoke Yiddish before he did both Russian and Romanian.

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  182. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian

    Hahaha.. Successfully gas lighted. I can tell you right now that it doesn’t matter

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  183. @Hunsdon
    Dude, the idea of Putin as God-Emperor is so 2014. He can be Tsarskii Bog Bsey Rossii, we've got our own.

    We've gotten used to Russia being weak, but that was situational. Russia's getting stronger. We can either accommodate ourselves to that, or oppose it, but if we're going to oppose it, we should have a damn good reason to be looking for a fight with a nuclear armed superpower.

    Russia is not getting stronger. Putin has become
    more aggressive, taking advantage of Obama’s
    passivity, and is trying to distract the Russian
    population from the economic troubles at home,
    namely the continuing recession and the major
    drop in the price of oil.

    This has had an interesting effect on Russia’s
    immediate neighborhood. Belarus, which has
    been to a large extent economically integrated
    with Russia and was doing reasonably well compared
    to Ukraine, is, like Russia, experiencing economic
    problems, has recently made overtures to Poland,
    its immediate EU neighbor to the west. Poland
    currently hosts over a million Ukrainian men and
    women, typically on short-term work permits and
    student visas. Ukrainian women may also be looking
    for husbands in Poland. What’s happening now is that
    increasingly also Belarusians are coming to Poland
    to ease the growing labor shortage.

    Belarus and western Ukraine used to be part of the
    vast Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Belarus
    to some extent was settled by the expanding Polish
    population in the 16-17th centuries, who often
    converted to Orthodox Christianity and effectively
    became Ruthenians. Many Polish still have relatives in
    Belarus, as well as Ukraine, and even Russia. It almost
    seems like geography is destiny and many Ukrainians
    and Belarusians, lured by the West, are drawn to Poland
    again, and the old federal Commonwealth is recreating
    itself

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    • Replies: @Anon 2
    OT Another interesting development in Europe
    is the rapprochement between Britain and
    Poland. High-level government delegations
    were exchanged, and the prospects for more
    trade, etc are getting better. Britain and
    Poland have a few things in common. Both
    lie on the periphery of the European Union,
    both rejected the euro, and now Britain hosts
    about 800,000 Polish employees. Both are
    interested in keeping NATO strong in view of
    the renewed Russian aggressiveness. Moreover,
    Britain needs an ally in the EU to ease the Brexit
    transition.

    England and Poland used to be closer centuries ago.
    For example, Mieszko I (10th century Polish ruler)'s
    daughter became the queen of Sweden and England at the time
    when Denmark was a big bad country and was throwing
    its weight around
    , @5371
    [the continuing recession and the major
    drop in the price of oil]

    You follow the news with a bit of a delay, don't you?
  184. @candid_observer
    On some level, I don't even get what the Russian conspiracy is supposed to be about.

    The Russians are going to dominate our politics and nation and do what, exactly? Make us Communist when they aren't Communists themselves? Turn us into Russian nationalists? Allow Russia to take over NATO, though they would seem to have no desire to interfere outside of certain areas already with a Russian component, such as the Ukraine?

    At least made it a little sense to fear monger about the Russians when they were Communists and controlled the Eastern Bloc, and, at least on paper, were committed to taking over other territories for Communism. But what is the fear here?

    I mean, is it really anything more than that the Russians won't support gay marriage? Are they conspiring to make American gays feel rather bad about themselves, because someone somewhere doesn't entirely approve of them, and that's very hurtful of the Russians?

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  185. @Anon 2
    Russia is not getting stronger. Putin has become
    more aggressive, taking advantage of Obama's
    passivity, and is trying to distract the Russian
    population from the economic troubles at home,
    namely the continuing recession and the major
    drop in the price of oil.

    This has had an interesting effect on Russia's
    immediate neighborhood. Belarus, which has
    been to a large extent economically integrated
    with Russia and was doing reasonably well compared
    to Ukraine, is, like Russia, experiencing economic
    problems, has recently made overtures to Poland,
    its immediate EU neighbor to the west. Poland
    currently hosts over a million Ukrainian men and
    women, typically on short-term work permits and
    student visas. Ukrainian women may also be looking
    for husbands in Poland. What's happening now is that
    increasingly also Belarusians are coming to Poland
    to ease the growing labor shortage.

    Belarus and western Ukraine used to be part of the
    vast Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Belarus
    to some extent was settled by the expanding Polish
    population in the 16-17th centuries, who often
    converted to Orthodox Christianity and effectively
    became Ruthenians. Many Polish still have relatives in
    Belarus, as well as Ukraine, and even Russia. It almost
    seems like geography is destiny and many Ukrainians
    and Belarusians, lured by the West, are drawn to Poland
    again, and the old federal Commonwealth is recreating
    itself

    OT Another interesting development in Europe
    is the rapprochement between Britain and
    Poland. High-level government delegations
    were exchanged, and the prospects for more
    trade, etc are getting better. Britain and
    Poland have a few things in common. Both
    lie on the periphery of the European Union,
    both rejected the euro, and now Britain hosts
    about 800,000 Polish employees. Both are
    interested in keeping NATO strong in view of
    the renewed Russian aggressiveness. Moreover,
    Britain needs an ally in the EU to ease the Brexit
    transition.

    England and Poland used to be closer centuries ago.
    For example, Mieszko I (10th century Polish ruler)’s
    daughter became the queen of Sweden and England at the time
    when Denmark was a big bad country and was throwing
    its weight around

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    • Replies: @5371
    [England and Poland used to be closer centuries ago.
    For example, Mieszko I (10th century Polish ruler)’s
    daughter became the queen of Sweden and England at the time
    when Denmark was a big bad country and was throwing
    its weight around]

    She was queen of Denmark for much longer than she was queen of England, according to those sources. More importantly, it's ridiculous to claim her career as showing a general closeness between Poland and England. It would be like my claiming that Henry I of France's marriage with Anna daughter of Yaroslav of Kiev showed a general closeness between Russia and France at that time.
  186. @schmenz
    Franco can not be placed alongside of Stalin and Hitler unless one throws history to the winds. I find that most people who characterize Franco in this way have drunk too deeply of the Black Legend against Spain which precludes them from forming a more objective opinion.

    The Spanish Communists began their church burnings and murders and chaos in 1931, years before Franco finally acted to restore order. He had to, since the government in power did nothing to put an end to it.

    You might be interested to know how Franco dealt with Hitler. He sidelined him at every opportunity and Hitler got nowhere with him. He did much to preserve Spanish culture in art and music as well. But the Left (and some poorly-educated Rightists) still cling to the anti-Franco fairy tales.

    By the way, the police state you refer to was not Franco's but his predecessor's. You really owe it to yourself to take a glance at the other side's point of view.

    And Franco could have made things very difficult for the Allies in WW2 if he’d let the Germans take Gibraltar.

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  187. The Russian influence thing, joined by usual suspects McCain and Graham, along with ridiculous recounts and touting of Clinton’s meaningless popular vote win and stories of faithless electors are quite brazen attempts to delegitimize Trump (or worse).
    Trump needs to be ready to play hard ball .
    These vile people do not give a shit about the country.
    At first I thought Rush was exaggerating, but these days before inauguration, indeed, are perilous times.
    How far will they go?
    Why does Obama want results of probe before 1/20?
    If Trump is not sworn in, there would (and should) be an insurrection.
    This all sounds crazy, but it is the worst I have seen it in my lifetime.

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  188. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian.

    And why would that be a problem? If Russia’s government acted in a pro-American way, as you allege, surely it’s appropriate for the American government to reciprocate. God forbid two nuclear superpowers should be friendly and cooperate!

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    • Replies: @epebble
    That is an excellent argument. Why complain about Russia's action if it caused US being rescued from evident harm? It is time the two nations buried the hatchet and openly declare friendship. Trump can start by awarding a Presidential Medal of Freedom to Putin and Putin can award an Order of Friendship to Trump. Then they can issue a joint declaration that we are entering a new era of peace and Trump can declare that NATO will be disbanded. Let the wily allies pay for their own defense if they think their freedoms are worth it. Trump should focus on MAGA within the borders.
    , @SFG
    I guess. I just don't see why Russia can't be playing the alt-right the way Israel plays the MSM (and much of the rest of the power structure).
  189. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    If Jennifer Rubin thinks Tillerson is the worst, he must be the best.

    If Jennifer Rubin thinks Tillerson is the worst, he must be the best.

    I’ll wait till I’ve heard from Ms. Nudelman.

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  190. @Anonymous
    Tillerson is a huge globalist! Loves common core for everybody else's children. Rejects American energy independence as a policy goal. Yuck.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2016/12/10/carbon-tax-climate-trade-education-policy-concerns-arise-with-trumps-
    likely-secretary-of-state-selection-tillerson/

    His statements in this article are disturbing but also a few years old.

    Reading Breitbart headline tonight on Puzder changing his tune on immigration: apparently all of these Jeb Bush approved cabinet picks are going to dance to Trump's tune -- even though they are emotionally alienated from Trump's politics, positions, platform.

    Does anyone really believe this will happen? It looks like a cabinet perfectly staged for a cuckservative like Mike Pence to run once Trump is out of the picture.

    Tillerson is a huge globalist! Loves common core for everybody else’s children. Rejects American energy independence as a policy goal.

    Fossil fuels are vastly underpriced. The smart decision is to import fossil fuels and save one’s own for the time when the price catches up to the value.

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  191. @Amasius
    The Mormon Mafia.

    http://www.cnn.com/2016/10/28/politics/evan-mcmullin-mormon-mafia/index.html

    Webster Tarpley promoted the theory back in 2012 that Benghazi was an attempted coup of sorts by Mormons to get Romney in.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jDAE-42Xeiw

    http://occupywallst.org/forum/what-is-the-mormon-mafia/

    I don't have any opinion as to whether it's true or how true it is. I mostly just like the idea of a "Mormon Mafia." It makes me laugh. Sounds cool too. Mormons ARE weird enough to be involved in something like this, so who knows.

    Mormon Mafia is a well known term in Fed LE agencies where Mormons seem to get away with all sorts of nonsense that would get others chewed up.

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  192. @Anonymous
    Supposedly it was Trump's kids that forced him to get rid of Lewandowski because he didn't have a good idea of what to do about Khan. And Manafort took himself out when his Russian connections were becoming a distraction.

    The Khan controversy arose during the Democratic National Convention, in late July. Corey Lewandowski had been unceremoniously fired by Donald Trump long before that.

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  193. @Cagey Beast
    Vladimir Putin does not see Anglo Saxon Protestants as his people. Vladimir Putin is a Russian nationalist, not a White nationalist.

    Do WASPs generally see any other European or European derived people as their folks either? Do WASPs even see other Anglo-Saxon Protestants as their own people, apart from their own family and immediate social circle? My lifetime of experience so far tells me "no" on both counts.

    Do WASPs generally see any other European or European derived people as their folks either?

    The history of the 20th century suggests that there’s not a great deal of solidarity among Europeans. European whites not only butchered each other, they demonised each other to the point where the mass slaughter of civilians was considered to be not only acceptable but laudable.

    When it comes to the crunch people will come down on the side of those they perceive to be their own people and they usually define that quite narrowly. People who speak the same language, share the same culture, share the same history. And there is no white language, nor is there a “white culture” – which is why white nationalism is nonsense.

    I’m an Australian. My loyalty is to Australia. I’m an Anglo-Celt so I have some emotional attachment to Britain. Beyond that, nothing.

    I have goodwill towards Americans, Canadians, Germans and Dutch but they’re not my people and I’d be appalled by the thought of Australians being asked to sacrifice their lives to help Americans, Canadians, Germans or Dutch. I have goodwill towards the Japanese and the Chinese as well. To be honest I care as much for the Japanese as I do for Americans – if they were in trouble I’d be happy to offer them all assistance short of actual assistance.

    Nationalism makes sense to me. Anything else, including white nationalism or pan-Europeanism is just woolly-minded feel-good liberal internationalism .

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "I’m an Australian. My loyalty is to Australia. I’m an Anglo-Celt so I have some emotional attachment to Britain. Beyond that, nothing."

    As an Anglo Saxon Celt Australian the only thing you have in common with Russians is that you are a Caucasoid just like them and that's where the similarities end. You have no ancestral ties to Russia and you do not speak the same language as them. Also Russians practice a different branch of Christianity than British descendant people. Expecting you to show loyalty to Russia is like expecting Manny Pacquiao to show loyalty to China because he is a Mongoloid just like them.
    , @BB753
    What about Indonesians, Malays, Papuans, Pacific Islanders? You don't care about them the way you do about the Chinese and the Japanese, yet they're closer neighbors to you..
  194. @Mr. Anon
    "How about rising global temperatures? I had to look long and hard to come up with that one."

    Yes, you're right. A consequence of global warming is global warming. Of coure, in the past, increases in temperature have preceded increases in CO2 concentration. The temperature record is itself a matter of some dispute, given that NOAA is continually fiddling with it. Of course a government agency would never cheat with that kind of thing. Next you'll be telling me that the CPI might not be trustworthy.

    I was mainly referring to other predictions made by AGW proponents in the early 00s - that the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes would increase, that snow would vanish from the British Isles, etc. These predictions were not made by Al Gore, but by actual climate scientists at reputable institutions.

    Back in 1988, James Hanson offered to Congress (and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research) three predictions of mean global temperature over the subsequent 20 years, under three assumptions: a.) No change in CO2 emissions or the growth of CO2 emissions, b.) moderate change, and c.) a more drastic change, essentially embodying what was targeted by the Kyoto protocol.

    Which prediction was most nearly correct by 2008? Option c, despite the fact that America never adopted Kyoto, and it was mostly abandoned. That was a state-of-the-art prediction of the latest GCMs back in the late 80s, which we were assured were highly reliable. Of course, the same kind of people (and in fact, many of the same actual people) assure us today that their new and improved GCMs are highly reliable.

    Is CO2 a "green-house" gas (i.e., a strong absorber in the far infrared) ? Yes. Does CO2 serve to insulate the Earth and cause it to be warmer than it otherwise would be? Yes. Is the global mean temperature of Earth increasing? Yes. Is it partly man-made? Probably yes. Is it wholly man-made? Nobody can truly say. Will it spell doom for us? Probably not.

    A consequence of global warming is global warming

    Global warming is bad because it causes global warming. It’s a bit like diversity is good because it encourages diversity. Nationalism is bad because it leads to nationalism. Inequality is bad because it results in inequality. Race realism is bad because it leads to realism about race. Freedom of speech is dangerous because it allows freedom of speech.

    This pretty much sums up modern thought.

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  195. @Jack D
    Putin is like a poker player who is bluffing to convince you that his cards are a lot better than they really are. Russia's working population (half of ours) is declining, oil (just about their only export worthy product) is declining and their GDP is less than Canada's (even though Canada has 1/4 as many people) . They are not "getting stronger" by any reasonable measure.

    Yes, and moreover, with the exception
    of France, Russia really has no friends
    in Europe. All the countries along its perimeter,
    Finland, Baltic countries, Poland, and Ukraine,
    exhibit varying levels of hatred and distrust toward
    Russia because they have bad memories of the
    Russian Empire and later the Soviet Union (for
    example, Communist Russia did not permit the
    members of the Soviet bloc to be beneficiaries of
    Marshall Plan aid and their children were forced
    to study Russian, a language of dubious importance
    compared to English). These negative attitudes were
    submerged for awhile, and then re-emerged with the
    annexation of Crimea and Russian aggression toward
    Ukraine.

    Do the Russians enjoy being disliked, even hated in some
    cases? I doubt it. Russia is the only country in Europe that
    still generates this kind of animosity and distrust. Of course,
    intelligent people make a distinction between the leadership
    and the rest of the population. The problem is that Putin
    continues to be immensely popular in Russia, and even Stalin
    still has a lot of fans. The Russians, in my experience, are very
    nostalgic about the 1880s -1890s when the Russian Empire was
    at the height of its power, and the Russian elites, brimming with self-
    confidence, were generating great literature and great music. Unfortunately,
    this was at the expense of the defeated countries around Russia that
    continue to have bad memories of that period. Funny how that works

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  196. @Anonymous
    Supposedly it was Trump's kids that forced him to get rid of Lewandowski because he didn't have a good idea of what to do about Khan. And Manafort took himself out when his Russian connections were becoming a distraction.

    Supposedly it was Trump’s kids that forced him to get rid of Lewandowski because he didn’t have a good idea of what to do about Khan. And Manafort took himself out when his Russian connections were becoming a distraction.

    I think it’s more reasonable to think that Trump hired Manafort because he needed that specific expertise to counter Cruz’s delegate stealing. As far as Manafort leaving, often resigning is mutual or an intelligent thing to take as an employee when an employer wants you gone, for your own reputation. Yes, there was the Russian connection but post-convention Manafort had outlived his usefulness, and one can’t argue with Bannon’s success.

    Lewandowski = took Trump from start to leading candidate
    Manafort = sealed the deal at the convention, Trump nominee
    Bannon = defeated Hillary

    Of course, Trump himself had a lot to do with the outcomes but there was a different manager for each job.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    George Steinbrenner used to do the same thing with Yankee baseball managers. Billy Martin could fire up a team, but he'd soon burn them out. So Steinbrenner would fire Martin and put somebody calmer in his job until the team was less stressed but getting complacent, then he'd fire the new guy and rehire Martin. He hired Martin five separate times. To Los Angeles Dodgers fans, who had two managers in 45 years, it seemed pretty crazy, but it worked fairly well for the Yankees.

    I'm sure Trump closely observed Steinbrenner since it was always a huge story in the New York press when Trump was just starting to enter the spotlight himself.

  197. @anonguy
    Remember when I told you guys that women love Trump and I was so right and everyone was so wrong?

    Anyhow, Marines love Trump, like women do, and the other armed forces follow the sensibility of the Corps when it comes to manhood and hence political issues.

    Done deal with those guys, and Mattis/Dunford/Kelly are an iron lock, two of them being officially Deplorables, Dunford kind of skated through somehow but he is an ok guy, if a little more oily political than Mattis/Kelly

    Anyhow, anyone who loves Marines and whom Marines love is totally a winner because USMC always wins, always. And women love Marines, or ex Marines at least.

    Trump knows what he is doing, which star to hitch to, USMC is one of the best brands out there, name a better one if you've got it.

    Trump did worse with women than men, though not as much as the lefties had hoped.

    USMC–oh yes.

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  198. @Anonym
    Supposedly it was Trump’s kids that forced him to get rid of Lewandowski because he didn’t have a good idea of what to do about Khan. And Manafort took himself out when his Russian connections were becoming a distraction.

    I think it's more reasonable to think that Trump hired Manafort because he needed that specific expertise to counter Cruz's delegate stealing. As far as Manafort leaving, often resigning is mutual or an intelligent thing to take as an employee when an employer wants you gone, for your own reputation. Yes, there was the Russian connection but post-convention Manafort had outlived his usefulness, and one can't argue with Bannon's success.

    Lewandowski = took Trump from start to leading candidate
    Manafort = sealed the deal at the convention, Trump nominee
    Bannon = defeated Hillary

    Of course, Trump himself had a lot to do with the outcomes but there was a different manager for each job.

    George Steinbrenner used to do the same thing with Yankee baseball managers. Billy Martin could fire up a team, but he’d soon burn them out. So Steinbrenner would fire Martin and put somebody calmer in his job until the team was less stressed but getting complacent, then he’d fire the new guy and rehire Martin. He hired Martin five separate times. To Los Angeles Dodgers fans, who had two managers in 45 years, it seemed pretty crazy, but it worked fairly well for the Yankees.

    I’m sure Trump closely observed Steinbrenner since it was always a huge story in the New York press when Trump was just starting to enter the spotlight himself.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    Interesting comparison. It does seem like a lot of effort to hire 3 different people to do specific jobs at specific points of time, but maybe that's why Trump's the billionaire.

    In the USA there is also a lot less legal hassle with firing someone. In other countries, an employee actually has to do something wrong in a lot of cases, rather than committing the sin of being suboptimal. As a corollary, in dissimilar countries, if one is smart the hiring must be done very carefully. By the time you've reached Trump's age, the habits have been baked in I would think. If Trump had built his business in another country, he might have stuck with the one campaign manager.

    Or not. For example, hiring lawyers. The best lawyer for one case is not necessarily the best lawyer for another case. It depends on what they are good at.

    , @ben tillman
    Good point.
  199. @Olorin
    You don't have enough calculus to form this opinion, never mind lavish it upon others.

    Want to compare Calculus creds?

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  200. @ben tillman

    If Jennifer Rubin thinks Tillerson is the worst, he must be the best.
     
    I'll wait till I've heard from Ms. Nudelman.

    Judith? or Michael?

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  201. @whorefinder

    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to ‘the world’ for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.
     
    You're dreaming if you think an oath will keep them from rolling over. Other nations had oaths to the Republic, the people, etc. and it never prevented multiple coups and the army simply following orders.

    Personalities and armies haven't changed.

    Your cynicism is worthy of John Derbyshire.

    But we aren’t “Other nations.” And “personalities and armies haven’t changed” is the voice of pessimism. If pessimism were the correct sentiment for the moment, then Trump would be licking his wounds and Britain would have voted remain.

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    • Replies: @whorefinder

    we aren’t “Other nations.” And “personalities and armies haven’t changed” is the voice of pessimism. If pessimism were the correct sentiment for the moment, then Trump would be licking his wounds and Britain would have voted remain.
     
    You're being ridiculous. Comparing the outcome of a contested vote to natural human reactions as seen through literally thousands of history is silly.

    Thinking that the piece of paper in Washington that has been shredded in by the Left in the last 100 years will in any way change human nature and behavior is as stupid as believing all races are the same. You're like some Roman in 200 A.D. thinking that a secession of the plebs will shortly take place to bring the emperor to heel. Wake up, it ain't gonna happen.

    You might was well expect starving people not to turn to violence.
  202. @Jack Hanson
    Coulter and Kaus have been predicting doom since the Pence pick and haven't let up. Its as tiresome as the doom masturbation here.

    Keeping the pressure on from the right is of utmost importance, even when the narrative isn’t strictly accurate. It’s why we got that statement from Puzder, why the Romney and McCaul/homeland picks were quashed, why the “big immigration speech” was a doubling-down instead of a flip-flop, and so on.

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    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    I think its more than a bit of confirmation bias to claim that because some commenters made a bunch of noise Trump changed his mind.

    Trump was likely going to do those things anyway, its just some people like to get worked into a froth and think the sky is falling at any moment.
  203. @Charles Erwin Wilson
    Our military members must swear an oath to the Constitution, and to defend it against all enemies both foreign and domestic.

    The enemies clause applies to the Elite and almost all Democrats. The latter have had an allegiance to 'the world' for quite some time (cf. flying the United Nations flag). Their Republican co-conspirators are one and the same.

    The Romans had none of this.

    Actually, Rome fell after it started giving away citizenship like candy. People no longer felt pride at being Roman. There was likely a coup or two around a time of radical change like that.

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  204. @Anon
    "And yes, I actually believe in the left-wing conspiracy theory/idea/science of anthropogenic global warming."

    Science is only as as good as the data it collects. If the data is junk, the science is junk. There are a lot of problems with the measuring stations used to collect temperatures around the United States. Look up 'heat islands,' and start from there. The measuring stations being used to support the notion that global warming exists are disproportionately city-based, and not rural-based.

    Cities are 'heat islands' because concrete absorbs sunlight and radiates it back out, which helps keep their temperatures at a higher level while the surrounding temperature cools. For example, if you're familiar with how hot big cities are around 9 pm to 3 am at night in summer, you'll see the effect. Houses in summer show the same properties. They'll roast you on a summer night without air conditioning or good ventilation to move the trapped heat outside the house.

    The use of 'heat islands' will warp the data collected because they give you artificially inflated temperatures. 'Heat islands' are only a tiny portion of the total global mass, and their effect is minimal on overall temperature averages. The data from rural areas doesn't support the notion that the globe is warming.

    'Belief' is claptrap when it comes to science. You need good quality data, and that alone.

    Thank you for your feedback!

    You are probably aware of this debate already…

    America’s First Great Global Warming Debate

    Thomas Jefferson and Noah Webster argue over conventional wisdom that lasted thousands of years

    Webster concluded by rejecting the crude warming theory of Jefferson and Williams in favor of a more subtle rendering of the data. The conversion of forests to fields, he acknowledged, has led to some microclimatic changes—namely, more windiness and more variation in winter conditions. But while snow doesn’t stay on the ground as long, that doesn’t necessarily mean the country as a whole gets less snowfall each winter: “We have, in the cultivated districts, deep snow today, and none tomorrow; but the same quantity of snow falling in the woods, lies there till spring….This will explain all the appearances of the seasons without resorting to the unphilosophical hypothesis of a general increase in heat.”

    http://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/americas-first-great-global-warming-debate-31911494/

    I participated in another discussion on this topic on a blog post by Vox Day titled “Reforestation”. It might interest you. There is so much to learn, and there are so many different variables to take into account: http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/10/reforestation.html

    “Even well-managed forests today store less carbon than their natural counterparts in 1750,” Kim Naudts, of the Laboratory of Climate Science and Environment in Gif-sur-Yvette, France and an author on the paper told the BBC. “Due to the shift to conifer species, there was a warming over Europe of almost 0.12 degrees; it is absolutely caused because the conifers are darker and absorb more solar radiation.”

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/10/reforestation.html#c5624024826883589271

    The following research supports your skepticism, since conifers produce aerosol more efficiently than deciduous trees above a certain temperature, which forms more clouds, and contributes to surface cooling [...]
    Could plants help to slow the march of global warming?

    It’s possible, suggests a new study, which finds that as climates warm around the world, plants may respond by releasing more aerosol particles into the atmosphere.

    http://voxday.blogspot.com/2016/10/reforestation.html#c8606430294332016972

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  205. @Steve Sailer
    George Steinbrenner used to do the same thing with Yankee baseball managers. Billy Martin could fire up a team, but he'd soon burn them out. So Steinbrenner would fire Martin and put somebody calmer in his job until the team was less stressed but getting complacent, then he'd fire the new guy and rehire Martin. He hired Martin five separate times. To Los Angeles Dodgers fans, who had two managers in 45 years, it seemed pretty crazy, but it worked fairly well for the Yankees.

    I'm sure Trump closely observed Steinbrenner since it was always a huge story in the New York press when Trump was just starting to enter the spotlight himself.

    Interesting comparison. It does seem like a lot of effort to hire 3 different people to do specific jobs at specific points of time, but maybe that’s why Trump’s the billionaire.

    In the USA there is also a lot less legal hassle with firing someone. In other countries, an employee actually has to do something wrong in a lot of cases, rather than committing the sin of being suboptimal. As a corollary, in dissimilar countries, if one is smart the hiring must be done very carefully. By the time you’ve reached Trump’s age, the habits have been baked in I would think. If Trump had built his business in another country, he might have stuck with the one campaign manager.

    Or not. For example, hiring lawyers. The best lawyer for one case is not necessarily the best lawyer for another case. It depends on what they are good at.

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  206. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @D. K.
    The Khan controversy arose during the Democratic National Convention, in late July. Corey Lewandowski had been unceremoniously fired by Donald Trump long before that.

    I meant Curiel.

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  207. @Opinionator
    But he cares about the fate of other Whites.

    “But he cares about the fate of other Whites.”

    Vladimir Putin only cares about Russians. He doesn’t give a damn about my people the Italians for example. Which makes sense because most people only care about their immediate family and Russians are his immediate family, not the Italians or the Portuguese for example.

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  208. @dfordoom

    Do WASPs generally see any other European or European derived people as their folks either?
     
    The history of the 20th century suggests that there's not a great deal of solidarity among Europeans. European whites not only butchered each other, they demonised each other to the point where the mass slaughter of civilians was considered to be not only acceptable but laudable.

    When it comes to the crunch people will come down on the side of those they perceive to be their own people and they usually define that quite narrowly. People who speak the same language, share the same culture, share the same history. And there is no white language, nor is there a "white culture" - which is why white nationalism is nonsense.

    I'm an Australian. My loyalty is to Australia. I'm an Anglo-Celt so I have some emotional attachment to Britain. Beyond that, nothing.

    I have goodwill towards Americans, Canadians, Germans and Dutch but they're not my people and I'd be appalled by the thought of Australians being asked to sacrifice their lives to help Americans, Canadians, Germans or Dutch. I have goodwill towards the Japanese and the Chinese as well. To be honest I care as much for the Japanese as I do for Americans - if they were in trouble I'd be happy to offer them all assistance short of actual assistance.

    Nationalism makes sense to me. Anything else, including white nationalism or pan-Europeanism is just woolly-minded feel-good liberal internationalism .

    “I’m an Australian. My loyalty is to Australia. I’m an Anglo-Celt so I have some emotional attachment to Britain. Beyond that, nothing.”

    As an Anglo Saxon Celt Australian the only thing you have in common with Russians is that you are a Caucasoid just like them and that’s where the similarities end. You have no ancestral ties to Russia and you do not speak the same language as them. Also Russians practice a different branch of Christianity than British descendant people. Expecting you to show loyalty to Russia is like expecting Manny Pacquiao to show loyalty to China because he is a Mongoloid just like them.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    As an Anglo Saxon Celt Australian the only thing you have in common with Russians is that you are a Caucasoid just like them and that’s where the similarities end. You have no ancestral ties to Russia and you do not speak the same language as them. Also Russians practice a different branch of Christianity than British descendant people. Expecting you to show loyalty to Russia is like expecting Manny Pacquiao to show loyalty to China because he is a Mongoloid just like them.
     
    Agreed. That's how I feel about Americans as well. They have a different history and a different culture. Any ancestral ties I might have with Americans are well and truly lost in the mists of time. Americans, and Russians, and Chinese, and Bolivians, they're all fine people and I sincerely wish them well but to imagine they have any genuine interests in common with Australia is pure fantasy. They pursue their own interests, as they should.

    Unfortunately Australia has never pursued its own interests. We deluded ourselves that Britain would protect our interests and we learnt the hard way that they had no intention of doing so, even after tens of thousands of Australians died in the First World War protecting Britain's interests. Then we deluded ourselves that the US would protect our interests. They never have and never will (even though Australians died protecting US interests in Korea, Vietnam and sundry other futile wars) but we're so accustomed to delusion that it seems we will never learn.
  209. Nationalism makes sense to me. Anything else, including white nationalism or pan-Europeanism is just woolly-minded feel-good liberal internationalism .

    Typical liberal blindness to biological reality.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Typical liberal blindness to biological reality."

    Do you feel tribal kinship with Pakistanis because they are biological Caucasoids just like you?
    , @dfordoom

    Typical liberal blindness to biological reality.
     
    I might be many things but I can assure you that I'm no liberal. There is no ideology I detest more than liberalism.
  210. @Steve Sailer
    George Steinbrenner used to do the same thing with Yankee baseball managers. Billy Martin could fire up a team, but he'd soon burn them out. So Steinbrenner would fire Martin and put somebody calmer in his job until the team was less stressed but getting complacent, then he'd fire the new guy and rehire Martin. He hired Martin five separate times. To Los Angeles Dodgers fans, who had two managers in 45 years, it seemed pretty crazy, but it worked fairly well for the Yankees.

    I'm sure Trump closely observed Steinbrenner since it was always a huge story in the New York press when Trump was just starting to enter the spotlight himself.

    Good point.

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  211. @ben tillman

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian.
     
    And why would that be a problem? If Russia's government acted in a pro-American way, as you allege, surely it's appropriate for the American government to reciprocate. God forbid two nuclear superpowers should be friendly and cooperate!

    That is an excellent argument. Why complain about Russia’s action if it caused US being rescued from evident harm? It is time the two nations buried the hatchet and openly declare friendship. Trump can start by awarding a Presidential Medal of Freedom to Putin and Putin can award an Order of Friendship to Trump. Then they can issue a joint declaration that we are entering a new era of peace and Trump can declare that NATO will be disbanded. Let the wily allies pay for their own defense if they think their freedoms are worth it. Trump should focus on MAGA within the borders.

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  212. @Jefferson
    "But he cares about the fate of other Whites."

    Vladimir Putin only cares about Russians. He doesn't give a damn about my people the Italians for example. Which makes sense because most people only care about their immediate family and Russians are his immediate family, not the Italians or the Portuguese for example.

    You are wrong. Follow the news.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "You are wrong. Follow the news."

    I am 100 percent right and I do follow the news. Vladimir Putin has never said that he is a pan-White nationalist. Vladimir Putin feels no tribal kinship with Non Russian speakers.
  213. @Mr. Anon
    "How about rising global temperatures? I had to look long and hard to come up with that one."

    Yes, you're right. A consequence of global warming is global warming. Of coure, in the past, increases in temperature have preceded increases in CO2 concentration. The temperature record is itself a matter of some dispute, given that NOAA is continually fiddling with it. Of course a government agency would never cheat with that kind of thing. Next you'll be telling me that the CPI might not be trustworthy.

    I was mainly referring to other predictions made by AGW proponents in the early 00s - that the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes would increase, that snow would vanish from the British Isles, etc. These predictions were not made by Al Gore, but by actual climate scientists at reputable institutions.

    Back in 1988, James Hanson offered to Congress (and published in the Journal of Geophysical Research) three predictions of mean global temperature over the subsequent 20 years, under three assumptions: a.) No change in CO2 emissions or the growth of CO2 emissions, b.) moderate change, and c.) a more drastic change, essentially embodying what was targeted by the Kyoto protocol.

    Which prediction was most nearly correct by 2008? Option c, despite the fact that America never adopted Kyoto, and it was mostly abandoned. That was a state-of-the-art prediction of the latest GCMs back in the late 80s, which we were assured were highly reliable. Of course, the same kind of people (and in fact, many of the same actual people) assure us today that their new and improved GCMs are highly reliable.

    Is CO2 a "green-house" gas (i.e., a strong absorber in the far infrared) ? Yes. Does CO2 serve to insulate the Earth and cause it to be warmer than it otherwise would be? Yes. Is the global mean temperature of Earth increasing? Yes. Is it partly man-made? Probably yes. Is it wholly man-made? Nobody can truly say. Will it spell doom for us? Probably not.

    So you will believe only research that no “government agency” had its filthy hands on? Presumably you will then reject any field of knowledge which enjoyed funding by any state. Indeed, if you are consistent the curse of the libertarian will fall upon you. Having forsworn all science and technology later than prehistory, you will end up by going about on hands and knees and eating grass as the beasts of the field.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "So you will believe only research that no “government agency” had its filthy hands on?"

    No, but when NOAA admits that they have recently revised the temperature record (while at the same time it's director criticized others for doing the same thing) and concerning a highly politicized topic, Yes - I mistrust them. Systematic errors in temperature collection have been known about for a long time - I heard about them 25 years ago in a seminar on AGW. Just a year or so ago, NOAA announced a revision to it's canonical record of US land temps, which reinforces the AGW orthodoxy. Soon after that, the director of NOAA ridiculed Roy Spencer (personally mind you) and his satellite temperature data-base, because he has revised it from time to time.

    The proponents of global warming are dishonest and shifty. If they want me to believe them, they should damn well behave like scientists and not like commisars.
  214. @Anon 2
    Russia is not getting stronger. Putin has become
    more aggressive, taking advantage of Obama's
    passivity, and is trying to distract the Russian
    population from the economic troubles at home,
    namely the continuing recession and the major
    drop in the price of oil.

    This has had an interesting effect on Russia's
    immediate neighborhood. Belarus, which has
    been to a large extent economically integrated
    with Russia and was doing reasonably well compared
    to Ukraine, is, like Russia, experiencing economic
    problems, has recently made overtures to Poland,
    its immediate EU neighbor to the west. Poland
    currently hosts over a million Ukrainian men and
    women, typically on short-term work permits and
    student visas. Ukrainian women may also be looking
    for husbands in Poland. What's happening now is that
    increasingly also Belarusians are coming to Poland
    to ease the growing labor shortage.

    Belarus and western Ukraine used to be part of the
    vast Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth. Belarus
    to some extent was settled by the expanding Polish
    population in the 16-17th centuries, who often
    converted to Orthodox Christianity and effectively
    became Ruthenians. Many Polish still have relatives in
    Belarus, as well as Ukraine, and even Russia. It almost
    seems like geography is destiny and many Ukrainians
    and Belarusians, lured by the West, are drawn to Poland
    again, and the old federal Commonwealth is recreating
    itself

    [the continuing recession and the major
    drop in the price of oil]

    You follow the news with a bit of a delay, don’t you?

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  215. @Opinionator
    You are wrong. Follow the news.

    “You are wrong. Follow the news.”

    I am 100 percent right and I do follow the news. Vladimir Putin has never said that he is a pan-White nationalist. Vladimir Putin feels no tribal kinship with Non Russian speakers.

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  216. @Svigor

    Nationalism makes sense to me. Anything else, including white nationalism or pan-Europeanism is just woolly-minded feel-good liberal internationalism .
     
    Typical liberal blindness to biological reality.

    “Typical liberal blindness to biological reality.”

    Do you feel tribal kinship with Pakistanis because they are biological Caucasoids just like you?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Sean Connery and Michael Caine debate that question regarding the Kafiristanis in The Man Who Would Be King, although the movie couldn't go into as much detail in that regard as Kipling did in his short story because the film wound up being shot in Morocco and the huge cast of extras was pretty dusky. The original plan had been to shoot in Turkey, but a political problem had gotten in the way.
    , @Anonym
    Do you feel tribal kinship with Pakistanis because they are biological Caucasoids just like you?

    No. However, if I were dropped in the Congo and met up with a Pakistani, I might develop a friendship with him. However, I do not want to be colonized by Pakistanis and resent them in my country.
  217. @Anon 2
    OT Another interesting development in Europe
    is the rapprochement between Britain and
    Poland. High-level government delegations
    were exchanged, and the prospects for more
    trade, etc are getting better. Britain and
    Poland have a few things in common. Both
    lie on the periphery of the European Union,
    both rejected the euro, and now Britain hosts
    about 800,000 Polish employees. Both are
    interested in keeping NATO strong in view of
    the renewed Russian aggressiveness. Moreover,
    Britain needs an ally in the EU to ease the Brexit
    transition.

    England and Poland used to be closer centuries ago.
    For example, Mieszko I (10th century Polish ruler)'s
    daughter became the queen of Sweden and England at the time
    when Denmark was a big bad country and was throwing
    its weight around

    [England and Poland used to be closer centuries ago.
    For example, Mieszko I (10th century Polish ruler)’s
    daughter became the queen of Sweden and England at the time
    when Denmark was a big bad country and was throwing
    its weight around]

    She was queen of Denmark for much longer than she was queen of England, according to those sources. More importantly, it’s ridiculous to claim her career as showing a general closeness between Poland and England. It would be like my claiming that Henry I of France’s marriage with Anna daughter of Yaroslav of Kiev showed a general closeness between Russia and France at that time.

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  218. @snorlax
    Keeping the pressure on from the right is of utmost importance, even when the narrative isn't strictly accurate. It's why we got that statement from Puzder, why the Romney and McCaul/homeland picks were quashed, why the "big immigration speech" was a doubling-down instead of a flip-flop, and so on.

    I think its more than a bit of confirmation bias to claim that because some commenters made a bunch of noise Trump changed his mind.

    Trump was likely going to do those things anyway, its just some people like to get worked into a froth and think the sky is falling at any moment.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    It's not just confirmation bias. Trump loves his trial balloons, aka A-B testing. Coulter reads Sailer, and probably comments too sometimes. Trump also links to Breitbart more than any other website. Appropriate pushback is useful, the squeaky wheel gets the grease.
  219. @Jefferson
    "Typical liberal blindness to biological reality."

    Do you feel tribal kinship with Pakistanis because they are biological Caucasoids just like you?

    Sean Connery and Michael Caine debate that question regarding the Kafiristanis in The Man Who Would Be King, although the movie couldn’t go into as much detail in that regard as Kipling did in his short story because the film wound up being shot in Morocco and the huge cast of extras was pretty dusky. The original plan had been to shoot in Turkey, but a political problem had gotten in the way.

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  220. @SFG
    Hmm...we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian. I don't see the point in poking a rival nuclear power with idiotic complaints about gay marriage, and I have huge respect for Russian culture and contributions to science (and stopping Hitler at terrible cost), but in the world of geopolitics, a stronger Russia ain't good for the USA, just like China.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He's supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    I hope Trump cracks down on illegal immigration and doesn't get us into any more idiot neocon wars, but this Russia thing bothers me.

    I am in the minority here, but I doubt Putin is interested in defending the white race or traditional values (except as it supports his regime of course). He’s supporting nationalist parties in Europe because they weaken the EU, which is a major local rival. The FSB is just playing the same Comintern game their KGB parents played, only from the right instead of the left.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=zv5stOZU9uk

    I see elements of both here. Putin is an intelligent man. He is not permitted to see the overall weakening of the white man through divide and conquer, and be perturbed about the situation? It is kind of dumb for us to be bickering among ourselves while the non-whites colonize us and grow economically, demographically and militarily stronger. We are only about 16% of world population.

    http://www.sciencechatforum.com/viewtopic.php?f=82&t=16165

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  221. @Jack Hanson
    I think its more than a bit of confirmation bias to claim that because some commenters made a bunch of noise Trump changed his mind.

    Trump was likely going to do those things anyway, its just some people like to get worked into a froth and think the sky is falling at any moment.

    It’s not just confirmation bias. Trump loves his trial balloons, aka A-B testing. Coulter reads Sailer, and probably comments too sometimes. Trump also links to Breitbart more than any other website. Appropriate pushback is useful, the squeaky wheel gets the grease.

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    • Agree: snorlax
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Really? Which commenter do you think is secretly Coulter? I don't detect her tone in anyone.
    , @Jack Hanson
    Lets apply Occam's Butterknife to your theory that instead of Trump keeping his campaign promises and realising who elected him he's actually a secret globalist held in check by commenters and pundits moonlighting as pundits on second tier news blogs.

    Got it.
  222. @Jefferson
    "Typical liberal blindness to biological reality."

    Do you feel tribal kinship with Pakistanis because they are biological Caucasoids just like you?

    Do you feel tribal kinship with Pakistanis because they are biological Caucasoids just like you?

    No. However, if I were dropped in the Congo and met up with a Pakistani, I might develop a friendship with him. However, I do not want to be colonized by Pakistanis and resent them in my country.

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "No. However, if I were dropped in the Congo and met up with a Pakistani, I might develop a friendship with him."

    As a WASP you would develop a friendship with a Pakistani in The Congo because of his Caucasoid skull shape? It certainly would not because of shared skin color because that Paki would definitely have darker skin than you. And it certainly would not be because of shared language and religion because Pakis are Urdu speaking Muslims, not English speaking Christians.
  223. @Anon 2
    Actually the fear of the czars is not entirely
    irrational. Let's not forget that the "Russian"
    czars have been heavily German. The Romanov
    dynasty rulers (1613-1761) intermarried with the
    German aristocracy, and the Holstein-Gottorp-
    Romanov dynasty (1761-1917) was directly German,
    e.g., Catherine the Great, who is still highly admired,
    was German by birth.

    As we know, the Jews were expelled from England,
    France, Italy, Spain, often repeatedly. But in Germany
    (i.e., the German states within the Holy Roman
    Empire) they were not just expelled but slaughtered.
    Many historians regard the Rhineland massacres of the
    Jews in 1096 as the first manifestation of German
    antisemitism that ultimately culminated in the Holocaust.

    So how did the Jews end up in Russia? After they were mostly
    expelled from Western Europe, they went east to the Polish-
    Lithuanian Commonwealth which comprised not just eastern
    Poland but also Lithuania, what is today known as Belarus,
    and western Ukraine (Putin keeps referring to Lvov as a Polish
    city). The Commonwealth (or Republic) prized itself on
    religious liberty - when you examine the history of Poland
    you note that even though the Polish are culturally Christian,
    theologically they tend to be somewhat Unitarian and hence
    Poland never engaged in religious wars that plagued Western
    Europe.

    Then in 1772 Catherine the Great, the German ruler in charge
    of Russia, annexed some of the eastern parts of the Commonwealth
    and with them the Jewish population that lived there. However,
    even then the Jews were confined to the Pale of Settlement (mostly
    Poland, etc) and not allowed to live in Moscow or St. Petersburg.
    This only gradually changed throughout the 19th century. Until
    1772 the Jews were prohibited from settling in Russia

    Many historians regard the Rhineland massacres of the Jews in 1096 as the first manifestation of German antisemitism that ultimately culminated in the Holocaust.

    That wouldn’t have anything to do with the rampage of the Vatican started under Pope Urban II the previous year, would it? Naaaah…..

    ……when you examine the history of Poland you note that even though the Polish are culturally Christian, theologically they tend to be somewhat Unitarian and hence Poland never engaged in religious wars that plagued Western Europe.

    They are the most Catholic of Catholic nations and they did wage religious wars, just against Orthodox Christians instead of against Protestants like the Catholics of western Europe. The religious tolerance within the Polish-Lithuanian Commonwealth didn’t last long.

    Frankly, your whole thesis about Russian antisemitism being due to Germanic influences is garbage. It’s a homegrown product going back to the church-state combine established under Peter the Great and the ethno-religious nationalist ideology espoused by the Czars right up to 1917. It was embraced by misty-eyed Russian romantics. Dostoevsky wrote of a desire to exterminate Jews. The Protocols of the Elders of Zion hoax has been traced to the Russian Ukraine. The Aufbau Vereinigung, centered on exiled Czarists, introduced apocalyptic Russian-style antisemitism and the PEZ hoax to Germany.

    (Putin keeps referring to Lvov as a Polish city)

    That’s the most informative and interesting part of your whole post. Is Vlad just trolling the Ukrainians or making a serious signal to Poland?

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    "Antisemitism" was--obviously--a reaction to jewish exploitation of local Christians in trade and finance and to jewish exclusive tactics. Also, it wouldn't be surprising if some Slavs were aware of the jewish role in the trade of Slavic slaves.
  224. @Anonym
    Do you feel tribal kinship with Pakistanis because they are biological Caucasoids just like you?

    No. However, if I were dropped in the Congo and met up with a Pakistani, I might develop a friendship with him. However, I do not want to be colonized by Pakistanis and resent them in my country.

    “No. However, if I were dropped in the Congo and met up with a Pakistani, I might develop a friendship with him.”

    As a WASP you would develop a friendship with a Pakistani in The Congo because of his Caucasoid skull shape? It certainly would not because of shared skin color because that Paki would definitely have darker skin than you. And it certainly would not be because of shared language and religion because Pakis are Urdu speaking Muslims, not English speaking Christians.

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    • Replies: @Anonym
    As a WASP you would develop a friendship with a Pakistani in The Congo because of his Caucasoid skull shape? It certainly would not because of shared skin color because that Paki would definitely have darker skin than you. And it certainly would not be because of shared language and religion because Pakis are Urdu speaking Muslims, not English speaking Christians.

    Have you ever lived in a foreign country? English is a world language. As a practical matter there usually are NW Europeans around for one to relate to, however as a general rule one tends to gravitate to the genetically proximate, which is a relative thing.
  225. @ben tillman

    Hmm…we know the Russians intervened in favor of Trump, and now his picks are pro-Russian.
     
    And why would that be a problem? If Russia's government acted in a pro-American way, as you allege, surely it's appropriate for the American government to reciprocate. God forbid two nuclear superpowers should be friendly and cooperate!

    I guess. I just don’t see why Russia can’t be playing the alt-right the way Israel plays the MSM (and much of the rest of the power structure).

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    I just don’t see why Russia can’t be playing the alt-right the way Israel plays the MSM (and much of the rest of the power structure).
     
    It is. In both cases, the influence is more or less benign depending on the alignment of real and perceived interests. From the perspective of the alt-right, that alignment seems pretty close presently, at least relative to their (shared) adversaries.

    Adversaries shared by many commenters here neither alt nor right nor Russian. That will happen when power is seized and clung to without authority.
  226. @5371
    So you will believe only research that no "government agency" had its filthy hands on? Presumably you will then reject any field of knowledge which enjoyed funding by any state. Indeed, if you are consistent the curse of the libertarian will fall upon you. Having forsworn all science and technology later than prehistory, you will end up by going about on hands and knees and eating grass as the beasts of the field.

    “So you will believe only research that no “government agency” had its filthy hands on?”

    No, but when NOAA admits that they have recently revised the temperature record (while at the same time it’s director criticized others for doing the same thing) and concerning a highly politicized topic, Yes – I mistrust them. Systematic errors in temperature collection have been known about for a long time – I heard about them 25 years ago in a seminar on AGW. Just a year or so ago, NOAA announced a revision to it’s canonical record of US land temps, which reinforces the AGW orthodoxy. Soon after that, the director of NOAA ridiculed Roy Spencer (personally mind you) and his satellite temperature data-base, because he has revised it from time to time.

    The proponents of global warming are dishonest and shifty. If they want me to believe them, they should damn well behave like scientists and not like commisars.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    The proponents of global warming are dishonest and shifty. If they want me to believe them, they should damn well behave like scientists and not like commisars.
     
    Agreed. Global warming has nothing whatever to do with science. It's a political ideology.