The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 iSteve BlogTeasers
The Kristol Family's Patriotism
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments

A lot of people are down on the patriotism of the Kristol family at the moment due to William Kristol’s comments this week about how we need some “new Americans” because America’s white working class just isn’t cutting the mustard anymore, what with all their coupon-clipping.

But I wanted to point out this 2014 wedding announcement in the New York Times about Kristol’s son and his bride.

The couple met at Harvard, from which they graduated. …

The groom, 26, is a consultant at McKinsey & Company, the management consultancy in New York. From 2009-13, he served in the Marine Corps as an infantry officer with the Third Battalion, Fifth Marines, based in Camp Pendleton, Calif. He served in Afghanistan from September 2010 to April 2011. From September 2012 to May 2013, he was a part of the 15th Marine Expeditionary Unit, which toured the Middle East and parts of Africa. He was last stationed at Camp Pendleton, having achieved the rank of captain.

His father is the editor of The Weekly Standard in Washington.

Okay, I’m impressed.

Granted, this elite college to Marine Corps to elite business or law path isn’t incredibly rare: I’ve had several friends who followed it.

In fact, I need to write back to an old college friend who became a Marine infantry officer and is now a lawyer. He just invited me to give a speech at our alma mater. Should I do it?

Personally, I’m feeling a chilling effect. If I were brave enough to get whomped over the head by masked blackshirt leftist rioters while trying to exercise my First Amendment rights by giving a speech at a college, maybe I would have joined the Marines in the first place?

I’m reminded of when I was doing jury duty or giving a deposition or something where precision in speech is called for and one lawyer asked me: “Did you have the opportunity to serve your country in the military?”

“Yes, I did.”

“In what branch did you serve.”

“I didn’t serve in any branch. As I said, I had the opportunity; I just didn’t do it.”

 
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
    []
  1. IHTG says:

    Kristol’s son-in-law, Matthew Continetti (who converted to Judaism to obtain the role), seems to have developed a grudging appreciation for Trump since the election.

    Read More
    • Replies: @oh its just me too

    Kristol’s son-in-law, Matthew Continetti (who converted to Judaism
     
    Well shows who is in power now. Most elite go jewish when they intermarry (Trump kids for example) considering the overt built in hostility to Christianity contained in Judaism(Talmud, nItel night) this is extraordinary .
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    /isteve/the-kristol-familys-patriotism/#comment-1760471
    More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  2. snorlax says:

    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they’re excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there’s a crowd of “protesters” (even the non-scare-quote variety) you’ll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain’t Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn’t necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Also, if you let them get the better of you chilling-effects-wise, they've won.
    , @Anonym
    It is highly unlikely they will recognize some 6'4 guy with pictures on google lurking around surreptitiously. Maybe a slouch would help.
    , @Autochthon
    A point for Steve's safety: Milo has routinely not been protected by police, most famously and recently in Berkeley. He has his own, private security detail. I encourage Steve to make the speech as well, but to have his friend ensure adequae private security if it's in-country (e.g., California). (If the speech is to be made in, say, Kentucky or Nebraska, where police still regularly do their damned jobs and honour their oaths, he'll probably be fine relying on them.)
    , @bomag
    Send your body double.

    Doesn't everyone in California have two or three?

    , @JohnnyGeo
    Absolutely! And as many here have suggested, combine it with a meetup/fund drive at a local watering hole.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    iSteve: If you need to arrange for protection, please let us know. There are some of us who may be able to procure the appropriate security detail.
    , @frayedthread
    Go for it. If its Houston, I might be able to attend
  3. snorlax says:
    @snorlax
    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they're excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there's a crowd of "protesters" (even the non-scare-quote variety) you'll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain't Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn't necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    Also, if you let them get the better of you chilling-effects-wise, they’ve won.

    Read More
  4. Mr. Blank says:

    I think Bill might be the black sheep of the family here. I haven’t heard from his pop in years, but he always struck me as far more sensible than about 80 percent of neocons. Joining the Marines indicates Bill’s son is made of sterner stuff, too. I doubt he will turn out to be a status-chasing neocon like his dad.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Maybe Bill just enjoys trolling people.

    By the way, what do people think about Trump's comment that the United States isn't so innocent? Could pertain to Iraq and other killing.

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Trump has long been effusive in his praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin, despite criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike.

    In an interview with Fox News's Bill O'Reilly, which will air ahead of the Super Bowl on Sunday, Trump doubled down on his “respect” for Putin — even in the face of accusations that Putin and his associates have murdered journalists and dissidents in Russia.

    “I do respect him. Well, I respect a lot of people, but that doesn’t mean I’ll get along with them,” Trump told O'Reilly.

    O'Reilly pressed on, declaring to the president that “Putin is a killer.”

    Unfazed, Trump didn't back away, but rather compared Putin's reputation for extrajudicial killings with the United States'.

    , @snorlax

    I haven’t heard from his pop in years
     
    He's been dead since '09.
  5. Anonym says:
    @snorlax
    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they're excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there's a crowd of "protesters" (even the non-scare-quote variety) you'll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain't Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn't necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    It is highly unlikely they will recognize some 6’4 guy with pictures on google lurking around surreptitiously. Maybe a slouch would help.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    By "avoid detection" I mean not attracting a "protest" in the first place.
    , @SFG
    Grow a big beard beforehand? He can shave it off afterward.
  6. @Mr. Blank
    I think Bill might be the black sheep of the family here. I haven't heard from his pop in years, but he always struck me as far more sensible than about 80 percent of neocons. Joining the Marines indicates Bill's son is made of sterner stuff, too. I doubt he will turn out to be a status-chasing neocon like his dad.

    Maybe Bill just enjoys trolling people.

    By the way, what do people think about Trump’s comment that the United States isn’t so innocent? Could pertain to Iraq and other killing.

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Trump has long been effusive in his praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin, despite criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike.

    In an interview with Fox News’s Bill O’Reilly, which will air ahead of the Super Bowl on Sunday, Trump doubled down on his “respect” for Putin — even in the face of accusations that Putin and his associates have murdered journalists and dissidents in Russia.

    “I do respect him. Well, I respect a lot of people, but that doesn’t mean I’ll get along with them,” Trump told O’Reilly.

    O’Reilly pressed on, declaring to the president that “Putin is a killer.”

    Unfazed, Trump didn’t back away, but rather compared Putin’s reputation for extrajudicial killings with the United States’.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bomag

    what do people think about Trump’s comment that the United States isn’t so innocent?
     
    Iffy. On one hand, he's being honest. On the other hand, the president should be a complete cheerleader for the country and not shift any attention to its flaws. Plenty of people are tearing it down.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Opi, We all know of the Nazi and Japanese atrocities in WWII, but in many instances GIs took no prisoners, preferring not to be burdened with the task of guarding them, as that reduced your manpower. But back then we had the moral high ground and the megaphone. What trump said isn't untrue, just that we don't want to hear it.
    , @D. K.
    Anyone here should feel free and welcome to quote the worst of Mr. Trump's "effusive . . . praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin"-- as this journalist making the claim tellingly fails to do!

    As for American innocence, I will simply copy-and-paste my comment in reply to Pat Buchanan's latest column, available elsewhere on this Web site:

    ***

    Michael Corleone: “My father is no different than any powerful man, any man with power, like a president or senator.”

    Kay Adams: “Do you know how naive you sound, Michael? Presidents and senators don’t have men killed.”

    Michael Corleone: “Oh. Who’s being naive, Kay?”

    “The Godfather” [film version (1972)]

    ***

    “American Exceptionalism” in action:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_Program

    ***

    To the Democratic Party’s “loyal opposition,” under Minority Leaders Schumer and Pelosi:

    Who murdered DNC staffer Seth Rich, last July, and what caused Wikileaks founder Julian Assange to offer such a hefty private reward for information in the (still-unsolved) murder case?

    ***
  7. D. K. says:

    I see no reason to project a young man’s personal choice to join the military– whether that choice is patriotic or practical in nature– onto his parents. Some such parents are influential in such a choice, while others are not. Some such parents are supportive of such a choice, while others are not. Dr. Kristol is not a man to whom I would personally lend the benefit of any appreciable doubt.

    As for enlisting in the Marine Corps out of Harvard:

    ***

    Ellsberg entered Harvard College on a scholarship, graduating summa cum laude with an A.B. in economics in 1952. He studied at the University of Cambridge for a year on a Woodrow Wilson Fellowship, then returned to Harvard for graduate school. In 1954, he enlisted in the U.S. Marine Corps and earned a commission.[4] He served as a platoon leader and company commander in the 2nd Infantry Division, and was discharged in 1957 as a first lieutenant.[4] Ellsberg returned to Harvard as a Junior Fellow in the Harvard Society of Fellows for two years, then began working as a strategic analyst at the RAND Corporation, where he concentrated on nuclear strategy[4] and the command and control of nuclear weapons.

    Ellsberg completed a PhD in Economics from Harvard in 1962.[4] His dissertation on decision theory was based on a set of thought experiments that showed that decisions under conditions of uncertainty or ambiguity generally may not be consistent with well defined subjective probabilities. Now known as the Ellsberg paradox,[5] this formed the basis of a large literature that has developed since the 1980s, including approaches such as Choquet expected utility and info-gap decision theory.

    ***

    As for me, I registered with Selective Service, as required, four weeks after my 18th birthday. I was reclassified as 1-A, as I recall, the following summer, without any additional vetting, like a physical or an interview; but, since the draft had been ended, a few years before, it was all very pro forma in nature. I still have my two draft cards, in one of my old wallets. I was planning to burn them, during our family picnic for the Bicentennial, but I decided that that would upset the rest of the gathering.

    Read More
  8. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    What’s needed is The Elite replacement.
    To paraphrase OprahWinfrey, the current establishment needs to just die.

    Read More
    • Agree: Seamus Padraig
    • Replies: @MBlanc46
    Perhaps we ought to go for elimination. And if someone responds that there will always be elites, okay, let's at least shoot for qualitative difference in the replacement.
  9. JohnnyD says:

    Bill’s father, Irving, served in the army during WWII. I’m pretty sure he saw combat in Europe towards the end of the war. I guess the military service skipped a generation.

    Read More
  10. Anonym says:

    If the speaking event was held in a hotel hosting a basketball conference reunion right next to a kermit the frog impersonator’s convention, it would be the perfect cover. “Man, you’re good! How long have you been practicing?”

    I keep thinking that a Steve Miller-like role of writing a speech and getting someone else to deliver it might have benefits. I don’t know if you’d get Trump to deliver it. Add a few Trumpisms and hand it through the back-channels to Miller, who knows what is possible. “People say that everyone is a blank slate. But those saying it are some awful, low energy people. Because everybody knows about Human Biodiversity, believe me!”

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    Hey, he can call himself the Pompatus of Immigration Restriction.
  11. “He either fears his fate too much,
    Or his deserts are small,
    That dares not put it to the touch.
    To gain or lose it all.” – James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Wasn't Montrose carved into four pieces and the bits nailed up in the main Scottish towns?

    I'd like to preserve Steve to report on the news, not make it. But is the security good, that's the issue? Seems not to be in large parts of CA, unless San Jose and Berkeley are outliers.
  12. TangoMan says:

    OT – It starts. Edmonton police arrest Syrian refugee for sexual assault against 6 girls under age of 16.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    From your linked article:

    "The Zebra Child Protection Centre, which offers support to children who have experienced abuse, ...
    The Edmonton Police Service Zebra Child Protection Section has taken over the investigation."
     
    "Zebra"? WTF?

    Is that like Howard Hughes' favorite Ice Station Zebra?

    , @Buffalo Joe
    Tango, Trudeau invited them and sponsored them, but forgot to vet or monitor them, but what could be wrong with that?
    , @Jack Highlands
    It's already well underway, of that one may be sure:

    http://www.therebel.media/muslim_rape_slavery_comes_to_canada

    However, Canada has parajudicial human rights tribunals and the most PC press in the 'free' world, but neither the gutsy White working class/Scots-Irish traditions of the US nor the ethnocentric core that remains in even the most cucked European counties. So you can be sure 'nothing to see here' operates at its best in Canada, the weakest formerly White nation of all.

    Mr. Trump, Canschluss now.

    https://twitter.com/Patronio_Moor/status/829801273968824320

  13. TangoMan says:

    Granted, this elite college to Marine Corps to elite business or law path isn’t incredibly rare: I’ve had several friends who followed it.

    Photo of Amy Chua’s daughter.

    Yale Law School professors Amy Chua ’84, J.D. ’87, and Jed Rubenfeld, J.D. ’86, attach second lieutenant’s bars to the uniform of their daughter Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld ’15 during the ROTC commissioning ceremony

    Read More
    • Replies: @dcthrowback
    She's going to be a JAGOFF, so...not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess. But even the brass are well aware of who her parents are - she'll either be LTG Chua-Rubenfeld in 30 years or working for Skadden Arps in 10.
    , @Anon
    Sheesh. Chua doesn't want her daughter in combat. She wants her daughter to get her Mrs. Degree by marrying a military officer, who will in time leave the service for a nice, high-paying CEO job of some sort. To arrange a marriage of that ilk, you need to have your daughter near all those military men.
    , @James Kabala
    I did not see that coming. It hardly seems like part of the tiger mother plan.
    , @oh its just me too
    the new power elite (oriental-jewish) really really scare me. Perhaps I feel as uneasy about them as Kristol feels about the sight of a Christmas tree, but long standing jewish animosity + oriental complete lack of internal conscious is not a recipe for noblesse oblige, is it?
    , @Peripatetic commenter
    She looks perfectly able to feed 155mm rounds into a gun or 120mm rounds in a tank.
  14. @Auntie Analogue
    "He either fears his fate too much,
    Or his deserts are small,
    That dares not put it to the touch.
    To gain or lose it all." - James Graham, 1st Marquess of Montrose

    Wasn’t Montrose carved into four pieces and the bits nailed up in the main Scottish towns?

    I’d like to preserve Steve to report on the news, not make it. But is the security good, that’s the issue? Seems not to be in large parts of CA, unless San Jose and Berkeley are outliers.

    Read More
  15. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    I would be delighted to hear your speech. One could always put out a call for reader-volunteers to accompany you to the university, surround the podium/stage and so forth.

    Read More
  16. NickG says:

    He just invited me to give a speech at our alma mater. Should I do it?

    Is there such a thing as bad publicity?

    You may of course loose your National Review gig and slot in the New York Times…..oh!

    Read More
  17. Altai says:

    The couple met at Harvard, from which they graduated. …

    Classic NYT weddings announcement.
    I’m sure everyone is familiar with their twitter account which feels like a parody of out of touch elitism, but actually isn’t. iSteve reading will have so much fun if they haven’t seen it before.

    https://twitter.com/nytimesvows

    There is also an attempt to parody it, but it has a weird focus on playing up blood-blue NE WASPyness, though one does sometimes see two people with Anglo-Saxon names marrying, it’s hardly notable and they aren’t exactly aristocrats. I honest can’t tell if the creator is making a joke and doesn’t see the much more obvious (((pattern))), or if it is a subversive way to mock this (((pattern))).

    https://twitter.com/nytvows

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Altai, I remember back in college one of my classmates reading the NYT engagement clips at the lunch table and he said, " Sad, none of them have a pot to piss in."
  18. “He just invited me to give a speech at our alma mater. Should I do it?”

    Of course! Congrats. Since your friend is ex-military, maybe he can provide security. Make sure that’s well covered.

    Read More
  19. Boxty says:

    Sign a book contract and get it listed on Amazon for pre-order. Then do your talk. It worked for Milo…

    Read More
  20. snorlax says:
    @Anonym
    It is highly unlikely they will recognize some 6'4 guy with pictures on google lurking around surreptitiously. Maybe a slouch would help.

    By “avoid detection” I mean not attracting a “protest” in the first place.

    Read More
  21. BB753 says:

    Steve Sailer, the face that started a thousand riots! Remember, you’re the monster who wrote that “let the good times roll” is a risky message for African-Americans! Antifas won’t let you anywhere near an institution of higher education, you know their educated concern and manners.

    Read More
  22. Maciano says:

    Hmm, I have to admit, that is admirable.

    A son serving in the military is the biggest sacrifice one can make to his/her convictions.

    Read More
  23. SFG says:
    @Anonym
    It is highly unlikely they will recognize some 6'4 guy with pictures on google lurking around surreptitiously. Maybe a slouch would help.

    Grow a big beard beforehand? He can shave it off afterward.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    Simply wear a burka when giving the speech, who would assault a patriotic transgender Muslima?

    Or is that the equivalent of turning up in blackface? I can't keep up.
  24. SFG says:
    @Anonym
    If the speaking event was held in a hotel hosting a basketball conference reunion right next to a kermit the frog impersonator's convention, it would be the perfect cover. "Man, you're good! How long have you been practicing?"

    I keep thinking that a Steve Miller-like role of writing a speech and getting someone else to deliver it might have benefits. I don't know if you'd get Trump to deliver it. Add a few Trumpisms and hand it through the back-channels to Miller, who knows what is possible. "People say that everyone is a blank slate. But those saying it are some awful, low energy people. Because everybody knows about Human Biodiversity, believe me!"

    Hey, he can call himself the Pompatus of Immigration Restriction.

    Read More
  25. SFG says:

    It’s possible the son doesn’t share the politics of the father; Paul Gottfried’s son went mildly left-wing, as did Ronald Reagan’s.

    The Marines have always been the preferred branch for the upper-class guys with more testosterone than they know what to do with in that milieu.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Romanian
    Isn't it true that most people's children go left wing compared to their parents? That has been the American experience and why the US has lurched leftward. What are the odds of children going to the right of parents? Of course they sometimes do, but is it comparable to the leftward shift? Also, age and experience are a factor.
  26. @snorlax
    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they're excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there's a crowd of "protesters" (even the non-scare-quote variety) you'll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain't Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn't necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    A point for Steve’s safety: Milo has routinely not been protected by police, most famously and recently in Berkeley. He has his own, private security detail. I encourage Steve to make the speech as well, but to have his friend ensure adequae private security if it’s in-country (e.g., California). (If the speech is to be made in, say, Kentucky or Nebraska, where police still regularly do their damned jobs and honour their oaths, he’ll probably be fine relying on them.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Generally the police will follow orders regardless of their personal beliefs. Police officers of large cities have the prospect of retiring at 50 on six digit pensions with life time free benefits, so a lot is at stake. ( or at least they will think they do until the unsustainable benefits house of cards collapses) In San Jose, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Berkeley the police were ordered by the city administrations to stand back and let the White "fascists" get whomped. Additionally, in big cities the police forces increasingly aren't ethnically related to the people getting whomped so there isn't much sympathy anyway.
    In smaller cities between the coasts, the cops don't have as much at stake financially, Darren Wilson would have never gotten that kind of pension in Ferguson MO. Also the administration are less likely to be hostile to the "fascists" politically or ethnically.
  27. dcthrowback says: • Website
    @TangoMan
    Granted, this elite college to Marine Corps to elite business or law path isn’t incredibly rare: I’ve had several friends who followed it.

    Photo of Amy Chua's daughter.

    Yale Law School professors Amy Chua ’84, J.D. ’87, and Jed Rubenfeld, J.D. ’86, attach second lieutenant’s bars to the uniform of their daughter Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld ’15 during the ROTC commissioning ceremony
     

    She’s going to be a JAGOFF, so…not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess. But even the brass are well aware of who her parents are – she’ll either be LTG Chua-Rubenfeld in 30 years or working for Skadden Arps in 10.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    She’s going to be a JAGOFF, so…not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess.

    Close enough? Really?
  28. @TangoMan
    OT - It starts. Edmonton police arrest Syrian refugee for sexual assault against 6 girls under age of 16.

    From your linked article:

    “The Zebra Child Protection Centre, which offers support to children who have experienced abuse, …
    The Edmonton Police Service Zebra Child Protection Section has taken over the investigation.”

    “Zebra”? WTF?

    Is that like Howard Hughes’ favorite Ice Station Zebra?

    Read More
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    You should see the associated article about the arrest "renewing criticism" of refugee policy. I'm so sick of diversity loving mush-headed Canadians. Pathetic and supine Eloi, they deserve their fate in the Morlocks' stomachs. We Dark Eloi shall be richer having lost them.

    The streets are extended gutters and the gutters are full of blood and when the drains finally scab over, all the vermin will drown. The accumulated filth of all their sex and murder will foam up about their waists and all the whores and politicians will look up and shout "Save us!"... and I'll whisper "no."
    - Rorschach, Watchmen

    Once you realize what a joke everything is, being the Comedian is the only thing that makes sense.
    - The Comedian, Watchmen
  29. Romanian says:
    @SFG
    It's possible the son doesn't share the politics of the father; Paul Gottfried's son went mildly left-wing, as did Ronald Reagan's.

    The Marines have always been the preferred branch for the upper-class guys with more testosterone than they know what to do with in that milieu.

    Isn’t it true that most people’s children go left wing compared to their parents? That has been the American experience and why the US has lurched leftward. What are the odds of children going to the right of parents? Of course they sometimes do, but is it comparable to the leftward shift? Also, age and experience are a factor.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    I assume most of us (Sailer commenters) are right of our parents.
    , @Light Roast
    We've hit peak liberalism. When you're raised by socialist hippies, you can't go farther left without being absurd.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Romanian, I am seventy, so my parents and their siblings were members of the "Greatest Generation", survivors of both the Great Depression and WWII. They owed everything they had , at least in their minds, to FDR and the Dems. But the Dems weren't a coalition of the fringes back then. The Viet Nam war protests and the '60s hippies moved them to the right. A Jesuit College education moved me Left, reality moved me right.
    , @S. Anonyia
    My husband is well to the right of his crazy ex-hippie parents. Probably a common experience with milennials. He won't even share his views with them.
    , @JohnnyD
    @Romanian,
    I'm well to the right of my father. My father is basically a liberal baby boomer who believes everything he hears on NPR or reads in the NYT. Unlike the baby boomers, my generation, the millennials, can't afford to be liberals.
  30. snorlax says:
    @Mr. Blank
    I think Bill might be the black sheep of the family here. I haven't heard from his pop in years, but he always struck me as far more sensible than about 80 percent of neocons. Joining the Marines indicates Bill's son is made of sterner stuff, too. I doubt he will turn out to be a status-chasing neocon like his dad.

    I haven’t heard from his pop in years

    He’s been dead since ’09.

    Read More
  31. snorlax says:
    @Romanian
    Isn't it true that most people's children go left wing compared to their parents? That has been the American experience and why the US has lurched leftward. What are the odds of children going to the right of parents? Of course they sometimes do, but is it comparable to the leftward shift? Also, age and experience are a factor.

    I assume most of us (Sailer commenters) are right of our parents.

    Read More
  32. @SFG
    Grow a big beard beforehand? He can shave it off afterward.

    Simply wear a burka when giving the speech, who would assault a patriotic transgender Muslima?

    Or is that the equivalent of turning up in blackface? I can’t keep up.

    Read More
  33. bomag says:
    @snorlax
    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they're excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there's a crowd of "protesters" (even the non-scare-quote variety) you'll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain't Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn't necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    Send your body double.

    Doesn’t everyone in California have two or three?

    Read More
  34. George says:

    The US military has endorsed every aspect of what is called cultural marxism with the possible exception of adultery. In general, the US military is the biggest benefactor of the US educational system and is welcome on campus. I do not see a military speaker inviting controversy like Mr Yiannipolis.

    As far as the alt right goes, as near as I can figure it endorses the invade the world part, while feeling icky about it being the causation of the invite the world part. This is the fundamental internal contradiction of the alt right. I also do not see in the so-called alt right any admission that Iraqistan is a fiasco. Was it?

    Throughout the Iraqistan fiasco I remember mentions of celebrity children like Joe Biden’s son, and I think others. It was never clear what they were doing.

    Unrelated to Mr Kristol’s son is Trump’s fiasco in Yemen which is probably the first sign that he will be a one, very long and expensive, term president as was prophesized in The Simpsons.

    Read More
    • Troll: IHTG
    • Replies: @Light Roast

    As far as the alt right goes, as near as I can figure it endorses the invade the world part
     
    Wrong.

    Spend more time on alt right sites. You will see over and over again that the alt right disagrees with the neocon invasions.
    , @WJ
    Trump dismembered Jeb Bush in a debate in Florida regarding the Iraq war. He repeatedly spoke out against it during the campaign. I don't what the Alt Right thinks as whole but I would think most are opposed to ridiculous foreign interventions and follow an isolationist philosophy.

    However, that doesn't translate into a hatred of the military.

    Regarding Kristol's son - much better than David Brooks son's choice of military service.
    , @Hunsdon
    I'll address your comments on Iraqistan, as I feel they are the only ones that deserve a reply.

    Of course Iraq was a fiasco. It was a bad idea from the beginning. We overturned a brutal but secular state, and replaced it with a brutal and sectarian civil war. Libya and Syria are even worse: if any other state had done what we did there, it would be roundly condemned as a war crime. And (was it Talleyrand who said this?) it was worse than a crime, it was a blunder.

    There. Are you happy?
  35. @dcthrowback
    She's going to be a JAGOFF, so...not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess. But even the brass are well aware of who her parents are - she'll either be LTG Chua-Rubenfeld in 30 years or working for Skadden Arps in 10.

    She’s going to be a JAGOFF, so…not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess.

    Close enough? Really?

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    She’s going to be a JAGOFF, so…not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess.

    Close enough? Really?
     
    For a chick? Yeah.
  36. @George
    The US military has endorsed every aspect of what is called cultural marxism with the possible exception of adultery. In general, the US military is the biggest benefactor of the US educational system and is welcome on campus. I do not see a military speaker inviting controversy like Mr Yiannipolis.

    As far as the alt right goes, as near as I can figure it endorses the invade the world part, while feeling icky about it being the causation of the invite the world part. This is the fundamental internal contradiction of the alt right. I also do not see in the so-called alt right any admission that Iraqistan is a fiasco. Was it?

    Throughout the Iraqistan fiasco I remember mentions of celebrity children like Joe Biden's son, and I think others. It was never clear what they were doing.

    Unrelated to Mr Kristol's son is Trump's fiasco in Yemen which is probably the first sign that he will be a one, very long and expensive, term president as was prophesized in The Simpsons.

    As far as the alt right goes, as near as I can figure it endorses the invade the world part

    Wrong.

    Spend more time on alt right sites. You will see over and over again that the alt right disagrees with the neocon invasions.

    Read More
  37. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Come on Steve, you grew up during the Cold War where our adversary had ICBMs and we had ICBMs. Do you really think joining the military then (or even today) is in anyway like being a soldier in WWII defending America? Since WWII the military has gotten a lot of mileage of the reputation off the men who fought in WWII even though the world has changed and moved on. And ironically, we refer to the superior “all-volunteer professional military” of today versus the WWII solider who came from every town and social-economic background, who after the war didn’t let having served (in real combat!) define them. At that time you went off to Europe and/or the Pacific and fought in serious battles. Afterward you came home, got married, had a bunch of kids, started working for a local company and worked hard. Today someone joins the Air Force, spends a few years at Lackland in Texas, a couple years at Osan in South Korea, a year at MacDill in Florida, and then gets out with a lifetime of benefits from that service and it defines them and they expect adulation for having served. Truly bizarro world and time we are living in.

    Read More
    • Troll: Jacobite
    • Replies: @David In TN
    Do you think American soldiers in the Korean War (1950-53) had an easy time? Not a few WW II veterans were called back into it.
  38. bomag says:
    @Opinionator
    Maybe Bill just enjoys trolling people.

    By the way, what do people think about Trump's comment that the United States isn't so innocent? Could pertain to Iraq and other killing.

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Trump has long been effusive in his praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin, despite criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike.

    In an interview with Fox News's Bill O'Reilly, which will air ahead of the Super Bowl on Sunday, Trump doubled down on his “respect” for Putin — even in the face of accusations that Putin and his associates have murdered journalists and dissidents in Russia.

    “I do respect him. Well, I respect a lot of people, but that doesn’t mean I’ll get along with them,” Trump told O'Reilly.

    O'Reilly pressed on, declaring to the president that “Putin is a killer.”

    Unfazed, Trump didn't back away, but rather compared Putin's reputation for extrajudicial killings with the United States'.

    what do people think about Trump’s comment that the United States isn’t so innocent?

    Iffy. On one hand, he’s being honest. On the other hand, the president should be a complete cheerleader for the country and not shift any attention to its flaws. Plenty of people are tearing it down.

    Read More
    • Disagree: Opinionator
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    Slightly different take -- Trump may have been primarily referring to the trail of bodies the Clintons have left in their wake, and giving a preview of the investigations to come. That example of "extrajudicial" killings is more on point than any reference to military combat deaths.
  39. Jimi says:

    I think its healthy trend for children of the rich and elite to join the military before they start their professional lifelong careers. This is a trend we should be encouraging even if these kids are not joining the most arduous military branch.

    Bill Kristol has become angry and reactionary. He loses his temper whenever someone disagrees with him. Intellectually he has become stale.

    I think it was a curse in disguise for him to receive funding from Rupert Murdoch for Weekly Standard. The stipend made him lazy. He never had to hustle for his paycheck.

    Read More
  40. Hunsdon says:

    Serving with 3/5 Darkhorse is no easy gig. They are the real deal. http://www.npr.org/2011/10/31/141724272/an-afghan-hell-on-earth-for-darkhorse-marines

    I believe Mike Ledeen’s sons served as Marine officers as well. Credit where credit is due.

    Read More
  41. @Romanian
    Isn't it true that most people's children go left wing compared to their parents? That has been the American experience and why the US has lurched leftward. What are the odds of children going to the right of parents? Of course they sometimes do, but is it comparable to the leftward shift? Also, age and experience are a factor.

    We’ve hit peak liberalism. When you’re raised by socialist hippies, you can’t go farther left without being absurd.

    Read More
  42. FPD72 says:

    I get the impression that Rice has more than its share of SJWs. The son of a former next door neighbor scored a perfect 1600 on the SAT but wasn’t admitted to Rice because he wouldn’t contribute to the diversity on campus.

    While not as radical as Berkeley’s mayor, Houston’s is VERY left wing on WWT issues. I don’t know how much authority she has over the police commissioner.

    Personally, if offered that type of platform I would accept the risks and take the opportunity, realizing that college students today are a unique combination of closed-minded and empty-headed. Assuming you survived, the publicity, although negative in the MSM, could extend your reading audience and influence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    "The son of a former next door neighbor scored a perfect 1600 on the SAT but wasn’t admitted to Rice because he wouldn’t contribute to the diversity on campus. "

    There's our meritocracy at work.
  43. J1234 says:

    He just invited me to give a speech at our alma mater. Should I do it?

    Yes!

    Read More
  44. WJ says:
    @George
    The US military has endorsed every aspect of what is called cultural marxism with the possible exception of adultery. In general, the US military is the biggest benefactor of the US educational system and is welcome on campus. I do not see a military speaker inviting controversy like Mr Yiannipolis.

    As far as the alt right goes, as near as I can figure it endorses the invade the world part, while feeling icky about it being the causation of the invite the world part. This is the fundamental internal contradiction of the alt right. I also do not see in the so-called alt right any admission that Iraqistan is a fiasco. Was it?

    Throughout the Iraqistan fiasco I remember mentions of celebrity children like Joe Biden's son, and I think others. It was never clear what they were doing.

    Unrelated to Mr Kristol's son is Trump's fiasco in Yemen which is probably the first sign that he will be a one, very long and expensive, term president as was prophesized in The Simpsons.

    Trump dismembered Jeb Bush in a debate in Florida regarding the Iraq war. He repeatedly spoke out against it during the campaign. I don’t what the Alt Right thinks as whole but I would think most are opposed to ridiculous foreign interventions and follow an isolationist philosophy.

    However, that doesn’t translate into a hatred of the military.

    Regarding Kristol’s son – much better than David Brooks son’s choice of military service.

    Read More
  45. I was doing jury duty or giving a deposition or something where precision in speech is called for

    LOL. I love this blog.

    Read More
  46. When I see in the recent video Kristol slouched down in his chair with his paunch sticking out, I can’t help remembering the aged Don Ciccio from Godfather II.

    Read More
  47. @Opinionator
    Maybe Bill just enjoys trolling people.

    By the way, what do people think about Trump's comment that the United States isn't so innocent? Could pertain to Iraq and other killing.

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Trump has long been effusive in his praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin, despite criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike.

    In an interview with Fox News's Bill O'Reilly, which will air ahead of the Super Bowl on Sunday, Trump doubled down on his “respect” for Putin — even in the face of accusations that Putin and his associates have murdered journalists and dissidents in Russia.

    “I do respect him. Well, I respect a lot of people, but that doesn’t mean I’ll get along with them,” Trump told O'Reilly.

    O'Reilly pressed on, declaring to the president that “Putin is a killer.”

    Unfazed, Trump didn't back away, but rather compared Putin's reputation for extrajudicial killings with the United States'.

    Opi, We all know of the Nazi and Japanese atrocities in WWII, but in many instances GIs took no prisoners, preferring not to be burdened with the task of guarding them, as that reduced your manpower. But back then we had the moral high ground and the megaphone. What trump said isn’t untrue, just that we don’t want to hear it.

    Read More
  48. @TangoMan
    OT - It starts. Edmonton police arrest Syrian refugee for sexual assault against 6 girls under age of 16.

    Tango, Trudeau invited them and sponsored them, but forgot to vet or monitor them, but what could be wrong with that?

    Read More
  49. Hunsdon says:
    @George
    The US military has endorsed every aspect of what is called cultural marxism with the possible exception of adultery. In general, the US military is the biggest benefactor of the US educational system and is welcome on campus. I do not see a military speaker inviting controversy like Mr Yiannipolis.

    As far as the alt right goes, as near as I can figure it endorses the invade the world part, while feeling icky about it being the causation of the invite the world part. This is the fundamental internal contradiction of the alt right. I also do not see in the so-called alt right any admission that Iraqistan is a fiasco. Was it?

    Throughout the Iraqistan fiasco I remember mentions of celebrity children like Joe Biden's son, and I think others. It was never clear what they were doing.

    Unrelated to Mr Kristol's son is Trump's fiasco in Yemen which is probably the first sign that he will be a one, very long and expensive, term president as was prophesized in The Simpsons.

    I’ll address your comments on Iraqistan, as I feel they are the only ones that deserve a reply.

    Of course Iraq was a fiasco. It was a bad idea from the beginning. We overturned a brutal but secular state, and replaced it with a brutal and sectarian civil war. Libya and Syria are even worse: if any other state had done what we did there, it would be roundly condemned as a war crime. And (was it Talleyrand who said this?) it was worse than a crime, it was a blunder.

    There. Are you happy?

    Read More
    • Replies: @WJ
    Watching the recent Frontline episode on the re-taking of Mosul, I had the strong feeling that the architects of the Iraq war, from the top all the way to Feith , Perle, Bolton etc. should be on trial for war crimes. Saddam would not have tolerated or abetted ISIS strolling into numerous towns in Iraq. We unleashed hell on that country.
    , @George
    What about Afghanistan? Is it a fiasco? Did we actually overturn Taliban Rule?

    Is Trump going to escalate in Afghanistan? If so will it be slow, or surge?

    Top US Commander Says More Troops Needed in Afghanistan
    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/top-us-general-troops-needed-afghanistan-45373588

    Is NATO obsolete or not? And if it is will Trump do anything about it?

    I won't bother with F-35. Or Somalia, which made less sense than Libya.
  50. @Altai

    The couple met at Harvard, from which they graduated. …
     
    Classic NYT weddings announcement.
    I'm sure everyone is familiar with their twitter account which feels like a parody of out of touch elitism, but actually isn't. iSteve reading will have so much fun if they haven't seen it before.

    https://twitter.com/nytimesvows

    There is also an attempt to parody it, but it has a weird focus on playing up blood-blue NE WASPyness, though one does sometimes see two people with Anglo-Saxon names marrying, it's hardly notable and they aren't exactly aristocrats. I honest can't tell if the creator is making a joke and doesn't see the much more obvious (((pattern))), or if it is a subversive way to mock this (((pattern))).

    https://twitter.com/nytvows

    Altai, I remember back in college one of my classmates reading the NYT engagement clips at the lunch table and he said, ” Sad, none of them have a pot to piss in.”

    Read More
  51. @Romanian
    Isn't it true that most people's children go left wing compared to their parents? That has been the American experience and why the US has lurched leftward. What are the odds of children going to the right of parents? Of course they sometimes do, but is it comparable to the leftward shift? Also, age and experience are a factor.

    Romanian, I am seventy, so my parents and their siblings were members of the “Greatest Generation”, survivors of both the Great Depression and WWII. They owed everything they had , at least in their minds, to FDR and the Dems. But the Dems weren’t a coalition of the fringes back then. The Viet Nam war protests and the ’60s hippies moved them to the right. A Jesuit College education moved me Left, reality moved me right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    A Jesuit College education moved me Left
     
    A perennial dynamic that defies easy explanation.
    , @Romanian
    Given the Communist period, the majority of Romanians are what you may call lefties, though they wouldn't define it that way. They agree with state companies, state healthcare, state schools (private ones are very expensive), state companies, government pensions etc. They will grumble about inefficiencies and will recognize the various pitfalls, but this is the default position since this is what we have experienced. The libertarians are a sort of jeune ecole in academia who are powerless in society, though they may become influential policy-wise as they age. Culturally speaking, you might say the country is a bit to the right - it's becoming unfashionable among the hipster set, but God and Nation are key coordinates for most people. The Schelling point towards which most will gravitate. So, in a sense, young people who skew politically different from their parents will either be right wing in economics or left wing culturally.

    PS I had Orthodox religion classes in school for the whole duration (one 50 minute class a week for 12 years), which I loved because I learned what apocatastasis means and where the important ecumenical councils were held (Nicaea, Constantinople, Ephesus, Chalcedony, Constantinople, Constantinople, Nicaea). Even learned a mnemonic device for them. I'm not sure whether they still have them in schools as default, with the parents having to opt out. Of course, different religions get the day off, though I remember being surprised by having a Protestant colleague in my hometown who had always attended the classes before I knew what he was.

  52. If the neocons would all send their children to war against Russia and China with their diversity battalions and immigrant merceneries, I might just enjoy sitting back and watching the carnage.

    When I turned 18 and the recruiters started calling, my father (who was also raised in a military family) told me to ignore them, since they don’t give a damn about kids like me. He was right, and I thank him to this day.

    White working class v. Jewish elites? Which group has done more positive for the nation? How about we send the Jewish elites to Israel, where their hearts and sympathies lie?

    Read More
  53. SPMoore8 says:

    If Kristol’s son has served in the armed forces I think it’s unlikely that he feels the same distance from regular Americans that his father feels. I served 4 years in the Marines over 40 years ago and I think about the guys I served with all the time, white, black, Latino, and Pacific Islander, and my association with them definitely affects my judgment on a lot of political and social issues. Semper Fi, guys!

    Read More
    • Replies: @The most deplorable one
    So, you know that the Pacific Islanders are not far removed from cannibalism and genocide, don't you?

    https://infogr.am/themoriori-genocide

    I seriously think your second childhood has set in.
    , @Sean

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2002/oct/28/usa.israel

    The members of the Christian Coalition of America are some of the most passionate defenders of Israel in the United States.[...]

    They don't love the real Jewish people," the author Gershom Gorenberg told the CBS programme 60 Minutes. "They love us as characters in their story, in their play, and that's not who we are. If you listen to the drama that they are describing, essentially it's a five-act play in which the Jews disappear in the fourth act."
     

    Kristol subscribes to his people's version of Dispensationalism, with white gentile masses as characters in a redemptive drama who are only lovable, because they are fated to disappear before the finale.
    , @Antoninus
    Not totally sure about that. I've met plenty of elites who have served in the armed forces, and my impression is that for elites military service has become just another way to acquire some credential that puts them above plebeians from the Midwest who can now attend the same schools by merely doing well on the SAT. You see, the Midwestern kid is just a boring nerd. Now, Kristol's kid, on the other hand, that's a well-rounded guy!

    As for understanding regular Americans, more often than not, the elites' military service I've seen invoked to soften the edges of regular Americans' political ideas. Basically, they get to be veritable "conservatives" who understand the "people," except their retelling of what the "people" believe sounds a lot like what every elite conservative ready to sell the country down the river might say. "I'm a conservative (look at my military credentials!), but American conservatism isn't about fear of foreigners!" Etc.
  54. Yes, Steve Sailer should do more video interviews, debates, and speeches. Hire a publicist if need be. If you want to advocate your causes, you need to get your word out a little more.

    Read More
  55. Alfa158 says:
    @Autochthon
    A point for Steve's safety: Milo has routinely not been protected by police, most famously and recently in Berkeley. He has his own, private security detail. I encourage Steve to make the speech as well, but to have his friend ensure adequae private security if it's in-country (e.g., California). (If the speech is to be made in, say, Kentucky or Nebraska, where police still regularly do their damned jobs and honour their oaths, he'll probably be fine relying on them.)

    Generally the police will follow orders regardless of their personal beliefs. Police officers of large cities have the prospect of retiring at 50 on six digit pensions with life time free benefits, so a lot is at stake. ( or at least they will think they do until the unsustainable benefits house of cards collapses) In San Jose, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Berkeley the police were ordered by the city administrations to stand back and let the White “fascists” get whomped. Additionally, in big cities the police forces increasingly aren’t ethnically related to the people getting whomped so there isn’t much sympathy anyway.
    In smaller cities between the coasts, the cops don’t have as much at stake financially, Darren Wilson would have never gotten that kind of pension in Ferguson MO. Also the administration are less likely to be hostile to the “fascists” politically or ethnically.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I understand and mostly concur with your assessment. I still emphasise these police are the lowest form of scum for prioritising greed and identity politics over an oath to protect those who cannot protect themselves.

    Sure, the mayor or the chief no doubt ordered them to stand around and watch people be beaten, but a compelling argument could be made (and doubtless would be made to the reviewing body for any procedure of discipline or dismissal, as powerful as police unions are) that such is an unlawful order.

    The situation never arose, because he was not a dirtbag and because my squadron was not involved in melee, but if my commander in Kosovo had ordered me to stand with my thumb in my ass while enemy soldiers beat the hell out of my shipmates, I very likely would have demurred and taken my chances with a court martial after the fact. Likewise, if these cops had an iota of character, they'd not stand idly while thugs assault civilian women.

  56. JohnnyGeo says:
    @snorlax
    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they're excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there's a crowd of "protesters" (even the non-scare-quote variety) you'll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain't Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn't necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    Absolutely! And as many here have suggested, combine it with a meetup/fund drive at a local watering hole.

    Read More
  57. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @TangoMan
    Granted, this elite college to Marine Corps to elite business or law path isn’t incredibly rare: I’ve had several friends who followed it.

    Photo of Amy Chua's daughter.

    Yale Law School professors Amy Chua ’84, J.D. ’87, and Jed Rubenfeld, J.D. ’86, attach second lieutenant’s bars to the uniform of their daughter Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld ’15 during the ROTC commissioning ceremony
     

    Sheesh. Chua doesn’t want her daughter in combat. She wants her daughter to get her Mrs. Degree by marrying a military officer, who will in time leave the service for a nice, high-paying CEO job of some sort. To arrange a marriage of that ilk, you need to have your daughter near all those military men.

    Read More
  58. @Alfa158
    Generally the police will follow orders regardless of their personal beliefs. Police officers of large cities have the prospect of retiring at 50 on six digit pensions with life time free benefits, so a lot is at stake. ( or at least they will think they do until the unsustainable benefits house of cards collapses) In San Jose, Los Angeles, Chicago, and Berkeley the police were ordered by the city administrations to stand back and let the White "fascists" get whomped. Additionally, in big cities the police forces increasingly aren't ethnically related to the people getting whomped so there isn't much sympathy anyway.
    In smaller cities between the coasts, the cops don't have as much at stake financially, Darren Wilson would have never gotten that kind of pension in Ferguson MO. Also the administration are less likely to be hostile to the "fascists" politically or ethnically.

    I understand and mostly concur with your assessment. I still emphasise these police are the lowest form of scum for prioritising greed and identity politics over an oath to protect those who cannot protect themselves.

    Sure, the mayor or the chief no doubt ordered them to stand around and watch people be beaten, but a compelling argument could be made (and doubtless would be made to the reviewing body for any procedure of discipline or dismissal, as powerful as police unions are) that such is an unlawful order.

    The situation never arose, because he was not a dirtbag and because my squadron was not involved in melee, but if my commander in Kosovo had ordered me to stand with my thumb in my ass while enemy soldiers beat the hell out of my shipmates, I very likely would have demurred and taken my chances with a court martial after the fact. Likewise, if these cops had an iota of character, they’d not stand idly while thugs assault civilian women.

    Read More
  59. @SPMoore8
    If Kristol's son has served in the armed forces I think it's unlikely that he feels the same distance from regular Americans that his father feels. I served 4 years in the Marines over 40 years ago and I think about the guys I served with all the time, white, black, Latino, and Pacific Islander, and my association with them definitely affects my judgment on a lot of political and social issues. Semper Fi, guys!

    So, you know that the Pacific Islanders are not far removed from cannibalism and genocide, don’t you?

    https://infogr.am/themoriori-genocide

    I seriously think your second childhood has set in.

    Read More
  60. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Re: Your potential speech. Houston has a black, Democratic mayor. Assume the worst and that you’re not going to get any police protection other than a stand-down order. Okay, you need to do research. Starting from there, is it easy to get into and out of the auditorium where your speech is being held and be sufficiently far away from a crowd? Look at a map and ask any people you know living in the area. Can your car get in and out of the parking lot easily? You’d need muscle, say half-a-dozen guys to escort you in and out. If you can’t muster these people from tough-minded friends who know what’s coming, look into hiring private security. You’d need them for about 4-5 hours, which gives you enough time to leave a hotel/friend’s house, drive there, give the speech, and get back to where you’re staying for the night. Call up a private security firm and ask for a quote for a 4-5 hour rate. It may not be too expensive. At the very least, call them up and wheedle a few safety tips out of them that you might not have thought of. Explain you’re a complete novice who might need security and ask for a bit of advice. They might just offer you a few valuable pointers for free.

    Next, invite a few Republican/Conservative organizations to your speech, preferably ones who happen to be armed. Examples: Local army base officers, Fraternal Order of Police officials, or area Republican party officials. You need to beef up the crowd with your supporters, not just theirs. Your supporters should be adult men who look like the could hold their own in a rumble. Their presence may intimidate others who will think twice about causing potential trouble. Do NOT stay the night in Houston, but in a close-by area, (sometimes suburbs are their own municipality) that is white and has its own conservative mayor and police force who won’t stand for any crap about protesters showing up where you’re going to be sleeping and causing a fuss. Repeat, do NOT trust the Houston police force or mayor. You may have plenty of sympathizers among their cops, but orders from the mayor to stand down are orders that must be obeyed.

    And like another commentator said, have a book ready. You have a bunch of old columns on VDare and other places. If you don’t have copyright issues, mine them for the best-supported (in terms of arguments–remember some buyers may be hostile to everything you say), most thought- provoking writing, arrange them by topic, and make each topic a different book chapter. Don’t worry if it’s a bit jumpy. Some people absorb information better that way. Slap it together and self-publish. You can put it out on Amazon, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and Draft to Digital to pick up a few other places. The latter is a good distributor than will help you get on Apple/Itunes if you don’t have an Apple computer for uploading direct to Itunes.

    I’m not going to tell you whether to give the speech or not, but the book is a good idea no matter what you do.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @IA
    I'd have my lawyer hire some blacks or Mestizos as security. I'd get Truth (where is he?) to give the intro or at least meet me somewhere public and have a photographer ready.
  61. Sean says:
    @SPMoore8
    If Kristol's son has served in the armed forces I think it's unlikely that he feels the same distance from regular Americans that his father feels. I served 4 years in the Marines over 40 years ago and I think about the guys I served with all the time, white, black, Latino, and Pacific Islander, and my association with them definitely affects my judgment on a lot of political and social issues. Semper Fi, guys!

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2002/oct/28/usa.israel

    The members of the Christian Coalition of America are some of the most passionate defenders of Israel in the United States.[...]

    They don’t love the real Jewish people,” the author Gershom Gorenberg told the CBS programme 60 Minutes. “They love us as characters in their story, in their play, and that’s not who we are. If you listen to the drama that they are describing, essentially it’s a five-act play in which the Jews disappear in the fourth act.”

    Kristol subscribes to his people’s version of Dispensationalism, with white gentile masses as characters in a redemptive drama who are only lovable, because they are fated to disappear before the finale.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Tracy
    Gentiles aren't fated to disappear, but to serve. Someone has to grow the food, fix the leaky pipes, and turn on the lights on the Sabbath. Anyway, if you want to read about one rabbi's milking of the dispensationalist types, check this out: The Rabbi Who Loved Evangelicals
  62. Dilemna says:

    Something tells me you sort of enjoy your status as an infamous thought criminal, who everyone in the media reads but acts like they don’t etc, as opposed to say a FAMOUS thought criminal. Being famous-famous in the USA isn’t associated with particularly great outcomes.

    On the the hand a portion of the people driven to your site expecting to be outraged would likely become at but Sailerish in their outlook which could be a net positive.

    I have a theory that you have largely avoided big 2 min of hate freak outs because the engineers of such are deathly afraid about introducing your work to a larger audience as they deep down suspect the rubes may not find it as objectionable as the are supposed to.

    Read More
  63. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Well if you’re kid was in the Marines then I guess ethnic cleansing is ok. I mean Kristol got the idea from his cousins in Israel so I’m sure the dumb hicks wouldn’t mind, seeing how much they love Israel.

    Read More
  64. @TangoMan
    Granted, this elite college to Marine Corps to elite business or law path isn’t incredibly rare: I’ve had several friends who followed it.

    Photo of Amy Chua's daughter.

    Yale Law School professors Amy Chua ’84, J.D. ’87, and Jed Rubenfeld, J.D. ’86, attach second lieutenant’s bars to the uniform of their daughter Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld ’15 during the ROTC commissioning ceremony
     

    I did not see that coming. It hardly seems like part of the tiger mother plan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @old okie
    Sure it is. She is just checking a box on her way to a political career
  65. @Romanian
    Isn't it true that most people's children go left wing compared to their parents? That has been the American experience and why the US has lurched leftward. What are the odds of children going to the right of parents? Of course they sometimes do, but is it comparable to the leftward shift? Also, age and experience are a factor.

    My husband is well to the right of his crazy ex-hippie parents. Probably a common experience with milennials. He won’t even share his views with them.

    Read More
  66. Should you do the speech? I’m reluctant to advise because only you know the all the facts, and your calculus of benefit/risk. It’s your body on the mountain.

    However, if you decide to do it, you might consider having a prepared text that could be released immediately if you are prevented from speaking (or even if you’re not). That prepared text could include some kind of appeals for free speech, rule of law and public policies/cultural norms that are broadly beneficial to many Americans. (Avoid snark and jokes that could be misunderstood.) So the headline might be: guy with reasonable speech prevented from speaking. Read his reasonable speech here [link]. Anyway, it’s one approach you may wish to consider.

    Read More
  67. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    How many of these Harvard officers see combat? A better question might be, how many of them have died in combat? Is it possible they go over to Afghanistan or Iraq and sit inside for 6 months, then come home and have the moral high ground because “they’ve been on the front lines and know what it’s like?” I’m surprised y’all are so gullible about this. I promise you it was white working class kids doing the fighting while Kristol’s kid sat on his ass in an air conditioned, well guarded building.

    Read More
  68. WJ says:
    @Hunsdon
    I'll address your comments on Iraqistan, as I feel they are the only ones that deserve a reply.

    Of course Iraq was a fiasco. It was a bad idea from the beginning. We overturned a brutal but secular state, and replaced it with a brutal and sectarian civil war. Libya and Syria are even worse: if any other state had done what we did there, it would be roundly condemned as a war crime. And (was it Talleyrand who said this?) it was worse than a crime, it was a blunder.

    There. Are you happy?

    Watching the recent Frontline episode on the re-taking of Mosul, I had the strong feeling that the architects of the Iraq war, from the top all the way to Feith , Perle, Bolton etc. should be on trial for war crimes. Saddam would not have tolerated or abetted ISIS strolling into numerous towns in Iraq. We unleashed hell on that country.

    Read More
  69. ganderson says:
    @Hunsdon
    Serving with 3/5 Darkhorse is no easy gig. They are the real deal. http://www.npr.org/2011/10/31/141724272/an-afghan-hell-on-earth-for-darkhorse-marines

    I believe Mike Ledeen's sons served as Marine officers as well. Credit where credit is due.

    Wasn’t 3/5 E.B. Sledge’s unit?

    Read More
  70. George says:
    @Hunsdon
    I'll address your comments on Iraqistan, as I feel they are the only ones that deserve a reply.

    Of course Iraq was a fiasco. It was a bad idea from the beginning. We overturned a brutal but secular state, and replaced it with a brutal and sectarian civil war. Libya and Syria are even worse: if any other state had done what we did there, it would be roundly condemned as a war crime. And (was it Talleyrand who said this?) it was worse than a crime, it was a blunder.

    There. Are you happy?

    What about Afghanistan? Is it a fiasco? Did we actually overturn Taliban Rule?

    Is Trump going to escalate in Afghanistan? If so will it be slow, or surge?

    Top US Commander Says More Troops Needed in Afghanistan

    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/top-us-general-troops-needed-afghanistan-45373588

    Is NATO obsolete or not? And if it is will Trump do anything about it?

    I won’t bother with F-35. Or Somalia, which made less sense than Libya.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hunsdon
    We should have been out of Afghanistan by 2003.
  71. old okie says:
    @James Kabala
    I did not see that coming. It hardly seems like part of the tiger mother plan.

    Sure it is. She is just checking a box on her way to a political career

    Read More
  72. Sean says:

    In communist Hungary many of the leading dissidents were Jewish and the children of members of the highest levels of the Party leadership. Its good that the daughter of law prof Jed Rubenfeld and the son of Kristol joined the Marines. It would be even better if they joined the State Department. It will mean fighting wars around the world but be worth it. They are young and obviously want to make their own mark instead of dutifully following the old party line, which is for old people like their parents.

    Read More
  73. @IHTG
    Kristol's son-in-law, Matthew Continetti (who converted to Judaism to obtain the role), seems to have developed a grudging appreciation for Trump since the election.

    Kristol’s son-in-law, Matthew Continetti (who converted to Judaism

    Well shows who is in power now. Most elite go jewish when they intermarry (Trump kids for example) considering the overt built in hostility to Christianity contained in Judaism(Talmud, nItel night) this is extraordinary .

    Read More
  74. @TangoMan
    Granted, this elite college to Marine Corps to elite business or law path isn’t incredibly rare: I’ve had several friends who followed it.

    Photo of Amy Chua's daughter.

    Yale Law School professors Amy Chua ’84, J.D. ’87, and Jed Rubenfeld, J.D. ’86, attach second lieutenant’s bars to the uniform of their daughter Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld ’15 during the ROTC commissioning ceremony
     

    the new power elite (oriental-jewish) really really scare me. Perhaps I feel as uneasy about them as Kristol feels about the sight of a Christmas tree, but long standing jewish animosity + oriental complete lack of internal conscious is not a recipe for noblesse oblige, is it?

    Read More
  75. @Buffalo Joe
    Romanian, I am seventy, so my parents and their siblings were members of the "Greatest Generation", survivors of both the Great Depression and WWII. They owed everything they had , at least in their minds, to FDR and the Dems. But the Dems weren't a coalition of the fringes back then. The Viet Nam war protests and the '60s hippies moved them to the right. A Jesuit College education moved me Left, reality moved me right.

    A Jesuit College education moved me Left

    A perennial dynamic that defies easy explanation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Desi, ain't that the truth, but most of my former left leaning classmates are now right of center.
  76. BenKenobi says:
    @Almost Missouri
    From your linked article:

    "The Zebra Child Protection Centre, which offers support to children who have experienced abuse, ...
    The Edmonton Police Service Zebra Child Protection Section has taken over the investigation."
     
    "Zebra"? WTF?

    Is that like Howard Hughes' favorite Ice Station Zebra?

    You should see the associated article about the arrest “renewing criticism” of refugee policy. I’m so sick of diversity loving mush-headed Canadians. Pathetic and supine Eloi, they deserve their fate in the Morlocks’ stomachs. We Dark Eloi shall be richer having lost them.

    The streets are extended gutters and the gutters are full of blood and when the drains finally scab over, all the vermin will drown. The accumulated filth of all their sex and murder will foam up about their waists and all the whores and politicians will look up and shout “Save us!”… and I’ll whisper “no.”
    - Rorschach, Watchmen

    Once you realize what a joke everything is, being the Comedian is the only thing that makes sense.
    - The Comedian, Watchmen

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    "I love workin' on American soil!"

    The Comedian, Watchmen

    "I'm not locked up in here with them, they're locked up in here with me."

    Rorschach, Watchmen
  77. @Buffalo Joe
    Altai, I remember back in college one of my classmates reading the NYT engagement clips at the lunch table and he said, " Sad, none of them have a pot to piss in."

    Meaning that they were poor?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Opi, The announcements read like one family trust marrying another family trust, a tongue in cheek comment about how the wealthy find each other to marry.
  78. George says:

    The Guardian thinks alt right types, like PATRICK J. BUCHANAN, are having buyers remorse.

    “Why you should read it: Eventually, Trump plays everyone. Buchanan’s support was premised on the idea that Trump, like him, was some kind of isolationist. ”

    https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/2017/feb/09/news-bubble-conservative-articles-for-liberals

    The Coming Clash With Iran
    By PATRICK J. BUCHANAN

    http://www.theamericanconservative.com/buchanan/the-coming-clash-with-iran/

    Steering Trump Back to Endless War

    https://consortiumnews.com/2017/02/04/steering-trump-back-to-endless-war/

    Read More
  79. D. K. says:
    @Opinionator
    Maybe Bill just enjoys trolling people.

    By the way, what do people think about Trump's comment that the United States isn't so innocent? Could pertain to Iraq and other killing.

    WEST PALM BEACH, Fla. — President Trump has long been effusive in his praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin, despite criticism from Republicans and Democrats alike.

    In an interview with Fox News's Bill O'Reilly, which will air ahead of the Super Bowl on Sunday, Trump doubled down on his “respect” for Putin — even in the face of accusations that Putin and his associates have murdered journalists and dissidents in Russia.

    “I do respect him. Well, I respect a lot of people, but that doesn’t mean I’ll get along with them,” Trump told O'Reilly.

    O'Reilly pressed on, declaring to the president that “Putin is a killer.”

    Unfazed, Trump didn't back away, but rather compared Putin's reputation for extrajudicial killings with the United States'.

    Anyone here should feel free and welcome to quote the worst of Mr. Trump’s “effusive . . . praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin”– as this journalist making the claim tellingly fails to do!

    As for American innocence, I will simply copy-and-paste my comment in reply to Pat Buchanan’s latest column, available elsewhere on this Web site:

    ***

    Michael Corleone: “My father is no different than any powerful man, any man with power, like a president or senator.”

    Kay Adams: “Do you know how naive you sound, Michael? Presidents and senators don’t have men killed.”

    Michael Corleone: “Oh. Who’s being naive, Kay?”

    “The Godfather” [film version (1972)]

    ***

    “American Exceptionalism” in action:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_Program

    ***

    To the Democratic Party’s “loyal opposition,” under Minority Leaders Schumer and Pelosi:

    Who murdered DNC staffer Seth Rich, last July, and what caused Wikileaks founder Julian Assange to offer such a hefty private reward for information in the (still-unsolved) murder case?

    ***

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    As for American innocence, I will simply copy-and-paste my comment in reply to Pat Buchanan’s latest column, available elsewhere on this Web site:
     
    Innocent nations don't get to be world powers.......
  80. @TangoMan
    Granted, this elite college to Marine Corps to elite business or law path isn’t incredibly rare: I’ve had several friends who followed it.

    Photo of Amy Chua's daughter.

    Yale Law School professors Amy Chua ’84, J.D. ’87, and Jed Rubenfeld, J.D. ’86, attach second lieutenant’s bars to the uniform of their daughter Sophia Chua-Rubenfeld ’15 during the ROTC commissioning ceremony
     

    She looks perfectly able to feed 155mm rounds into a gun or 120mm rounds in a tank.

    Read More
  81. Do it, Steve.

    1. Why should all the piggy-backers get the glory for the Sailer Strategy?
    2. As others have said, we can’t let them intimidate.
    3. Your friend is ex-Marine so discuss all security concerns with him – if he can’t make it work, who can?
    4. It will be good therapy for you.

    Easy for me to volunteer you, I know. I’m non-confrontational physically, and I’ve made no great intellectual contribution. But precisely because you have, you should take the challenge.

    Read More
  82. @snorlax
    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they're excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there's a crowd of "protesters" (even the non-scare-quote variety) you'll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain't Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn't necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    iSteve: If you need to arrange for protection, please let us know. There are some of us who may be able to procure the appropriate security detail.

    Read More
  83. Antoninus says:
    @SPMoore8
    If Kristol's son has served in the armed forces I think it's unlikely that he feels the same distance from regular Americans that his father feels. I served 4 years in the Marines over 40 years ago and I think about the guys I served with all the time, white, black, Latino, and Pacific Islander, and my association with them definitely affects my judgment on a lot of political and social issues. Semper Fi, guys!

    Not totally sure about that. I’ve met plenty of elites who have served in the armed forces, and my impression is that for elites military service has become just another way to acquire some credential that puts them above plebeians from the Midwest who can now attend the same schools by merely doing well on the SAT. You see, the Midwestern kid is just a boring nerd. Now, Kristol’s kid, on the other hand, that’s a well-rounded guy!

    As for understanding regular Americans, more often than not, the elites’ military service I’ve seen invoked to soften the edges of regular Americans’ political ideas. Basically, they get to be veritable “conservatives” who understand the “people,” except their retelling of what the “people” believe sounds a lot like what every elite conservative ready to sell the country down the river might say. “I’m a conservative (look at my military credentials!), but American conservatism isn’t about fear of foreigners!” Etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    You might have a point there, inasmuch as officers are of a different class than enlisted men. And this is especially going to be the case where, say, some officer is essentially a JAG, that is, a lawyer in uniform, or a dentist, or a doctor, or what have you, none of which is the same as being the company commander of an infantry unit, or a supply unit, or a transport unit, etc. etc. etc.

    And I also totally agree with you on the larger question; just because someone has been in the service either as an enlisted man or as an officer, that doesn't give any particular authority to his remarks about Americans in general, especially in the political arena. Comments of the type, "I'm a veteran, and I say Trump sucks!" or "I was in Nam, and I think we should allow anyone on the planet to come here and live!" can be found any day of the week.

    If Kristol's son was with an infantry unit as a company commander, he would have developed some understanding and empathy for the men under his command. That would normally translate into some compassion for people from much less privileged backgrounds than his own. On the other hand, if he was just a martinet playing a role to earn brownie points that would have showed, too. But I'm willing to give him the benefit of the doubt, for now. I do know my own enlisted service has always served me as a reminder whenever I'm about to say something about different races or people of lesser intelligence. And it invariably softens my judgments.
  84. @Opinionator
    Meaning that they were poor?

    Opi, The announcements read like one family trust marrying another family trust, a tongue in cheek comment about how the wealthy find each other to marry.

    Read More
  85. @Desiderius

    A Jesuit College education moved me Left
     
    A perennial dynamic that defies easy explanation.

    Desi, ain’t that the truth, but most of my former left leaning classmates are now right of center.

    Read More
  86. @TangoMan
    OT - It starts. Edmonton police arrest Syrian refugee for sexual assault against 6 girls under age of 16.

    It’s already well underway, of that one may be sure:

    http://www.therebel.media/muslim_rape_slavery_comes_to_canada

    However, Canada has parajudicial human rights tribunals and the most PC press in the ‘free’ world, but neither the gutsy White working class/Scots-Irish traditions of the US nor the ethnocentric core that remains in even the most cucked European counties. So you can be sure ‘nothing to see here’ operates at its best in Canada, the weakest formerly White nation of all.

    Mr. Trump, Canschluss now.

    Read More
  87. syonredux says:
    @Opinionator
    She’s going to be a JAGOFF, so…not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess.

    Close enough? Really?

    She’s going to be a JAGOFF, so…not quite the real Army, but close enough, I guess.

    Close enough? Really?

    For a chick? Yeah.

    Read More
  88. syonredux says:
    @D. K.
    Anyone here should feel free and welcome to quote the worst of Mr. Trump's "effusive . . . praise for Russian President Vladimir Putin"-- as this journalist making the claim tellingly fails to do!

    As for American innocence, I will simply copy-and-paste my comment in reply to Pat Buchanan's latest column, available elsewhere on this Web site:

    ***

    Michael Corleone: “My father is no different than any powerful man, any man with power, like a president or senator.”

    Kay Adams: “Do you know how naive you sound, Michael? Presidents and senators don’t have men killed.”

    Michael Corleone: “Oh. Who’s being naive, Kay?”

    “The Godfather” [film version (1972)]

    ***

    “American Exceptionalism” in action:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Phoenix_Program

    ***

    To the Democratic Party’s “loyal opposition,” under Minority Leaders Schumer and Pelosi:

    Who murdered DNC staffer Seth Rich, last July, and what caused Wikileaks founder Julian Assange to offer such a hefty private reward for information in the (still-unsolved) murder case?

    ***

    As for American innocence, I will simply copy-and-paste my comment in reply to Pat Buchanan’s latest column, available elsewhere on this Web site:

    Innocent nations don’t get to be world powers…….

    Read More
  89. JohnnyD says:
    @Romanian
    Isn't it true that most people's children go left wing compared to their parents? That has been the American experience and why the US has lurched leftward. What are the odds of children going to the right of parents? Of course they sometimes do, but is it comparable to the leftward shift? Also, age and experience are a factor.

    ,
    I’m well to the right of my father. My father is basically a liberal baby boomer who believes everything he hears on NPR or reads in the NYT. Unlike the baby boomers, my generation, the millennials, can’t afford to be liberals.

    Read More
  90. snorlax says:

    Oh no…

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/powerpost/wp/2017/02/09/trump-expresses-openness-to-new-bipartisan-immigration-bill-senators-say/

    According to the West Virginia Democrat, when Trump noted that there is no current immigration legislation under consideration on Capitol Hill, another senator in attendance, Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), mentioned the 2013 bill.

    Alexander also noted that the 2013 bill had passed with 68 votes, Manchin recalled.

    “Well, that sounds like something good and you all agreed, 68? What happened to it?” Trump said, according to Manchin.

    “I’ll tell you exactly what happened, Mr. President,” Manchin said he told Trump. “It went to the House and [Majority Leader] Eric Cantor gets defeated. They’re crying ‘Amnesty, amnesty, amnesty’ and [House Speaker] John Boehner could not bring it back up on the floor and get a vote — that’s exactly what happened.”

    At that point, Trump said, “I want to see it,” Manchin said. “So he was very anxious to see it. He says, ‘I know what amnesty is.’ And I said, ‘Sir, I don’t think you’re going to find this [is] amnesty at all.’”

    A spokesman for Alexander said in an email that the senator “thinks it is appropriate to allow the President to characterize his own position. But the Senator did suggest that it is important to fix our immigration system and that the President is in a unique position to help do that.”

    Sen. John Cornyn (R-Tex.), who also attended the lunch, confirmed that the group “talked a little bit about immigration reform.”

    “I think he’s looking to try to find some way to broker deals where we can get things done,” Cornyn said of Trump.

    Read More
  91. “I didn’t serve in any branch. As I said, I had the opportunity; I just didn’t do it.”

    In an old hollywood movie, the lawyer would have said, “A wise guy, eh?”

    Read More
  92. @Anonymous
    Come on Steve, you grew up during the Cold War where our adversary had ICBMs and we had ICBMs. Do you really think joining the military then (or even today) is in anyway like being a soldier in WWII defending America? Since WWII the military has gotten a lot of mileage of the reputation off the men who fought in WWII even though the world has changed and moved on. And ironically, we refer to the superior "all-volunteer professional military" of today versus the WWII solider who came from every town and social-economic background, who after the war didn't let having served (in real combat!) define them. At that time you went off to Europe and/or the Pacific and fought in serious battles. Afterward you came home, got married, had a bunch of kids, started working for a local company and worked hard. Today someone joins the Air Force, spends a few years at Lackland in Texas, a couple years at Osan in South Korea, a year at MacDill in Florida, and then gets out with a lifetime of benefits from that service and it defines them and they expect adulation for having served. Truly bizarro world and time we are living in.

    Do you think American soldiers in the Korean War (1950-53) had an easy time? Not a few WW II veterans were called back into it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Do you think American soldiers in the Korean War (1950-53) had an easy time? Not a few WW II veterans were called back into it.
     
    No, Korea was a nightmare. Vietnam dreadful. Afghanistan was hell. Iraq no cakewalk. But please, do you believe any had to anything to defending America??
  93. @snorlax
    Yes, you should do it. Anti-free-speech pogroms are good publicity. More importantly, they're excellent publicity for you, donations-wise. If there's a crowd of "protesters" (even the non-scare-quote variety) you'll have police protection, like Milo did. And Houston ain't Berkeley.

    If possible, you might want to show up very early. And you might be able to avoid detection in the first place if you use a pseudonym that your readers would recognize but SJW goon squads wouldn't necessarily. Steven H Monahan, perhaps?

    Go for it. If its Houston, I might be able to attend

    Read More
  94. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @FPD72
    I get the impression that Rice has more than its share of SJWs. The son of a former next door neighbor scored a perfect 1600 on the SAT but wasn't admitted to Rice because he wouldn't contribute to the diversity on campus.

    While not as radical as Berkeley's mayor, Houston's is VERY left wing on WWT issues. I don't know how much authority she has over the police commissioner.

    Personally, if offered that type of platform I would accept the risks and take the opportunity, realizing that college students today are a unique combination of closed-minded and empty-headed. Assuming you survived, the publicity, although negative in the MSM, could extend your reading audience and influence.

    “The son of a former next door neighbor scored a perfect 1600 on the SAT but wasn’t admitted to Rice because he wouldn’t contribute to the diversity on campus. ”

    There’s our meritocracy at work.

    Read More
  95. The apple sometimes falls far from the tree; case in point, Khizr Kucks Khan (sleazeball) vs his (probably rebellious) son Humayun.

    Read More
  96. MBlanc46 says:
    @anonymous
    What's needed is The Elite replacement.
    To paraphrase OprahWinfrey, the current establishment needs to just die.

    Perhaps we ought to go for elimination. And if someone responds that there will always be elites, okay, let’s at least shoot for qualitative difference in the replacement.

    Read More
  97. DO-IT!
    DO-IT!
    DO-IT!

    Why would you wait for that time of emergency, some six-seven years from now, when Mrs. Sailer starts to bug you every morning about that Honduras made LG dryer crying for another replacement?

    It’s time to cash in for twenty years of undeserved deprivation…

    You’re not only Nation’s top movie critic among political pundits, but also Nation’s top political pundit among movie critics.

    Instead of bringing daily joy only to less than few thousands of ultimate deplorables, you ‘ll have a chance to get into the living rooms of millions of normies…

    All we have to do is to spread the word that Steve The Baptist of Everything Evil Considered is Coming to Town!
    Than we’ll all take the day off from our jobs, pack our Doc Martens,balaclavas and spaners, and come to the venue-just like we did it during recent Berkeley social gathering .

    (As you can see; I’m already doing some pedestrian PR)

    Worked miracle for Milo…

    Bored Prediction:
    If Sailer accepts commencement speech offer, in the 72 hours aftermath, this ranking will drop to six digit number:

    http://sre.novelrank.com/fdc27c5b866978302306bb3ce4a6aae2bcfa8b

    Than you’ll be able to pick some decent US assembled Bosch appliances, and you’ll see that conniving Ol’ Lonely never again.

    You want your better half to be happy, don’t you Steve?

    Read More
  98. Hunsdon says:
    @ganderson
    Wasn't 3/5 E.B. Sledge's unit?

    Helmet for My Pillow Sledge? I believe so.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SPMoore8
    "Helmet for My Pillow" was Robert Leckie, right?
  99. Hunsdon says:
    @George
    What about Afghanistan? Is it a fiasco? Did we actually overturn Taliban Rule?

    Is Trump going to escalate in Afghanistan? If so will it be slow, or surge?

    Top US Commander Says More Troops Needed in Afghanistan
    http://abcnews.go.com/Politics/wireStory/top-us-general-troops-needed-afghanistan-45373588

    Is NATO obsolete or not? And if it is will Trump do anything about it?

    I won't bother with F-35. Or Somalia, which made less sense than Libya.

    We should have been out of Afghanistan by 2003.

    Read More
  100. Hunsdon says:
    @WJ
    Watching the recent Frontline episode on the re-taking of Mosul, I had the strong feeling that the architects of the Iraq war, from the top all the way to Feith , Perle, Bolton etc. should be on trial for war crimes. Saddam would not have tolerated or abetted ISIS strolling into numerous towns in Iraq. We unleashed hell on that country.

    No argument, brother.

    Read More
  101. SPMoore8 says:
    @Antoninus
    Not totally sure about that. I've met plenty of elites who have served in the armed forces, and my impression is that for elites military service has become just another way to acquire some credential that puts them above plebeians from the Midwest who can now attend the same schools by merely doing well on the SAT. You see, the Midwestern kid is just a boring nerd. Now, Kristol's kid, on the other hand, that's a well-rounded guy!

    As for understanding regular Americans, more often than not, the elites' military service I've seen invoked to soften the edges of regular Americans' political ideas. Basically, they get to be veritable "conservatives" who understand the "people," except their retelling of what the "people" believe sounds a lot like what every elite conservative ready to sell the country down the river might say. "I'm a conservative (look at my military credentials!), but American conservatism isn't about fear of foreigners!" Etc.

    You might have a point there, inasmuch as officers are of a different class than enlisted men. And this is especially going to be the case where, say, some officer is essentially a JAG, that is, a lawyer in uniform, or a dentist, or a doctor, or what have you, none of which is the same as being the company commander of an infantry unit, or a supply unit, or a transport unit, etc. etc. etc.

    And I also totally agree with you on the larger question; just because someone has been in the service either as an enlisted man or as an officer, that doesn’t give any particular authority to his remarks about Americans in general, especially in the political arena. Comments of the type, “I’m a veteran, and I say Trump sucks!” or “I was in Nam, and I think we should allow anyone on the planet to come here and live!” can be found any day of the week.

    If Kristol’s son was with an infantry unit as a company commander, he would have developed some understanding and empathy for the men under his command. That would normally translate into some compassion for people from much less privileged backgrounds than his own. On the other hand, if he was just a martinet playing a role to earn brownie points that would have showed, too. But I’m willing to give him the benefit of the doubt, for now. I do know my own enlisted service has always served me as a reminder whenever I’m about to say something about different races or people of lesser intelligence. And it invariably softens my judgments.

    Read More
  102. SPMoore8 says:
    @Hunsdon
    Helmet for My Pillow Sledge? I believe so.

    “Helmet for My Pillow” was Robert Leckie, right?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Captain Tripps

    “Helmet for My Pillow” was Robert Leckie, right?
     
    Correct; E.B. (Eugene Bondurant) Sledge wrote With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa. Both authors' works were used as source materiel for the HBO series The Pacific. Leckie in particular was a fairly prolific military historian:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Leckie_(author)#Books
    , @ganderson
    "Helmet for my Pillow" was Robert Leckie; "With the Old Breed at Pelelieu and Okinawa" was Sledge, both good books. Leckie's is more literary, but both knew whereof they wrote
  103. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @David In TN
    Do you think American soldiers in the Korean War (1950-53) had an easy time? Not a few WW II veterans were called back into it.

    Do you think American soldiers in the Korean War (1950-53) had an easy time? Not a few WW II veterans were called back into it.

    No, Korea was a nightmare. Vietnam dreadful. Afghanistan was hell. Iraq no cakewalk. But please, do you believe any had to anything to defending America??

    Read More
    • Replies: @David In TN
    For some two and a half years, the Vietnam War was overwhelmingly supported by the American public. This is about the same as the time between Operation Torch and VE Day in WW II.

    BTW, there were about as many Americans KIA in three years in Korea as in 10 years in Vietnam. The lesson from Korea should have been "No more ground wars in Asia."
  104. IA says:
    @Anon
    Re: Your potential speech. Houston has a black, Democratic mayor. Assume the worst and that you're not going to get any police protection other than a stand-down order. Okay, you need to do research. Starting from there, is it easy to get into and out of the auditorium where your speech is being held and be sufficiently far away from a crowd? Look at a map and ask any people you know living in the area. Can your car get in and out of the parking lot easily? You'd need muscle, say half-a-dozen guys to escort you in and out. If you can't muster these people from tough-minded friends who know what's coming, look into hiring private security. You'd need them for about 4-5 hours, which gives you enough time to leave a hotel/friend's house, drive there, give the speech, and get back to where you're staying for the night. Call up a private security firm and ask for a quote for a 4-5 hour rate. It may not be too expensive. At the very least, call them up and wheedle a few safety tips out of them that you might not have thought of. Explain you're a complete novice who might need security and ask for a bit of advice. They might just offer you a few valuable pointers for free.

    Next, invite a few Republican/Conservative organizations to your speech, preferably ones who happen to be armed. Examples: Local army base officers, Fraternal Order of Police officials, or area Republican party officials. You need to beef up the crowd with your supporters, not just theirs. Your supporters should be adult men who look like the could hold their own in a rumble. Their presence may intimidate others who will think twice about causing potential trouble. Do NOT stay the night in Houston, but in a close-by area, (sometimes suburbs are their own municipality) that is white and has its own conservative mayor and police force who won't stand for any crap about protesters showing up where you're going to be sleeping and causing a fuss. Repeat, do NOT trust the Houston police force or mayor. You may have plenty of sympathizers among their cops, but orders from the mayor to stand down are orders that must be obeyed.

    And like another commentator said, have a book ready. You have a bunch of old columns on VDare and other places. If you don't have copyright issues, mine them for the best-supported (in terms of arguments--remember some buyers may be hostile to everything you say), most thought- provoking writing, arrange them by topic, and make each topic a different book chapter. Don't worry if it's a bit jumpy. Some people absorb information better that way. Slap it together and self-publish. You can put it out on Amazon, Kobo, Barnes & Noble, and Draft to Digital to pick up a few other places. The latter is a good distributor than will help you get on Apple/Itunes if you don't have an Apple computer for uploading direct to Itunes.

    I'm not going to tell you whether to give the speech or not, but the book is a good idea no matter what you do.

    I’d have my lawyer hire some blacks or Mestizos as security. I’d get Truth (where is he?) to give the intro or at least meet me somewhere public and have a photographer ready.

    Read More
  105. Romanian says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Romanian, I am seventy, so my parents and their siblings were members of the "Greatest Generation", survivors of both the Great Depression and WWII. They owed everything they had , at least in their minds, to FDR and the Dems. But the Dems weren't a coalition of the fringes back then. The Viet Nam war protests and the '60s hippies moved them to the right. A Jesuit College education moved me Left, reality moved me right.

    Given the Communist period, the majority of Romanians are what you may call lefties, though they wouldn’t define it that way. They agree with state companies, state healthcare, state schools (private ones are very expensive), state companies, government pensions etc. They will grumble about inefficiencies and will recognize the various pitfalls, but this is the default position since this is what we have experienced. The libertarians are a sort of jeune ecole in academia who are powerless in society, though they may become influential policy-wise as they age. Culturally speaking, you might say the country is a bit to the right – it’s becoming unfashionable among the hipster set, but God and Nation are key coordinates for most people. The Schelling point towards which most will gravitate. So, in a sense, young people who skew politically different from their parents will either be right wing in economics or left wing culturally.

    PS I had Orthodox religion classes in school for the whole duration (one 50 minute class a week for 12 years), which I loved because I learned what apocatastasis means and where the important ecumenical councils were held (Nicaea, Constantinople, Ephesus, Chalcedony, Constantinople, Constantinople, Nicaea). Even learned a mnemonic device for them. I’m not sure whether they still have them in schools as default, with the parents having to opt out. Of course, different religions get the day off, though I remember being surprised by having a Protestant colleague in my hometown who had always attended the classes before I knew what he was.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Romanian, I just read an article about Romania in an older (1998) National Geographic magazine, and while dated, it was informative. Religious studies are really a more defined study of history and philosophy and of course, politics. Probably too toxic to add to a curriculum today, although, you can teach any other "ism" that passes the Left's sniff test. I went to a Catholic boys' HS and a Jesuit college and there were Protestants as HS classmates and in college some Jews. Thank you for your reply.
  106. @Anonymous

    Do you think American soldiers in the Korean War (1950-53) had an easy time? Not a few WW II veterans were called back into it.
     
    No, Korea was a nightmare. Vietnam dreadful. Afghanistan was hell. Iraq no cakewalk. But please, do you believe any had to anything to defending America??

    For some two and a half years, the Vietnam War was overwhelmingly supported by the American public. This is about the same as the time between Operation Torch and VE Day in WW II.

    BTW, there were about as many Americans KIA in three years in Korea as in 10 years in Vietnam. The lesson from Korea should have been “No more ground wars in Asia.”

    Read More
  107. @BenKenobi
    You should see the associated article about the arrest "renewing criticism" of refugee policy. I'm so sick of diversity loving mush-headed Canadians. Pathetic and supine Eloi, they deserve their fate in the Morlocks' stomachs. We Dark Eloi shall be richer having lost them.

    The streets are extended gutters and the gutters are full of blood and when the drains finally scab over, all the vermin will drown. The accumulated filth of all their sex and murder will foam up about their waists and all the whores and politicians will look up and shout "Save us!"... and I'll whisper "no."
    - Rorschach, Watchmen

    Once you realize what a joke everything is, being the Comedian is the only thing that makes sense.
    - The Comedian, Watchmen

    “I love workin’ on American soil!”

    The Comedian, Watchmen

    “I’m not locked up in here with them, they’re locked up in here with me.”

    Rorschach, Watchmen

    Read More
  108. @bomag

    what do people think about Trump’s comment that the United States isn’t so innocent?
     
    Iffy. On one hand, he's being honest. On the other hand, the president should be a complete cheerleader for the country and not shift any attention to its flaws. Plenty of people are tearing it down.

    Slightly different take — Trump may have been primarily referring to the trail of bodies the Clintons have left in their wake, and giving a preview of the investigations to come. That example of “extrajudicial” killings is more on point than any reference to military combat deaths.

    Read More
  109. @Romanian
    Given the Communist period, the majority of Romanians are what you may call lefties, though they wouldn't define it that way. They agree with state companies, state healthcare, state schools (private ones are very expensive), state companies, government pensions etc. They will grumble about inefficiencies and will recognize the various pitfalls, but this is the default position since this is what we have experienced. The libertarians are a sort of jeune ecole in academia who are powerless in society, though they may become influential policy-wise as they age. Culturally speaking, you might say the country is a bit to the right - it's becoming unfashionable among the hipster set, but God and Nation are key coordinates for most people. The Schelling point towards which most will gravitate. So, in a sense, young people who skew politically different from their parents will either be right wing in economics or left wing culturally.

    PS I had Orthodox religion classes in school for the whole duration (one 50 minute class a week for 12 years), which I loved because I learned what apocatastasis means and where the important ecumenical councils were held (Nicaea, Constantinople, Ephesus, Chalcedony, Constantinople, Constantinople, Nicaea). Even learned a mnemonic device for them. I'm not sure whether they still have them in schools as default, with the parents having to opt out. Of course, different religions get the day off, though I remember being surprised by having a Protestant colleague in my hometown who had always attended the classes before I knew what he was.

    Romanian, I just read an article about Romania in an older (1998) National Geographic magazine, and while dated, it was informative. Religious studies are really a more defined study of history and philosophy and of course, politics. Probably too toxic to add to a curriculum today, although, you can teach any other “ism” that passes the Left’s sniff test. I went to a Catholic boys’ HS and a Jesuit college and there were Protestants as HS classmates and in college some Jews. Thank you for your reply.

    Read More
  110. @SPMoore8
    "Helmet for My Pillow" was Robert Leckie, right?

    “Helmet for My Pillow” was Robert Leckie, right?

    Correct; E.B. (Eugene Bondurant) Sledge wrote With the Old Breed: At Peleliu and Okinawa. Both authors’ works were used as source materiel for the HBO series The Pacific. Leckie in particular was a fairly prolific military historian:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Leckie_(author)#Books

    Read More
  111. ganderson says:
    @SPMoore8
    "Helmet for My Pillow" was Robert Leckie, right?

    “Helmet for my Pillow” was Robert Leckie; “With the Old Breed at Pelelieu and Okinawa” was Sledge, both good books. Leckie’s is more literary, but both knew whereof they wrote

    Read More
  112. Tracy says: • Website
    @Sean

    https://www.theguardian.com/world/2002/oct/28/usa.israel

    The members of the Christian Coalition of America are some of the most passionate defenders of Israel in the United States.[...]

    They don't love the real Jewish people," the author Gershom Gorenberg told the CBS programme 60 Minutes. "They love us as characters in their story, in their play, and that's not who we are. If you listen to the drama that they are describing, essentially it's a five-act play in which the Jews disappear in the fourth act."
     

    Kristol subscribes to his people's version of Dispensationalism, with white gentile masses as characters in a redemptive drama who are only lovable, because they are fated to disappear before the finale.

    Gentiles aren’t fated to disappear, but to serve. Someone has to grow the food, fix the leaky pipes, and turn on the lights on the Sabbath. Anyway, if you want to read about one rabbi’s milking of the dispensationalist types, check this out: The Rabbi Who Loved Evangelicals

    Read More

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
Confederate Flag Day, State Capitol, Raleigh, N.C. -- March 3, 2007
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
The evidence is clear — but often ignored