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The Ignorance of Economists: Refugees, Cocaine, and Miami in 1980
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The basic requirement for most research in economics is the notion of ceteris paribus, or all else being equal. You find some naturally occurring experiment — such as, in David Card’s celebrated study, the 1980 Mariel boatlift of Cubans into Miami that boosted the supply of labor — and see if that, say, drove down Miami wages relative to some other American cities where the Mariel boatlift didn’t happen. Thus, you can see whether the Law of Supply and Demand applies, or if it magically doesn’t in the case of immigration.

But of course you have to choose a control group of cities for Miami in the early 1980s where all else was equal to Miami except for Mariel. But that should be easy right? I mean there wasn’t anything else going on in Miami in the early 1980s other than the Mariel boatlift to make the local economy unusual, right?

Economist Giovanni Peri, a devoted defender of the magical migration exception to Supply & Demand, now reiterates that the 1980 Mariel boatlift should end the debate: immigration doesn’t affect wages! From Business Insider:

Here’s what happened the last time the US welcomed a huge group of refugees
BOB BRYAN TOMORROW AT 3:34 AM

While the debate rages on over the number of Syrian and Middle Eastern refugees to let into the US, or whether to let them in at all, a group of researchers took a look back at the economic impact the last time America opened its borders in a big way.

Spurned on by the current crisis, Giovanni Peri and Vasil Yasenov of the University of California-Davis, analysed the economic impact of the Mariel Boatlift. From April to September 1980, 125,000 Cuban refugees came ashore in Miami in a massive wave of people fleeing their home country.

Looking back on the time period, the researchers found that both in the short and long-term there were no negative effects on the wages or employment status of native low-skill Miamians.

“Running many reasonable scenarios conveys the picture that nothing significant happened to the wage and to the unemployment of Miami high school dropouts between 1979 and 1981, relative to any reasonable control groups,” wrote the researchers in a new study.

According to Peri and Yasenov, most of the refugees coming into the country from Cuba were low-education, generally unskilled, so the most likely impact would be felt among high school dropouts. The basic prediction would be that the increase in Cubans would displace those in the low-skill labour.

“Instead what we observe for all samples and wage measures is no deviation of Miami from control in 1979-81, and also no deviation if we consider the longer period 1979-1983,” said the study. “In none of the Panels of Figure 2 do we observe a systematic large deviation and subsequent adjustment between Miami and synthetic control beginning in the 1979-1981 period.”

To put it simply, none of the terrible predictions came true.

… Additionally, when these factors over the 1979-1982 time period, leading up to and directly after the inflow, are compared to other cities, Miami stays within its historical and projected range. So compared to both a theoretical trajectory of itself and 44 other cities, the Boatlift migrants had no effect.

Since the Boatlift case has been oft-studied, the researchers also ran the tests in a number of ways and considering a wide variety of factors. …

By doing this, Peri and Yasenov hope to end the debate over the Boatlift for good and show that massive numbers of refugees can be integrated economically successfully.

If you are not a professional economist, however, you might remember something that wasn’t ceteris paribus about Miami in the early 1980s: namely, Miami’s economy became red hot from the most notorious Cocaine Boom in the history of the world. Entrepreneurs who moved to Miami in 1980 include Tony Montana and ¡Jeb¡

Outside of the economics profession, the early 1980s Miami Cocaine Boom is not a forgotten event. It was portrayed in 1983′s Scarface, 1984′s Miami Vice, and the new Netflix series Narcos, an extended biopic of Colombian billionaire Pablo Escobar.

Narcos is narrated by a Drug Enforcement Administration agent in Miami, the narrator in the clip above, who contrasts what his job was like in Miami in (the economists’ control period of) the 1970s — chasing down hippie weed dealers in flip-flops with a kilo of marijuana in their backpacks — to what it suddenly became like in (the economists’ test period of) the early 1980s — firefights with Colombian cocaine traffickers with automatic weapons.

I’ve been pointing out for almost a decade that ceteris was famously not paribus in Miami before and after 1980 due to the Cocaine Boom, but have any economists ever noticed? Do economists ever notice anything that doesn’t appear in other economists’ papers?

Speaking of billionaires, that reminds me that I haven’t reminded anybody of my December fundraiser for about a week now.

I now have seven ways for you to send me encouragement, including Paypal, Bitcoin, and fee-free bank transfers.

First: You can use PayPal (non-tax deductible) by going to the page on my old blog here. PayPal accepts most credit cards. Contributions can be either one-time only, monthly, or annual. Fee 2.9%.

Second: You can mail a non-tax deductible donation to:Steve Sailer
P.O Box 4142
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91617-0142

Third: You can make a tax deductible contribution to VDARE by clicking here. (Paypal and credit cards accepted, including recurring “subscription” donations.) Make sure you click the button for “Steve Sailer.” If you send VDARE a check make sure to put “I like Steve Sailer” on the Memo line. Note: the VDARE site goes up and down on its own schedule, so if this link stops working, please let me know.

Fourth: You can use Bitcoin:

I’m using Coinbase as a sort of PayPal for Bitcoins.

The IRS has issued instructions regarding Bitcoins. I’m having Coinbase immediately turn all Bitcoins I receive into U.S. dollars and deposit them in my bank account. At the end of the year, Coinbase will presumably send me a 1099 form for filing my taxes.

Payments are not tax deductible.

Below are links to two Coinbase pages of mine. This first is if you want to enter a U.S. dollar-denominated amount to pay me.

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in U.S. Dollars)

This second is if you want to enter a Bitcoin-denominated amount. (Remember one Bitcoin is currently worth many U.S. dollars.)

Pay With Bitcoin (denominated in Bitcoins)

Fifth: if you have a Chase bank account (or even other bank accounts), you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Chase QuickPay (FAQ). Just tell Chase QuickPay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address (steveslrATaol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). If Chase asks for the name on my account, it’s StevenSailer with an n at the end of Steven. (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Sixth: if you have a Wells Fargo bank account, you can transfer money to me (with no fees) via Wells Fargo SurePay. Just tell WF SurePay to send the money to my ancient AOL email address steveslrAT aol.com — replace the AT with the usual @). (Non-tax deductible.) There is no 2.9% fee like with PayPal or Google Wallet, so this is good for large contributions.

Seventh: Google Wallet, which I’ll put below the fold because the instructions are kind of verbose. It’s actually pretty simple, though.



Seventh: send money via the Paypal-like Google Wallet to my Gmail address (that’s isteveslrATgmail .com — replace the AT with a @). (Non-tax deductible.)

Here’s the Google Wallet FAQ. From it: “You will need to have (or sign up for) Google Wallet to send or receive money. If you have ever purchased anything on Google Play, then you most likely already have a Google Wallet. If you do not yet have a Google Wallet, don’t worry, the process is simple: go to wallet.google.com and follow the steps.” You probably already have a Google ID and password, which Google Wallet uses, so signing up Wallet is pretty painless.

You can put money into your Google Wallet Balance from your bank account and send it with no service fee.

Or you can send money via credit card (Visa, MasterCard, AmEx, Discover) with the industry-standard 2.9% fee. (You don’t need to put money into your Google Wallet Balance to do this.)

Google Wallet works from both a website and a smartphone
app (Android and iPhone — the Google Wallet app is currently available only in the U.S., but the Google Wallet website can be used in 160 countries).

Or, once you sign up with Google Wallet, you can simply send money via credit card, bank transfer, or Wallet Balance as an attachment from Google’s free Gmail email service.Here’s how to do it.

(Non-tax deductible.)

Thanks!

 
    []
  1. Nico says:

    Before I moved to Paris, I lived in Miami. It is pretty much taken for granted in all sectors of Miamian society that the city’s financial apparatus was founded on 1980s to 1990s cocaine money.

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  2. Blobby5 says:

    I have an economics degree and none of it made any sense until I was exposed to the Austrian School (thanks Ron Paul). Now my eyes are wide open and unfortunately the future doesn’t look good. It is best to know a storm is coming, but you can appear gloomy to others.

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  3. EriK says:

    ” Do economists ever notice anything that doesn’t appear in other economists’ papers?”

    It doesn’t seem so. But is this a recent phenomenon? Or has it always been so?

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    They don't know, because none of them have noticed.

    (/rim shot)

  4. “If economists could manage to get themselves thought of as humble, competent people on a level with dentists, that would be splendid”. -John Maynard Keynes

    Read More
  5. whorefinder says: • Website

    What’s the old joke?

    An economist, a military officer, and a carpenter all escape from cannibals. They run to the edge of cliff. There is another cliff about 30 feet beyond the edge of the one they are standing on—and that leads to freedom.

    The carpenter says, ” I’ll cut down those trees quickly and make a bridge.”

    The military officer says,” I’ll set up a makes shift fort right here, and we’ll use these sticks and rocks to fight them off.”

    The economist says, “Gentlemen, why worry? Just assume a bridge.”

    And steps off the ledge.

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  6. Rotten says:

    As Cocaine Cowboys documented, those Marielitos worked as the bag men, enforcers, and hired assassins for the Columbian cartels.

    This made Miami the murder capital of North America.

    The excess refugees took unskilled jobs from African Americans, leading to riots for most of the 1980s and multiple neighborhoods being burned down.

    Defeating the Columbian cartel and fixing miami required tens of billions of yearly anti drug spending, military invasions of several countries, and lost civil liberties for all Americans, inclusion insane sentencing.

    Did the economists include a decade of murders and riots, as well as the costs of the war on drugs hen they I’d their study?

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    It was my understanding that the established Cubans were more often at war with the upstart (and more luridly violent) Columbians, though some Marielanos did work for the bigger Columbian outfits as needed.
  7. whorefinder says: • Website
    @EriK
    " Do economists ever notice anything that doesn’t appear in other economists’ papers?"

    It doesn't seem so. But is this a recent phenomenon? Or has it always been so?

    They don’t know, because none of them have noticed.

    (/rim shot)

    Read More
  8. this is one good aspect of the immigration explosion in Sweden, Germany etc. this year: in the future other countries can study those cases and avoid what has happened

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dumbo
    "this is one good aspect of the immigration explosion in Sweden, Germany etc. this year: in the future other countries can study those cases and avoid what has happened"

    a) It has already happened in the past but no one took notice, much else tried to avoid it

    b) which other countries?
  9. The Peri and Yasenov paper is a working paper, so it is brand new and unvetted. I would like to see commentary by Borjas who found a significant wage impact.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Larry, San Francisco
    Borjas's October 2015 paper:
    http://www.hks.harvard.edu/fs/gborjas/publications/working%20papers/Mariel2015.pdf

    pretty much refuted the earlier analysis from David Card. At a minimum this paper showed that the impact of migrants is very sensitive to what cities you are comparing Miami too.
  10. Economics, like statistics, is used to fit facts to a predetermined narrative. It is a helpful way to analyze memes in the news. When all the predetermined narratives are examined, we have a rough sketch of what unpopular new legislation will be passed against the will of the (right-thinking) people. It seems apparent that policies in the US and the memes that support them wish to “level” American living standards with the rest of the third world. Destroy the culture (complete); destroy the history (complete); import citizens to supplement the new desired culture (still working on it).

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  11. Ah, yes, the joys of Mariel.

    In the early 1980s, Miami was one of the most violent cities in America, if not the world. There were whole neighborhoods that were no-go zones, even in broad daylight. Murders were so common that they often didn’t make it into the Herald, even the local section.

    Native-born English-speaking Americans found themselves relegated to third-class status, at best.

    So many people – “Anglos,” yes – started leaving Dade County for points north that the local TV stations began running “Miami’s for Me” public-service ads to try to persuade folks not to flee for greener pastures.

    It was a wretched time for anyone who wasn’t a millionaire drug lord.

    So, yes, the economists are full of it.

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  12. Jefferson says:

    Kamala Khan who is a Muslim Pakistani female character created by Marvel, knocks out Donald Trump in one of the comics, similar to when Captain America knocked out Adolf Hitler.

    So Pakistani Muslims are the new Jews now since Donald Trump is the new Adolf Hitler. Too bad none of those Pakistani Muslim rapist pimps at Rotherham got the gas chamber.

    Read More
  13. I see the hawks still haven’t gotten to your bunny.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    I see the hawks still haven’t gotten to your bunny.
     
    Yesterday, I saw a hawk eating a bunny on a golf course. An iSteve trifecta!
  14. MEH 0910 says:
    @Jefferson
    Kamala Khan who is a Muslim Pakistani female character created by Marvel, knocks out Donald Trump in one of the comics, similar to when Captain America knocked out Adolf Hitler.

    So Pakistani Muslims are the new Jews now since Donald Trump is the new Adolf Hitler. Too bad none of those Pakistani Muslim rapist pimps at Rotherham got the gas chamber.

    Read More
  15. Someone upthread referenced Corbin’s documentary Cocaine Cowboys, which did a really good job of contrasting the sleepy 1970s roosting spot for snowbirds with what Miami became with the Cocaine trade of the 1980s. All of a sudden the influx of cash (which could not be explained as anything other than the produce of illicit drug trafficking) drew banks, luxury goods, high end restaurants and clubs, real estate development etc.

    Cocaine aside, it always seemed ridiculous that economists would overlook other factors which are definitely not equal between statistically similar entities. If you would wonder why Miami could weather an immigration wave better in economic terms than, say, Cleveland, (being a similarly sized city) it would be ridiculous not to account for Miami’s year round warm Caribbean climate, beaches and desirability as a tourist destination (yielding low wage, low skilled jobs) relative to Cleveland.

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  16. @Rotten
    As Cocaine Cowboys documented, those Marielitos worked as the bag men, enforcers, and hired assassins for the Columbian cartels.

    This made Miami the murder capital of North America.

    The excess refugees took unskilled jobs from African Americans, leading to riots for most of the 1980s and multiple neighborhoods being burned down.

    Defeating the Columbian cartel and fixing miami required tens of billions of yearly anti drug spending, military invasions of several countries, and lost civil liberties for all Americans, inclusion insane sentencing.

    Did the economists include a decade of murders and riots, as well as the costs of the war on drugs hen they I'd their study?

    It was my understanding that the established Cubans were more often at war with the upstart (and more luridly violent) Columbians, though some Marielanos did work for the bigger Columbian outfits as needed.

    Read More
  17. Ivy says:

    The article may have tapped into the desperate subconscious motivation for acceptance among economists, based on the following:

    Spurned on by the current crisis…

    Read More
  18. Anon7 says:

    I think I managed to figure something out about the way most people refuse to talk about immigration. When you point out to them the sheer numbers involved, everyone I’ve talked to agrees that the USA can’t take in hundreds of millions of people.

    But they don’t want to be the ones who choose. Resistance to immigration reform or discussion is cowardice in men, it’s just typical in women. It’s like when you have a difficult choice to make in your family, and your wife just wants you to decide. Their hands are clean, and any fallout is your problem to deal with.

    They want the fantasy of unlimited generosity and helpfulness, and assuaged guilty conscience, that comes with only saying “Yes” to the world’s masses of people. President Obama is the chief offender here, because as a black men he is telling the white majority what they have to do to get clean. But as we know, there is no limit to reparations for our guilt. Just keep saying “Yes”, and be saved.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Whiskey
    Id rather be damned for all time. Sinners have more fun and ***always*** get the girl.

    Puritans have no answer for those of us who choose damnation.

    Or as Jason and the Scorchers put it, two steps out of line, dammed for all time, to walk both sides of the line.
  19. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Cloudswrest
    I see the hawks still haven't gotten to your bunny.

    I see the hawks still haven’t gotten to your bunny.

    Yesterday, I saw a hawk eating a bunny on a golf course. An iSteve trifecta!

    Read More
  20. iSteveFan says:

    Giovanni Peri and Vasil Yasenov of the University of California-Davis, …

    So two immigrants to the USA (I am guessing) are telling us to keep the doors open. That carries about as much weight with me as Fareed Zakaria telling us that America is a propositional nation in need of more and more immigrants.

    I imagine a couple of American econ grads feel a bit differently about immigrants being good for the economy. I imagine a position at UC-Davis is a nice gig. But apparently there are no Americans willing to fill it.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Some Economist
    Yes, it is a good gig indeed. Maybe top 10% for a graduating PhD these days, in what is a very noisy market.

    I think Card is from Canada, by the way. There are obviously numerous excellent economists not from the US, but it really is a problem for those whose research area requires contextual the knowledge someone like Steve can instantly draw on.

    Just as the immigrant immigration economists seem to identify somehow with immigrant dishwashers, might I also identify with economists here? I know the best argument against questionable economics research is that the economics Nobel isn't a real Nobel, but the second best arguments are usually found in economics research, and there is much of it. It just doesn't get quite the coverage.
  21. Whiskey says: • Website
    @Anon7
    I think I managed to figure something out about the way most people refuse to talk about immigration. When you point out to them the sheer numbers involved, everyone I've talked to agrees that the USA can't take in hundreds of millions of people.

    But they don't want to be the ones who choose. Resistance to immigration reform or discussion is cowardice in men, it's just typical in women. It's like when you have a difficult choice to make in your family, and your wife just wants you to decide. Their hands are clean, and any fallout is your problem to deal with.

    They want the fantasy of unlimited generosity and helpfulness, and assuaged guilty conscience, that comes with only saying "Yes" to the world's masses of people. President Obama is the chief offender here, because as a black men he is telling the white majority what they have to do to get clean. But as we know, there is no limit to reparations for our guilt. Just keep saying "Yes", and be saved.

    Id rather be damned for all time. Sinners have more fun and ***always*** get the girl.

    Puritans have no answer for those of us who choose damnation.

    Or as Jason and the Scorchers put it, two steps out of line, dammed for all time, to walk both sides of the line.

    Read More
    • Replies: @middle aged vet
    Whiskey, your comment is ridiculous, and my guess is you know it. That is, either you were kidding everybody or you have no idea what you are talking about! Nor does Anon7. Obama feels terrible that every year of his presidency leads to a smaller percentage of African-Americans like his wife. (He is cool with rising percentages of Kenyan-Americans, but I a morally certain that he still feels bad that he has betrayed his wife - twenty generations in this country and their first president that looks like them is not on their side, demographically!) He is, for reasons that are easily explainable but are nevertheless rather dreary, tired of traditional African-Americans and their desire not to become even more of a minority. He should not be, but he is. Also, Whiskey, the kind of girl that sinners always get is not the girl you want. As you no doubt know. Believe me. There is still enough left in this world of the Garden of Eden that people with decent God-approved advantages can find sacramental true love. Pick up your Bible and read it , dude. Any other kind of love than sacramental love (look up the word, it is an important word, dude) is - and I use this word (easily) advisedly - easily - bought and sold by the rich, and hence, while not worthless, easily susceptible to the quick slide to Botox and Valium and straight-up craziness that has disappointed so many rich, such as yourself, "cats who were looking for true love", as Jerry G. said a few years ago, not all that long before royally screwing up at his last rehab assignment. Pure Adam Smith. Pure Moral Sentiments of humanity. Whiskey, if you are something more than a performing monkey, please read at least read Philippians or a few chapters in the Gospel of John.
  22. @Whiskey
    Id rather be damned for all time. Sinners have more fun and ***always*** get the girl.

    Puritans have no answer for those of us who choose damnation.

    Or as Jason and the Scorchers put it, two steps out of line, dammed for all time, to walk both sides of the line.

    Whiskey, your comment is ridiculous, and my guess is you know it. That is, either you were kidding everybody or you have no idea what you are talking about! Nor does Anon7. Obama feels terrible that every year of his presidency leads to a smaller percentage of African-Americans like his wife. (He is cool with rising percentages of Kenyan-Americans, but I a morally certain that he still feels bad that he has betrayed his wife – twenty generations in this country and their first president that looks like them is not on their side, demographically!) He is, for reasons that are easily explainable but are nevertheless rather dreary, tired of traditional African-Americans and their desire not to become even more of a minority. He should not be, but he is. Also, Whiskey, the kind of girl that sinners always get is not the girl you want. As you no doubt know. Believe me. There is still enough left in this world of the Garden of Eden that people with decent God-approved advantages can find sacramental true love. Pick up your Bible and read it , dude. Any other kind of love than sacramental love (look up the word, it is an important word, dude) is – and I use this word (easily) advisedly – easily – bought and sold by the rich, and hence, while not worthless, easily susceptible to the quick slide to Botox and Valium and straight-up craziness that has disappointed so many rich, such as yourself, “cats who were looking for true love”, as Jerry G. said a few years ago, not all that long before royally screwing up at his last rehab assignment. Pure Adam Smith. Pure Moral Sentiments of humanity. Whiskey, if you are something more than a performing monkey, please read at least read Philippians or a few chapters in the Gospel of John.

    Read More
  23. @iSteveFan

    Giovanni Peri and Vasil Yasenov of the University of California-Davis, ...
     
    So two immigrants to the USA (I am guessing) are telling us to keep the doors open. That carries about as much weight with me as Fareed Zakaria telling us that America is a propositional nation in need of more and more immigrants.

    I imagine a couple of American econ grads feel a bit differently about immigrants being good for the economy. I imagine a position at UC-Davis is a nice gig. But apparently there are no Americans willing to fill it.

    Yes, it is a good gig indeed. Maybe top 10% for a graduating PhD these days, in what is a very noisy market.

    I think Card is from Canada, by the way. There are obviously numerous excellent economists not from the US, but it really is a problem for those whose research area requires contextual the knowledge someone like Steve can instantly draw on.

    Just as the immigrant immigration economists seem to identify somehow with immigrant dishwashers, might I also identify with economists here? I know the best argument against questionable economics research is that the economics Nobel isn’t a real Nobel, but the second best arguments are usually found in economics research, and there is much of it. It just doesn’t get quite the coverage.

    Read More
  24. Dumbo says:
    @Erik Sieven
    this is one good aspect of the immigration explosion in Sweden, Germany etc. this year: in the future other countries can study those cases and avoid what has happened

    “this is one good aspect of the immigration explosion in Sweden, Germany etc. this year: in the future other countries can study those cases and avoid what has happened”

    a) It has already happened in the past but no one took notice, much else tried to avoid it

    b) which other countries?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Erik Sieven
    a) that´s right. Though up to know there has been this frog in boiled water phenomena, now it was so fast and possible effects will be easy to identify
    b) India, China, Russia, USA, ....
  25. HBD Guy says:

    Steve: What is wrong with you? Don’t you believe in the Free Market? LOL

    Read More
  26. @FactsAreImportant
    The Peri and Yasenov paper is a working paper, so it is brand new and unvetted. I would like to see commentary by Borjas who found a significant wage impact.

    Borjas’s October 2015 paper:

    http://www.hks.harvard.edu/fs/gborjas/publications/working%20papers/Mariel2015.pdf

    pretty much refuted the earlier analysis from David Card. At a minimum this paper showed that the impact of migrants is very sensitive to what cities you are comparing Miami too.

    Read More
  27. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    First and foremost, Giovanni Peri is a Marxist.

    Like all rabid Marxists, purely for ideological and ‘religious’ reasons, ‘immigration control’ is anathema to him. High on 200 years ago, his prophet uttered words to that effect, and the prophet must be obeyed no matter what.

    Hence, Peri will prostitute his profession and use every damned lie and filthy trick possible to rationalize Marxism and press the revolution on.

    Just for your information, there are thousands upon thousands of Marxists just like Giovanni Peri infesting academe and a great many are ‘high ranking economists’.
    The tragedy is many a dumb ass politician takes them seriously.

    Read More
  28. @Dumbo
    "this is one good aspect of the immigration explosion in Sweden, Germany etc. this year: in the future other countries can study those cases and avoid what has happened"

    a) It has already happened in the past but no one took notice, much else tried to avoid it

    b) which other countries?

    a) that´s right. Though up to know there has been this frog in boiled water phenomena, now it was so fast and possible effects will be easy to identify
    b) India, China, Russia, USA, ….

    Read More
  29. Psmith says:

    OK, but the cocaine boom should have affected the wages of the dropouts in Borjas’s paper too, yes?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Cocaine-fueled building and spending boom in South Florida creating jobs and higher salaries for those in the working class: GOOD.

    Carter-fueled influx of Marielitos taking the strong-back jobs for a pittance: BAD.

    The last 35 years have been a simple rinse & repeat.
  30. The most deplorable one [AKA "Fourth doorman of the apocalypse"] says:

    Come on folks.

    If everyone dropped $50 in Steve’s tip jar he would be able to go on a nice holiday with his wife …

    Read More
  31. Giovanni Peri and Vasil Yasenov of the University of California-Davis

    I’ll assume that Messrs. Peri and Yasenov arrived in the US long ago on student visas and that they took such good advantage of their US schooling that they were far more qualified for their positions at UC-Davis than any US-born Economics PhDs.

    Nonetheless, assuming that the conclusion of their study is correct (though elementary economics, common sense, and Occam tell us otherwise), the study’s time period is too short. By the time I arrived in Miami in 1990, a non-Spanish speaker couldn’t get hired for almost any job, and if they did, they couldn’t function and didn’t last. Except for low level government jobs, lower class American-born and Caribbean blacks were shut off from the job market. The Whites just moved north up the state or to GA or NC. Now, thirty-five years after Mariel, the US-born grandchildren of the Marielitos can’t speak Spanish and have also moved north, leaving Miami to American and Caribbean blacks, with well-off Russians and South Americans residing part-time in the wealthier areas outside of the City of Miami.

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  32. $50 sent.

    Plus a monthly recurring of a nominal amount.

    Compared to therapy, a bargain.

    First discovered this blog when I googled for Zizek quotes.

    Read it so much on my Note 4 it made my eyes hurt.

    Recently got a Kindle Paperwhite. On my Note, I use the Puffin browser, print to pdf, and send to the Kindle.

    Reading on the Paperwhite at night I get drowsy and fall asleep instead of using the Note which has me clicking on links to Trump speeches on youtube and keeping me up all night.

    Reading patterns have changed since discovering this blog. Before: humanities with lots of mentions of postmodernism. Since: Charles Murray, Coulter, Sowell. Ordered and read Steve’s book on Obama.

    Joined Mensa too.

    Read More
  33. Brutusale says:
    @Psmith
    OK, but the cocaine boom should have affected the wages of the dropouts in Borjas's paper too, yes?

    Cocaine-fueled building and spending boom in South Florida creating jobs and higher salaries for those in the working class: GOOD.

    Carter-fueled influx of Marielitos taking the strong-back jobs for a pittance: BAD.

    The last 35 years have been a simple rinse & repeat.

    Read More
  34. I may be wrong about this, and I haven’t seen Scarface, but I have seen the first two Godfather movies twice, and when you think about it, possibly the best non-comedic cinematic directing coup de theatre of all time was Coppola’s making Pacino appear on the screen in the Godfather movies to legitimately have two or three more standard deviations of intelligence than he could actually ever had. When I see Pacino playing at his real level (not too bright, some animal cunning, little to no connection to the world outside of his immediate desires), without a great director, I think of Proverbs 7 (google Proverbs 7 images to see what I mean, it is the chapter that focuses on people who are driven to sin by concupiscence).

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