The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
The Future Is Female ... and Boring
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

From the New York Times opinion page:

Toni Morrison, dead this week at 88, was a great American novelist who was also a Great American Novelist. This means she had a special form of celebrity, an oracular status, and also that she was embraced by the tradition that regards novels as keys to interpreting America — insisting that you must read Morrison (and Ellison and Wright and Hurston) to understand the black experience, just as you must read Hawthorne and Melville to understand the legacy of Puritanism, or Faulkner or Cather to understand the South or West, and so on down the high-school English list.

So her passing raises the question: Is she the last of the species? The last American novelist who made novels seem essential to an educated person’s understanding of her country? …

But something has changed in the cultural status of the novel in the time I’ve been a reader, the years between Morrison’s canonization and her passing — and maybe especially the years since social media and the iPhone first arrived. …

But in my own life it’s the internet that’s killing novel-reading. And specifically the social media/iPhone combination, whose distracting effect is the enemy of the novel more than of other forms of art.

Well said, but another aspect is the rise of video games uses up an enormous number of male hours, so fewer males are reading books, so the publishing industry is signing fewer male writers, and the publishing industry itself is becoming more and more female.

You might think that the increasing feminization of fiction wouldn’t necessarily undermine the importance and relevance of literature. But it does. Basically, most of the interesting artistic accomplishments of, say, the last 600 years have been the work of today’s bete noire: white males.

Much as everybody would like that not to be true for the next 600 years, we don’t have much evidence that such a change will actually happen.

 
Hide 171 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. We have an ideology here that for all its worship of progress, doesn’t like progress actually occurring.

    • Replies: @Steve in Greensboro
  2. JimDandy says:

    There are white female hip-hop “artists,” but it’s a black male genre. The novel is a Euro-male genre, and Euro-males are currently cancelled. We night not be witnessing the actual end of the novel just yet, but we are most likely seeing the slow, muffled death rattle of the literary novel.

    • Replies: @SunBakedSuburb
  3. Lurker says:

    Dead at 88.

    The lulz keep coming!

    • LOL: Cowboy Shaw
    • Replies: @Fred Boynton
    , @Henry's Cat
  4. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:

    One only has to endure a few minutes of the painfully dull and excruciatingly boring UK ITV television network – 90% soap opera and ‘reality’ and ‘lifestyle’ shows’ – to glimpse a peek of the ultimate in psychological Hell – ‘entertainment’ made by women for women.

  5. It’s true that the publishing industry is increasingly gynocentric. So is television. As far as the decline of the novel, it’s true that leisure time is increasingly spent elsewhere. But I’d blame streaming services like Netflix and the dozens of hours binge-watching seven or eight series of mediocre crap like GOT more than I would video games.

    I read ‘Song of Solomon.’ Didn’t enjoy it enough to want to read more Toni Morrison, but there are some excellent female novelists. I highly recommend Lionel Shriver’s novel ‘The Mandibles’ to iSteve readers. It’s about a family of Brooklyn liberals after the collapse of the American economy, set in the not-distant future. iSteve themes abound.

  6. Aging German critics like the late Wolfram Schütte of the webzine Glanz und Elend say, that not even their friends are interested any longer in new novels they recommend to them.

    University bookstores close. My favorite bookstore Die Schwarze Geiss in Konstanz sees hardly anybody younger than 50 or so. An (interesting) interview with Jonathan Franzen in the daily die weLT, in which he says, that climate change will not be changed, and that it would be wise to concentrate rather on species protection, drew a few comments from birders and cat lovers (who hate Franzen, because he says that cats play a major role in diminishing birds) – and that was it. Ah: Franzen also predicted a renaissance of the novel, because everything is so intertwined and tangled up, that no other means of order is suited to deal with our current state of mind.

    The one scientist I’ve read lately who said that novels are something necessary for the human mind to grow and be brought up properly was neuroscientist Lisa Feldmann Barrett. She argues, that consciousness is something which can only be cultivated by knowing words – and how they are applied in all possible human conditions, and that there is simply no better way to achieve this goal than to read novels and poetry – and talk about this experience with others. Strange.

    The once famous literary critics die and no well known younger ones take their place and nobody seems to care. The big exception I know of might be the German-speaking part of Switzerland.

  7. Is she the last of the species?

    She never was one. She’s a vastly overrated and overpromoted AA hire.

    The last American novelist who made novels seem essential to an educated person’s understanding of her country?

    What a steamin’ load of pompous bull. Henry Dumas is superior in almost every way (Morrison herself called him a “absolute genius”, FWIW), but he was shot dead before he could get a boost from Oprah’s book club, so we’re left with “greats” whose primary claim to “greatness’ is notoriety.

    • Replies: @pyrrhus
  8. anon[306] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dieter Kief

    not even their friends are interested any longer in new novels they recommend to them.

    As you get older fiction novels are just that- fake.

  9. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    So her passing raises the question: Is she the last of the species? The last American novelist who made novels seem essential to an educated person’s understanding of her country? …

    Lol, no.

    Jonathan Franzen’s “Freedom” will probably be remembered as the novel that best captured America in the aughts.

    His novel after that, “Purity” did something similar with the 2010s.

    And to understand Silicon Valley, Neal Stephenson is probably the most important American novelist.

  10. Altai says:

    I would have thought that social media is the female equivalent to video games. (Multiplayer ones at least) But maybe it’s influence has only been apparent for such a short period compared to video games that there will be a lag effect before things balance out again.

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
  11. @Dieter Kief

    It seems to me that genre writers keep chugging along. Specifically fantasy, and mystery/crime, though a horror or sci-fi book pops up prominently now and then.

    I think a big problem with modern/new fiction is the same problem with music nowadays, which is a lot/most of it just sucks. A lot of the tastemakers really let down readers in the Sunday book sections of newspapers. Instead of highlighting books the majority of readers want to read, they do the equivalent of boosting a Picasso when more people would rather look at a Reubens, Russell, or even a Dali.

    Wasting time on a movie is losing two hours. Wasting time on a book is a lot more than that, and also more expensive.

    Like newspapers and news magazines, they aren’t just in decline because of the internet, but also because the owners of them don’t give a damn about potentially significant chunck of their audience, and the audience returned the favor.

  12. Anon[126] • Disclaimer says:

    As someone who sees few movies and doesn’t watch TV I am amazed that Americans are so aware of movies and television. How much time does that take up? Some of these TV shows are multiyear commitments. And endless comic book movie sequels. For young men this plus the internet means no time for anything. Are there still kids who spend hours practicing guitar licks, or is that dead also?

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Kent Nationalist
  13. JRB says: • Website
    @Dieter Kief

    Interesting comment. Are you sure that Wolfram Schütte is dead ? I had a look at his wikipedia article and there he is still alive.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  14. Gordo says:
    @Dieter Kief

    Lisa Feldmann Barrett

    Just wondering if you have a Jewish surname and a White middle name, are you less likely to display the middle name than if the middle name was Jewish and the surname White?

    And if so what would this tell us about the realities privilege?

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  15. IHTG says:

    Well said, but another aspect is the rise of video games uses up an enormous number of male hours, so fewer males are reading books

    Where these two trends cross over is in the field of video game writing, which is also becoming increasingly female, to the displeasure of parts of the male audience.

    • Replies: @SFG
  16. @Dave Pinsen

    I agree about Jonathan Franzen. Don’t know Neal Stephenson’s work. David Guterson’s Ed King is an interesting and quite entertaining novel about Silicon Valley – and men and women. His best book is Our Lady of the Forest. Found T. C. Boyle’s Outside Looking In about LSD – it’s origins in Switzerland and then Tim Leary etc. quite good.

  17. eD says:

    I noticed a decline in quality of novels and of fiction in general about ten years ago and stopped reading them. I also thought that “Tony Morrison great novelist” was a sham when she was inflicted on me in high school thirty plus years ago.

    However, I think the cause and effect is the opposite of what Steve thinks, in this and other areas of life. The rot sets in first, and then the girls are let in. Fields start becoming feminized only when they have started declining in status anyway. I do think a good part of the problem was increased cronyism and incompetence in publishing houses.

    For some perspective, the first Western novel is generally held to be Don Quixote, published in 1605, and its true that in the West before the 17th century serious works of fiction meant poetry (plus plays and dialogues to some extent), with the closest equivalent to novels being epic poems. Shakespeare probably never read a novel. The genre really took off in the 18th century and had its heyday in the nineteenth century.

    For a genre, this is a pretty natural rise, peak, and decline. And its explicable by technological factors, the printing press, followed by the rise and then the decline of the middle class, and then shorter attentions caused by first by more visual forms of mass media and then the internet. I think the next big literary genre will be much more episodic, and eventually dialogues will be brought back.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  18. SFG says:
    @Ghost of Bull Moose

    The lady also got herself in trouble with the woke crowd by arguing any writer should be able to write any ethnic group, so I bought her book on general principle.

  19. Tiny Duck says:

    Reading will always be important

    You guys think it is end By because you are old white men

    Look at booktube on YouTube

    Reading is alive and well

  20. you must read Morrison (and Ellison and Wright and Hurston) to understand the black experience

    Do these people really want you to read the FDR-hating Republican Zora Neale Hurston?

    Say, what was Zora’s take on redlining?

  21. Wow, you’ve given me an idea: The Toni Morrison video game. The question is, what genre? You’d think Text Adventure, a Visual Novel, or maybe some sort of Role Playing Game, but the real money might be found in a First Person Shooter where you kill a number of her annoying characters until you reach and obtain the ur-character and take her Blue Eye as the prize.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  22. @eD

    Fields start becoming feminized only when they have started declining in status anyway.

    That was the crux of Steven Goldberg’s The Inevitability of Patriarchy.

    Which was reissued with the more anodyne title Why Men Rule. That alone is noteworthy.

  23. @The Alarmist

    I didn’t read Toni Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye” but Wikipedia’s description makes it sound like the Ur-text for Sailer’s Law of Female Writers.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
  24. Basically, most of the interesting artistic accomplishments of, say, the last 600 years have been the work of today’s bete noire: white males.

    That coincides with Pitirim Sorokin’s 600-year-cycle theory of intellectual and social development. You have an “ideational” period, followed by a “sensate” one, then go back. He proposed that the latter was coming to its end, and we should be turning irrational (medieval?) pretty soon now.

  25. SFG says:
    @IHTG

    Won’t the dudes just stop playing the feminized video games?

    • Replies: @jim jones
    , @SoloWingPixy
  26. @Tiny Duck

    Look at booktube on YouTube

    Why not just read something instead?

  27. Well said, but another aspect is the rise of video games uses up an enormous number of male hours, so fewer males are reading books

    How does one explain the surprising development that the major cultural phenomenon among the young in the 1990s was not only a book, but a series of rather long ones, the Harry Potter craze?

    Just a speed bump? Exaggeration by print-based reporters?

  28. pyrrhus says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    Yes, Toni Morrison’s work is boring and far from insightful about America…Highly overrated.

    • Agree: Ibound1
  29. jcd1974 says:

    If the novel is not dead, it is at least dying.

    Has there been another “must read” novel since Bonfire of the Vanities, which was thirty years ago?

    Once upon a time college students were voracious readers. Now (except for class work) they don’t read and if they do, it’s children’s books – the Harry Potter series.

    I imagine that there will never again be a novel that will become universally popular.

  30. Anon[732] • Disclaimer says:

    Sorry Mr Sailer, but in your mansplaining you’re completely ignoring the ‘shopping and f*cking’ genre.
    Greatest contribution to the canyons of landfill, I mean, to the canons of Western literature ever.

  31. SFG says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Those had a huge, female readership, though, resulting in Rowling becoming a billionaire, people even now using their Hogwarts house as a sort of inversely hip Myers-Briggs, and a huge number of erotic stories involving Harry and Draco (among other characters).

    • Replies: @syonredux
  32. Anon7 says:

    Starting in the 1990’s, the educational system started getting rid of “controversial” (white male) authors, and instead substituting the worst printed crap you could possibly imagine. This large print garbage for young people was (as Truman Capote said) “not writing, just typing”.

    Compare the list of authors for 19th century children’s primers to the useless typing sold as “young adult” fiction today. There’s no brain food there at all. When I was a child, say, age 8 to 15, I read Twain, Dickens, Tolstoy, Melville, Homer, Virgil, Arthur Conan Doyle, Jules Verne, plus lots of stories about mountain men, inventors and explorers. These are the books that librarians handed to curious boys in the 1960’s.

    Boring reading material in childhood leads to boring writing in adulthood.

  33. I suspect novel will go the way of the epic, i.e. dodo & dino.

    Nothing new: https://www.salon.com/2011/06/28/stopped_reading_fiction/

    Some people don’t like fiction and never have. That’s quite different from having once read fiction avidly and then, in the fullness of time, giving it up. To judge informally (that is, according to what people tell me when they learn I’m a book reviewer), the latter is far from an uncommon experience. Many former devourers of novels haven’t stopped reading, they’ve just come, like Roth, to prefer nonfiction books on history, science or politics.

    There’s a school of evolutionary anthropology that might agree with him. It speculates that fictional storytelling — a universal cultural practice — helps people imagine what others are thinking and feeling, and consequently how they might behave in the future. The value of such skills when it comes to navigating complex social groups is obvious, but perhaps people do reach a saturation point with age. No other artistic form can surpass the novel’s ability to immerse us in the inner life of another human being, yet there may come a stage when that prospect promises nothing new.

  34. Kronos says:
    @Anonymous

    Isn’t that what the Hallmark and Lifetime Channels are all about? I’ve seen more crazy women on those two channels than all the others combined. (This was five years ago with an ex-girlfriend.)

  35. @Anonymous

    When I got to the UK 20 years ago I presumed ITV was some sick joke cooked up by Philip Larkin and Kingsley Amis – a sort of wallowing in the very worst aspects of lower middle class British life. It’s gotten worse since then.

    Rod Liddle wrote something about Radio 4 recently. That it was now 24 hours of women moaning about stuff:

    “We had a long drive back from the north-east last weekend. Six hours or so, including a stop halfway, just past Britain’s most crepuscular town, Grantham. My wife does the driving because she thinks I’ll kill us all. My job is to feed album after album into the car’s admirably old-fashioned CD player. I rarely play more than three or four songs from the same album because my wife gets tetchy and says something like ‘This is too noisy’ or ‘This is boring, change it.’ So I’m kept pretty busy. Every time I remove a CD, the car’s ‘entertainment centre’ reverts to its default position of playing Radio 4.

    And here’s the point. We set out at midday. It was five hours before I heard a male voice on Radio 4, when Saturday PM came on. Five hours. We must have heard snatches (an appropriate term, I think) of Radio 4 40 or 50 times and on each occasion it was a woman moaning about something. Moan, moan, moan, all the livelong day. Women were moaning as we passed Thirsk, Selby, Doncaster. They were still moaning at Retford and Newark and Grantham. Their moaning was often afforded succour by the presenter — always female — who did a spot of empathetic moaning alongside them. Marginal moaning, tendentious moaning, gratuitous moaning. A drama with foreign women moaning. A discussion programme with British women moaning. It was ceaseless.”

    https://www.spectator.co.uk/2018/06/there-are-too-many-women-on-radio-4-and-theyre-always-moaning/

  36. Pericles says:
    @Anonymous

    One only has to endure a few minutes of the painfully dull and excruciatingly boring UK ITV television network – 90% soap opera and ‘reality’ and ‘lifestyle’ shows’ – to glimpse a peek of the ultimate in psychological Hell – ‘entertainment’ made by women for women.

    On the other hand it feels good to have escaped the matrix.

  37. Kronos says:
    @Anon

    It’s been dead (more or less) for a while. I’m a Millennial and no social caste/demographic really plays music for recreational use. Even music majors only practice/played for career purposes. I remember an older English teacher from High School talking about Gen Xers (1980s students) who’d actually discuss song lyrics and their various meanings. That simply doesn’t happen anymore. (I still have a hard time imagining that it DID happen.)

    I wouldn’t want to discuss contemporary lyrics from the last 10 years to present. Jeez, what’s there to discuss? It’s all about butt humping in the club. Not just metaphorical or figurative, that’s the straight up lyrics. Probably everyone is more focused on beat and rhythm, lyrics have taken the backseat. I occasionally try to listen to a song’s wording and instantly regret it. It’s like Grandpa’s sex life, I don’t want to hear about it.

  38. jim jones says:
    @SFG

    I am playing Rage 2 at the moment and the toughest, most kick ass soldier is a woman. She dies pretty quickly though so I can`t say I was bothered:

  39. Tex says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    How does one explain the surprising development that the major cultural phenomenon among the young in the 1990s was not only a book, but a series of rather long ones, the Harry Potter craze?

    There is a divide between “serious” novelists and genre writers. Genre has a bigger hold on the popular taste, but few SF or crime writers get quite the same treatment from the rapidly dwindling high-culture press. Rowling and Tolkien are exceptions. Funny that after finishing the Harry Potter books, Rowling tried writing a “serious” social novel (Casual Vacancy) before going back to her bread and butter fantasy.

    Genre is not in particularly good shape either. Lower sales, closing markets, and turmoil have been the trend for a while.

  40. @Anon

    Wait till you find out how much time young men waste playing computer games like League of Legends

  41. I thought she already died, but it turns out that it was Maya Angelou.

    • Replies: @flyingtiger
  42. Jack D says:

    Pretty much all of the past great white male novelists are now considered as “problematic” because their writings or personal behavior are (by 2019 Woke standards) racist, sexist, etc.

    Given this, it’s hard to see how any future white male will make the cut and not be deplatformed at some point. Even if he tailors his personal life and writing to Current Year standards (which pretty much guarantee that the man and his writings will be uninteresting anyway), the standards keep shifting so that something that he did or wrote in the past will no longer meet Current Year standards 5 or 10 years from now when the fact that the author used gendered pronouns and didn’t call of his characters “they” will be considered a thought crime. It’s virtually impossible for people in the past to meet standards that didn’t even exist at the time.

  43. Paul says:

    When I became an adult, I lost interest in fiction. As a boy, I was mostly bored by novels with a female protagonist. I wanted someone like an adventuresome Huckleberry Finn.

  44. Anonymous[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Start a new industry called 100.

    100 publishes books that are only 100 pgs.

    Btw, novel reading is popular among fans of Harry Potter, Twilight, 50 Shades, Hunger Games, etc.
    But the kind of introspective novels of yesteryear are out of fashion. People aren’t very philosophical anymore.

    Also, serious novels require individual immersion. But internet made people get used to interacting and sharing at all times. So, people feel uncomfortable with being ‘alone’.
    It’s rice culture-like. A need to always be together.

  45. Corvinus says:

    “You might think that the increasing feminization of fiction wouldn’t necessarily undermine the importance and relevance of literature. But it does.”

    Assuming there is a “feminization of fiction” and that it is undermining literature.

    “Basically, most of the interesting artistic accomplishments of, say, the last 600 years have been the work of today’s bete noire: white males.”

    That depends upon one’s cultural perspective. It’s more or less an opinion.

    “I didn’t read Toni Morrison’s “The Bluest Eye”…”

    Chances are, you probably did, but are not willing to give props. Just like it is more than likely you are a secret reader of Seth Abramson. Stay cagey!

    • Troll: YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
  46. Paul says:

    I think novels these days are boring because there are a lack of dramatic things to right about in contemporary life — no world wars, no Great Depression, etc.

  47. @Steve Sailer

    You made me go look up “The Bluest Eye” on Wikipedia.

    The plot summary is repulsive – no wonder parents around the country have tried to ban it from school reading lists.

    However, I see that it no longer makes the top ten on banned reading lists.

    (Apparently there is no shortage in America of awful novelists!)

    http://www.ala.org/advocacy/bbooks/frequentlychallengedbooks/top10

  48. @jcd1974

    Well, if you read for entertainment, a lot of YA books are better than the “adult” books, which get dull quickly.

  49. anonymous[340] • Disclaimer says:

    One of my favorite pundits – Caitlin Johnstone – is a woman. (She was added to the Unz Review columnist roster a while back, but that one piece has been scrubbed without explanation.) Her current “How To Avoid Being Called A Russian Agent Online” is a good example of her ornery insights about the Establishment.

  50. @Reg Cæsar

    The Harry Potter phenomenon was limited almost exclusively to white kids. (Asian kids, latino kids and black kids hardly ever read that series.)

    And not just any white kids but the right side of the Bell Curve.

    Since public schools have fewer and fewer white kids generally (and fewer bright +1SD whites specifically), and since a significant part of the appeal of Harry Potter was the school setting for teens, I doubt we will see another “major cultural phenomenon” like that again.

    The success of that series is not likely to be repeated.

  51. BenKenobi says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    One of the (many) interesting things about seveneves was all characters who were clearly expys of real people.

    There was Bezos, Hillary, and DeGrasse-Tyson, to name a few.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  52. Schools forcefeeding kids on second-rate affirmative action authors: that can’t be good for generating future readers either.

    On the other hand, the musty classics they made me read back in the day didn’t build much enthusiasm either. I only started enjoying literature once I was free to pick my own reading material.

  53. @Jack D

    A friend, who hopes to become a novelist in his retirement, has been reporting to me on the publishing market. And the word is that the publishers want diversity diversity diversity.

    He’s a good guy but a bad writer, so if his novel never sees the light of day, our cultural world will manage to keep staggering along. What makes me happy is that he was badly in need of a red pill, and now I think he’s found it.

    • Replies: @SFG
  54. So her passing raises the question: Is she the last of the species? The last American novelist who made novels seem essential to an educated person’s understanding of her country?

    Let the games begin…to produce the most absurdly fawning obituary ever.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  55. @Anon7

    “these are the books that librarians handed out to curious boys”

    Not to be a stickler, but where I came from, the curious boys found cool books on their own, they didn’t ask a librarian what to read. It’s possible the decline of the serious novel’s readership is caused by the mass infusion of cultural soy: boys are made to be less curious, daring and independent by the culture, brow-beaten into social media submission. By the time I was in about 6th grade, I had totally chucked the curriculum and assigned readings, and I just read whatever I damn well wanted, and the school had no problem with that. In fact they encouraged it. Amusing tidbit: in 5th grade, I asked my father what a “whorehouse” was, and if it was similar to a “warehouse”. I mispronounced the word in such a way it was clear I had read it, not heard it aloud. My father angrily demanded to know what the hell I was reading. When it turned out to be Mickey Spillane, he was totally cool with it.

    Has the existence of big-budget movies of The Lord of the Rings led to a decline among 12- and 13-year old boys reading the books themselves? Among young male nerds of a certain era, that was a total rite of passage. I wonder if kids just skip the books now, and watch the movies instead. If so, they’re missing out on one hell of a gateway drug.

    • Replies: @Anon7
  56. SFG says:
    @International Jew

    I’ve read that.

    I’m seriously contemplating a novel ‘exploring my experiences as a Hispanic Jew’ that starts out woke and then makes a 180 halfway through.

  57. @JRB

    Thanks. And no, Wolfram Schütte is alive and kickin’, he even bothers to answer my long and winding emails. But he has fewer readers than Steve Sailer has commenters and his influence on readers is near the homeopathic doses. And this has changed considerably. WoS was an important voice once, and he is the same serious and rich with ideas critic he always was. His public has just walked away from him. I see this happening a lot with German writers too. A bookseller in her 60ies talked to me last week and she said she has the feeling, that she herself starts to lose interest in the scene, something she could never have imagined. The famous bookstore Zum Wetzstein in Freiburg closes soon (visit it as long as it still exists – and buy a book there: I’ve just finished Emanuel Berl, “Geisterbeschörung” in Die Andere Bibliothek from 1991, an incredibly beautiful book-object and a (nostalgic) reading experience like a shorter and more modern hetero-version of Proust’s Recherche, like none before. Could well be they still have it in stock at the Wetzstein. People visit the store (which is really beautiful) like a museum, the owner says, but they buy no more books, so they close it. A big loss for Freiburg.

    Peter Hamm died recently, and nobody seemed to care much except a few peers of him, like the Handke-expert “Keuschnig” on his literary blog Begleitschreiben. I liked Hamm’s work, even though I did not share his taste. He was all in for obscure Polish Poets and unreadable Balkan prose etc. (Peter Handke, Peter Handke, Peter Handke, Peter Handke) and what have you at the outer fringes of the world of letters. But he was absolutely unspoiled and he knew quite a lot about the books and authors he dealt with.

    • Replies: @black sea
    , @JRB
    , @EdwardM
  58. syonredux says:
    @SFG

    Those had a huge, female readership, though, resulting in Rowling becoming a billionaire, people even now using their Hogwarts house as a sort of inversely hip Myers-Briggs, and a huge number of erotic stories involving Harry and Draco (among other characters).

    It was also a sign of another trend: the fondness that adult females have for YA fiction.I know a lot of women in their 20s and 30s who avidly consume lit meant for teenagers: Harry Potter, Hunger Games, etc. In contrast, mature males (when they do read) favor non-fiction and novels written for adults.

    On a related note, what was the last serious novel that had a big impact on the culture? Wolfe’s Bonfire of the Vanities? Larry McMurtry’s Lonesome Dove?

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  59. I read a lot and do not play video games. Fortunately, I have a Kindle, and there is lots of self-published novels on the Amazon site that is written by guys in the spy/covert op/military genre. It is true that the traditional publishing houses offer novels by most female authors these days.

  60. In 1986, Star Trek moviegoers laughed at the notion that Jacqueline Susann would go down in history as one of “the giants”:

    If only…

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  61. Bill B. says:

    I realized a couple of years ago that I had more or less stopped reading fiction. Some classics aside.

    I miss the novel as a mechanism for getting inside the the minds of others and as an efficient transmitter of subtle knowledge of the world.

    But there is too much tosh out there. Too many pumped up fashionable types sitting in their underwear in the spare room who have no clue even of how little they have to offer.

  62. black sea says:
    @Dieter Kief

    Are German reader still interested in the work of Thomas Bernhard?

    • Replies: @Meretricious
    , @Dieter Kief
  63. Toni Morrison was a no-talent antisemitc race hustler. Like Barry, her entire career was based on affirmative action. Great American novelist? Well, that’s true if you think that Spike Lee is a great American filmmaker or that Maya Angelou was a great American poet

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  64. JRB says: • Website
    @Dieter Kief

    Thanks for replying, I will keep the works of Emmanuel Berl in mind for possible future reading. Living in Holland proper the bookshops in the major cities here rapidly declined between 10 and 15 years ago, the last few years however there has been some improvement again. Since Holland seems to be the trendsetter for the rest of Western-Europe in many things, the same can happen in Baden-Württemberg.

  65. @Dieter Kief

    Franzen also predicted a renaissance of the novel

    I don’t know about that, but he’s done his part by writing some good novels. (IMO of course: Freedom, and 75% of Purity.)

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  66. @syonredux

    Without much investigation, just a few thoughts…

    a) there are, especially across US & Anglophone world, “book clubs” galore. They are, I’d say, 95%+female. I’ve seen their reading lists, 5-10 in the US, 2-3 in Brazil & a few others in Europe. It is mostly contemporary fiction, something like “Kite Runner” of that Afghan guy (I forgot his name – his novel was atrociously bad & one-dimensional, actually unintentionally comic). “Classics” are read very rarely & non-fiction is rare, but something female I don’t care about. No history, serious psychology, philosophy, readable science, politics, religion, theology, even literary theory or art history,… Most titles were multi-culti/colored/oppression-patriarchy/non-white, especially dark skin adoration/… basically worthless trash.

    b) yes, women who read tend to read chick lit (Kinsella etc.), young adult (that absurd Harry Potter series), and “what’s new”. Most of them never read serious authors (drama, novel, short stories,..). They, almost all of them, never read relatively newer non-fiction that is easy to read (say, Sebag Montefiore’s bio of Stalin or short works by Paul Johnson). Nothing “controversial”. No conflict. No opinion. No nothing.

    c) of course, there are brilliant female scholars who wrote magnificent works I’ve read in past 5-10 years. But, they are not your average reader. Moreover- I haven’t seen even among them anything “controversial”, especially re politics or explosive issues. They may be great scholars, but tend not to touch anything potentially dangerous.

    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    , @Yawrate
  67. R.G. Camara says: • Website

    We must remember that reading novels was considered a dissolute activity, especially among females.

    Today pop culture informs us that “women who read” are the bravest, bestest women in the world, and that in the past those who looked down on such women were ignorant hicks, or else evil. A great example of the modern cliche: Disney’s portrayal of Belle in both the cartoon and live-action version of Beauty and the Beast is that she’s a bookworm, and that the ignorant/evil townsfolk ostracize her for it, but she’s proven the heroine in the end for her smarts.

    But that wasn’t the case in the past. Bookworm women were seen as either wasteful, dangerous, or pedantic. In The Eustace Diamonds, the main female character is a shallow, nasty thing who is portrayed as very bad who doesn’t go to church on Sundays, and instead spends the day in bed reading novels about pirates (“corsairs”). She becomes so enraptured of the idea from her books of having an exciting pirate lover that she pushes away good men and her properly motherly instincts in the hope of meeting a pirate-lover, while also lying dreadfully about the ownership of said diamonds.

    Meanwhile, Jane Austen portrayed the bookish sister Mary in Pride and Prejudice as insufferable and priggish with no social graces, who spends her time lecturing or singing badly when confronted with a party.

  68. just a smaller example of a much larger general principle that european men make things interesting, and when they leave a field, things become vastly less interesting.

    books are behind. this already happened to music, with predictable results. and yes, european men moved to video games, which pay BILLIONS. so, video games are better than ever, generate billions a year, and european men do most of the heavy lifting. what a surprise.

    not sure what a good name for this concept would be, but everybody on earth is chasing the stuff that european men create. generating entire fields, even countries, out of thin air, which everybody else then wants.

    one main question: movies are now almost completely based on books that european men wrote decades ago. there is a lag, between when they were written, and when they were converted into movies. have we already reached the point where movie studios have already used all the available material?

    science fiction was tapped out decades ago, when they converted all the master writer’s books into movies. but comic books have reached their end point now too i would argue. do people realize there hasn’t been a single new, important comic book character invented since the 1970s? wolverine and the punisher were the last important characters to be created. that’s over 40 years ago. and the other well known characters are older than that. until the surprise success of the deadpool movie, there wasn’t a character less than 40 years old on screen. that could have easily been a flop, like spawn. and ryan reynolds had just starred in a flop in the green latern movie.

    deadpool is coming up on 30 years old, and i’d venture, no way there’s any characters after that. comic books themselves are dead, and have been dead since the late 90s. comic books peaked in 1993, and it’s been a steep decline ever since. no more good source material to draw from, just scraps now for the movie studios.

    • Replies: @SFG
  69. @black sea

    are you kidding? Bernhard was a major genius (and he wrote in Austrian, not German, my pal Barry infoms me)

  70. Ted Bell says:

    I think you may have cause and effect backward. Publishing isn’t getting more female because boys are reading less. Boys are reading less because publishing is getting more female. And men are writing less, at an even higher rate, because publishers won’t publish them. The powers that (shouldn’t) be have simply declared all fiction to be the domain of women, whether anyone wants it or not.

    After decimating science fiction, the big push right now is, of all things, comic books. They started pushing woke comics hard about 5 years ago, with Thor becoming a woman. Then Spiderman became Puerto Rican, Captain America became a nazi, Iron Man became a teenage black girl, etc. (there are plenty more, but I’m not a comic book guy)

    The latest step is tearing down the newly profitable comic book movies, and replacing them with woke fantasies. It arguably started with Star Wars VII, the Rise of Mary Sue. Now we have Captain Wammin, a black lesbian Valkerie, and soon, a movie version of Wammin Thor. The real Thor is now fat and, along with the Hulk and younger Nick Fury, pussified. Iron Man is dead, and Captain America isn’t far behind. Batwammin is about to crap all over Batman on TV, while the movie version is about to be played by a sparkly vampire. No man, EVER, watched Twilight and thought, “He’d make a perfect Batman.”

    All this is being pushed on an overwhelmingly male audience, who’s kicking and screaming the whole way. The writers are openly calling their fans evil/racist/sexist/homophobic/nerfherders, while literally bragging about destroying everything traditional comic book fans liked about the genre. (youtube is going crazy lately with the “get woke go broke” theme) And, just like in sci-fi, it’s been an abject failure. Comic book sales have gone off a cliff, and movie tickets will almost certainly follow. D.C. comics is even talking about throwing in the towel completely. And none of this started with boys losing interest. It’s ENDING with boys losing interest, because women don’t know how to write the Hero’s Journey. Feminism preaches that women are born perfect. The end. It may be a fairy tale, but it’s just not an interesting story. It’s not even interesting to the wammins they’re trying to bring in. It was never an organic change. It was imposed from on high, and that just doesn’t work in artistic endeavors.

    TLDR:
    Publishers demand woke women authors, for purely political reasons. Stale pale males need not apply. Woke women are incapable of writing stories that interest boys. The genre is irrelevant. Males aren’t leaving by choice, we’re being kicked out. Fiction isn’t dying. It’s being ritually sacrificed.

    • Replies: @SFG
  71. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Shriver is *ourgal*. I encourage all iStevers to read her great piece on childless liberal white women (she’s one herself, but unusually honest).

    https://www.theguardian.com/books/2005/sep/17/society

    To be almost ridiculously sweeping: baby boomers and their offspring have shifted emphasis from the communal to the individual, from the future to the present, from virtue to personal satisfaction. Increasingly secular, we pledge allegiance to lower-case gods of our private devising. We are less concerned with leading a good life than the good life. We are less likely than our predecessors to ask ourselves whether we serve a greater social purpose; we are more likely to ask if we are happy. We shun values such as self-sacrifice and duty as the pitfalls of suckers. We give little thought to the perpetuation of lineage, culture or nation; we take our heritage for granted. We are ahistorical. We measure the value of our lives within the brackets of our own births and deaths, and don’t especially care what happens once we’re dead. As we age – oh, so reluctantly! – we are apt to look back on our pasts and ask not ‘Did I serve family, God and country?‘ but ‘Did I ever get to Cuba, or run a marathon? Did I take up landscape painting? Was I fat?We will assess the success of our lives in accordance not with whether they were righteous, but with whether they were interesting and fun.

  72. Look how boring the Hugo and Nebula award winners for science fiction have gotten since the ruling bodies have focused on inclusion rather than story. The Narrative trumps a good narrative amongst the Woke.

  73. GunnarT says:

    The last novel was Infinite Jest, IMHO.

    David Sedaris also did some good stories, but novels died in the mid-90s.

    The Internet killed them.

    Rock music is dead, too. Killed after the last blast of Grunge, but then the marketing drones took over the world.

    And for the past 10 years, art and music have been controlled by algorithm … almost pure stimulus response.

    Finally, there was another issue, which was this:

    One of the first thing that men did with the Internet was compare notes around women. The mystery of thousands of years was figured out in about 10-15 years, tops. Basically, men cracked the code on women.

    There goes an awful lot of literature.

    Next, there used to be these encyclopedic kind of big novels. Can’t compete with the Internet.

    The Novel itself was about a technological breakthrough–cheaply produced books.

    So what’s left to tell stories about?

    Finally, there was the friggin’ iPhone.

    How much plotting in life is based on information delays? (Way more than you think?)

    Try to plot Romeo and Juliet when both of them have iPhones.

    Othello gets a text “You’re not listening to that creep, Iago, are you? Look at the emails he left me.”

    I know one novelist who said he only does historical fiction because otherwise he has to come up with an unreasonable number of reasons no one has a cell phone.

    Stories will continue. But the technological means to tell them will not be the novel.

    Who they can read anymore, anyway? I can’t.

    / rant over for time being

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Dave Pinsen
  74. Ted Bell says:
    @jcd1974

    Once upon a time, college was a place where only serious students went.

    Today, college enrollment dips solidly in to the left half of the bell curve. I live about 3 miles from U.C. Santa Barbara, which is usually listed in the top 30 or so American universities. Conservatively, I’d say 2/3 of the students there have no business in any college, much less a high second tier one. I shudder to think what the students at Cal State Northridge must be like.

  75. Mr. Anon says:
    @Corvinus

    Assuming there is a “feminization of fiction” and that it is undermining literature.

    There is, and it is.

    That depends upon one’s cultural perspective. It’s more or less an opinion.

    No. In any event, your opinions are invariably wrong, you stupid, preening asshat.

  76. The publishing industry has become overwhelmingly female, including top positions..no affirmative action for men, either in hiring or in a representative fraction of published works with an appeal for men. It’s no wonder video gaming (among other things) has filled the gap.

  77. @International Jew

    What do you think – why doesn’t Franzen get how close together Steve Sailer and Karl Kraus are? – Maybe because he doesn’t quite get just how narrow and cold and – – boring Karl Kraus was? – After a while, quite a lot of his contemporaries got this. Not least Bloch, Adorno, Canetti et tutti quanti. I know of only two writers who regularly refer to Kraus. Franzen and – – – Hermann L. Gremliza – the indefatigable old workhorse of the German pro-American and pro-Israel left. Ok one more: How can you side with Kraus against Heinrich Heine, as Franzen does? Franzen obviously because of Heines misogynist tendencies – I mean: What the heck?!

    (I like all of Franzens novels a lot. The 25% of Purity you don’t like – is this the East-German part with its drastic cruelties?)

  78. > So her passing raises the question: Is she the last of the species? The last American novelist who made novels seem essential to an educated person’s understanding of her country?

    No. Cormac McCarthy is still with us.

  79. Turns out that when you take away family–who mates with whom, children, lineage–then men and women really don’t have all that in the way of interests in common.

    This is further energized as modernity/prosperity refocuses women from direct domestic concerns to the replacement activities, trinkets, entertainments, fads and fashions … all of which are pretty trivial with zero depth or meaning and also utterly uninteresting to men.

    The interesting stuff that matters–civilization, history, politics, war, science, technology, production, business, economics–seems to be of interest mainly to men. Sports–a peacetime war substitute–is the male interest that has the same sort of triviality as women’s interests.

    Human behavior is the one meaningful area beyond family where both sexes have an interest. But most women have little scientific interest–really figuring out human behavior and its motivation– even there. Their interest generally ends at “relationships”.

    What modern women do not seem to get is that it is not who gets into their vagina that’s of critical interest but who comes out of it. This confusion may stem from seeing men’s strong desire to “get into”, but that is biologically programmed by the “comes out”. The “modern” women’s repeated couplings–and uncouplings–absent the considerations of family, children, posterity–plus all her whining about “her man” not doing this or that, not validating her precious feelings … are about as interesting as listening to a prostitute recount her Johns. Jane Austen level of drama it is not.

  80. @black sea

    I love Wittgensteins Nephew and some of his plays (Ritter, Dene Voss especially).
    This is wonderful material for good older actresses.

    Michel Houellebecq discovered lately, that there was a big insulter and grumbler and affronter before him…he even visited Bernhards castle-like and very beautiful chalk-white “Einödhof” in the Austrian Salzkammergut. But people who read him and still talk or write about him are rather rare. Some aficionados do still exist though. In an ideal world, some very angry men would discover while reading Bernhard, that they are not alone in this wolrd***.
    (That the Austrian post-war society made him a big player in their public sphere is a true accomplishment! Friedrich Dürrenmatt is close to Bernhard and even better (more humorous and more interested in the modern world’s conundrums).
    (I lost this comment and had to write it again, but didn’t care, so: The Bernhard&Dürrenmatt-spark seem to lighten me still up quite a bit).

  81. @AnotherDad

    Their interest generally ends at “relationships”

    Try Annie Proulx’ short stories! – Especially those she wrote in Wyoming.

    • LOL: Kylie
  82. @Jack D

    Just re-reading after 35 years or so Fleming’s Live And Let Die (the voodoo one).

    No way would his descriptions of black psychology or black American speech get published today.

    Mind, “M” seems to be a bit of a blank-slater. Note the 1954 demographics as he briefs 007.

    “.. the negro races are just beginning to throw up geniuses in all the professions – scientists, doctors, writers. It’s about time they turned out a great criminal. After all, there are 250 million of them in the world. Nearly a third of the white population. They’ve got plenty of brains and ability and guts. And now Moscow’s taught one of them the technique.”

  83. “… so fewer males are reading books, so the publishing industry is signing fewer male writers, and the publishing industry itself is becoming more and more female.”

    This ain’t good.

  84. @Dieter Kief

    I like all of Franzens novels a lot. The 25% of Purity you don’t like – is this the East-German part with its drastic cruelties?

    No, that was one of the best parts. What I didn’t like (because it was boring and weird) was Andreas’ descent into madness.

    I can’t say Freedom was great throughout either, but close enough.

    I tried The Corrections and gave up because it was too depressing (reminded me of certain people close to me). I tried Strong Motion and got bored about 1/3 of the way through.

    Sorry I don’t have anything to say about the other authors you mention, I don’t know them.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  85. I actually think one of the things killing the novel is internet commenting boards.

    I mean, I could read a book where an author tries to get into the mind of a cop or a theoretical physicist or a plumber or whatever, and show the world through his eyes.

    Or I could listen to what actual cops and theoretical physicists and plumbers say about their world on the internet. They usually don’t lack for eloquence, and whatever they do lack they make up for with real world experience and insight.

    Better yet every interesting statement on a commenting board will be immediately evaluated, dissected, etc. instead of just left to hang.

    Assuming of course the board is well moderated

    • Agree: jim jones
  86. @JimDandy

    “… the slow, muffled death rattle of the literary novel.”

    This problem is much greater than the extinction of the classics, which is bad enough. Literacy itself seems headed for the boneyard. This is an abyss. Lots of guilty parties here; my favorites are the constant use of digital instruments by the youth, and handing over our culture to black people.

  87. @Cowboy Shaw

    Moaning (bitching, we more commonly say in America in this context) is an own-goal for females. I’d always known it was in the context of personal relationships; any teenaged boy with a girlfriend learns it quickly.

    But it is true of their relations with their girlfriends, co-workers, bosses, subordinates – everyone else! – as well. The world at large, really.

    The females in my office were always complaining about the (legitimate) problems I complained about, and I came to commiserate with them. “Ah!” I thought “Now we are a group, on the same page; with solidarity and thought we can fix some of this stuff, even if it means going over the boss’ head, because his boss will realise such a large group cannot all be disgruntled whiners….”

    But something quite else happened. As I proposed and recommended actions, and even took the initiative to achieve some genuine solutions by presenting the changes as something a large group wanted that would resolve a problem bothering a large group, and got sympathy and support from the boss on many matters: the women all kept bitching. Any reform we were granted was, they “just knew,” only a ruse to make it easier for the boss to say they’d no excuse for screw-ups, and wasn’t that just the thing one expects from the jerk? If we’d vanquished ten serious problems, twenty petty gripes had arisen in their stead. If I dared point out these new grievances were not at all very serious matters, why, I had turned coat from all my kissing up to the Man (i.e,, being the only one with the gumption to civilly yet assertively negotiate our concerns with the boss in the first place). And so on.

    Females bitch. As surely as males are curious to explore, repair, and improve things, females are driven to criticise, complain, and tear things down. It’s some Yin and Yang shit, I guess.

    And its a scary aspect of Sailer’s valid point that the unproductive sex is on the ascendency.

    • Replies: @Corn
  88. @Dave Pinsen

    I tried reading Stephenson’s Snow Crash (1992). Then I realized I wasn’t smart enough to finish it. But I still keep it on the bookshelf in my living room in the hope that my guests (chicks) will think I’m smart.

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Dave Pinsen
    , @Percy Gryce
  89. @International Jew

    She wasn’t even one of the species (she is not a very good writer, just a token Negro) never mind the last. And, anyway, Don DeLillo and Cormac McCarthy are still alive, so what’s with all this “last of the great American novelists” nonsense?!

  90. @jcd1974

    After reading Tom Wolfe’s Bonfire of the Vanities (1987) I lost all hope. My dream of becoming the Xer Robert Stone was extinguished because I knew I could never write like that. Tom Wolfe’s splendid prose kills dreams.

  91. @Altai

    I would have thought that social media is the female equivalent to video games. (Multiplayer ones at least) But maybe it’s influence has only been apparent for such a short period compared to video games that there will be a lag effect before things balance out again.

    Super important point–the video game/social media analogy.

    I think the effect of social-media on the female brain is a very important and under appreciated point. The male issues with video games and on-line porn at least get some attention/discussion. But with the cell phone, social media lets women stroke their social media brain sort of like porn. But it’s deemed respectable.

    The issues with men–the softness and feminization on the one hand and disconnection on the other are real. We badly need to reverse those trends to have a healthy and civilized society. But men still–takes them a while–grow up. The video game thing fades with age during their 20s. Very few are obsessed with video games at 30. The sports thing is a problem–a huge distraction from actual fighting to defend their nation. But most men–or at least a lot of men–by 30 or so are doing some sort of reasonable male work, interested in male stuff and acting like reasonable males.

    My 50,000 ft. take is that modernity is probably more damaging to, corrosive to women’s brains and behavior. Women are simply are lot healthy, more sane and grounded if they are out at dawn milking the cows or getting eggs from the henhouse. Giving women more and more conveniences–less and less actual work to do–and then telling them to go sit in an office doing some bullshit job has not improved their behavior. Giving them cell phones so they can “social network”–stay in loop with their friends, gossipping all day over ever more trivial nonsense–is a disaster. And unlike video games for men, an addiction women do not grow out of.

  92. J.Ross says:

    Video games my foot, the personnel of the official mainstream fiction publishing industry is 100% feminist harpies and hostile £@&$. Ann Sterzinger posted an excellent piece years ago at Taki’s and there’s no reason to expect anything has changed. Check out her novels, and those of the vet and cop novelist Chris Hernandez (who was told to make his books dumber and refused).
    I remember as a kid having a subscription to Fantasy And Science Fiction Magazine and being baffled that every story was about a big dumb man put in his place by an underappreciated woman, or about an underappreciated woman and her feelings. Of course that was a function of the editor and a vocal part of the audience. It wasn’t video games that made me walk away from that.
    https://chrishernandezauthor.com/about/

  93. @AnotherDad

    “What modern women do not seem to get is that it is not who gets into their vagina that’s of critical interest but who comes out of it.”

    Perhaps, but I still think who gets into their vagina is critically important. But we need to focus on feminine totalitarianism, the inverse of The Handmaid’s Tale. To cancel the coming matriarchy we need to dig up the bones of World War 2 males. We need their DNA to supplement our lackluster manly manliness. I believe this is the third time I’ve made reference to grave-robbing on Unz.

  94. Kyle says:

    I was never very impressed with the high school English curriculum. I’m glad that I read all of those books it allows me to relate to pop culture but most of them were pretty terrible, especially token diversicrat books like native son. Senior year we were forced to read the kite runner and kaffir boy. They were both novels about disgusting children in disgusting third world cultures, and the climax of both books was the main character getting butt raped. This doesn’t exonerate white male authors. Great expectations might be the worst thing I’ve ever read. But I’m glad that I read it because Pip is hilarious. My girlfriends sister named her little maltese dog pip, a perfect name for a little dog, but of course she had no idea what I was talking about when I brought up great expectations. I found John Steinbeck books to be unnecessarily dark and depressing, exploitative and overly political. I spend most of my time in high school playing video games yes, but I also read every Stephen king and Michael Crichton novel. Those guys will never be part of a high school curriculum. Tom Wolfe and Hunter S. Thompson deserve to be but they never will either. I’ve never heard of tony Morrison and I’m glad haven’t. I highly doubt she’s contributed anything substantial to literature.

    • Replies: @Dissident
  95. @Dieter Kief

    You’re mixing periods, fiction & non-fiction. Kraus’ aphorisms are mediocre &, in my opinion, plainly inferior to the great 17th C French aphoristic tradition; his huge central work is, due to his strange combination of montage, drama, … virtually unreadable. If one even reads it, one cannot “get” much from it. Anyway, this hybrid is not even drama, let alone novel.

    Canetti is great in his “Crowds & Power”, while Adorno is a mixed bag. Be as it may, this is my totally subjective opinion on 20th C English and German language literatures (having in mind I don’t read fiction anymore).

    English language literature produces much more than any comparable in the world, especially in various fields of entertainment (crime fiction, romance novels, science fiction, fantasy fiction, spy novels & thrillers…). Also, it has a variety of readable 2nd & 3rd rate ordinary writers (Hemingway, Iris Murdoch, Joseph Heller, George Orwell ..).

    But, it is also parochial & mentally vacuous, especially when compared to German literature (the same with British & American philosophy in contrast to German language philosophy). Strong suits of Anglophone writers are characterization, frequently vividness, social criticism & cultural varieties due to its colonial & Imperial heritage.

    On the other hand, acknowledged greatest modern English language writers like Joyce & Faulkner (some would add Beckett, Nabokov and perhaps 2-3 other authors) are not only parochial, but mentally underdeveloped; their best work has the quality of perfect rendering of the ordinary, dull low IQ world. Joyce’s “Ulysses” is, alongside Musil’s “The Man without Qualities” empty of mental content & no English or American writer could write dialectical fireworks between Naphta & Settembrini in Mann’s “Magic Mountain”. In short, this literature has more or less equal emo-stuff, superior social stuff, equal low IQ stuff & definitely inferior high IQ & “spiritual” stuff.

    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
  96. The title should really be in the subjunctive, but otherwise this is fun:

  97. Kyle says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    I’ll go out on a limb and defend J.K. Rowling. She’s a good writer. It’s impossible to try to explain, but she possesses a certain genius for story telling. Of course they’re just children’s stories meant for children. I read it when I was 10. If your question is why would children in the 90s rather read Harry Potter books than play video games, the answer is because they don’t suck. It’s like asking if you’d rather read a Harry Potter book or watch a marvel super hero movie. You’d rather read the Harry Potter book because it doesn’t suck.

  98. @Anonymous

    I am not sure the producers of Downton Abbey had women primarily in mind as viewers but it has to be THE super soap opera . No scene lasts longer than three minutes and the plot seems to develop in an impromptu manner. My wife is hooked on it and watches the DVR reruns over and over.

    • Replies: @Known Fact
  99. @Redneck farmer

    Let’s not confuse the decay process with progress.

  100. anon[368] • Disclaimer says:

    Who cares? Reading fiction is for fags. Only STEM matters!

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
    • Replies: @SFG
  101. @SFG

    Possibly, but story-based single player games have been largely supplanted by online multiplayer modes in the last 10 years or so. It is true, however, that with a few exceptions the games and stories have been getting worse. Battlefield 5 is deservedly a whipping boy in this regard; if they wanted to feature a woman in combat during WWII so badly there were plenty of real life examples from the Soviet front, which was totally absent from the game.

    It doesn’t help that the newer consoles are far more expensive to develop games for, which has drastically reduced the quantity of games released. Grand Theft Auto 5, for example, had not only a worse story than GTA 4 (but made loads of money thanks to its online mode) but is six years old and the replacement may not be released until the next generation of consoles. Ace Combat 7 was a return to form, but took eight years to develop following it’s PS3 era dud. Far Cry 5 is actually good. Madden football bought exclusive rights from the NFL back in 2005 and has been getting worse by the year since. Given all this, my PS4 mostly collects dust.

  102. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    Shriver’s the best out there now, Mandibles is very timely and her We Need to Talk About Kevin is even better. Evil offspring plagues upscale couple — really horrifying.

  103. @jcd1974

    50 Shades of Gray – written by a woman, E.L. James, has sold 125 million. Bridget Jones’ Diary (1996) by Helen Fielding also came to mind but sold a mere sold 2 million. They both kinda prove the point about women taking over.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  104. @GunnarT

    How much plotting in life is based on information delays? (Way more than you think?)

    Try to plot Romeo and Juliet when both of them have iPhones.

    William Monahan’s 2006 screenplay for The Departed was the first movie I noticed in which the plot realistically incorporated cellphones without destroying the tension.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  105. SFG says:
    @Ted Bell

    I wonder; can’t you market directly to the fans?

    • Replies: @anon
  106. SFG says:
    @anon

    That’s why we had scifi, until recently.

    I was reading Milo Yiannopoulous’ atrocious Forbidden Thoughts collection, and thinking, “I can do better than this…”

    So now I’m waiting until I have enough money to retire, and I intend to try…

  107. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    Not only didn’t it destroy the tension, but it added to it.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  108. SFG says:
    @SunBakedSuburb

    Very, very few women will be impressed by Snow Crash, my friend.

    (If you do find one, she’s a keeper…)

  109. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @GunnarT

    How much plotting in life is based on information delays? (Way more than you think?)

    […]

    I know one novelist who said he only does historical fiction because otherwise he has to come up with an unreasonable number of reasons no one has a cell phone.

    This is a failure of imagination on his part. Write the phones into the story.

  110. @Simply Simon

    Plot? I’m guessing the big draw is the costumes and hairstyles.

  111. SFG says:
    @prime noticer

    Thing with the comic books is they are recycling characters from the 20s-60s, before creators realized they could make money off these things and started demanding rights.

  112. SFG says:
    @Anon7

    Who are they removing specifically? It would be nice to build up a list for any future ‘hedge school’.

  113. @Known Fact

    50 Shades of Gray – written by a woman, E.L. James, has sold 125 million.

    Incidentally, this illustrates one my comment on Epstein death…

    1. we agree that Epstein was a criminal (procurer), sleazebag & probably someone involved in other criminal activities, perhaps money laundering. Essentially, he was a highly functioning psychopath.

    Epstein “girls” were, as it seems, not of a self-destructive druggy sort. Those who sued him looked good for their age, healthy, had families (many of them),…anyway, I don’t see that Epstein “ruined their lives”. They are prime examples of how classy prostitutes would have looked like in, say, 18th or 19th C.

    Epstein’s life revolved around sex & girls. But he was an unimaginative bore re that matter, unlike, say, French author Georges Simenon (detective Maigret), who spent entire fortune on prostitutes, risky behavior & kinky sex. Epstein was, basically, a pimp for the limelight. His only peculiarity was an obsession with fringe science. His main appeal was, it seems, for so called “rich and powerful”, that they all knew they could get their sex fantasies (mostly dull Lolita massage plus extra) fulfilled through him. He was a pimp for moneyed geezers.

    2. where we seem to disagree is this: you, I’d say, think I’m romanticizing escort world & high level prostitution. Not at all. Crucial difference is that my view of human, and female nature in particular, is much darker: it is not a coincidence that top female erotic fantasies include rape, submission, exhibitionism, prostitution, group sex & bondage. In other words, non-negligible part of females would go into world of prostitution & degradation, even if there was no economic & social necessity for that, like those existing in many 3rd world countries.

    As I see it, they were girls, both above & below 18, who were seduced by lavish life-style & were not bound by any personal strict morality, family ties or anything similar. Are we to believe that 15 or 16 years old girls were so clueless about life they would not even think they live, eat, sleep…in a grown man’s mansions without even a hint of giving, eh, something “in exchange”?

    Are we to believe that those 15, 16, 17..years old girls were not human females, with female sexual desires, ideas, projections & plans? That these girls did not have sexual feelings or were totally clueless about them, like, say, about quantum algebra? That there was not a suspicion on their side that something of a sexual nature was bound to happen, sooner or later?

    With a few exceptions, female erotic mindset is not more mature when they’re 35 in comparison when they’re 15. Prostitutes are as ineradicable as are thieves. Or, in other words: soft patriarchy is the only way of sustaining functioning societies because, if in charge, females would ruin any society.

    That said, I utterly despise all this world of prostitution, johns, sex addiction & slavery to “lower part of nature”. But, I’m not blind to life’s realities. Why do you think Muslim women don’t show any real wish to get emancipated? Why do you think liberal Western women are so pro-immigration & so silent about rapes by turd worlders?

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Dr Van Nostrand
  114. @Reg Cæsar

    The first Harry Potter novel had the good fortune to be released in 1997, before high speed internet was something every kid had regular access to, and the first four were released before the Playstation 2. In particular, the multiplayer online gaming that soaks up so much male attention now was in its infancy in those days. Call of Duty 4, for example, was released in 2007, the same year as the last Harry Potter book.

  115. MBlanc46 says:

    Who is this “everybody” of whom you speak?

  116. anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @SFG

    A few “sad puppies” have tried marketing directly to the fans. I tried to enjoy their fiction – I really TRIED. I got about 50 or 60 pages into a tome by Larry Correia, and I feel that he is a good person, but I just don’t enjoy his version of a superhero story.

    Here the Commies were right about one thing – quantity has a quality all its own. The leftists have a huge number of aspiring writers. The Sad Puppies have just a handful of writers. The leftists can spew out thousands of novels every month. The Sad Puppies have to do their best with each of their contributions.

    The real thought leaders are edgy indie game developers. They can use games made by two or three guys to convey politically incorrect thoughts.

  117. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    How does Franzen compare with Wolfe?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  118. anon[257] • Disclaimer says:

    Lewd games are popular with Japanese gamers, and many are voting with their wallets.

    Lewd games might be an interesting market for politically incorrect writers.

    The story at the link below can be boiled down to:

    According to the latest Japanese sales charts, the uncensored version of Omega Labyrinth Life sold a modest 6,643 physical copies last week. This was more than three times what Labyrinth Life managed on the PS4 (which only moved a paltry 1,977 copies).

    https://nintendosoup.com/japan-omega-labyrinth-life-for-switch-sells-three-times-more-than-censored-version-labyrinth-life-on-ps4/

  119. Anonymous[254] • Disclaimer says:
    @Stan Adams

    That STAR TREK movie was about Save the Whale, the last ST movie I saw and the one I sort of enjoyed.

    Movies such as ONCE UPON A HOLLYWOOD seem to serve as kind of Save the Whitey. It’s been said that many species will only remain alive in the zoo as their habitats are being destroyed at record pace in Africa, Asia, South America, and etc. Therefore, there’s a chance that future people will only see them at zoos… or nature documentaries that keep the memory alive of extinct species.

    With white worlds being erased in a matter of decades, the only way to ‘experience’ white world might be through movies. ONCE HOLLYWOOD shows L.A. before it turned totally hodge-podge. Just like Westerns kept alive the myth of the West long after it was settled and modernized, these ‘Whitern’ movies may be the only remaining memory of what white worlds were like. Look at entire parts of London and Paris already. Keep this up, and they will become essentially Muslim-Africanized. It will be like visiting North Africa or Pakistan than a white city. Then, one can see the appeal of French and British movies about past history. JOURNEY’S END and DUNKIRK did just that. Tragic as they were, they were about white lands. No matter which side won or lost, Europe was Europe. No longer if trends keep up. And California isn’t a white city anymore. Whites are a minority there and will only lose more power. In the end of A.I., humanity is gone and ‘survive’ only in artifacts. Though the white race won’t go extinct, many white worlds will vanish or be altered to such extent that they will resemble the non-west more than the West. In that case, the ONLY way to experience whiteness will be to see movies like HOLLYWOOD, DUNKIRK, and FAR FROM THE MADDING CROWD. Of course, there is a cultural agenda to change past history as well so that white figures and characters are turned black or some POC.

  120. J.Ross says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    A lot of RaJ depends on them being separate and unable to communicate. How do you have the most famous scene in there if they can just chat like modern teens? How do they end up committing suicide if they can explain everything to each other?

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  121. @Lurker

    On August 14 Toni Morrison will have been dead for nine (or should I say ‘nein‘) days.

  122. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Anonymous

    Wolfe is probably funnier, but both capture the American zeitgeist better than anyone else, IMO. Freedom may be the Bonfire of the Vanities of the aughts in that sense.

  123. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @BenKenobi

    They were certainly riffs on real people. The female president character was more self-made than Hillary but also more Machiavellian. The black pop-scientist was more competent than DeGrasse Tyson.

    Seveneves is probably the best Stephenson novel I’ve read.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
  124. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    White power/white nationalist novels seem to be doing well, relatively speaking. Covington’s Northwest Quartet seems to be pretty popular.

  125. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @J.Ross

    You write something different.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  126. ‘…Basically, most of the interesting artistic accomplishments of, say, the last 600 years have been the work of today’s bete noire: white males.

    Much as everybody would like that not to be true for the next 600 years, we don’t have much evidence that such a change will actually happen.’

    On a less elevated plane, a related effect is what’s happened to science fiction.

    It’s still written mostly by men, but they often feel obliged to have female heroines.

    This doesn’t work very well, because while a reasonable number of men can write stories with convincing male main characters, and a reasonable number of women can write stories with convincing female main characters, those capable of stepping into the other gender’s shoes are pretty few and far between. Writers who can do this exist, but it’s not a common ability.

    So often, I’ve given up after twelve pages. Uh huh. This is supposed to be a woman? Right…

    • Replies: @Alden
    , @flyingtiger
  127. @Lurker

    She ascended to met the Great Ancestors happy in the knowledge that she’d passed on the torch to the next great negress author, Michelle Obama.

    • LOL: jim jones
  128. J.Ross says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    >you be as good as shakespeare
    Man up, brah. Bootstraps, literary type. While we’re at it, we can do Othello with no Ottoman Empire, no borders, and no concepts of race or monogamy. Just like use your imagination brah.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  129. JRB says: • Website
    @Cowboy Shaw

    Nice comment, but you left we wondering what you mean when you say that Grantham is Britain’s most crepuscular town.

    • Replies: @jim jones
  130. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @J.Ross

    I didn’t say anything about being as good as Shakespeare, but I’m pretty sure if he were around today he wouldn’t let the ubiquity of smart phones hinder him; instead, he’d write them into his plays.

    Imagine telling Shakespeare that a little hand held machine can record and transmit sound and images everywhere. You think he would set all of his work in the past to avoid the implications of that or embrace it? If he were alive today, I bet he’d be all over it like Charlie Brooker.

    • Replies: @Dissident
  131. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @SunBakedSuburb

    I don’t think you have to be that smart to read it, but it is kind of geeky. Cryptonomicon might be a better entry point for Stephenson (it’s long but don’t worry, it’s compulsively readable).

  132. @SunBakedSuburb

    I’m reading Snow Crash now. Seems incredibly prescient.

  133. @Bardon Kaldian

    there are, especially across US & Anglophone world, “book clubs” galore.

    Yes, but all the mail order book clubs–the Book of the Month Club, the History Book Club, the Military Book Club, etc., etc.–died off, killed by the Internet presumably.

  134. eah says:

    • Replies: @eah
    , @Jim Don Bob
  135. SFG says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Sure, look how popular 50 Shades of Grey was. And I suspect, as you say, a lot of them knew what was going on and figured they’d get money and/or connections in exchange for ‘servicing’ these rich guys.

  136. @Bardon Kaldian

    Thanks. Interesting.
    Have you ever looked into Die Fackel of Karl Kraus? That monstrous enterprise with it’s twenty thousand+ pages, almost completely written by Kraus himself is Franzen’s obsession: The continuous critique of the Austrian megaphone in the first half of the 20th century up until the second world war. The parallel to Steve Sailer is stunning!

    I’m glad to read that you love Thomas Mann. There are three works of him I think of quite often: Der Zauberberg, Doktor Faustus and – Der Kleine Herr Friedemann, the absolutely lovely portrait of his most beloved dog (if he hadn’t written anything else, he would still be one of the greats). I’d have a hard time though to explain why he should be better than – – – Tom Wolfe or Jonathan Franzen – or T. C. Boyle or Evelyn Waugh or Updike even. The novel is a many-headed beast. This can’t be otherwise. Above a certain level, all that counts is whether the books – how to put that: Add something to all the stuff, the reader knows anyhow.
    Musil is more of a question mark than anything else (I’d say vastly overestimated). He did write some terrific short stories though.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  137. @ScarletNumber

    I thought they were the same person. I never could tell them apart.

  138. Corn says:
    @Autochthon

    I remember many many years ago a marriage counselor or shrink said in Reader’s Digest, “Women view a complaint as a plea for sympathy or support. Men view a complaint as a challenge to come up with a solution.”

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  139. @International Jew

    Love hurts.

    (A few hours after I’d read your comment about Jonathan Franzen’s novel Corrections, I found myself humming along to this song above – – – )

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  140. Yawrate says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Joining a book club seems like a great way to meet women!

    • LOL: Bardon Kaldian
  141. @Dieter Kief

    They’re different. Steve is a journalist with economic education & science oriented, essentially a healthy modern man whose satire is in the function of health, common sense & reason; Kraus, while satirizing Austrian & central European societies, seems to me basically a nihilist with flashes of spirituality, but in his deepest core a tragic figure who attacks life’s absurdities, but somewhere in his inward self, loathes the entire life as such (and in passing having a good time as is possible at all for such a person).

    There was a discussion long time ago, and I quoted Henry James: great literature augments your inner self. Simply, Mann is greater than all Wolfes or Franzens or Updikes (or Werfels etc) because on various levels, his novels & stories change the reader & his perception in such a way that he is potentially “bigger”, wiser, more perceptive, …. That’s why so much fuss about canonical writers who had passed through time’s test. Of, course, there is no scientific way to ascertain anything.

    Musil is, along RobertWalser & Kafka (two different authors), in the category of highly atypical writers who somehow elude normative sensibilities. One likes them or not.

  142. The Novel has died many deaths. People were performing autopsies in the 1970s. So, I think its current death is great exaggerated.

    But when the Nobel prize for literature goes to a singer, that just shows things are very bad. The lack of male talent doesn’t explain EVERYTHING. Women are better at writing novels than almost every other artistic endeavor. In most fields, probably 90-95% of the great or most popular work is male, in novels its more like 80-20. jane Austen, j.k Rowlings, agatha christie, edith wharton, etc.

    The trouble is female writers rarely write anything intelligent about politics, history, adventure, war, etc. Its all detective stories, crime, family, romance, sex, domestic stuff, werewolves and vampires. Writers are supposed to “write what they know” and most women writers don’t seem to know much.

    Anyway, once any field of endeavor becomes female dominated, its doomed to mediocrity, if it doesn’t crash and burn. That’s why females were kept out of church leadership.

    • Replies: @Mike_from_SGV
  143. @Meretricious

    I agree, but I’d suggest that calling someone by that oh-so-scary (and badly misused) slur “antiSemitic” won’t get you far here.

    Do you mean that she reflexively disliked, distrusted, or tried to harm all Arabs and Sephardic Jews regardless of their merit, character, and conduct? Because that would actually be “antiSemitic.”

    • Replies: @Dissident
    , @Jack D
  144. BenKenobi says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    One of my favorite passages is when they hang a lampshade on the fact that Tekla’s descendents are basically the Hitlerian-ideal Aryan warrior caste.

  145. eah says:
    @eah

  146. Alden says:
    @Cowboy Shaw

    My car radio is permanently on a classic music station. Very few ads. The announcer is always a man with an artificially low voice.

  147. Alden says:
    @Colin Wright

    John Le Carre’s women characters in his earlier books were pretty good. In his later books they were just old men’s fantasies.

  148. JRB says: • Website
    @jim jones

    Thanks. I had a look myself why Rod Liddle names Grantham Britain’s most crepuscular town. Found one reference. See here https://www.granthammatters.co.uk/is-this-a-fair-description-of-grantham/

  149. Anon7 says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    “Not to be a stickler, but where I came from, the curious boys found cool books on their own, they didn’t ask a librarian what to read.”

    I know I’m going to strain your credulity here, but in the 1960’s elementary school librarians were college-educated women who liked men and boys and were trained to be as helpful to men and boys as possible and to love their job in which at least part of the time they sincerely helped boys to be the most boy they could be.

    Hard to believe, but that was the world that once was in the early 1960’s in America.

    My elementary school was once a high school and had lots of books for adults, and nobody told me what I could and couldn’t read, believe me. I used to climb the shelves to get top shelf books if I had to. Well, I did until I was asked to use a stepladder. I would have been willfully disobedient, but those women were so nice.

    That’s a lost world. Sigh.

    I could also tell you that I read unabridged translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey, Le Morte d’Arthur, The Man in the Iron Mask and Les Miserables by the time I was in the fourth grade and blah blah blah – we were all early readers in those days. No video games, no TV for kids.

    Not an amusing tidbit: I never asked my parents anything.

    If you were lucky (as I was), at least one of your friends was the youngest in his family, with older sibs at fancy eastern colleges. That’s how you get to listen to Firesign Theater, the Goon Show, Beyond the Fringe and yes geek out on LOTR when you’re twelve.

    • Replies: @Dissident
  150. @Gordo

    Feldmann is not necessarily a Jewish name. Lots of gentiles by the name of Feldmann in Germany. So, the name & heritage question aside: Her new book on neuroscience is quite interesting. The most interesting part in it is about bodily representations of certain states of mind/feelings like anger, disgust, fear, depression, etc.

  151. @eah

    “If civilization had been left in female hands, we would still be living in grass huts.”
    – Camille Paglia

    https://www.nytimes.com/1990/07/22/books/siding-with-the-men.html

    • Replies: @Dissident
  152. Dissident says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Do you mean that she reflexively disliked, distrusted, or tried to harm all Arabs and Sephardic Jews regardless of their merit, character, and conduct? Because that would actually be “antiSemitic.”

    On the term “Anti-Semite”:

    Its modern name of “Anti-Semite” is as ridiculous in
    derivation as it is ludicrous in form. It is partly of German academic
    origin and partly a newspaper name, vulgar as one would expect it to be
    from such an origin, and also as falsely pedantic as one would expect,
    but the exasperated mood of which it is a label is very real.

    I say the word “Anti-Semite” is vulgar and pedantic: that I think will
    be universally admitted. It is also nonsensical. The antagonism to the
    Jews has nothing to do with any supposed “Semitic” race–which probably
    does not exist any more than do many other modern hypothetical
    abstractions, and which, anyhow, does not come into the matter. The
    Anti-Semite is not a man who hates the modern Arabs or the ancient
    Carthaginians. He is a man who hates Jews.

    However, we must accept the word because it has become currency [emphasis mine- Dissident], and go
    on to the more essential matter of discovering how those to whom it
    applies are moved, what the result of their action would be if (or when)
    they could act freely; and, most important of all, of what they are a
    sign.

    ~ Hilaire Belloc, The Jews

  153. Dissident says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    Imagine telling Shakespeare that a little hand held machine can record and transmit sound and images everywhere. You think he would set all of his work in the past to avoid the implications of that or embrace it?

    The CBS Radio Workshop, dedicated to man’s imagination, the theater of the mind, presents
    Colloquy #1- Interview with William Shakespeare

    ( https://archive.org/details/OTRR_CBS_Radio_Workshop_Singles , #5 )

  154. The societal pyramid narrows quite a bit towards the pinnacle: Jeff Bezos’s ex-wife was one of Morrison’s “best students”.

    https://www.businessinsider.com/mackenzie-bezos-career-2017-11

    And Mackenzie is also a woman, so there’s that connection too … Log-rollin’ in the Sister’hood.

  155. Dissident says:
    @Kyle

    Senior year we were forced to read the kite runner and kaffir boy. They were both novels about disgusting children in disgusting third world cultures, and the climax of both books was the main character getting butt raped.

    Really? I can imagine the Gay lobby objecting on the grounds that exposing impressionable youths to such traumatic depictions of buggery is likely to prejudice them against that sacred, glorious act (which, in turn, could promote homophobic attitudes).

    Great expectations might be the worst thing I’ve ever read.

    That’s quite a statement. What didn’t you like about Great Expectations?

    Did you ever read Dickens’ Barnaby Rudge? Link is to a superb audio book version read by the extraordinarily talented Mil Nicholson.

  156. Dissident says:
    @Jim Don Bob

    Camille Paglia made some great comments in her interview with Jordan Peterson
    https://www.jordanbpeterson.com/transcripts/camille-paglia/

  157. @Colin Wright

    I always felt that the only author who created good female characters is John Norman.

  158. Jack D says:
    @RadicalCenter

    Right, around here (to some people at least) anti-Semite is a compliment. If they found out the Morrison was an anti-Semite they’d be MORE inclined to read her books.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  159. Dissident says:
    @Anon7

    I could also tell you that I read unabridged translations of the Iliad and the Odyssey, Le Morte d’Arthur, The Man in the Iron Mask and Les Miserables by the time I was in the fourth grade and blah blah blah – we were all early readers in those days.

    Are you claiming that it was typical or even common for children no older than fourth grade age to read such advanced works as the ones you listed?
    ~ ~ ~
    No one mentioned C.S. Lewis?
    ~ ~ ~

    Voyage of the Scarlet Queen was a radio drama portraying the adventures of the 78-foot ketch Scarlet Queen in the South Pacific. It was broadcast on Mutual from 3 July 1947 to 14 February 1948.

    ( Wikipedia)

    A masterful production that may have even been the inspiration for Star Trek.

    Thirty-five episodes can be downloaded or streamed from this Archive.org page.
    Excerpt from one of the reviews posted:

    A bunch of us kids used to listen to this show back in 1950 and we always had arguments about the people in the show and the situations – and dreamed of doing the same thing someday.

    The first time I listened to the first show this week and heard “Stand by to make sail!” a TON of memories came flooding back. I’m at the age where I can’t remember something from a week ago, but a few hints from this show and it’s “Oh yeah, I remember that!”.

    As one born after the Golden Age of Radio who has discovered and retreated into it, I found the comment I quoted above quite moving.

    I wonder how many kids (children, teens and even 20-somethings) can be found today who have discovered and embrace vintage literature, radio, television, film or music. Surely there must be some.

  160. @Yawrate

    Would rather remain single than read such trash. But then a good chunk of these book clubs are really about socializing and an excuse for consuming wine at 3pm, so Im game LOL. Just scan the summary or Cliffs Notes(do they make these anymore) and youre ahead of the curve.

  161. @Bardon Kaldian

    If he was into 15,16 years old then he was a pedophile yes but there is foolish tendency to lump all pedophiles together. A man who is sexually attracted to a 6 year is very different from someone attracted to a 16 year old.
    To call these by the same name is absurd. To be sure a grown man who pursues and manipulates 16 year olds is vile but a 16 year old isnt exactly a babe in the woods either.While she is a victim, she is not really scarred for life as say 6-13 year old would be.

    • Replies: @Anon
  162. Brutusale says:
    @Yawrate

    Do you know any women in a “book club”? The only things they read are the labels on the chardonnay!

  163. Anon[957] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dr Van Nostrand

    “If he was into 15,16 years old then he was a pedophile yes”

    You might want to look up the definition of ‘pedophile’.

  164. Anonymous[267] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Right, around here (to some people at least) anti-Semite is a compliment.

    Whether it is a compliment would depend on whether Semitism is harmful and immoral, wouldn’t it?

  165. You could learn more about the “black experience” from books written by former pimp Iceberg Slim or white man Richard Price. Hell, you could learn more from the Stevie Ray Vaughan song “Willie The Wimp”.

  166. @Honesthughgrant

    Bingo! Outside of traditional or fundamentalist circles, churches are now feminized, boring, and uninteresting to normal men. Females are generally incapable of saying anything interesting about text, theology, history, or doctrine. Only “love ‘n’ relationships”. Basically, religious chick-lit.

  167. EdwardM says:
    @Dieter Kief

    This is a beautiful post. Bravo.

  168. @Dieter Kief

    If you look up One-Hit Wonder in the dictionary, you see Nazareth.

    Believe it or not, this song was originally recorded by the Everly Brothers and then was a hit for Roy Orbison.

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?