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From The Atlantic:

How Intelligence Leads to Stereotyping
A new study complicates the trope of the stupid bigot.

OLGA KHAZAN JUL 29, 2017 SCIENCE

… Racists stereotype other people, for the most part, but there are also stereotypes about racists. And the stereotype about racists is that, well, they’re kind of dumb.

But a new study complicates the narrative that only unintelligent people are prejudiced. The paper, published recently in the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General, suggests smart people are actually more at risk of stereotyping others.

The study consisted of a series of experiments, all of which suggested that people who performed better on a test of pattern detection—a measure of cognitive ability—were also quicker to form and apply stereotypes.

First, researchers from New York University showed 271 participants a series of pictures of red, blue, and yellow cartoon aliens with different facial features, paired with a statement of either a nice behavior (“gave another alien a bouquet of flowers”) or a rude one (“spat in another alien’s face”):

… The subjects didn’t know if the statements about the aliens were true or false. In this way, the study tried to mimic how people actually form prejudices about certain groups, like through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows.

Or by reading articles in The Atlantic reporting social science findings, as I’ve been doing since 1972.

Later, the subjects were asked to pick which alien had committed a given behavior from a lineup…

The participants then took a test called the Raven’s Advanced Progressive Matrices, a pattern-based exam that’s a common measure of human intelligence.

I.e., an IQ test. In fact, it’s probably the IQ Enthusiast’s IQ Test.

The participants who were better pattern detectors were more likely to make stereotypical errors: …

A second study showed similar results, but for measures of implicit bias. That is, smarter participants were quicker to stereotype the aliens in the course of a word-sorting task, even if they didn’t realize they were doing it. …

These depressing results suggest there’s a downside to being smart—it makes you risk reading too much into a situation and drawing inappropriate conclusions. But there’s hope. In the second part of the study, the researchers showed that while smart people learn and apply stereotypes more eagerly, they also unlearn those stereotypes quickly in the face of new information.

For example, in 1972, the latest information seemed to show that African-Americans were good at basketball, running the football, sprinting, popular music, comedy, and popular dance. But since then, new information has become available that shows that the stereotypes that African-Americans are relatively good at these things on average is wrong. As we now know after 45 years of more information, African-Americans instead are relatively great at those stereotypical black activities.

 
    []
  1. The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it’s become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    —–

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars…

    No more “broken taillights” or accusations of being stopped for “driving while black” if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be “noticeable” to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally…

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don't have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother's request, he's his own boss.
    , @anon
    Use of FICO or credit scores is pretty effective and has also withstood pressures regarding disparate impact. So .. .yes. It's going on and there are people fighting the use of algorithmic metrics, but they haven't been able to eliminate them. Yet.
    , @guest
    There have already been AI Is Racist articles on iSteve, as I recall.
    , @Dave Pinsen

    Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did.
     
    Uber also freezes drivers out of the system if they don't accept a high enough percentage of rides. And it doesn't tell you where you'll be taking someone until the ride starts. So that's one way it gets drivers to pick up more minorities and take them to dangerous areas.

    On the other hand, Uber's technology didn't keep it from taking on an ex-con as a driver who went on to rape and kill someone, IIRC.

    , @Ed
    Funny on Uber driver boards you'll still find threads of drivers complaining about black customers, swapping tips to avoid them and sharing horror stories.

    For sure though overall Uber has overallbrought better service to black areas while not needlessly risking the lives of their drivers.
    , @songbird
    I've always considereed the idea that blacks commit more moving violations to be both very believable (from observation) and very testable. Not only from red light cameras, closed circuit TV, and insurance claims, but from the simple fact that it is typically sort of hard to tell someone's race at night from a distance when they are driving.
    , @Jack D
    AirBnB has a problem with renters desiring to avoid renting to minorities. There is pressure on them to be non-discriminatory (although legally boarding house operators were exempted from the Civil Rights Act - they didn't want to force nice old Mrs. Witherspoon to have to take Negroes into her own home). AirBnB is experimenting with hiding information (such as photos) from the people who are renting out rooms in order to prevent them from being racist. Of course, the AirBnB model depends in part on providing reliable information about renters/operators so that you know who you are letting into your home, so they are somewhat shooting themselves in the foot. Then again Uber also masks some information from drivers and they get away with it. The business model of both companies is "how much can we rip off / deny information to BOTH customers and operators without pissing them off so much that they quit the service."
    , @Anonymous
    https://www.fastcodesign.com/90134278/biased-ai-is-a-threat-to-civil-liberty-the-aclu-has-a-plan-to-fix-it

    Biased AI Is A Threat To Civil Liberties. The ACLU Has A Plan To Fix It

    ... For example, Los Angeles began using a service called PredPol to determine areas where burglaries and car break-ins might occur. After the mathematical model–which uses past police reports–outlines where these crimes are likely to occur, the LAPD dispatches police to the area. The presence of police alone is a deterrent and in some precincts, crime dropped 25%. But meanwhile, Oakland police decided not to implement the same technology because the city was concerned about racial profiling.
     

    “Governments are really being pushed to do more with less money and AI tools are, at least on a surface level, appealing ways to do that and make decisions efficiently,” Goodman says. “We want to see if there are appropriate roles [for AI] and to ensure tools are fair and free of racial biases. Those are hard questions and hard math problems.”

    A second area that the ACLU is prioritizing is machine bias in financing and lending.

    ... “Housing providers and banks are adopting algorithmic tools on who gets a job or home or mortgage or loan at what rate and we know those tools very often incorporate all sorts of biases,” Goodman says, mentioning that this is important for racial justice, women’s rights, and LGBTQ rights.

    ... The long game involves forming a legal agenda on how AI should be regulated and how to protect rights and liberties as the technology becomes more pervasive.

    “Developers of these tools have been fairly isolated from conversations about legal and policy and ethical frameworks that are vital to the work they’re doing,” she says. “Many of the ill effects are not intentional. It comes from people designing technology in closed rooms in close conversations and not thinking of the real world.”
     
    The real world, you computer autists. You know, where there are social consequences to noticing patterns. (Oh, you don't even know what I'm talking about.) Look, it's a case of making the machines smarter, right? Smart enough to not have racial biases? Like ACLU intern smart.

    (I kid. It's actually a case of intelligently dispatching thoughtpolice to AI fields to deter bias-crime. And to "increase efforts to improve diversity among AI developers".)

    Through its AI Now partnership, the ACLU hopes technologists, algorithm designers, and civil libertarians will have better and more open communication. If bias in AI is addressed head on, accepted practices that perpetuate bias can be challenged and fixed. “We can inject legal principles earlier on in the conversation so ideally we aren’t in the position of arguing the illegality of technology that’s already being used,” Goodman says.
     
    , @hyperbola
    The main take-home-lesson from this "psychological fairy tale" is how anti-American The Atlantic has become. Imagine using an enemy of Americans (Rhodes) in the very first sentence!


    NETANYAHU'S GODFATHER

    How British Imperialists Created the Fascist Jabotinsky
    http://www.larouchepub.com/other/2009/3603brit-imps_created_jabotinsky.html

    .... Jabotinsky's Imperial Roots

    Every Likud prime minister in Israel has been an avowed promoter of the policies of Vladimir Ze'ev Jabotinsky. Some were personal protégés, others extremist leaders within his movement. The father of current Likud leader and candidate for prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, was Jabotinsky's personal secretary.

    The Likud prime ministers are considered an elite grouping. They are often referred to as Jabotinsky's Princes, and to this day, Jabotinsky is omnipresent within the Jewish right wing. His picture adorns the Likud website, and U.S. Anti-Defamation League director Abe Foxman has had a framed photo of him on his desk.

    Jabotinsky was a wholly owned and created asset of the British Empire. He was controlled by a political network led by Leo Stennet Amery, who became Britain's most prominent Imperial spokesman and political organizer. Amery's circle included the greatest names of British imperialism: Cecil John Rhodes, the self-avowed enemy of the American republic; the Coefficients group; and Alfred Milner, Rhodes' mentor, who ran Rhodes' secret society.

    Jabotinsky and the creation of a Jewish Legion became Amery's number one project, as the British moved to take over Palestine at the close of World War I.

    Amery's vision was that of Rhodes, who, in 1877, wrote his first Last Will and Testament. Only a bit more than a decade had passed since the British plan to dismember the United States in a Civil War had failed, bitterly. Rhodes, a rabid British race imperialist, had amassed his fortune through the exploration and mining of gold in Africa. Rhodes wrote that the purpose of his Will was: "To and for the establishment, promotion and development of a Secret Society, the true aim and object whereof shall be for the extension of British rule throughout the world, the perfecting of a system of emigration from the United Kingdom, and of colonisation by British subjects of all lands ... and especially the ... entire continent of Africa, the Holy Land, the Valley of the Euphrates, ... the whole of South America, the Islands of the Pacific not heretofore possessed by Great Britain, ... the seaboard of China and Japan, the ultimate recovery of the United States of America as an integral part of the British Empire..." (emphasis added).
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  2. Johnny789 says:

    African-Americans are also fan-frickin’-tastic at swarming unpopular opinions on Twitter.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    The use of "smdh" unironically correlates to the level of melanin.
  3. anon says: • Disclaimer

    Stereotyping sounds a lot like inference.

    Read More
    • Replies: @hyperbola
    The surreal part of this "story" is the amount of stereotypes that it contains! Starting with the very first sentence. Not surprising for something from the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General and its pretense to be "science"!

    What this "story" mostly reveals is how degenerate The Atlantic has become.

    How Intelligence Leads to Stereotyping
    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/07/intelligent-people-are-more-likely-to-stereotype/535158/

    """" Upon seeing a young man hoisting a Hitler salute in 2017, most people likely do not think, “there goes a Rhodes Scholar.” Racists stereotype other people, for the most part, but there are also stereotypes about racists. And the stereotype about racists is that, well, they’re kind of dumb...."""


    Rhodes & Hitler: The Naked Truth
    http://www.thejournalist.org.za/spotlight/rhodes-hitler-the-naked-truth

    .... Modern Fascism could, indeed, be said to have begun with Cecil Rhodes. A book could be written, “From Rhodes to Hitler”. He was the first man to organise business politically, his diamond industry was the first great cartel. His was the dream of an èlite, a secret society that ruled whole continents by money controlled by a single source. His hope was for a great British Reich.

    There followed a further comparison: “Mussolini’s dream was the pale echo of Rhodes’s; his conquest of Ethiopia and inglorious aping of the conquest of Rhodesia.” Cloete likened Rhodes’ methods to those of Mussolini and Hitler: “Rhodes’s pioneers were, to all intents and purposes, black shirts; his leaders operated outside the law. He intimidated with threats of force, he bought men and parties, he spoke of Nordic superiority.” Late biographers picked up on Cloete’s comparison, John Flint noted that Spengler, whose book, The Decline of the West, came to be an inspirational text for the Nazis, was a great admirer of Rhodes. For the fascists and Nazis, Rhodes would have been a kindred spirit. As Flint put it:

    His will to power and love of power for its own sake strikingly anticipated the pretensions of the fascist Leader-Principle. His mystic obsession with his “idea”, which was never clearly enunciated, seemed to anticipate the stress on the Leader’s intuition in later fascism and Nazism. His companies, like the later fascist parties, operated as statues within the formal state.

    Admired by Nazis

    Rhodes, it seems, was much admired in Nazi Germany. Hitler himself is reported as having said that the British had been unable to maintain a dominant position in the world because they had not paid sufficient heed to Rhodes, the only person who had understood what was required for continuing British supremacy. Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels described Rhodes as “a rare force-man”, atypical of the cautious, hesitant British.....
  4. @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don’t have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother’s request, he’s his own boss.

    Read More
    • LOL: BenKenobi
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don’t have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother’s request, he’s his own boss.
     
    I'm an investigator and my job is related to employment. Most of the black Uber drivers are African or Haitian. They are usually very hard-working and have their shit together. And a much higher percentage have (come from) intact nuclear families with family members who also hard working and have their shit together.
    , @Jack D
    Kenobi is laughing but Steve was being completely serious and truthful. In addition to having to bail out Cousin Deshawntavious, you might have to take the day off to take care of some matters at the welfare office or with your parole officer, your car (which is probably older) might break and you don't have the money just now to fix it (the average black has zero $ of savings and not enough credit for a credit card), or maybe you don't have a car and the bus just doesn't come that day, you might have to take the day off to move or to go to housing court because you are being evicted for non-payment of rent, the woman who does day care for your kids might have one of the above happen to her, etc., etc. - the list of things that can go wrong are just endless. Ghetto life is just too chaotic to permit a lot of blacks, even if they are well intentioned, to show up every day on time. A lot of blacks also lack the problem solving skills to figure out a good plan B when things go wrong or else they just can't comprehend why their whitey boss is so upset when they show up a couple of hours late or miss a day - white people seem to be incredibly tightly wound and lacking chill and human sympathy.
    , @MBlanc46
    Unless the courts decide that he's actually an employee. Then he'll have to be available when Uber tells him he has to be available.
    , @whorefinder
    Except that with Uber blacks have been more exposed to actually being rated for their performance, instead of being coddled as the "company token."

    The Boston Globe ran an article last year about a lawyer suing because his clients-- black Uber drivers----were receiving lower Uber ratings than whites. https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/10/06/attorney-for-uber-drivers-says-star-ratings-are-racially-biased/R28mqWL6ShjMFB5xAr3uGL/story.html

    The black Uber drivers quoted swear they give top-notch service, and the Globe of course swallows this at face value. It must be racism, the blacks say they were wronged!

    Either Uber will "correct" this (e.g. removing a lot of negative reviews about black drivers, or artificially boosting black Uber drivers through extra stars), or black Uberers will whine more and start threatening Uber passengers that if they give a bad review they'll come after them---since the black Uber driver really does "know where they live."

    The funny part is that many of these black Uber drivers like Ubering because they can avoid picking up black people, unlike with many cab/livery companies, who have to obey a lot of non-discrimination laws. They understand blacks will whine at them or rob them or just generally be unpleasant, while non-blacks will be pleasant and clean and give better ratings.

    , @hyperbola
    I agree with anonymous.

    Sailer here shows us that he is every bit a stereotypical racist - how many black Uber drivers does he actually know personally?

    What is increasingly obvious is how boring, provincial and incestuous the tiny sect that creates this kind of "thougth-control" propaganda actually is.
  5. Mr. Anon says:

    First, researchers from New York University showed 271 participants a series of pictures of red, blue, and yellow cartoon aliens with different facial features, paired with a statement of either a nice behavior (“gave another alien a bouquet of flowers”) or a rude one (“spat in another alien’s face”):

    … The subjects didn’t know if the statements about the aliens were true or false.

    Perhaps the subjects thought that all the statements were false, given that they were ostensibly made by “cartoon aliens”, whom a reasonable person might tend to think don’t actually exist. So, perhaps they reasoned that the exercise was all rather stupid and that it didn’t matter how they answered.

    Who thinks up these “experiments”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
    Actually looking at the "alien' faces used, and the computer generated "mens" faces, and this was less a test of prejudices and more a modernized version of the old game Memory. It also proves, once again, that sociology isn't a science.

    I'm also always highly entertained by the human obsession with intelligence, who has it, whose is highest, how do you measure it, when a strong case could be made that the only things that actually matter in our short existence betwixt two yawning black abysses are emotional events.
  6. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    OLGA KHAZAN

    I am terribly sorry but my pattern detection has just been triggered.

    Read More
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
    Could have been Olga Khazar.

    Our elites feel that being able to recognise patterns is good in IQ tests, but doubleplusungood anywhere else.
    , @Ris_Eruwaedhiel
    That jumped out at me, too.
  7. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    Use of FICO or credit scores is pretty effective and has also withstood pressures regarding disparate impact. So .. .yes. It’s going on and there are people fighting the use of algorithmic metrics, but they haven’t been able to eliminate them. Yet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @David
    Insurance companies use an Insurance Score to price non-catastrophe lines. The difference in cost between the highest and lowest (acceptable) score is typically four to five times. This is true of homeowners or renters insurance and has a hugely disproportional impact on NAMs.
    , @Barnard
    Using FICO scores has withstood disparate impact attempts so far, but there are constant efforts against using them, or at least ignoring them, in an effort to increase lending to "disadvantaged groups."
  8. guest says:
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    There have already been AI Is Racist articles on iSteve, as I recall.

    Read More
  9. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    https://twitter.com/robert_mariani/status/888791299998011392

    They’ll slowly converge on the idea that intelligence, or pattern-recognition, is the problem, but it can’t really be knee-capped. Fine, sure, there are patterns, but they’re the patterns our systemically white supremacist society created. We must instead see data not as descriptive, but normative!

    Just as they now feed us black judges and white criminals through our televisions screens, they’ll feed into the Artificial Intelligence machines not real datasets, but the Artificial Data of their ideal society. Immantentize the eschaton two-point-oh.

    Read More
  10. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did.

    Uber also freezes drivers out of the system if they don’t accept a high enough percentage of rides. And it doesn’t tell you where you’ll be taking someone until the ride starts. So that’s one way it gets drivers to pick up more minorities and take them to dangerous areas.

    On the other hand, Uber’s technology didn’t keep it from taking on an ex-con as a driver who went on to rape and kill someone, IIRC.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    Don't get me wrong. I'm no particular fan of that company. I'm talking more about the technology and business model in general than the management execution in particular. There have been some touching accounts of enthusiastic former taxi drivers of many colors who no longer have to worry about getting ambushed and mugged as well as enthusiastic riders who no longer suffer the indignity and inconvenience of being passed up because the drivers fear that these minority riders will lead them into an ambush attack. The legacy of diversity and urban anonymity may indeed be low trust societies, but using information technology to emulate the reputation effects of small communities may offer some kind of substitute.

    The point was that the technology solved problems where regulation mostly failed. What management does with the technology might be another story.

  11. “These depressing results suggest there’s a downside to being smart – it makes you risk reading too much into a situation and drawing inappropriate conclusions.”

    bored identity just drew inappropriate conclusion about Mrs. Khazan having her job not because she’s overly smart, but because she has all doors opening last name perfectly fitted for a group evolutionary strategy.

    Read More
  12. “The social norm against stereotyping, including the opposition to profiling, has been highly beneficial in creating a more civilized and more equal society. It is useful to remember, however, that neglecting valid stereotypes inevitably results in suboptimal judgments. Resistance to stereotyping is a laudable moral position, but the simplistic idea that the resistance is costless is wrong. The costs are worth paying to achieve a better society, but denying that the costs exist, while satisfying to the soul and politically correct, is not scientifically defensible. Reliance on the affect heuristic is common in politically charged arguments. The positions we favor have no cost and those we oppose have no benefits. We should be able to do better.”

    –Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, chapter 16

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Yeah that - what Kahnemann says is, you make models (assumptions), and then you test them - such is life, minute in minute out, I'd say. (That simple, really - unless you start to complicate it...).


    Except for that, I'd like to add this:


    The Atlantic is quite grit-less at times. What mind-numbing, sub-scientific - - pseudo-liberal, even - - hodgepoge.

    , @Jack D
    "Because I don't believe in stereotypes (or that race even exists), I live in the middle of the biggest black ghetto in my city (rents are so low!) and send my kids to the local ghetto school. I often stroll the streets of my neighborhood and visit the ATM at 3AM and I don't even bother locking the doors in my house or my car - I have nothing to fear from my neighbors because black criminality is a myth", said no (living) white liberal ever.
  13. @Dave Pinsen

    Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did.
     
    Uber also freezes drivers out of the system if they don't accept a high enough percentage of rides. And it doesn't tell you where you'll be taking someone until the ride starts. So that's one way it gets drivers to pick up more minorities and take them to dangerous areas.

    On the other hand, Uber's technology didn't keep it from taking on an ex-con as a driver who went on to rape and kill someone, IIRC.

    Don’t get me wrong. I’m no particular fan of that company. I’m talking more about the technology and business model in general than the management execution in particular. There have been some touching accounts of enthusiastic former taxi drivers of many colors who no longer have to worry about getting ambushed and mugged as well as enthusiastic riders who no longer suffer the indignity and inconvenience of being passed up because the drivers fear that these minority riders will lead them into an ambush attack. The legacy of diversity and urban anonymity may indeed be low trust societies, but using information technology to emulate the reputation effects of small communities may offer some kind of substitute.

    The point was that the technology solved problems where regulation mostly failed. What management does with the technology might be another story.

    Read More
  14. The Z Blog says: • Website

    If you want to see how oppressive and stupid modern intellectual life is now, go to AmRen. It’s the only place on earth you can see a Jew and a Goy discussing whether Jews fit into white identity or they should have their own thing. Wide swaths of reality are now off-limits, meaning the only safe places to discuss this stuff are where mentally disturbed Antifa actors are chanting about the Nazis inside discussing taboo subjects.

    By the way Steve, you really should speak at one of these things.

    Read More
    • Replies: @RaceRealist88
    AmRen is full of creationists who deny evolution. I lose a few brain cells when I decide to read the comments.
  15. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Be an Organicist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    I thought the prevailing practice nowadays was to be a Onanist....
    Hence the upcoming extinction of the White Race.
  16. @Anonymous

    OLGA KHAZAN
     
    I am terribly sorry but my pattern detection has just been triggered.

    Could have been Olga Khazar.

    Our elites feel that being able to recognise patterns is good in IQ tests, but doubleplusungood anywhere else.

    Read More
  17. @Mr. Anon

    First, researchers from New York University showed 271 participants a series of pictures of red, blue, and yellow cartoon aliens with different facial features, paired with a statement of either a nice behavior (“gave another alien a bouquet of flowers”) or a rude one (“spat in another alien’s face”):

    … The subjects didn’t know if the statements about the aliens were true or false.
     
    Perhaps the subjects thought that all the statements were false, given that they were ostensibly made by "cartoon aliens", whom a reasonable person might tend to think don't actually exist. So, perhaps they reasoned that the exercise was all rather stupid and that it didn't matter how they answered.

    Who thinks up these "experiments"?

    Actually looking at the “alien’ faces used, and the computer generated “mens” faces, and this was less a test of prejudices and more a modernized version of the old game Memory. It also proves, once again, that sociology isn’t a science.

    I’m also always highly entertained by the human obsession with intelligence, who has it, whose is highest, how do you measure it, when a strong case could be made that the only things that actually matter in our short existence betwixt two yawning black abysses are emotional events.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    When I was at Rensselaer Polytechnic, John Schumacher, an Oxford PhD who taught physics and philosophy (not at the same time), said at a cocktail party that he didn't care whether computers could think, only if they could fuck. Smart guy, that John.
  18. Karl says:

    > Or by reading articles in The Atlantic [...] as I’ve been doing since 1972

    another WASP successfully anaesthetized !

    Those whom we cannot neutralize with paedophilic-ritualistic-torture tranquilizers…. we will neutralize with Jane Eisner blogpost-reaction syndrome!

    Read More
  19. “pattern detection”? Scary pattern detection! Everyone knows that it’s a only a short step to the ovens from pattern detection!

    Good to have you back Steve!

    Read More
  20. @Chrisnonymous

    "The social norm against stereotyping, including the opposition to profiling, has been highly beneficial in creating a more civilized and more equal society. It is useful to remember, however, that neglecting valid stereotypes inevitably results in suboptimal judgments. Resistance to stereotyping is a laudable moral position, but the simplistic idea that the resistance is costless is wrong. The costs are worth paying to achieve a better society, but denying that the costs exist, while satisfying to the soul and politically correct, is not scientifically defensible. Reliance on the affect heuristic is common in politically charged arguments. The positions we favor have no cost and those we oppose have no benefits. We should be able to do better."

    –Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, chapter 16
     

    Yeah that – what Kahnemann says is, you make models (assumptions), and then you test them – such is life, minute in minute out, I’d say. (That simple, really – unless you start to complicate it…).

    Except for that, I’d like to add this:

    The Atlantic is quite grit-less at times. What mind-numbing, sub-scientific – – pseudo-liberal, even – – hodgepoge.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I think Nassim Taleb once tweeted that the opposite of reading is not not reading but reading something like The Atlantic.
  21. Clyde says:

    BTW The Atlantic is being sold to a foundation controlled by Steve Jobs widow Laurene. She is batshyte crazy lib and has nine billion of Steve’s money to do damage with.
    Make that number higher. Net worth: $14.30 billion USD (2017)

    Read More
    • Replies: @SPConservative
    I thought everybody knew Atlantic was leftist. I accidentally subscribed to it before I knew what it weas (long story) and got woke up in a real hurry. That and Vanity Fair are practically twins.
  22. Adam Russell seems to try to build a science-bullshit-detector – that could be helpful for Atlantic readers too:

    https://www.wired.com/story/darpa-bs-detector-science/

    What Russel doesn’t seem to get is, that such a bullshit-detectorial thing already exists – it’s called critical thinking, I’d say, and rests firmly on the not really subcultural or conspiratorial, but rather famous three “Critiques” by Immanuel Kant.

    Read More
  23. Ed says:
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    Funny on Uber driver boards you’ll still find threads of drivers complaining about black customers, swapping tips to avoid them and sharing horror stories.

    For sure though overall Uber has overallbrought better service to black areas while not needlessly risking the lives of their drivers.

    Read More
  24. El Dato says:

    Evidently everyone needs to be a babe in the woods with no preconceptions. Only then can egalitarianism be unlocked.

    War is Peace
    Freedom is Slavery
    Ignorance is Strength
    Inference is Racism.
    Trust the mechanized bureaucracy!

    Hold on, I have Pol Pot on the phone!

    Read More
  25. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don't have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother's request, he's his own boss.

    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don’t have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother’s request, he’s his own boss.

    I’m an investigator and my job is related to employment. Most of the black Uber drivers are African or Haitian. They are usually very hard-working and have their shit together. And a much higher percentage have (come from) intact nuclear families with family members who also hard working and have their shit together.

    Read More
  26. fenster says:

    As Riff sang in West Side Story “hey! I’m biased on account of I’m the slyest!”

    Read More
  27. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Dieter Kief
    Yeah that - what Kahnemann says is, you make models (assumptions), and then you test them - such is life, minute in minute out, I'd say. (That simple, really - unless you start to complicate it...).


    Except for that, I'd like to add this:


    The Atlantic is quite grit-less at times. What mind-numbing, sub-scientific - - pseudo-liberal, even - - hodgepoge.

    I think Nassim Taleb once tweeted that the opposite of reading is not not reading but reading something like The Atlantic.

    Read More
  28. NickG says:

    Following his Twitter ban Godfrey Elfwick has moved on beyond 140 characters.

    Read More
  29. “…through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows.”

    The only stereotypes anybody’s going to pick up there are that straight white men tend to be retarded, white women tend to be strident domineering bitches, and blacks tend to be especially good at STEM.

    So not all wrong, could be worse.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Logan
    I've always thought it would be interesting if somebody took all the characters of TV shows for a year and analyzed their behavior, etc. by ethnicity, then compared the results to the real world. Course, it would be a lot more difficult to do than it was back when there were only three networks to compile.

    I can tell you that TV people are on average a very great deal younger, thinner and better looking.

    I've recently noticed that just about every TV show I watch has a black male genius IT-type as part of the team. I have no idea whether this is a reflection of reality, but it's definitely a thing in TV.

    As an extension of this research project, one could compare shifts in TV world vs. the real world over time.
  30. So there I am, at the record store and I see this album by a band called Black Sabbath. It looks scary and dark because it looks like there’s a witch on the cover, plus it has song titles like “Wicked World” and “The Wizard.”

    Under normal circumstances, I’d pass up this album because from the looks of things, it’s heavy metal and I don’t like metal.

    But thanks to Olga Khazan’s brilliant article in The Atlantic, I know that making assumptions based on “pattern detection” is wrong because it leads to “stereotyping.”

    So I put my preconceptions aside and bought the album because for all I know, it could be filled with bright, cheery surf music or upbeat Latin jazz. After all, judging something based on previous knowledge is wrong.

    ****

    Come tomorrow, I plan on going to the supermarket, but it’s going to be rough sledding after that Olga Khazan article. After all, just because those big containers in the dairy section have always had milk-like substances in them, who is to say they’re filled with milk? Claiming they are just leads to stereotypes. They could just as well have cereal in them!

    This is a great way to live life. Like a 2-year-old, endlessly befuddled about everything because to apply knowledge would be to stereotype.

    Read More
    • LOL: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @StillCARealist
    You mean like the one that says commie journalists write commie articles?

    My son has a bad singing voice but I suppose that has no connection to the fact that he sings badly.
    , @guest
    I've seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they're totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.
  31. David says:
    @anon
    Use of FICO or credit scores is pretty effective and has also withstood pressures regarding disparate impact. So .. .yes. It's going on and there are people fighting the use of algorithmic metrics, but they haven't been able to eliminate them. Yet.

    Insurance companies use an Insurance Score to price non-catastrophe lines. The difference in cost between the highest and lowest (acceptable) score is typically four to five times. This is true of homeowners or renters insurance and has a hugely disproportional impact on NAMs.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    LIFE has a hugely disproportional impact on NAMs. The reason insurance companies use these scores is that they have a high predictive power regarding the risk of future claims. My son is a volunteer fireman in a community that doesn't have a particularly large black population but a disproportionate % of his calls are to black occupied residences (and the poor in general). Poor people smoke more than rich ones and smoking is the cause of many fires. Maybe you don't notice that you've forgotten the frying pan on the stove because you've had a little too much to drink or consumed some mind altering substance. Maybe the battery in your smoke detector ran out and you forgot to replace it. Rich white people just don't do this stuff at the same rate. In the cities it's even worse because blacks don't pay their utility bills and get cut off and then they heat their houses with kerosene heaters or use candles, etc. Not to mention the houses are older, with poor wiring, defective appliances, etc. (and sometimes with improvised taps on the gas and electric lines to cheat the utility co.).


    Insurance co's aren't allowed to price policies by race so they look for measures that correlate with race such as FICO score.

    In a competitive market, ins. cos. will divide people into risk pools so they can offer the better risks better rates. The only way to prevent this is to make it illegal so that the better risks have to subsidize the poorer ones as part of the war on noticing.

  32. @Anonymous

    OLGA KHAZAN
     
    I am terribly sorry but my pattern detection has just been triggered.

    That jumped out at me, too.

    Read More
  33. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Oleaginous Outrager
    Actually looking at the "alien' faces used, and the computer generated "mens" faces, and this was less a test of prejudices and more a modernized version of the old game Memory. It also proves, once again, that sociology isn't a science.

    I'm also always highly entertained by the human obsession with intelligence, who has it, whose is highest, how do you measure it, when a strong case could be made that the only things that actually matter in our short existence betwixt two yawning black abysses are emotional events.

    When I was at Rensselaer Polytechnic, John Schumacher, an Oxford PhD who taught physics and philosophy (not at the same time), said at a cocktail party that he didn’t care whether computers could think, only if they could fuck. Smart guy, that John.

    Read More
  34. Anonym says:

    When it comes to media entities engaged in the manufacture of public opinion, over Olga Khazan I prefer Eliza Cassan. More intelligent, less duplicitous, better looking and overall a greater sense of humanity.

    Read More
  35. Arclight says:

    For the progressives, pattern recognition is fine so long as you can attribute an observed phenomena to white supremacy.

    Also featured in The Atlantic recently was a piece stating that it is harmful to minority children to believe that society is fair because they then will be more likely to act out and engage in risky behavior than if they are instead instructed that the game is rigged against them. This is because those who believe society is fair internalize negative stereotypes about their own race and others, allegedly.

    Can’t wait to see what direction this magazine takes now that it will be controlled by Steve Jobs’ widow.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    The Atlantic recently featured a piece stating that it is harmful to minority children to believe that society is fair because they then will be more likely to act out and engage in risky behavior than if they are instead instructed that the game is rigged against them.
     
    This can't go on like this. Readers will laugh about them. The longer the more.
  36. Dr. X says:

    The first thing they teach you in college social science statistics classes is that “correlation does not prove causality.”

    Once they’ve gotten that disclaimer out of the way, social science professors then proceed to do almost nothing else but use statistical patters to infer that correlation does indeed imply causality. Or, more accurately, they do this when it suits their political agenda to do so — i.e., x number of white cops shoot y number of black suspects, therefore the cops are racist. Or x number of blacks shoot each other with y number of guns, therefore we must abolish the Second Amendment.

    Of course smart people make pattern inferences. Marketing, economics, voting, psychology are nothing but pattern inferences.

    What they do is rig the statistical analysis to fit a pre-determined outcome by failing to notice or include certain variables in their analysis, or by over-emphasizing other variables according to their political agenda.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Logan
    "x number of white cops shoot y number of black suspects, therefore the cops are racist."

    Cops shoot black people at a rate 2.5x that at which they shoot white people. The only possible explanation is racism by white cops. Screaming and rioting results.

    Cops shoot male people at a rate 22x that at which they shoot female people. Crickets. People refuse to notice, much less care, and even less to do anything about it.

    Male Lives Matter!
  37. songbird says:
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    I’ve always considereed the idea that blacks commit more moving violations to be both very believable (from observation) and very testable. Not only from red light cameras, closed circuit TV, and insurance claims, but from the simple fact that it is typically sort of hard to tell someone’s race at night from a distance when they are driving.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ed
    My 6 month insurance premium dropped $600 or by 2/3 when I moved from Charles County, MD to Alexandria, VA. My premium while living at Charles County was still about $100 lower than when I was living in PG County. Evidently the discrepancy is due to accidents and car thefts.

    Truckers used to have a nickname for the section of the beltway that is in PG County called it, "the Congo Bypass"

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.urbandictionary.com/define.php%3fterm=Congo%2520Bypass&amp=true
    , @benjaminl
    Heather MacDonald at City Journal has been writing about this for a long time, going back at least to GW Bush denouncing "profiling" c. 2000-2001.

    https://www.city-journal.org/html/racial-profiling-myth-debunked-12244.html

    According to a new study, black drivers on the New Jersey Turnpike are twice as likely to speed as white drivers, and are even more dominant among drivers breaking 90 miles per hour.
     
    And earlier:
    https://www.city-journal.org/html/myth-racial-profiling-12022.html
  38. songbird says:

    There is a rumor that the Chinese government is working on an AI system to prevent crime by reading body language, faces, and, more controversially, skin color. That first part is sort of alarming, esp. in the hands of a Communist government. The second part really makes quite a lot of sense.

    Statistically speaking, beyond holding a knife, a bomb, or a gun, or smashing a window, being black or not is probably the next highest predictive factor. In fact, due to false positives (for instance, toy guns) it may even be higher in some instances. If you take the black to Asian differential, it has really got to be enormous.

    Read More
  39. Thirdtwin says:

    Looks like the left is about ready to deal with reality, or at least re-frame it as “Cognitive Privilege”…

    “There are many kinds of privilege besides white privilege: cognitive privilege, for example. We now know that intelligence is not something we have significant control over but is something we are born with…”

    http://daily-iowan.com/2017/07/25/williams-what-is-privilege-and-what-do-we-do-with-it/

    Read More
  40. people who performed better on a test of pattern detection—a measure of cognitive ability—were also quicker to form and apply stereotypes.

    A stereotype is literally a pattern. Demographic group X tends to have trait Y.

    This is a tautology. People who can quickly recognize patterns can quickly recognize patterns.

    Read More
  41. Erik L says:

    “In this way, the study tried to mimic how people actually form prejudices about certain groups, like through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows.”

    Is it inconceivable to the authors that one could meet people from other races and cultural groups in real life?

    Read More
    • Agree: slumber_j
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Since the study participants were in all likelihood college students, they were simply re-enacting their natural habitat of living in the virtual reality of social media. Staring at a screen is their typical social interaction.
    , @Light Roast
    Sure, you can meet people from other races and cultural groups in real life, but you won't form a prejudice that way. You're only going to form a prejudice through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows.
  42. Barnard says:
    @anon
    Use of FICO or credit scores is pretty effective and has also withstood pressures regarding disparate impact. So .. .yes. It's going on and there are people fighting the use of algorithmic metrics, but they haven't been able to eliminate them. Yet.

    Using FICO scores has withstood disparate impact attempts so far, but there are constant efforts against using them, or at least ignoring them, in an effort to increase lending to “disadvantaged groups.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Hence, the housing crisis, and the Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac debacle.
  43. @Arclight
    For the progressives, pattern recognition is fine so long as you can attribute an observed phenomena to white supremacy.

    Also featured in The Atlantic recently was a piece stating that it is harmful to minority children to believe that society is fair because they then will be more likely to act out and engage in risky behavior than if they are instead instructed that the game is rigged against them. This is because those who believe society is fair internalize negative stereotypes about their own race and others, allegedly.

    Can't wait to see what direction this magazine takes now that it will be controlled by Steve Jobs' widow.

    The Atlantic recently featured a piece stating that it is harmful to minority children to believe that society is fair because they then will be more likely to act out and engage in risky behavior than if they are instead instructed that the game is rigged against them.

    This can’t go on like this. Readers will laugh about them. The longer the more.

    Read More
  44. Hubbub says:

    These depressing results suggest there’s a downside to being smart…

    ‘Depressing’? ‘Downside’? I dare say they confirm positive instincts about self-preservation. The problem with many progressives is that they don’t exhibit these traits sufficiently and we end up with the chaotic society that we now have: Damn the truth, full speed ahead.

    Read More
  45. “As we now know after 45 years of more information, African-Americans instead are relatively great at those stereotypical black activities.”

    But the corollary to this truism (blacks are great at certain activities) would hold that blacks are also very, very, poor at other activities. (i.e. Mathematics; Science; Engineering; Technology; Medicine; etc.)

    Regarding certain activities that blacks are great at: if making such observations is deemed to be racist, what would be the penalty if one were to observe that there are in fact activities of which they are quite poor at doing?

    I mean, one group simply cannot be expected to be good much less great at doing every single thing under the sun, can they?

    “Or am I wrong about that?”–Richard Nixon, ca.1972

    Read More
  46. I suppose any pattern recognition might be racist, but it depends how it is used. In medicine it is well known that certain racial groups are more likely to have certain diagnoses, for example blacks diabetic or sickle cell trait and disease, or high blood pressure.

    However this does not mean excluding the possibility of these diagnoses in whites, or people who look like they are white. Sometimes when medical diagnosis errors are made it is because a disease is not expected in a particular person because they do not fit the demographic.

    My doctor ordered blood pressure medication for me a couple months ago, not because I have high blood pressure, but because my grandfather died of a stroke age 49, and my mother died of a stroke aged 78.

    I do not see why I should be sentenced to pay for blood pressure medication, and revisits to the doctor for the rest of my life for the sins of my forefathers and their genes. I have already outlived all my grandparents who lived to be 28, 48, 53, and 63.

    Read More
  47. Jack D says:
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    AirBnB has a problem with renters desiring to avoid renting to minorities. There is pressure on them to be non-discriminatory (although legally boarding house operators were exempted from the Civil Rights Act – they didn’t want to force nice old Mrs. Witherspoon to have to take Negroes into her own home). AirBnB is experimenting with hiding information (such as photos) from the people who are renting out rooms in order to prevent them from being racist. Of course, the AirBnB model depends in part on providing reliable information about renters/operators so that you know who you are letting into your home, so they are somewhat shooting themselves in the foot. Then again Uber also masks some information from drivers and they get away with it. The business model of both companies is “how much can we rip off / deny information to BOTH customers and operators without pissing them off so much that they quit the service.”

    Read More
  48. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don't have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother's request, he's his own boss.

    Kenobi is laughing but Steve was being completely serious and truthful. In addition to having to bail out Cousin Deshawntavious, you might have to take the day off to take care of some matters at the welfare office or with your parole officer, your car (which is probably older) might break and you don’t have the money just now to fix it (the average black has zero $ of savings and not enough credit for a credit card), or maybe you don’t have a car and the bus just doesn’t come that day, you might have to take the day off to move or to go to housing court because you are being evicted for non-payment of rent, the woman who does day care for your kids might have one of the above happen to her, etc., etc. – the list of things that can go wrong are just endless. Ghetto life is just too chaotic to permit a lot of blacks, even if they are well intentioned, to show up every day on time. A lot of blacks also lack the problem solving skills to figure out a good plan B when things go wrong or else they just can’t comprehend why their whitey boss is so upset when they show up a couple of hours late or miss a day – white people seem to be incredibly tightly wound and lacking chill and human sympathy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Ironically, the more conscientious blacks are more likely to annoy their boss with their explanations for patchy attendance (running an errand, family matter) than the less conscientious ones who have no concept of discretion and will just explicitly say they had to bail their nephew out of jail (which whitey boss would accept as a legitimate excuse, until it’s the fifth time in a month anyhow).
  49. Jack D says:
    @Chrisnonymous

    "The social norm against stereotyping, including the opposition to profiling, has been highly beneficial in creating a more civilized and more equal society. It is useful to remember, however, that neglecting valid stereotypes inevitably results in suboptimal judgments. Resistance to stereotyping is a laudable moral position, but the simplistic idea that the resistance is costless is wrong. The costs are worth paying to achieve a better society, but denying that the costs exist, while satisfying to the soul and politically correct, is not scientifically defensible. Reliance on the affect heuristic is common in politically charged arguments. The positions we favor have no cost and those we oppose have no benefits. We should be able to do better."

    –Daniel Kahneman, Nobel laureate, in Thinking, Fast and Slow, chapter 16
     

    “Because I don’t believe in stereotypes (or that race even exists), I live in the middle of the biggest black ghetto in my city (rents are so low!) and send my kids to the local ghetto school. I often stroll the streets of my neighborhood and visit the ATM at 3AM and I don’t even bother locking the doors in my house or my car – I have nothing to fear from my neighbors because black criminality is a myth”, said no (living) white liberal ever.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TWS
    Every word they say is a lie including the, and, and, of.
    , @Logan
    Actually, some have said this, just like the guy who went to live with the grizzlies in Alaska.

    And, like him, they don't usually live long.
  50. But there’s hope. In the second part of the study, the researchers showed that while smart people learn and apply stereotypes more eagerly, they also unlearn those stereotypes quickly in the face of new information.

    Yeah, right. The correct sentence would be: “they also quickly understand the social and career consequences of voicing their fact-based stereotypes and learn to say in public what we want them to say.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    I think this is the paper link: http://content.apa.org/record/2017-31437-001

    No free full text though. Can anyone who has looked at the full text comment on whether the Atlantic is selectively quoting the results (in a stereotypical fashion, that darned pattern recognition...)?

    I am especially interested in the "new information" mentioned in the comment I am replying to. Was it similar to the original information? If so, one would expect a Bayesian response to new evidence, unless the researchers intentionally or unintentionally cued the subjects they had been engaging in badthink (as CoaSC speculates).
  51. @Johnny789
    African-Americans are also fan-frickin'-tastic at swarming unpopular opinions on Twitter.

    The use of “smdh” unironically correlates to the level of melanin.

    Read More
  52. rac·ist
    ˈrāsəst/
    noun
    noun: racist; plural noun: racists
    1. a person who shows or feels discrimination or prejudice against people of other races, or who believes that a particular race is superior to another.
    “the comments have led to her being called a racist”
    synonyms:
    racial bigot, racialist, xenophobe, chauvinist, supremacist More
    “he was exposed as a racist”

    Serious question: Does noticing average differences in various races make you a “racist” by this definition. Certainly the second part of the definition doesn’t apply, but it’s the question of “feels discrimination or prejudice against people of other races.” I’m honestly not sure what that means.

    Here’s the defintion of prejudice.

    “preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience.”

    That would seem not to apply to noticing average differences. If I know that blacks are seven times more likely to commit violent crimes than whites and thus avoid black neighborhoods, that action – that prejudice – most certainly is based on reason or actual experience.

    Much to my surprise, I am not, in fact, be a racist. I’ve embraced the label for so long, I’m not sure that I want to give it up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jim jones
    Every human gives preference to their own children over other people`s because they share the same genes. Leftists get upset when you point this out.
  53. MarcB. says:

    Higher cognitive ability also provides one the ability to transform unpleasant empirical and anecdotal truths into complicated abstractions. Back in the late 1990′s we joked that parents were paying universities to have the intelligence educated out of their kids.

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  54. The Atlantic a liberal rag for idiots and blabbering fools just as bad as any of the other leftists rags like Rolling Stone and TIME as well as the Defunk Newsweek and USA TODAY and the NYT’s (All the Sludge that.s Fit to Print)and the talking crash test dummies on the morning and evening news

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  55. @The Z Blog
    If you want to see how oppressive and stupid modern intellectual life is now, go to AmRen. It's the only place on earth you can see a Jew and a Goy discussing whether Jews fit into white identity or they should have their own thing. Wide swaths of reality are now off-limits, meaning the only safe places to discuss this stuff are where mentally disturbed Antifa actors are chanting about the Nazis inside discussing taboo subjects.

    By the way Steve, you really should speak at one of these things.

    AmRen is full of creationists who deny evolution. I lose a few brain cells when I decide to read the comments.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Z Blog
    You must be thinking of something else. My experience was the exact opposite.
    , @AM

    AmRen is full of creationists who deny evolution. I lose a few brain cells when I decide to read the comments
     
    Who cares if they believe in creationism? Seriously. I lose brain cells when anyone on either side.

    To believe in evolution (which version, by the way?), is to believe in an unprovable creation story, just like the other side. It ain't hard science, which involves difficult math and experiments that people can replicate.

    Meanwhile in real life, sane people have noticed that 6 days to God could be any length of time. Oh look, God creates evolution - problem solved. It's only a few Protestant sects that even believe in creationism. Why debate? Why even care unless it's a clash of a dogmatic atheist religion with a dogmatic Protestant version of Christianity? I can't think of any other reason.

    , @MBlanc46
    I'm a regular there and I don't recall many creationists.
  56. PSR says:

    “But a new study complicates the narrative that only unintelligent people are prejudiced.”

    I think it was Allan Bloom who wrote “An unprejudiced mind is an empty mind.” Liberals are as prejudiced – often more so – than anyone else. They just don’t like to admit it because when truth makes them confront their prejudices their ego is so bruised for being wrong. It’s like they never heard the expression ‘live and learn.’

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  57. TWS says:
    @Jack D
    "Because I don't believe in stereotypes (or that race even exists), I live in the middle of the biggest black ghetto in my city (rents are so low!) and send my kids to the local ghetto school. I often stroll the streets of my neighborhood and visit the ATM at 3AM and I don't even bother locking the doors in my house or my car - I have nothing to fear from my neighbors because black criminality is a myth", said no (living) white liberal ever.

    Every word they say is a lie including the, and, and, of.

    Read More
  58. Logan says:
    @Jack D
    "Because I don't believe in stereotypes (or that race even exists), I live in the middle of the biggest black ghetto in my city (rents are so low!) and send my kids to the local ghetto school. I often stroll the streets of my neighborhood and visit the ATM at 3AM and I don't even bother locking the doors in my house or my car - I have nothing to fear from my neighbors because black criminality is a myth", said no (living) white liberal ever.

    Actually, some have said this, just like the guy who went to live with the grizzlies in Alaska.

    And, like him, they don’t usually live long.

    Read More
  59. Logan says:
    @Massimo Heitor

    people who performed better on a test of pattern detection—a measure of cognitive ability—were also quicker to form and apply stereotypes.
     
    A stereotype is literally a pattern. Demographic group X tends to have trait Y.

    This is a tautology. People who can quickly recognize patterns can quickly recognize patterns.

    Exactly.

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  60. Jack D says:
    @David
    Insurance companies use an Insurance Score to price non-catastrophe lines. The difference in cost between the highest and lowest (acceptable) score is typically four to five times. This is true of homeowners or renters insurance and has a hugely disproportional impact on NAMs.

    LIFE has a hugely disproportional impact on NAMs. The reason insurance companies use these scores is that they have a high predictive power regarding the risk of future claims. My son is a volunteer fireman in a community that doesn’t have a particularly large black population but a disproportionate % of his calls are to black occupied residences (and the poor in general). Poor people smoke more than rich ones and smoking is the cause of many fires. Maybe you don’t notice that you’ve forgotten the frying pan on the stove because you’ve had a little too much to drink or consumed some mind altering substance. Maybe the battery in your smoke detector ran out and you forgot to replace it. Rich white people just don’t do this stuff at the same rate. In the cities it’s even worse because blacks don’t pay their utility bills and get cut off and then they heat their houses with kerosene heaters or use candles, etc. Not to mention the houses are older, with poor wiring, defective appliances, etc. (and sometimes with improvised taps on the gas and electric lines to cheat the utility co.).

    Insurance co’s aren’t allowed to price policies by race so they look for measures that correlate with race such as FICO score.

    In a competitive market, ins. cos. will divide people into risk pools so they can offer the better risks better rates. The only way to prevent this is to make it illegal so that the better risks have to subsidize the poorer ones as part of the war on noticing.

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    • Agree: David
    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    Does the same thing apply to babies falling out of open windows? I only ask because the CTA trains have these ads telling people to keep their windows open only so many inches. But just observationally, the only babies I recall falling out of windows are Black babies. Is that an IQ test for Black mothers?
  61. res says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country

    But there’s hope. In the second part of the study, the researchers showed that while smart people learn and apply stereotypes more eagerly, they also unlearn those stereotypes quickly in the face of new information.
     
    Yeah, right. The correct sentence would be: "they also quickly understand the social and career consequences of voicing their fact-based stereotypes and learn to say in public what we want them to say."

    I think this is the paper link: http://content.apa.org/record/2017-31437-001

    No free full text though. Can anyone who has looked at the full text comment on whether the Atlantic is selectively quoting the results (in a stereotypical fashion, that darned pattern recognition…)?

    I am especially interested in the “new information” mentioned in the comment I am replying to. Was it similar to the original information? If so, one would expect a Bayesian response to new evidence, unless the researchers intentionally or unintentionally cued the subjects they had been engaging in badthink (as CoaSC speculates).

    Read More
  62. Ed says:
    @songbird
    I've always considereed the idea that blacks commit more moving violations to be both very believable (from observation) and very testable. Not only from red light cameras, closed circuit TV, and insurance claims, but from the simple fact that it is typically sort of hard to tell someone's race at night from a distance when they are driving.

    My 6 month insurance premium dropped $600 or by 2/3 when I moved from Charles County, MD to Alexandria, VA. My premium while living at Charles County was still about $100 lower than when I was living in PG County. Evidently the discrepancy is due to accidents and car thefts.

    Truckers used to have a nickname for the section of the beltway that is in PG County called it, “the Congo Bypass”

    https://www.google.com/amp/www.urbandictionary.com/define.php%3fterm=Congo%2520Bypass&amp=true

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  63. I read through the Atlantic article three times, also read all the comments here. Boy, there are some clever people commenting here. I’m afraid I’m not clever, just a dull plodder. But in my plodding way, I couldn’t help but notice some problems about the study Khazan cites and the conclusions she drew from it.

    In the first place, the study uses supposedly neutral facial representations and couples them (randomly, to a point) with deeds with positive or negative connotations. Well, there ain’t no such animal. If humans are attuned to ONE THING it is reading emotions as they are expressed in faces and connecting those facial expressions with actions and consequences. So I question the whole approach.

    Secondly, she says ” The subjects didn’t know if the statements about the aliens were true or false. In this way, the study tried to mimic how people actually form prejudices about certain groups, like through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows.”

    Is she really contending that anecdotes in the media or portrayals in TV shows stand an equal chance of being either true or false? That’s pretty damning of our media. I question whether people’s information about color etc. is randomly acquired or attributed, so the experiment doesn’t say a thing about real life experience.As someone above said , the proper term for generalizing from experience is called “induction”.

    Then there is the hidden agenda in the nose bridge width experiment, an obvious allusion to black’s and Jew’s wider noses.

    And she says “one of the best ways to beat back racial bias”…. How did we go from blue squares and pink circles to “racial bias” or “prejudiced against gay people”? Is she seriously trying to suggest that an arbitrary pairing on a strictly perceptual level is equivalent to knowledge acquired about others through direct personal interaction? Again, someone’s trying to draw unwarranted conclusions here.

    I don’t think the experiments support what she wants to draw from them.

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  64. Logan says:
    @Wilbur Hassenfus
    "...through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows."

    The only stereotypes anybody's going to pick up there are that straight white men tend to be retarded, white women tend to be strident domineering bitches, and blacks tend to be especially good at STEM.

    So not all wrong, could be worse.

    I’ve always thought it would be interesting if somebody took all the characters of TV shows for a year and analyzed their behavior, etc. by ethnicity, then compared the results to the real world. Course, it would be a lot more difficult to do than it was back when there were only three networks to compile.

    I can tell you that TV people are on average a very great deal younger, thinner and better looking.

    I’ve recently noticed that just about every TV show I watch has a black male genius IT-type as part of the team. I have no idea whether this is a reflection of reality, but it’s definitely a thing in TV.

    As an extension of this research project, one could compare shifts in TV world vs. the real world over time.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rod1963
    Yes most people on TV don't look like or act like people in real life. The problem stems from the fact that many writers are young and have no real world experience. This is why most sitcoms and cop shows are so dumb.

    Compare the cop shows to the First 48 Hours show which is following real life police around solving murder cases.

    Other shows are just formula based like CSi, Bones, CSU, NCIS. where if you seen one you've seen them all.

    Other patterns emerge as well. Most formula shows are based around 4 main characters. It doesn't matter if it's StarGate One, Castle, or NCIS and CSI. It cuts across the spectrum. It's the formula at work.

    Breaking it down even further you get:
    (for crime and sci-fi shows except for later CSVU that has jumped the shark because of it's insane levels of PC/MC and Mariska Haggarty need to be front and center all the time)
    One strong male lead
    One strong female lead
    One tough or macho guy
    One brainy guy or gal.

    Even Seinfeld followed the rule of 4.
    , @TangoMan
    USC School of Media performs an annual analysis of racial depictions from the world of TV and from film, so that would satisfy your first request.

    The problem arises in your second request, comparing depictions to reality. You've lobbed a softball at me because I remember reading that USC report and this metric stood out - Black men are the most often depicted in committed relationships with women on TV and Asian men are the least depicted. That struck me as being quite divorced from reality with respect to the 72% Black illegitimacy rate and other Black parental dysfunctions.
    , @whorefinder
    Even the "ugly" people on TV are better looking than average, whether its a drama or a sitcom. Its not for nothing that LA is considered the land of "beautiful people" and the service jobs that in most cities are filled by average folk are filled by gorgeous physical specimens in LA. Jokes about pool about sleeping with your wife come from this.

    I remember a friend of a friend getting an internship at NBC News when Brian Williams was there, and her telling the story that upon meeting Brian Williams in the flesh she was floored by how good looking he was, and how she'd never noticed it before. Then this intern realized that, on TV, everyone was good looking, so Brian Williams didn't stand out, but in real life he was probably the best looking man she'd seen for a while.

    , @Alwin
    I recall a study demonstrating that Law and Order episodes seriously underrepresent Blacks as criminals when accounting for their crime levels.
  65. Logan says:
    @Dr. X
    The first thing they teach you in college social science statistics classes is that "correlation does not prove causality."

    Once they've gotten that disclaimer out of the way, social science professors then proceed to do almost nothing else but use statistical patters to infer that correlation does indeed imply causality. Or, more accurately, they do this when it suits their political agenda to do so -- i.e., x number of white cops shoot y number of black suspects, therefore the cops are racist. Or x number of blacks shoot each other with y number of guns, therefore we must abolish the Second Amendment.

    Of course smart people make pattern inferences. Marketing, economics, voting, psychology are nothing but pattern inferences.

    What they do is rig the statistical analysis to fit a pre-determined outcome by failing to notice or include certain variables in their analysis, or by over-emphasizing other variables according to their political agenda.

    “x number of white cops shoot y number of black suspects, therefore the cops are racist.”

    Cops shoot black people at a rate 2.5x that at which they shoot white people. The only possible explanation is racism by white cops. Screaming and rioting results.

    Cops shoot male people at a rate 22x that at which they shoot female people. Crickets. People refuse to notice, much less care, and even less to do anything about it.

    Male Lives Matter!

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  66. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Eyes can see reality.

    Nose can smell odors.

    Ears can hear sounds.

    Legs can walk.

    In a way, it’s good that Libs and Progs are into arts and culture and ideas. Those are good things.

    But it creates a conceit of a ‘higher reality’ that can be altered by some PC remote control.

    After all, Hollywood movies can prefer PC fantasy over reality. BBC can make the past ‘diverse’ with black Britons. And TV shows can make black crime into white crime. And media can make Zionists and Palestinians equal in power.

    It’s like Homos prefer creativity over creation, and their mental habits tend to reflect this. So, if they wish for ‘gay parents’, it’s a reality!

    Libbism distrusts eyes, ears, and basic mental faculties as fault. They must be filtered and refined and processes(with PC additives) into the Narrative.

    Reality says US is aggressor against Russia. Can’t have that. So, senses and faculties that detect reality are bad. We must rely on the Processed Reality that removes all the fibers and replaces natural nutrients with artifiicial ones

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  67. Forbes says:
    @Erik L
    "In this way, the study tried to mimic how people actually form prejudices about certain groups, like through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows."

    Is it inconceivable to the authors that one could meet people from other races and cultural groups in real life?

    Since the study participants were in all likelihood college students, they were simply re-enacting their natural habitat of living in the virtual reality of social media. Staring at a screen is their typical social interaction.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    You said in two sentences what it took me seven paragraphs to get at.
    , @Anonymous
    So they've seen Black Twitter then.
  68. Forbes says:
    @Barnard
    Using FICO scores has withstood disparate impact attempts so far, but there are constant efforts against using them, or at least ignoring them, in an effort to increase lending to "disadvantaged groups."

    Hence, the housing crisis, and the Fannie Mae/Freddie Mac debacle.

    Read More
  69. The Z Blog says: • Website
    @RaceRealist88
    AmRen is full of creationists who deny evolution. I lose a few brain cells when I decide to read the comments.

    You must be thinking of something else. My experience was the exact opposite.

    Read More
  70. J1234 says:

    There’s a difference between patterned thinking and formulaic thinking, and I’m wondering if the author of the Atlantic article understands this. Formulaic thinking is plugging circumstances into a formula that spits out a conclusion that the formulaic thinker accepts as truth. Using a formula means the person doesn’t have to think. Formulaic thinking tends towards precept.

    Pattern thinking is noticing trends, usually among populations or quantities. Pattern thinking tends towards concept. There’s no reason that noticing trends – both positive and negative – among racial populations can’t be conceptual rather than preceptual.

    Of course, since patterns typically occur among groups, the same doesn’t apply to individuals. So while saying, “black people, as a group, aren’t as intelligent as white people…” could be conceptual thinking, adding”…therefore, that black person walking down the street (who I don’t know) isn’t as smart as I am” would be a formulaic precept. That’s because groups and individuals are different.

    On the other hand, an individual can have a pattern of behaviors or traits that could lead someone to suspect that they aren’t very smart. That wouldn’t necessarily be a prejudiced way of thinking.

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  71. AM says:
    @RaceRealist88
    AmRen is full of creationists who deny evolution. I lose a few brain cells when I decide to read the comments.

    AmRen is full of creationists who deny evolution. I lose a few brain cells when I decide to read the comments

    Who cares if they believe in creationism? Seriously. I lose brain cells when anyone on either side.

    To believe in evolution (which version, by the way?), is to believe in an unprovable creation story, just like the other side. It ain’t hard science, which involves difficult math and experiments that people can replicate.

    Meanwhile in real life, sane people have noticed that 6 days to God could be any length of time. Oh look, God creates evolution – problem solved. It’s only a few Protestant sects that even believe in creationism. Why debate? Why even care unless it’s a clash of a dogmatic atheist religion with a dogmatic Protestant version of Christianity? I can’t think of any other reason.

    Read More
  72. benjaminl says:
    @songbird
    I've always considereed the idea that blacks commit more moving violations to be both very believable (from observation) and very testable. Not only from red light cameras, closed circuit TV, and insurance claims, but from the simple fact that it is typically sort of hard to tell someone's race at night from a distance when they are driving.

    Heather MacDonald at City Journal has been writing about this for a long time, going back at least to GW Bush denouncing “profiling” c. 2000-2001.

    https://www.city-journal.org/html/racial-profiling-myth-debunked-12244.html

    According to a new study, black drivers on the New Jersey Turnpike are twice as likely to speed as white drivers, and are even more dominant among drivers breaking 90 miles per hour.

    And earlier:

    https://www.city-journal.org/html/myth-racial-profiling-12022.html

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  73. benjaminl says:

    For extra credit, we can predict how this Chinese innovation will play out in the lands of vibrant diversity:

    http://www.roughtype.com/?p=7975

    Each company and person in China is to take part in it. Everyone will be continuously assessed at all times and accorded a rating. In [the test cities], each participant starts with 1000 points, and then their score either improves or worsens. You can be a triple-A citizen (“Role Model of Honesty,” with more than 1050 points), or a double-A (“Outstanding Honesty”). But if you’ve messed up often enough, you can drop down to a C, with fewer than 849 points (“Warning Level”), or even a D (“Dishonest”) with 599 points or less. In the latter case, your name is added to a black list, the general public is informed, and you become an “object of significant surveillance.”…. The Social Credit System’s heart and soul is the algorithm that gathers information without pause, and then processes, structures and evaluates it. The “Accelerate Punishment Software” section of the system guidelines describes the aim: “automatic verification, automatic interception, automatic supervision, and automatic punishment” of each breach of trust, in real time, everywhere. If all goes as planned, there will no longer be any loopholes anywhere.

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  74. @Forbes
    Since the study participants were in all likelihood college students, they were simply re-enacting their natural habitat of living in the virtual reality of social media. Staring at a screen is their typical social interaction.

    You said in two sentences what it took me seven paragraphs to get at.

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  75. snorlax says:
    @Jack D
    Kenobi is laughing but Steve was being completely serious and truthful. In addition to having to bail out Cousin Deshawntavious, you might have to take the day off to take care of some matters at the welfare office or with your parole officer, your car (which is probably older) might break and you don't have the money just now to fix it (the average black has zero $ of savings and not enough credit for a credit card), or maybe you don't have a car and the bus just doesn't come that day, you might have to take the day off to move or to go to housing court because you are being evicted for non-payment of rent, the woman who does day care for your kids might have one of the above happen to her, etc., etc. - the list of things that can go wrong are just endless. Ghetto life is just too chaotic to permit a lot of blacks, even if they are well intentioned, to show up every day on time. A lot of blacks also lack the problem solving skills to figure out a good plan B when things go wrong or else they just can't comprehend why their whitey boss is so upset when they show up a couple of hours late or miss a day - white people seem to be incredibly tightly wound and lacking chill and human sympathy.

    Ironically, the more conscientious blacks are more likely to annoy their boss with their explanations for patchy attendance (running an errand, family matter) than the less conscientious ones who have no concept of discretion and will just explicitly say they had to bail their nephew out of jail (which whitey boss would accept as a legitimate excuse, until it’s the fifth time in a month anyhow).

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  76. MBlanc46 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don't have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother's request, he's his own boss.

    Unless the courts decide that he’s actually an employee. Then he’ll have to be available when Uber tells him he has to be available.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    Even if a court decides an Uber driver is an employee--a speculation, at best--Uber is based on crowd sourcing, i.e. drivers deciding when it is best to work. Presumably drivers can figure out how many hours and which hours of the day/days of the week maximize their pay vs convenience trade-off.
  77. @Days of Broken Arrows
    So there I am, at the record store and I see this album by a band called Black Sabbath. It looks scary and dark because it looks like there's a witch on the cover, plus it has song titles like "Wicked World" and "The Wizard."

    Under normal circumstances, I'd pass up this album because from the looks of things, it's heavy metal and I don't like metal.

    But thanks to Olga Khazan's brilliant article in The Atlantic, I know that making assumptions based on "pattern detection" is wrong because it leads to "stereotyping."

    So I put my preconceptions aside and bought the album because for all I know, it could be filled with bright, cheery surf music or upbeat Latin jazz. After all, judging something based on previous knowledge is wrong.

    ****

    Come tomorrow, I plan on going to the supermarket, but it's going to be rough sledding after that Olga Khazan article. After all, just because those big containers in the dairy section have always had milk-like substances in them, who is to say they're filled with milk? Claiming they are just leads to stereotypes. They could just as well have cereal in them!

    This is a great way to live life. Like a 2-year-old, endlessly befuddled about everything because to apply knowledge would be to stereotype.

    You mean like the one that says commie journalists write commie articles?

    My son has a bad singing voice but I suppose that has no connection to the fact that he sings badly.

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  78. Luke Lea says:

    If true, it follows that Jews must be the group most guilty of racial stereotyping, only they don’t talk about it when it comes to those who are two standard deviations below them in smarts. But for those who are just a single standard deviation below, it’s open season! Southern hicks are a particularly juicy target on tv and in Hollywood movies. Back in the old country it was Polish peasants.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder

    Back in the old country it was Polish peasants.
     
    The "dumb blond" stereotype originally came from Eastern/Central Jewish women enraged that their Jewish men were so enthralled with the beautiful, thin, pleasant, non-confrontational, feminine blond shikskas among the surrounding goyim. So the Jewish women insulted the blonds as stupid.

    A Universal Truth: in all eras and in all nations, women who are not the most desirable in their societies act like the same catty, backstabbing mean girls towards the prettiest girls.

  79. @Anon
    Be an Organicist.

    I thought the prevailing practice nowadays was to be a Onanist….
    Hence the upcoming extinction of the White Race.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Bowling Alone, so that is what they call it now.
  80. MBlanc46 says:
    @bored identity



    "These depressing results suggest there’s a downside to being smart - it makes you risk reading too much into a situation and drawing inappropriate conclusions."

     

    bored identity just drew inappropriate conclusion about Mrs. Khazan having her job not because she's overly smart, but because she has all doors opening last name perfectly fitted for a group evolutionary strategy.

    https://youtu.be/5OboRTLbKWk


    https://twitter.com/olgakhazan/status/889854957586927616

    She also entertains only appropriate ideas.

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  81. MBlanc46 says:
    @RaceRealist88
    AmRen is full of creationists who deny evolution. I lose a few brain cells when I decide to read the comments.

    I’m a regular there and I don’t recall many creationists.

    Read More
  82. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don't have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother's request, he's his own boss.

    Except that with Uber blacks have been more exposed to actually being rated for their performance, instead of being coddled as the “company token.”

    The Boston Globe ran an article last year about a lawyer suing because his clients– black Uber drivers—-were receiving lower Uber ratings than whites. https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/10/06/attorney-for-uber-drivers-says-star-ratings-are-racially-biased/R28mqWL6ShjMFB5xAr3uGL/story.html

    The black Uber drivers quoted swear they give top-notch service, and the Globe of course swallows this at face value. It must be racism, the blacks say they were wronged!

    Either Uber will “correct” this (e.g. removing a lot of negative reviews about black drivers, or artificially boosting black Uber drivers through extra stars), or black Uberers will whine more and start threatening Uber passengers that if they give a bad review they’ll come after them—since the black Uber driver really does “know where they live.”

    The funny part is that many of these black Uber drivers like Ubering because they can avoid picking up black people, unlike with many cab/livery companies, who have to obey a lot of non-discrimination laws. They understand blacks will whine at them or rob them or just generally be unpleasant, while non-blacks will be pleasant and clean and give better ratings.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    In the spirit of meterless taxis, let me respond with a meterless rap:

    Tha gig economy
    be ZFG
    vis-a-vis
    what's biased implicitly

    I'd keep my day job, if I had one.

    , @bomag
    From the link:

    Liss-Riordan (lawyer suing Uber) does not have data from Uber’s system showing drivers of some races consistently receive lower ratings. She is hoping the EEOC case will allow her to obtain ratings data from the company.
     
    Looks like her pattern-recognizing brain knows what to expect, and how to use those patterns to bully people for money.
  83. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Luke Lea
    If true, it follows that Jews must be the group most guilty of racial stereotyping, only they don't talk about it when it comes to those who are two standard deviations below them in smarts. But for those who are just a single standard deviation below, it's open season! Southern hicks are a particularly juicy target on tv and in Hollywood movies. Back in the old country it was Polish peasants.

    Back in the old country it was Polish peasants.

    The “dumb blond” stereotype originally came from Eastern/Central Jewish women enraged that their Jewish men were so enthralled with the beautiful, thin, pleasant, non-confrontational, feminine blond shikskas among the surrounding goyim. So the Jewish women insulted the blonds as stupid.

    A Universal Truth: in all eras and in all nations, women who are not the most desirable in their societies act like the same catty, backstabbing mean girls towards the prettiest girls.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alwin
    See Also: Negro Women on White women. It's even more prominent since Negro women have an absence of men from prison/death/desertion.
  84. guest says:
    @Days of Broken Arrows
    So there I am, at the record store and I see this album by a band called Black Sabbath. It looks scary and dark because it looks like there's a witch on the cover, plus it has song titles like "Wicked World" and "The Wizard."

    Under normal circumstances, I'd pass up this album because from the looks of things, it's heavy metal and I don't like metal.

    But thanks to Olga Khazan's brilliant article in The Atlantic, I know that making assumptions based on "pattern detection" is wrong because it leads to "stereotyping."

    So I put my preconceptions aside and bought the album because for all I know, it could be filled with bright, cheery surf music or upbeat Latin jazz. After all, judging something based on previous knowledge is wrong.

    ****

    Come tomorrow, I plan on going to the supermarket, but it's going to be rough sledding after that Olga Khazan article. After all, just because those big containers in the dairy section have always had milk-like substances in them, who is to say they're filled with milk? Claiming they are just leads to stereotypes. They could just as well have cereal in them!

    This is a great way to live life. Like a 2-year-old, endlessly befuddled about everything because to apply knowledge would be to stereotype.

    I’ve seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they’re totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    I’ve seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they’re totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.
     
    This is true, but as I recall Black Sabbath were a British band formed in the late 60's at a time when no one in Britain would have taken Satanism, vampires, and witchcraft in the least bit seriously, even at Hallowe'en, and they were seen as a kind of performance art just like white middle class physical education teacher's son Mick Jagger mimicked a Mississippi bluesman.

    It just wasn't that serious. Black Sabbath, which was originally a blues band, actually took their name from a 1963 Boris Karloff horror movie called, yes, Black Sabbath, which was very popular at the time and had something of a cult following.
    , @Mr. Anon

    I’ve seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such.
     
    Parodied amusingly in This is Spinal Tap, when they express dismay at being labeled satanists while showing off their new album Christmas with the Devil.
  85. @Jack D
    LIFE has a hugely disproportional impact on NAMs. The reason insurance companies use these scores is that they have a high predictive power regarding the risk of future claims. My son is a volunteer fireman in a community that doesn't have a particularly large black population but a disproportionate % of his calls are to black occupied residences (and the poor in general). Poor people smoke more than rich ones and smoking is the cause of many fires. Maybe you don't notice that you've forgotten the frying pan on the stove because you've had a little too much to drink or consumed some mind altering substance. Maybe the battery in your smoke detector ran out and you forgot to replace it. Rich white people just don't do this stuff at the same rate. In the cities it's even worse because blacks don't pay their utility bills and get cut off and then they heat their houses with kerosene heaters or use candles, etc. Not to mention the houses are older, with poor wiring, defective appliances, etc. (and sometimes with improvised taps on the gas and electric lines to cheat the utility co.).


    Insurance co's aren't allowed to price policies by race so they look for measures that correlate with race such as FICO score.

    In a competitive market, ins. cos. will divide people into risk pools so they can offer the better risks better rates. The only way to prevent this is to make it illegal so that the better risks have to subsidize the poorer ones as part of the war on noticing.

    Does the same thing apply to babies falling out of open windows? I only ask because the CTA trains have these ads telling people to keep their windows open only so many inches. But just observationally, the only babies I recall falling out of windows are Black babies. Is that an IQ test for Black mothers?

    Read More
  86. jim jones says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    rac·ist
    ˈrāsəst/
    noun
    noun: racist; plural noun: racists
    1. a person who shows or feels discrimination or prejudice against people of other races, or who believes that a particular race is superior to another.
    "the comments have led to her being called a racist"
    synonyms:
    racial bigot, racialist, xenophobe, chauvinist, supremacist More
    "he was exposed as a racist"


    Serious question: Does noticing average differences in various races make you a "racist" by this definition. Certainly the second part of the definition doesn't apply, but it's the question of "feels discrimination or prejudice against people of other races." I'm honestly not sure what that means.

    Here's the defintion of prejudice.

    "preconceived opinion that is not based on reason or actual experience."

    That would seem not to apply to noticing average differences. If I know that blacks are seven times more likely to commit violent crimes than whites and thus avoid black neighborhoods, that action - that prejudice - most certainly is based on reason or actual experience.

    Much to my surprise, I am not, in fact, be a racist. I've embraced the label for so long, I'm not sure that I want to give it up.

    Every human gives preference to their own children over other people`s because they share the same genes. Leftists get upset when you point this out.

    Read More
  87. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “The subjects didn’t know if the statements about the aliens were true or false”.

    Whatthehell?

    The “aliens” were literally cartoons — ink on paper — maybe photons emitted from thousands of light emitting diode elements.

    The only “statements” about the cartoons that could have any truth value are “they are yellow” or “they are rectangular” or “they have two eyes”.

    So were the testees wrong or something? Was the green triangular “alien” really a Nobel Prize winning neurosurgeon, and the only reason he punched some other “alien” was to restart his heart?

    Read More
  88. Cognitive connections are as “racist” as social connections. Read the Slate article “Maybe Bowling Alone Isn’t So Bad”:

    http://slate.me/1DMAbJn

    Social capital is dangerous, intellectual ability is dangerous.

    Clearly the most effective way to prevent the next Holocaust is to beat every smart gentile’s brains out with a ball-peen hammer (that “induction” thing you’re doing? yeah, it’s Nazism, you pig), and isolate the rest by destroying their societies and their families.

    Come to think of it: since thinking and cooperating are, basically, living, why not ensure safety by simply killing all the gentiles? Becuase if they breathe, they’re “racist.” Making the world a better place is a full-time job for Deeply Moral idealists.

    Read More
  89. @guest
    I've seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they're totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.

    I’ve seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they’re totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.

    This is true, but as I recall Black Sabbath were a British band formed in the late 60′s at a time when no one in Britain would have taken Satanism, vampires, and witchcraft in the least bit seriously, even at Hallowe’en, and they were seen as a kind of performance art just like white middle class physical education teacher’s son Mick Jagger mimicked a Mississippi bluesman.

    It just wasn’t that serious. Black Sabbath, which was originally a blues band, actually took their name from a 1963 Boris Karloff horror movie called, yes, Black Sabbath, which was very popular at the time and had something of a cult following.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    I agree they weren't serious. But music is powerful, and theirs could be seriously spooky.
    , @whorefinder
    Tony Iommi (the guitarist) is driving force behind Black Sabbath, and the idea that anything he did wasn't deliberate is hard to fathom.

    Iommi's a very very strong bullying personality---Ozzy Osbourne was literally one of the younger kids in school Iommi used to beat up, and Iommi used that residual psychological fear to keep Ozzy in check for most of his Black Sabbath run, to the point that Black Sabbath was one of the few bands where the lead singer was not placed front and center, but off to the side (to show off Iommi on the guitar better). In another story, Iommi had a guitarist girlfriend who broke up with him in the 80s and immediately found herself frozen out of gigs and music industry contracts, and fingers Iommi as the reason her mid-level career stalled out, saying he really was that powerful.

    Anyway, Iommi saw how the Stones crafted their image---how Mick Jagger turned his ugly visage into a look women swooned over is amazing----and took it into a more macabre direction with devils and witch images, while maintaining music seriousness. Much how later rappers sold themselves as tough hardcore gangstas when they were really middle-class music geek losers.
  90. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Uh, oh, people are getting mad and they’re picking up guns again. Quick grasp at these straws and try to come up with another story that means the same thing.
    The media. They’re not biased, they just hate White People because they’re too smart to be fooled by this. Please support open borders to save them. They need more dumb people who are willing to listen to crap.

    Read More
  91. guest says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    I’ve seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they’re totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.
     
    This is true, but as I recall Black Sabbath were a British band formed in the late 60's at a time when no one in Britain would have taken Satanism, vampires, and witchcraft in the least bit seriously, even at Hallowe'en, and they were seen as a kind of performance art just like white middle class physical education teacher's son Mick Jagger mimicked a Mississippi bluesman.

    It just wasn't that serious. Black Sabbath, which was originally a blues band, actually took their name from a 1963 Boris Karloff horror movie called, yes, Black Sabbath, which was very popular at the time and had something of a cult following.

    I agree they weren’t serious. But music is powerful, and theirs could be seriously spooky.

    Read More
    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon

    "What is this that stands before me?
    Figure in black which points at me
    Turn around quick, start to run
    Find out I'm the chosen one
    Oh no!"
     
    Not a good vibe on hallucinogens (a lot around in 1970), I'd have thought.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0lVdMbUx1_k
  92. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Olga Khazan is a comma queen! This article of hers begins “Recently, (blah blah blah)” and lots more commas are used after that lemme tell ya:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/07/uber-but-for-happiness/534711/

    Every writer has their own style. But part of what makes the manosphere/alt-right great is THE OVERALL READABILITY. And that usually means More Periods. Less Commas.

    iSteve could teach Olga a thing or two about proper use of commas. iSteve = hardly notice them because the use is natural. Olga = clunky placement like an obstacle course.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Steven Pinker says commas are more out of fashion at present than ever before.
    , @Negrolphin Pool
    I believe the AP Style Guide would counsel us that recently, when beginning a sentence, is a one-word introductory phrase, which should always be followed by a comma.

    The AP Style Guide yields sentences like the one just written above. Olga may well be forced to adhere to it.

    , @guest
    The movie Shattered Glass featured the imperious New Republic owner forces his staff to circle all the commas in the latest edition. Which he claimed was "rife with comma errors."

    Maybe journalists should do that more often.
  93. @Anonymous
    Olga Khazan is a comma queen! This article of hers begins "Recently, (blah blah blah)" and lots more commas are used after that lemme tell ya:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/07/uber-but-for-happiness/534711/

    Every writer has their own style. But part of what makes the manosphere/alt-right great is THE OVERALL READABILITY. And that usually means More Periods. Less Commas.

    iSteve could teach Olga a thing or two about proper use of commas. iSteve = hardly notice them because the use is natural. Olga = clunky placement like an obstacle course.

    Steven Pinker says commas are more out of fashion at present than ever before.

    Read More
  94. Rod1963 says:
    @Logan
    I've always thought it would be interesting if somebody took all the characters of TV shows for a year and analyzed their behavior, etc. by ethnicity, then compared the results to the real world. Course, it would be a lot more difficult to do than it was back when there were only three networks to compile.

    I can tell you that TV people are on average a very great deal younger, thinner and better looking.

    I've recently noticed that just about every TV show I watch has a black male genius IT-type as part of the team. I have no idea whether this is a reflection of reality, but it's definitely a thing in TV.

    As an extension of this research project, one could compare shifts in TV world vs. the real world over time.

    Yes most people on TV don’t look like or act like people in real life. The problem stems from the fact that many writers are young and have no real world experience. This is why most sitcoms and cop shows are so dumb.

    Compare the cop shows to the First 48 Hours show which is following real life police around solving murder cases.

    Other shows are just formula based like CSi, Bones, CSU, NCIS. where if you seen one you’ve seen them all.

    Other patterns emerge as well. Most formula shows are based around 4 main characters. It doesn’t matter if it’s StarGate One, Castle, or NCIS and CSI. It cuts across the spectrum. It’s the formula at work.

    Breaking it down even further you get:
    (for crime and sci-fi shows except for later CSVU that has jumped the shark because of it’s insane levels of PC/MC and Mariska Haggarty need to be front and center all the time)
    One strong male lead
    One strong female lead
    One tough or macho guy
    One brainy guy or gal.

    Even Seinfeld followed the rule of 4.

    Read More
  95. @whorefinder
    Except that with Uber blacks have been more exposed to actually being rated for their performance, instead of being coddled as the "company token."

    The Boston Globe ran an article last year about a lawyer suing because his clients-- black Uber drivers----were receiving lower Uber ratings than whites. https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/10/06/attorney-for-uber-drivers-says-star-ratings-are-racially-biased/R28mqWL6ShjMFB5xAr3uGL/story.html

    The black Uber drivers quoted swear they give top-notch service, and the Globe of course swallows this at face value. It must be racism, the blacks say they were wronged!

    Either Uber will "correct" this (e.g. removing a lot of negative reviews about black drivers, or artificially boosting black Uber drivers through extra stars), or black Uberers will whine more and start threatening Uber passengers that if they give a bad review they'll come after them---since the black Uber driver really does "know where they live."

    The funny part is that many of these black Uber drivers like Ubering because they can avoid picking up black people, unlike with many cab/livery companies, who have to obey a lot of non-discrimination laws. They understand blacks will whine at them or rob them or just generally be unpleasant, while non-blacks will be pleasant and clean and give better ratings.

    In the spirit of meterless taxis, let me respond with a meterless rap:

    Tha gig economy
    be ZFG
    vis-a-vis
    what’s biased implicitly

    I’d keep my day job, if I had one.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Uber is a popular side gig for a lot of bored middle aged men who aren't married, have no kids/kids aren't around, and who aren't big into golf. A little sad, but it probably gives them a lot of needed human interaction that they wouldn't get sitting at home watching TV, gives them a little cash, passes the time, and never really had life plans.

    I've also noticed that middle aged men get a bit more gossipy and observant than when younger, so the people constantly hopping into their cars stimulates this part of their brain. (This is also why middle aged folks get really into detective dramas such as Poirot, Columbo, Matlock, Diagnosis: Murder, Murder She Wrote, etc. There's not enough "action" in those type of shows for younger viewers, but the middle aged folk aren't that much into action.
  96. @Anonymous
    Olga Khazan is a comma queen! This article of hers begins "Recently, (blah blah blah)" and lots more commas are used after that lemme tell ya:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/07/uber-but-for-happiness/534711/

    Every writer has their own style. But part of what makes the manosphere/alt-right great is THE OVERALL READABILITY. And that usually means More Periods. Less Commas.

    iSteve could teach Olga a thing or two about proper use of commas. iSteve = hardly notice them because the use is natural. Olga = clunky placement like an obstacle course.

    I believe the AP Style Guide would counsel us that recently, when beginning a sentence, is a one-word introductory phrase, which should always be followed by a comma.

    The AP Style Guide yields sentences like the one just written above. Olga may well be forced to adhere to it.

    Read More
  97. TangoMan says:
    @Logan
    I've always thought it would be interesting if somebody took all the characters of TV shows for a year and analyzed their behavior, etc. by ethnicity, then compared the results to the real world. Course, it would be a lot more difficult to do than it was back when there were only three networks to compile.

    I can tell you that TV people are on average a very great deal younger, thinner and better looking.

    I've recently noticed that just about every TV show I watch has a black male genius IT-type as part of the team. I have no idea whether this is a reflection of reality, but it's definitely a thing in TV.

    As an extension of this research project, one could compare shifts in TV world vs. the real world over time.

    USC School of Media performs an annual analysis of racial depictions from the world of TV and from film, so that would satisfy your first request.

    The problem arises in your second request, comparing depictions to reality. You’ve lobbed a softball at me because I remember reading that USC report and this metric stood out – Black men are the most often depicted in committed relationships with women on TV and Asian men are the least depicted. That struck me as being quite divorced from reality with respect to the 72% Black illegitimacy rate and other Black parental dysfunctions.

    Read More
  98. @Erik L
    "In this way, the study tried to mimic how people actually form prejudices about certain groups, like through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows."

    Is it inconceivable to the authors that one could meet people from other races and cultural groups in real life?

    Sure, you can meet people from other races and cultural groups in real life, but you won’t form a prejudice that way. You’re only going to form a prejudice through anecdotes in the media or through portrayals in TV shows.

    Read More
  99. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    https://www.fastcodesign.com/90134278/biased-ai-is-a-threat-to-civil-liberty-the-aclu-has-a-plan-to-fix-it

    Biased AI Is A Threat To Civil Liberties. The ACLU Has A Plan To Fix It

    … For example, Los Angeles began using a service called PredPol to determine areas where burglaries and car break-ins might occur. After the mathematical model–which uses past police reports–outlines where these crimes are likely to occur, the LAPD dispatches police to the area. The presence of police alone is a deterrent and in some precincts, crime dropped 25%. But meanwhile, Oakland police decided not to implement the same technology because the city was concerned about racial profiling.

    [MORE]

    “Governments are really being pushed to do more with less money and AI tools are, at least on a surface level, appealing ways to do that and make decisions efficiently,” Goodman says. “We want to see if there are appropriate roles [for AI] and to ensure tools are fair and free of racial biases. Those are hard questions and hard math problems.”

    A second area that the ACLU is prioritizing is machine bias in financing and lending.

    … “Housing providers and banks are adopting algorithmic tools on who gets a job or home or mortgage or loan at what rate and we know those tools very often incorporate all sorts of biases,” Goodman says, mentioning that this is important for racial justice, women’s rights, and LGBTQ rights.

    … The long game involves forming a legal agenda on how AI should be regulated and how to protect rights and liberties as the technology becomes more pervasive.

    “Developers of these tools have been fairly isolated from conversations about legal and policy and ethical frameworks that are vital to the work they’re doing,” she says. “Many of the ill effects are not intentional. It comes from people designing technology in closed rooms in close conversations and not thinking of the real world.”

    The real world, you computer autists. You know, where there are social consequences to noticing patterns. (Oh, you don’t even know what I’m talking about.) Look, it’s a case of making the machines smarter, right? Smart enough to not have racial biases? Like ACLU intern smart.

    (I kid. It’s actually a case of intelligently dispatching thoughtpolice to AI fields to deter bias-crime. And to “increase efforts to improve diversity among AI developers”.)

    Through its AI Now partnership, the ACLU hopes technologists, algorithm designers, and civil libertarians will have better and more open communication. If bias in AI is addressed head on, accepted practices that perpetuate bias can be challenged and fixed. “We can inject legal principles earlier on in the conversation so ideally we aren’t in the position of arguing the illegality of technology that’s already being used,” Goodman says.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    Are the Oakland police actually dumb enough that they may not be aware of CompuStat and its astonishing track record in NYC and similar programs elsewhere?

    We can inject legal principles earlier on in the conversation so ideally we aren’t in the position of arguing the illegality of technology that’s already being used
     
    Ok, but these AA lawyers who want to "fix" computer science by injecting legal principles should be forced to show their work.

    Most -if not all - AI algorithms are very much bottom up affairs. They start with a set of rules, run through a vast decision tree or solution space or whatever and spit out the results that fit the criteria set by the designer. For example, it would be nonsense to stipulate that a game theory optimal poker agent needs to "go all in on the river whenever a black suited card comes". That would no longer be a GTO solution or anything close. And if the operator wanted to redefine that as a criterion, it would have all kinds of havoc-wreaking consequences - you might say butterfly effects - on the end result. In fact, the gameplay would probably be belly-achingly funny, even on earlier streets.

    In short, redefining the criteria would break the algorithm to the point where it was beyond useless for the original purpose. I'm far from an AI expert, but I don't see how such distortions and unpredictable consequences are really avoidable. And the more complex the system, the worse the distortions will be.

    , @Daniel Chieh
    China use the pattern-recognition that you do not.
  100. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Forbes
    Since the study participants were in all likelihood college students, they were simply re-enacting their natural habitat of living in the virtual reality of social media. Staring at a screen is their typical social interaction.

    So they’ve seen Black Twitter then.

    Read More
  101. guest says:
    @Anonymous
    Olga Khazan is a comma queen! This article of hers begins "Recently, (blah blah blah)" and lots more commas are used after that lemme tell ya:

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/07/uber-but-for-happiness/534711/

    Every writer has their own style. But part of what makes the manosphere/alt-right great is THE OVERALL READABILITY. And that usually means More Periods. Less Commas.

    iSteve could teach Olga a thing or two about proper use of commas. iSteve = hardly notice them because the use is natural. Olga = clunky placement like an obstacle course.

    The movie Shattered Glass featured the imperious New Republic owner forces his staff to circle all the commas in the latest edition. Which he claimed was “rife with comma errors.”

    Maybe journalists should do that more often.

    Read More
  102. bomag says:
    @whorefinder
    Except that with Uber blacks have been more exposed to actually being rated for their performance, instead of being coddled as the "company token."

    The Boston Globe ran an article last year about a lawyer suing because his clients-- black Uber drivers----were receiving lower Uber ratings than whites. https://www.bostonglobe.com/business/2016/10/06/attorney-for-uber-drivers-says-star-ratings-are-racially-biased/R28mqWL6ShjMFB5xAr3uGL/story.html

    The black Uber drivers quoted swear they give top-notch service, and the Globe of course swallows this at face value. It must be racism, the blacks say they were wronged!

    Either Uber will "correct" this (e.g. removing a lot of negative reviews about black drivers, or artificially boosting black Uber drivers through extra stars), or black Uberers will whine more and start threatening Uber passengers that if they give a bad review they'll come after them---since the black Uber driver really does "know where they live."

    The funny part is that many of these black Uber drivers like Ubering because they can avoid picking up black people, unlike with many cab/livery companies, who have to obey a lot of non-discrimination laws. They understand blacks will whine at them or rob them or just generally be unpleasant, while non-blacks will be pleasant and clean and give better ratings.

    From the link:

    Liss-Riordan (lawyer suing Uber) does not have data from Uber’s system showing drivers of some races consistently receive lower ratings. She is hoping the EEOC case will allow her to obtain ratings data from the company.

    Looks like her pattern-recognizing brain knows what to expect, and how to use those patterns to bully people for money.

    Read More
  103. @guest
    I agree they weren't serious. But music is powerful, and theirs could be seriously spooky.

    “What is this that stands before me?
    Figure in black which points at me
    Turn around quick, start to run
    Find out I’m the chosen one
    Oh no!”

    Not a good vibe on hallucinogens (a lot around in 1970), I’d have thought.

    Read More
  104. @Negrolphin Pool
    I believe the AP Style Guide would counsel us that recently, when beginning a sentence, is a one-word introductory phrase, which should always be followed by a comma.

    The AP Style Guide yields sentences like the one just written above. Olga may well be forced to adhere to it.

    Recently I’ve been dropping commas.

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  105. Mr. Anon says:
    @guest
    I've seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they're totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.

    I’ve seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such.

    Parodied amusingly in This is Spinal Tap, when they express dismay at being labeled satanists while showing off their new album Christmas with the Devil.

    Read More
  106. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Logan
    I've always thought it would be interesting if somebody took all the characters of TV shows for a year and analyzed their behavior, etc. by ethnicity, then compared the results to the real world. Course, it would be a lot more difficult to do than it was back when there were only three networks to compile.

    I can tell you that TV people are on average a very great deal younger, thinner and better looking.

    I've recently noticed that just about every TV show I watch has a black male genius IT-type as part of the team. I have no idea whether this is a reflection of reality, but it's definitely a thing in TV.

    As an extension of this research project, one could compare shifts in TV world vs. the real world over time.

    Even the “ugly” people on TV are better looking than average, whether its a drama or a sitcom. Its not for nothing that LA is considered the land of “beautiful people” and the service jobs that in most cities are filled by average folk are filled by gorgeous physical specimens in LA. Jokes about pool about sleeping with your wife come from this.

    I remember a friend of a friend getting an internship at NBC News when Brian Williams was there, and her telling the story that upon meeting Brian Williams in the flesh she was floored by how good looking he was, and how she’d never noticed it before. Then this intern realized that, on TV, everyone was good looking, so Brian Williams didn’t stand out, but in real life he was probably the best looking man she’d seen for a while.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I can recall Justine Bateman, Michael J. Fox's TV sister, walking by in the late 1980s. Wow.

    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow. Actresses don't marry their cameramen, but as David Niven noted it's not unknown for actresses to marry their cameramen. Julia Roberts is a current century example.

    As Kramer noted on Seinfeld, George Will is really good looking by real world standards.

    Some of it is detailing. I can recall a top L.A. TV weatherman at Parent Night between the 6pm news and the 11 pm news being much more well-groomed than the Pasadena lawyers and doctors who were most of the other dads. There are a lot of little things you can do to be 1% better looking each. Most guys don't do them. For example, I should get my hair cut every month, but I usually go at least 2 months. Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?

    Another aspect is that people in the entertainment industry work out much more seriously than normal people. I vaguely knew a TV and stage actress who was typecast as an amusing, kind of funny looking character actress. She was in better shape in her late 40s than most girls in their early 20s in Nebraska.

    , @StillCARealist
    I was at Lowe's one day and a guy stuck a microphone in my face while another had a camera going. They were doing impromptu public interviews for a DIY show. It was pretty funny overall.

    The guy doing the microphone with me was so good looking he took my breath away. I wanted to touch his face like some isolated native meeting my first white man and ask him, "are you for real?"
  107. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Negrolphin Pool
    In the spirit of meterless taxis, let me respond with a meterless rap:

    Tha gig economy
    be ZFG
    vis-a-vis
    what's biased implicitly

    I'd keep my day job, if I had one.

    Uber is a popular side gig for a lot of bored middle aged men who aren’t married, have no kids/kids aren’t around, and who aren’t big into golf. A little sad, but it probably gives them a lot of needed human interaction that they wouldn’t get sitting at home watching TV, gives them a little cash, passes the time, and never really had life plans.

    I’ve also noticed that middle aged men get a bit more gossipy and observant than when younger, so the people constantly hopping into their cars stimulates this part of their brain. (This is also why middle aged folks get really into detective dramas such as Poirot, Columbo, Matlock, Diagnosis: Murder, Murder She Wrote, etc. There’s not enough “action” in those type of shows for younger viewers, but the middle aged folk aren’t that much into action.

    Read More
  108. whorefinder says: • Website
    @Jonathan Mason

    I’ve seen interviews with members of Black Sabbath where they feign surprise that people accuse them of being Satanists and such. As if they’re totally innocent in that regard. Despite the fact that they call themselves Black Sabbath and have spooky albums with witches on the cover.
     
    This is true, but as I recall Black Sabbath were a British band formed in the late 60's at a time when no one in Britain would have taken Satanism, vampires, and witchcraft in the least bit seriously, even at Hallowe'en, and they were seen as a kind of performance art just like white middle class physical education teacher's son Mick Jagger mimicked a Mississippi bluesman.

    It just wasn't that serious. Black Sabbath, which was originally a blues band, actually took their name from a 1963 Boris Karloff horror movie called, yes, Black Sabbath, which was very popular at the time and had something of a cult following.

    Tony Iommi (the guitarist) is driving force behind Black Sabbath, and the idea that anything he did wasn’t deliberate is hard to fathom.

    Iommi’s a very very strong bullying personality—Ozzy Osbourne was literally one of the younger kids in school Iommi used to beat up, and Iommi used that residual psychological fear to keep Ozzy in check for most of his Black Sabbath run, to the point that Black Sabbath was one of the few bands where the lead singer was not placed front and center, but off to the side (to show off Iommi on the guitar better). In another story, Iommi had a guitarist girlfriend who broke up with him in the 80s and immediately found herself frozen out of gigs and music industry contracts, and fingers Iommi as the reason her mid-level career stalled out, saying he really was that powerful.

    Anyway, Iommi saw how the Stones crafted their image—how Mick Jagger turned his ugly visage into a look women swooned over is amazing—-and took it into a more macabre direction with devils and witch images, while maintaining music seriousness. Much how later rappers sold themselves as tough hardcore gangstas when they were really middle-class music geek losers.

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  109. Forbes says:
    @MBlanc46
    Unless the courts decide that he's actually an employee. Then he'll have to be available when Uber tells him he has to be available.

    Even if a court decides an Uber driver is an employee–a speculation, at best–Uber is based on crowd sourcing, i.e. drivers deciding when it is best to work. Presumably drivers can figure out how many hours and which hours of the day/days of the week maximize their pay vs convenience trade-off.

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  110. @whorefinder
    Even the "ugly" people on TV are better looking than average, whether its a drama or a sitcom. Its not for nothing that LA is considered the land of "beautiful people" and the service jobs that in most cities are filled by average folk are filled by gorgeous physical specimens in LA. Jokes about pool about sleeping with your wife come from this.

    I remember a friend of a friend getting an internship at NBC News when Brian Williams was there, and her telling the story that upon meeting Brian Williams in the flesh she was floored by how good looking he was, and how she'd never noticed it before. Then this intern realized that, on TV, everyone was good looking, so Brian Williams didn't stand out, but in real life he was probably the best looking man she'd seen for a while.

    I can recall Justine Bateman, Michael J. Fox’s TV sister, walking by in the late 1980s. Wow.

    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow. Actresses don’t marry their cameramen, but as David Niven noted it’s not unknown for actresses to marry their cameramen. Julia Roberts is a current century example.

    As Kramer noted on Seinfeld, George Will is really good looking by real world standards.

    Some of it is detailing. I can recall a top L.A. TV weatherman at Parent Night between the 6pm news and the 11 pm news being much more well-groomed than the Pasadena lawyers and doctors who were most of the other dads. There are a lot of little things you can do to be 1% better looking each. Most guys don’t do them. For example, I should get my hair cut every month, but I usually go at least 2 months. Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?

    Another aspect is that people in the entertainment industry work out much more seriously than normal people. I vaguely knew a TV and stage actress who was typecast as an amusing, kind of funny looking character actress. She was in better shape in her late 40s than most girls in their early 20s in Nebraska.

    Read More
    • Replies: @jim jones
    The only women who look good without their clothes are dancers
    , @StillCARealist
    Older men tend to have hair growing in their ears and nose and eyebrows that needs to be carefully shorn and groomed. This should be done frequently. Also, if your nails are split, yellowing, or too long, you look older. Get your women-folk to critique and help with this.

    there really are some simple little extras that men can do to stay looking younger, but most guys just don't care about such details. I'm married to such a one, and he doesn't want me nagging him to wear a hat all the time because his head is covered with skin pre-cancers and looks awful. Fortunately the doctor helped me with that one.
    , @anonguy

    Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?
     
    I'm in my late 50s, still have the hairline I had in high school with only imperceptible gray.

    Through my 40s, I used to think, geez, I've got all this great hair, so why not flaunt it, and occasionally grow it out a bit.

    But I always ended up looking homeless and everyone always complimented me on my haircut whenever I got one, so eventually I got the message.

    Very few older guys can pull off long-ish hair even if they have great hair.
    , @MEH 0910


    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow.
     
    Say it ain't so, Steve!

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/instead-of-h-1b-why-not-american-women/

    I saw Geena Davis in 2000 rushing through the drugstore without her makeup on. Let’s just say that the lovely Geena the you know from movies and television has devoted much of her waking existence to thinking hard (and effectively) about makeup.
     

     
  111. jim jones says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I can recall Justine Bateman, Michael J. Fox's TV sister, walking by in the late 1980s. Wow.

    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow. Actresses don't marry their cameramen, but as David Niven noted it's not unknown for actresses to marry their cameramen. Julia Roberts is a current century example.

    As Kramer noted on Seinfeld, George Will is really good looking by real world standards.

    Some of it is detailing. I can recall a top L.A. TV weatherman at Parent Night between the 6pm news and the 11 pm news being much more well-groomed than the Pasadena lawyers and doctors who were most of the other dads. There are a lot of little things you can do to be 1% better looking each. Most guys don't do them. For example, I should get my hair cut every month, but I usually go at least 2 months. Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?

    Another aspect is that people in the entertainment industry work out much more seriously than normal people. I vaguely knew a TV and stage actress who was typecast as an amusing, kind of funny looking character actress. She was in better shape in her late 40s than most girls in their early 20s in Nebraska.

    The only women who look good without their clothes are dancers

    Read More
  112. hyperbola says:
    @anon
    Stereotyping sounds a lot like inference.

    The surreal part of this “story” is the amount of stereotypes that it contains! Starting with the very first sentence. Not surprising for something from the Journal of Experimental Psychology: General and its pretense to be “science”!

    What this “story” mostly reveals is how degenerate The Atlantic has become.

    How Intelligence Leads to Stereotyping

    https://www.theatlantic.com/science/archive/2017/07/intelligent-people-are-more-likely-to-stereotype/535158/

    “””” Upon seeing a young man hoisting a Hitler salute in 2017, most people likely do not think, “there goes a Rhodes Scholar.” Racists stereotype other people, for the most part, but there are also stereotypes about racists. And the stereotype about racists is that, well, they’re kind of dumb….”””

    Rhodes & Hitler: The Naked Truth

    http://www.thejournalist.org.za/spotlight/rhodes-hitler-the-naked-truth

    …. Modern Fascism could, indeed, be said to have begun with Cecil Rhodes. A book could be written, “From Rhodes to Hitler”. He was the first man to organise business politically, his diamond industry was the first great cartel. His was the dream of an èlite, a secret society that ruled whole continents by money controlled by a single source. His hope was for a great British Reich.

    There followed a further comparison: “Mussolini’s dream was the pale echo of Rhodes’s; his conquest of Ethiopia and inglorious aping of the conquest of Rhodesia.” Cloete likened Rhodes’ methods to those of Mussolini and Hitler: “Rhodes’s pioneers were, to all intents and purposes, black shirts; his leaders operated outside the law. He intimidated with threats of force, he bought men and parties, he spoke of Nordic superiority.” Late biographers picked up on Cloete’s comparison, John Flint noted that Spengler, whose book, The Decline of the West, came to be an inspirational text for the Nazis, was a great admirer of Rhodes. For the fascists and Nazis, Rhodes would have been a kindred spirit. As Flint put it:

    His will to power and love of power for its own sake strikingly anticipated the pretensions of the fascist Leader-Principle. His mystic obsession with his “idea”, which was never clearly enunciated, seemed to anticipate the stress on the Leader’s intuition in later fascism and Nazism. His companies, like the later fascist parties, operated as statues within the formal state.

    Admired by Nazis

    Rhodes, it seems, was much admired in Nazi Germany. Hitler himself is reported as having said that the British had been unable to maintain a dominant position in the world because they had not paid sufficient heed to Rhodes, the only person who had understood what was required for continuing British supremacy. Nazi propagandist Joseph Goebbels described Rhodes as “a rare force-man”, atypical of the cautious, hesitant British…..

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  113. hyperbola says:
    @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The great hope was for artificial intelligence because it's become taboo to use the natural kind.

    Technology has shown a way to solve business problems where prior regulatory regimes failed. Uber for example provides enough security and reputational effects to guarantee minorities and residents of dangerous areas access to transportation much better than regulation and discrimination bans ever did. Likewise, artificial intelligence will only provide a brief window of opportunity for regulatory arbitrage to escape the fairness & anti-disparate impact policy.

    -----

    Another great hope for new technology & artificial intelligence: Driverless cars...

    No more "broken taillights" or accusations of being stopped for "driving while black" if all transportation is public and shared and if all vehicles are owned, maintained and operated by large public transportation companies.

    Corollary:
    No more excessively tinted windows, blingy rims or attention getting features that might also be "noticeable" to law enforcement even well before the ethnicity of the driver.

    Challenge:
    After enough riders are blacklisted by these transportation companies for crime, vandalism, non-payment or other infractions there will again be cries about discrimination because of the disparate impact to minority riders from the policies to keep the new driverless carpooling system safe and well maintained.

    The cycle of diversity and disparate impact will never end.

    Finally...

    Even after artificial intelligence has been successfully created, it will inevitably be limited for the sake of fairness. Then we will dedicate increasing resources to the search for extraterrestrial intelligence, because by then it will have become obvious that there is no hope of finding any here on Earth.

    The main take-home-lesson from this “psychological fairy tale” is how anti-American The Atlantic has become. Imagine using an enemy of Americans (Rhodes) in the very first sentence!

    NETANYAHU’S GODFATHER

    How British Imperialists Created the Fascist Jabotinsky

    http://www.larouchepub.com/other/2009/3603brit-imps_created_jabotinsky.html

    …. Jabotinsky’s Imperial Roots

    Every Likud prime minister in Israel has been an avowed promoter of the policies of Vladimir Ze’ev Jabotinsky. Some were personal protégés, others extremist leaders within his movement. The father of current Likud leader and candidate for prime minister, Benjamin Netanyahu, was Jabotinsky’s personal secretary.

    The Likud prime ministers are considered an elite grouping. They are often referred to as Jabotinsky’s Princes, and to this day, Jabotinsky is omnipresent within the Jewish right wing. His picture adorns the Likud website, and U.S. Anti-Defamation League director Abe Foxman has had a framed photo of him on his desk.

    Jabotinsky was a wholly owned and created asset of the British Empire. He was controlled by a political network led by Leo Stennet Amery, who became Britain’s most prominent Imperial spokesman and political organizer. Amery’s circle included the greatest names of British imperialism: Cecil John Rhodes, the self-avowed enemy of the American republic; the Coefficients group; and Alfred Milner, Rhodes’ mentor, who ran Rhodes’ secret society.

    Jabotinsky and the creation of a Jewish Legion became Amery’s number one project, as the British moved to take over Palestine at the close of World War I.

    Amery’s vision was that of Rhodes, who, in 1877, wrote his first Last Will and Testament. Only a bit more than a decade had passed since the British plan to dismember the United States in a Civil War had failed, bitterly. Rhodes, a rabid British race imperialist, had amassed his fortune through the exploration and mining of gold in Africa. Rhodes wrote that the purpose of his Will was: “To and for the establishment, promotion and development of a Secret Society, the true aim and object whereof shall be for the extension of British rule throughout the world, the perfecting of a system of emigration from the United Kingdom, and of colonisation by British subjects of all lands … and especially the … entire continent of Africa, the Holy Land, the Valley of the Euphrates, … the whole of South America, the Islands of the Pacific not heretofore possessed by Great Britain, … the seaboard of China and Japan, the ultimate recovery of the United States of America as an integral part of the British Empire…” (emphasis added).

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  114. @whorefinder
    Even the "ugly" people on TV are better looking than average, whether its a drama or a sitcom. Its not for nothing that LA is considered the land of "beautiful people" and the service jobs that in most cities are filled by average folk are filled by gorgeous physical specimens in LA. Jokes about pool about sleeping with your wife come from this.

    I remember a friend of a friend getting an internship at NBC News when Brian Williams was there, and her telling the story that upon meeting Brian Williams in the flesh she was floored by how good looking he was, and how she'd never noticed it before. Then this intern realized that, on TV, everyone was good looking, so Brian Williams didn't stand out, but in real life he was probably the best looking man she'd seen for a while.

    I was at Lowe’s one day and a guy stuck a microphone in my face while another had a camera going. They were doing impromptu public interviews for a DIY show. It was pretty funny overall.

    The guy doing the microphone with me was so good looking he took my breath away. I wanted to touch his face like some isolated native meeting my first white man and ask him, “are you for real?”

    Read More
  115. hyperbola says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Driving for Uber is pretty good for blacks because they don't have to show up every single day for work on time. Even diligent blacks have a lot of chaos in their lives due to relatives getting in trouble. If an Uber driver has to take the day off to, say, go bail out a cousin at their grandmother's request, he's his own boss.

    I agree with anonymous.

    Sailer here shows us that he is every bit a stereotypical racist – how many black Uber drivers does he actually know personally?

    What is increasingly obvious is how boring, provincial and incestuous the tiny sect that creates this kind of “thougth-control” propaganda actually is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @whorefinder
    Troll level: 1/10.

    Mr. Soros and Mr. Zuckerberg are not getting their money's worth out of you. Up your game.
  116. @Anonymous
    https://www.fastcodesign.com/90134278/biased-ai-is-a-threat-to-civil-liberty-the-aclu-has-a-plan-to-fix-it

    Biased AI Is A Threat To Civil Liberties. The ACLU Has A Plan To Fix It

    ... For example, Los Angeles began using a service called PredPol to determine areas where burglaries and car break-ins might occur. After the mathematical model–which uses past police reports–outlines where these crimes are likely to occur, the LAPD dispatches police to the area. The presence of police alone is a deterrent and in some precincts, crime dropped 25%. But meanwhile, Oakland police decided not to implement the same technology because the city was concerned about racial profiling.
     

    “Governments are really being pushed to do more with less money and AI tools are, at least on a surface level, appealing ways to do that and make decisions efficiently,” Goodman says. “We want to see if there are appropriate roles [for AI] and to ensure tools are fair and free of racial biases. Those are hard questions and hard math problems.”

    A second area that the ACLU is prioritizing is machine bias in financing and lending.

    ... “Housing providers and banks are adopting algorithmic tools on who gets a job or home or mortgage or loan at what rate and we know those tools very often incorporate all sorts of biases,” Goodman says, mentioning that this is important for racial justice, women’s rights, and LGBTQ rights.

    ... The long game involves forming a legal agenda on how AI should be regulated and how to protect rights and liberties as the technology becomes more pervasive.

    “Developers of these tools have been fairly isolated from conversations about legal and policy and ethical frameworks that are vital to the work they’re doing,” she says. “Many of the ill effects are not intentional. It comes from people designing technology in closed rooms in close conversations and not thinking of the real world.”
     
    The real world, you computer autists. You know, where there are social consequences to noticing patterns. (Oh, you don't even know what I'm talking about.) Look, it's a case of making the machines smarter, right? Smart enough to not have racial biases? Like ACLU intern smart.

    (I kid. It's actually a case of intelligently dispatching thoughtpolice to AI fields to deter bias-crime. And to "increase efforts to improve diversity among AI developers".)

    Through its AI Now partnership, the ACLU hopes technologists, algorithm designers, and civil libertarians will have better and more open communication. If bias in AI is addressed head on, accepted practices that perpetuate bias can be challenged and fixed. “We can inject legal principles earlier on in the conversation so ideally we aren’t in the position of arguing the illegality of technology that’s already being used,” Goodman says.
     

    Are the Oakland police actually dumb enough that they may not be aware of CompuStat and its astonishing track record in NYC and similar programs elsewhere?

    We can inject legal principles earlier on in the conversation so ideally we aren’t in the position of arguing the illegality of technology that’s already being used

    Ok, but these AA lawyers who want to “fix” computer science by injecting legal principles should be forced to show their work.

    Most -if not all – AI algorithms are very much bottom up affairs. They start with a set of rules, run through a vast decision tree or solution space or whatever and spit out the results that fit the criteria set by the designer. For example, it would be nonsense to stipulate that a game theory optimal poker agent needs to “go all in on the river whenever a black suited card comes”. That would no longer be a GTO solution or anything close. And if the operator wanted to redefine that as a criterion, it would have all kinds of havoc-wreaking consequences – you might say butterfly effects – on the end result. In fact, the gameplay would probably be belly-achingly funny, even on earlier streets.

    In short, redefining the criteria would break the algorithm to the point where it was beyond useless for the original purpose. I’m far from an AI expert, but I don’t see how such distortions and unpredictable consequences are really avoidable. And the more complex the system, the worse the distortions will be.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Negrolphin Pool
    In other words, these AA lawyers are imagining the results of an algorithm that maximizes returns on lending capital would look pretty similar to those of an algorithm that maximizes returns on lending capital WHILE not discriminating against blacks, when in fact the latter may well be unrecognizable and quickly bankrupt any company implementing it.
  117. @Negrolphin Pool
    Are the Oakland police actually dumb enough that they may not be aware of CompuStat and its astonishing track record in NYC and similar programs elsewhere?

    We can inject legal principles earlier on in the conversation so ideally we aren’t in the position of arguing the illegality of technology that’s already being used
     
    Ok, but these AA lawyers who want to "fix" computer science by injecting legal principles should be forced to show their work.

    Most -if not all - AI algorithms are very much bottom up affairs. They start with a set of rules, run through a vast decision tree or solution space or whatever and spit out the results that fit the criteria set by the designer. For example, it would be nonsense to stipulate that a game theory optimal poker agent needs to "go all in on the river whenever a black suited card comes". That would no longer be a GTO solution or anything close. And if the operator wanted to redefine that as a criterion, it would have all kinds of havoc-wreaking consequences - you might say butterfly effects - on the end result. In fact, the gameplay would probably be belly-achingly funny, even on earlier streets.

    In short, redefining the criteria would break the algorithm to the point where it was beyond useless for the original purpose. I'm far from an AI expert, but I don't see how such distortions and unpredictable consequences are really avoidable. And the more complex the system, the worse the distortions will be.

    In other words, these AA lawyers are imagining the results of an algorithm that maximizes returns on lending capital would look pretty similar to those of an algorithm that maximizes returns on lending capital WHILE not discriminating against blacks, when in fact the latter may well be unrecognizable and quickly bankrupt any company implementing it.

    Read More
  118. @Steve Sailer
    I can recall Justine Bateman, Michael J. Fox's TV sister, walking by in the late 1980s. Wow.

    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow. Actresses don't marry their cameramen, but as David Niven noted it's not unknown for actresses to marry their cameramen. Julia Roberts is a current century example.

    As Kramer noted on Seinfeld, George Will is really good looking by real world standards.

    Some of it is detailing. I can recall a top L.A. TV weatherman at Parent Night between the 6pm news and the 11 pm news being much more well-groomed than the Pasadena lawyers and doctors who were most of the other dads. There are a lot of little things you can do to be 1% better looking each. Most guys don't do them. For example, I should get my hair cut every month, but I usually go at least 2 months. Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?

    Another aspect is that people in the entertainment industry work out much more seriously than normal people. I vaguely knew a TV and stage actress who was typecast as an amusing, kind of funny looking character actress. She was in better shape in her late 40s than most girls in their early 20s in Nebraska.

    Older men tend to have hair growing in their ears and nose and eyebrows that needs to be carefully shorn and groomed. This should be done frequently. Also, if your nails are split, yellowing, or too long, you look older. Get your women-folk to critique and help with this.

    there really are some simple little extras that men can do to stay looking younger, but most guys just don’t care about such details. I’m married to such a one, and he doesn’t want me nagging him to wear a hat all the time because his head is covered with skin pre-cancers and looks awful. Fortunately the doctor helped me with that one.

    Read More
  119. @Anonymous
    https://www.fastcodesign.com/90134278/biased-ai-is-a-threat-to-civil-liberty-the-aclu-has-a-plan-to-fix-it

    Biased AI Is A Threat To Civil Liberties. The ACLU Has A Plan To Fix It

    ... For example, Los Angeles began using a service called PredPol to determine areas where burglaries and car break-ins might occur. After the mathematical model–which uses past police reports–outlines where these crimes are likely to occur, the LAPD dispatches police to the area. The presence of police alone is a deterrent and in some precincts, crime dropped 25%. But meanwhile, Oakland police decided not to implement the same technology because the city was concerned about racial profiling.
     

    “Governments are really being pushed to do more with less money and AI tools are, at least on a surface level, appealing ways to do that and make decisions efficiently,” Goodman says. “We want to see if there are appropriate roles [for AI] and to ensure tools are fair and free of racial biases. Those are hard questions and hard math problems.”

    A second area that the ACLU is prioritizing is machine bias in financing and lending.

    ... “Housing providers and banks are adopting algorithmic tools on who gets a job or home or mortgage or loan at what rate and we know those tools very often incorporate all sorts of biases,” Goodman says, mentioning that this is important for racial justice, women’s rights, and LGBTQ rights.

    ... The long game involves forming a legal agenda on how AI should be regulated and how to protect rights and liberties as the technology becomes more pervasive.

    “Developers of these tools have been fairly isolated from conversations about legal and policy and ethical frameworks that are vital to the work they’re doing,” she says. “Many of the ill effects are not intentional. It comes from people designing technology in closed rooms in close conversations and not thinking of the real world.”
     
    The real world, you computer autists. You know, where there are social consequences to noticing patterns. (Oh, you don't even know what I'm talking about.) Look, it's a case of making the machines smarter, right? Smart enough to not have racial biases? Like ACLU intern smart.

    (I kid. It's actually a case of intelligently dispatching thoughtpolice to AI fields to deter bias-crime. And to "increase efforts to improve diversity among AI developers".)

    Through its AI Now partnership, the ACLU hopes technologists, algorithm designers, and civil libertarians will have better and more open communication. If bias in AI is addressed head on, accepted practices that perpetuate bias can be challenged and fixed. “We can inject legal principles earlier on in the conversation so ideally we aren’t in the position of arguing the illegality of technology that’s already being used,” Goodman says.
     

    China use the pattern-recognition that you do not.

    Read More
  120. anonguy says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I can recall Justine Bateman, Michael J. Fox's TV sister, walking by in the late 1980s. Wow.

    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow. Actresses don't marry their cameramen, but as David Niven noted it's not unknown for actresses to marry their cameramen. Julia Roberts is a current century example.

    As Kramer noted on Seinfeld, George Will is really good looking by real world standards.

    Some of it is detailing. I can recall a top L.A. TV weatherman at Parent Night between the 6pm news and the 11 pm news being much more well-groomed than the Pasadena lawyers and doctors who were most of the other dads. There are a lot of little things you can do to be 1% better looking each. Most guys don't do them. For example, I should get my hair cut every month, but I usually go at least 2 months. Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?

    Another aspect is that people in the entertainment industry work out much more seriously than normal people. I vaguely knew a TV and stage actress who was typecast as an amusing, kind of funny looking character actress. She was in better shape in her late 40s than most girls in their early 20s in Nebraska.

    Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?

    I’m in my late 50s, still have the hairline I had in high school with only imperceptible gray.

    Through my 40s, I used to think, geez, I’ve got all this great hair, so why not flaunt it, and occasionally grow it out a bit.

    But I always ended up looking homeless and everyone always complimented me on my haircut whenever I got one, so eventually I got the message.

    Very few older guys can pull off long-ish hair even if they have great hair.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Steven Pinker can pull it off. It's a short list though, that's for sure.
  121. whorefinder says: • Website
    @hyperbola
    I agree with anonymous.

    Sailer here shows us that he is every bit a stereotypical racist - how many black Uber drivers does he actually know personally?

    What is increasingly obvious is how boring, provincial and incestuous the tiny sect that creates this kind of "thougth-control" propaganda actually is.

    Troll level: 1/10.

    Mr. Soros and Mr. Zuckerberg are not getting their money’s worth out of you. Up your game.

    Read More
  122. Ivy says:
    @Bill Jones
    I thought the prevailing practice nowadays was to be a Onanist....
    Hence the upcoming extinction of the White Race.

    Bowling Alone, so that is what they call it now.

    Read More
  123. @Clyde
    BTW The Atlantic is being sold to a foundation controlled by Steve Jobs widow Laurene. She is batshyte crazy lib and has nine billion of Steve's money to do damage with.
    Make that number higher. Net worth: $14.30 billion USD (2017)

    I thought everybody knew Atlantic was leftist. I accidentally subscribed to it before I knew what it weas (long story) and got woke up in a real hurry. That and Vanity Fair are practically twins.

    Read More
  124. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I can recall Justine Bateman, Michael J. Fox's TV sister, walking by in the late 1980s. Wow.

    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow. Actresses don't marry their cameramen, but as David Niven noted it's not unknown for actresses to marry their cameramen. Julia Roberts is a current century example.

    As Kramer noted on Seinfeld, George Will is really good looking by real world standards.

    Some of it is detailing. I can recall a top L.A. TV weatherman at Parent Night between the 6pm news and the 11 pm news being much more well-groomed than the Pasadena lawyers and doctors who were most of the other dads. There are a lot of little things you can do to be 1% better looking each. Most guys don't do them. For example, I should get my hair cut every month, but I usually go at least 2 months. Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?

    Another aspect is that people in the entertainment industry work out much more seriously than normal people. I vaguely knew a TV and stage actress who was typecast as an amusing, kind of funny looking character actress. She was in better shape in her late 40s than most girls in their early 20s in Nebraska.

    On the other hand, I can also recall a famously beautiful movie leading lady rushing by in a drug store without her makeup on. Not as wow.

    Say it ain’t so, Steve!

    https://www.unz.com/isteve/instead-of-h-1b-why-not-american-women/

    I saw Geena Davis in 2000 rushing through the drugstore without her makeup on. Let’s just say that the lovely Geena the you know from movies and television has devoted much of her waking existence to thinking hard (and effectively) about makeup.

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  125. Alwin says:
    @Logan
    I've always thought it would be interesting if somebody took all the characters of TV shows for a year and analyzed their behavior, etc. by ethnicity, then compared the results to the real world. Course, it would be a lot more difficult to do than it was back when there were only three networks to compile.

    I can tell you that TV people are on average a very great deal younger, thinner and better looking.

    I've recently noticed that just about every TV show I watch has a black male genius IT-type as part of the team. I have no idea whether this is a reflection of reality, but it's definitely a thing in TV.

    As an extension of this research project, one could compare shifts in TV world vs. the real world over time.

    I recall a study demonstrating that Law and Order episodes seriously underrepresent Blacks as criminals when accounting for their crime levels.

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  126. Alwin says:
    @whorefinder

    Back in the old country it was Polish peasants.
     
    The "dumb blond" stereotype originally came from Eastern/Central Jewish women enraged that their Jewish men were so enthralled with the beautiful, thin, pleasant, non-confrontational, feminine blond shikskas among the surrounding goyim. So the Jewish women insulted the blonds as stupid.

    A Universal Truth: in all eras and in all nations, women who are not the most desirable in their societies act like the same catty, backstabbing mean girls towards the prettiest girls.

    See Also: Negro Women on White women. It’s even more prominent since Negro women have an absence of men from prison/death/desertion.

    Read More
  127. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The Romans didn’t need commas. And, you, Dear Reader, don’t need them either.

    As all-balls real man Tom Brady would say: “Figure it out.”

    Read More
  128. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @anonguy

    Noel Coward said that every decade older you should keep your hair cut a half inch shorter. But how many guys remember to do that?
     
    I'm in my late 50s, still have the hairline I had in high school with only imperceptible gray.

    Through my 40s, I used to think, geez, I've got all this great hair, so why not flaunt it, and occasionally grow it out a bit.

    But I always ended up looking homeless and everyone always complimented me on my haircut whenever I got one, so eventually I got the message.

    Very few older guys can pull off long-ish hair even if they have great hair.

    Steven Pinker can pull it off. It’s a short list though, that’s for sure.

    Read More
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