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The Atlantic: Body Cameras Were Supposed to Expose All That Police Brutality, So What Went Wrong?
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From The Atlantic:

Did Body Cameras Backfire?
Body cameras were supposed to fix a broken system. What happened?

SIDNEY FUSSELL
8:00 AM ET

In 2014, when Police Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown on a street in Ferguson, Missouri, police brutality rocketed to the center of the national discourse on race. Law enforcement needed more accountability, activists argued, and body cameras became the state’s preferred corrective. The Obama administration’s Department of Justice offered more than $23 million in grants for new cameras in 2015, the year after Brown’s death, and another $20 million in 2016. Then-candidate Hillary Clinton called for mandatory body cameras nationwide. In 2018, a New York judge mandated that all NYPD officers wear them, as part of efforts to end “stop and frisk” tactics. The future of policing, it seemed, had arrived. …

And now some police-reform advocates argue that recent technological advances mean these cameras are increasingly used not to scrutinize police, but to surveil the public. Recorded footage uploads to the cloud, allowing police to hold more images and videos, and to hold them longer. Object recognition lets officers quickly search through hours of footage to find items of interest (a red backpack, for example). With live-streaming, officers can send everything they see back to department headquarters nearly instantaneously.

It’s almost as if The Establishment’s Anti-Police / Anti-White Hate Spree of 2014-2016 was based on bigoted faulty assumptions about who the Bad Guys tended to be.

 
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  1. OT

    https://www.theatlantic.com/technology/archive/2019/11/stealing-amazon-packages-age-nextdoor/598156/

    “As Banks saw it, Fairley had been caught in a web of surveillance, gentrification, and racism, in which vigilante neighbors targeted her for anything that went missing, when, in fact, many other porch pirates”

    The article describes a heroin addict who unrepentantly steals Amazon packages over and over again, getting arrested by SFPD dozens of times and always being immediately released.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    , @mmack
  2. Rosie says:

    police brutality rocketed to the center of the national discourse on race.

    That’s right. “Police brutality” just “rocketed” somewhere all by itself, no need for any (((spacecraft propulsion))) whatsoever.

    • Agree: Charon
    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  3. Rapparee says:

    I have no idea what’s really true regarding this issue, but I’ll repeat the talking points that I overheard whilst drinking with some off-duty patrolmen- points, probably self-interested, and possibly inaccurate, which likely came from a Policemen’s union meeting, so take them for what they’re worth:

    “Body cameras carry an iffy cost/benefit ratio. They’re not cheap, and require a whole bunch of supporting devices and pricey name-brand operating systems- one Boston official said rolling saving video footage for a full bodycam program could cost $3 million per year for the city (though I don’t know how much of that figure is bureaucratic budget-padding), or if that’s actually an optimistic early-period underestimate. The bodycams often don’t capture much useful information when the officer is particularly tall or particularly short, because average people’s faces don’t show in frame. They’re also not useful in a lot of violent altercations, because two men struggling in a dark alley will quickly become less distinguishable than characters in a Paul Greengrass movie. Moreover, some kind of civil rights legislation apparently (?) gives citizens a right of some sort to ask officers to turn the bodycams off so they can’t be filmed (ask the producers of COPS about this, I guess), which means creeps who are planning to do something stupid and illegal will eventually learn how to preemptively eliminate footage which will be used against them in court.”

    Perhaps someone more directly knowledgeable can weigh in on these.

  4. There’s a reason why the anti cop activists ancestors didn’t have nice things. And their descendants won’t either.

  5. Altai_2 says:

    Don’t worry, Hollywood has you covered!

    In Black and Blue a female black police rookie witnesses an execution by a corrupt white cop of a black man. Second white cop panics and shoots our hero but she survives and escapes with her bodycam which records the whole incident. Corrupt police officer then calls in not only armed police and SWAT but also the local criminal gangs since he is allied to the local crime boss. Our heroine has to escape the hood and upload her footage in 12 hours before the footage is overwrote.

  6. anon[360] • Disclaimer says:

    Here is some actual cop bodycam from the Gibson’s bakery incident in Oberlin. This is an example of what this stuff really looks like. As a bonus, one gets to see why Gibson’s won their case, although Oberlin has appealed.

    Part one.

    Part two.

    • Replies: @S
  7. Rapparee says:
    @Altai_2

    It’s a Sony Pictures film, so despite pushing all of the Current Year political buttons, it will probably still flop horribly and wind up forgotten and unwatched.

  8. Kronos says:

    Seriously, the smart white liberals must’ve realized this would happen. (Maybe that was the plan? “Hey we tricked black people to give police more surveillance equipment.”)

    • Replies: @TWS
    , @anon
    , @getaclue
    , @bomag
  9. Anonymous[969] • Disclaimer says:

    They need a software to Hollywoodize the police cameras.

    The software will turn all black criminals into Neo-Nazi punkers with mohawks. Or the black criminals will be transformed into magic negroes with the voice of Morgan Freeman. And if one says to cops, “Git yo hands off me hon*ey-ass mothafu***”, the software will change the words to, “Can I help you, officer?”

    And when the cop is reading the Miranda rights, the software will change the words, “Get your black ass on the ground, you worthless scumbag n***** monkey.”

    All problems fixed. World must conform to the reigning myths.

  10. From the Atlantic article:

    The widespread adoption of facial-recognition technology means that simply existing in public puts one at risk of being scanned—which could have an enormous chilling effect on undocumented immigrants living in border communities routinely patrolled by the CBP.

    So that’s the “problem” in a nutshell: Body-cam data could result in catching lawbreakers and thus have a “chilling” effect on crime. We can’t have that.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  11. @415 reasons

    You’re supposed to give Steve suggestions BEFORE they appear as blog posts. Then he comments “Thanks” and you get your money in the mail…. wait… Just sayin’.

    ;-}

    • Replies: @415 reasons
  12. Which of the Democratic candidates will be the first to “courageously call for a ban of this fascist, police state policy the Trump administration enacted to conduct genocide against Communities of Color.”

  13. Read between the lines: Body cams tend to show less police brutality and more crime reality.

    • Agree: Alden, David In TN
    • Replies: @Clyde
    , @Stebbing Heuer
  14. eah says:

    You don’t really excerpt enough of the article to get a good idea of what it tries to say overall, and I’m not going to waste time bother reading it — ignoring the opening bullshit about the Michael Brown case (which is however emblematic of a reprobate Establishment: “faulty assumptions about who the Bad Guys tended to be”), this seems to be the/a key passage:

    And now some police-reform advocates argue that recent technological advances mean these cameras are increasingly used not to scrutinize police, but to surveil the public. Recorded footage uploads to the cloud, allowing police to hold more images and videos, and to hold them longer.

    This is actually something of a legitimate concern; the same concern has been raised re AMZN’s Ring doorbell video surveillance system/service — from a civil liberties standpoint, the interesting and important questions are: When does a person have a reasonable expectation of privacy? — And does a surveillance system unduly infringe on this reasonable expectation of privacy?

  15. Anon[163] • Disclaimer says:

    I started to read this when I saw it today at The Atlantic, expecting an enjoyable schadenfreude article about “Whoops, the anti-black police brutality turns out to mostly be anti-cop violence from blacks.” But it takes a left turn and starts bitching about privacy and face recognition (which I thought didn’t work on black faces anyway because of racist AI), and a bunch of peripheral issues unrelated to the filming of individual incidents.

    “You take the case around Eric Garner,” said Kesi Foster, an organizer with Make the Road New York, which focuses on immigrants’ rights and police accountability. “Everyone saw what happened in that video,” he said, referring to a viral video of NYPD Officer Daniel Pantaleo putting Garner in a fatal choke hold. “And it still took over five years of organizing and community pressure for one officer … to be held accountable.”

    This is such bullshit. Pantaleo threw Garner off balance with his forearm. There was no chokehold, which requires compression with the crook of the arm. The coroner found no bruising of the esophogus or neck. The New York Time finally admitted that Garner died of a sort of asphyxiation that obese people with asthma are subject to if lying on their stomachs for too long. This is known by some in the law enforcement community and the Justice Department has years before spoken to NYPD about it, but it’s not known if Pantaleo was trained to be careful about it.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  16. Sidney Fussell in white face:

    Also, hard to not think of Nipsey Hussle when reading Sidney Fussell.

    • Replies: @The Anti-Gnostic
  17. Realist says:

    It’s almost as if The Establishment’s Anti-Police / Anti-White Hate Spree of 2014-2016 was based on bigoted faulty assumptions about who the Bad Guys tended to be.

    Almost? Almost?

  18. Hans says:
    @Altai_2

    If I’m not mistaken, she was talent spotted at an incident at Chucky Cheeses’. Looks spiffier without the hair weave. Go Girl!

  19. dearieme says:

    Object recognition lets officers quickly search through hours of footage to find items of interest (a red backpack, for example)

    In that case they might like to apply it to the footage from the Boston marathon bombing. Know what I mean?

  20. Arclight says:

    I am guessing some SJW organizations are starting to realize that body cam footage produces a whole lot more tape of the oppressed blatantly acting/talking in ways that justifies the much higher likelihood of being questioned or arrested, and not a whole lot of cops just randomly roughing up minorities for the fun of it.

    At some point, someone is going to publish research based on body cam footage on the number of interactions cops have annually with the public, how much of it results in arrest, how much uses force, etc. and the percentages are going to run totally contrary to the SJW narrative.

    I’d also guess that there used to be a lot more instances that involved the police going easy on people caught for low-level crime and letting them go on their way without any paperwork being filed, but now that everything is recorded cops have to go by the letter of the law and arrest or cite everybody for even minor stuff.

    • Replies: @Charon
  21. @Hypnotoad666

    About half the Black population is incapable of productive work in an industrial society due to low cognitive ability. This part of the Black population gets its income elsewhere — government money and an illegal side business. If crimes were prosecuted with enough severity to suppress criminal activity, then Black society could not function — half of it would have nothing to do. This would destabilize a voting block that the US establishment requires to remain in office or retain their jobs.

    The Black voting block is not the only one that is intrinsically criminal. Hispanic street gangs, for example, are essential for Hispanic displacement of Black populations, and for that matter are essential for Hispanic protection from Black populations.

    The American (indeed, the Western) political establishment is urban, not rural. The cities lost their economic base back in the 1960s, tried to replace that with a political base, and have been slowly going broke every since. Now their infrastructure is failing and they have been reduced to augmenting their city income by collecting Federal and State income for CATO4321 street dwellers (“homeless people”) whose income the cities have destroyed by exporting Western industry and generally diverting capital stream to immediate consumption by urban areas.

    So _of course_ law enforcement is being dropped. The cities are so broke that negative rewards (we won’t arrest or incarcerate members of their constituency) and public relations (LBGT is GREAT) are about all the city based American political establishment _can_ grant. It’s related to the tendency to authoritarian government in the West — the authoritarian government can squeeze the non-urban hinterland with more force than could the previous system. which at least pretended to be a merit based principate. Note that for people _not_ in the establishment’s constituencies, law enforcement has become more severe (swat teams for civil offences, increased fines, property confiscation). The only consistency is more rewards for constituencies that are growing rebellious as the infrastructure they need (e.g. trash collection, health hazard suppression, rat suppression) becomes becomes impossible for cities to fund.

    Counterinsurgency

  22. IC says:

    There were quite a few incidences where a black would complained about white police being racist towards them and the bodycam footage actually showed it was the black who was a racist POS.

    Here’s just two of them

    https://wtvr.com/2018/05/07/body-cam-footage-released-after-racism-accusations-go-viral/

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  23. George says:

    I thought the idea was the Police would moderate their behavior if they knew they were being watched. It is also useful for the dumber cops that don’t quite realize there are now cameras everywhere, for example door bells, and misbehave because ‘who will know?’

    As far as the proprietary operating systems and other silliness, that goes along with how governments work, corruptly. At some point Amazon or Microsoft will produce an inexpensive streaming service for cops.

    The cameras are also there for evidence in lawsuits demanding damages from the police.

    Unmentioned, is the consumer surplus provided by watching cop videos on video sharing sites.

  24. lhtness says:

    Police Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown on a street in Ferguson, Missouri

    If only there had been a thorough investigation into what actually happened…

  25. @Achmed E. Newman

    I should know I can’t keep up w Steve

  26. @Altai_2

    This is just another example of why I’ve stopped going to the (((movies))), canceled (((HBO))), and am finding fewer and fewer shows on (((TV))) that I’d care to watch. I’d recommend that all do the same who are as disturbed as I am by the relentless war being waged against White, native-born Christians.

    • Agree: Charon, Anonymousse
    • Replies: @Lurker
    , @Moses
  27. As per the video in Anon #360’s comment above, lots of the video is pretty mundane, and, if you can sit through 35 minutes of that, you may realize that life is pretty boring, even for cops. However, when those exciting moments happen, I’m guessing that any cop who wears these cameras regularly already has it ingrained in hm to talk and act differently than if there were no cameras around (that he KNOWS of).

    I’d guess that you won’t hear as bad of the insulting language, or see the “stop resisting” (while he beats the guy in hand-cuffs on the back of the head) business that you would have with a camera unknown to the cops in the past. Of course, when the adrenaline is really pumping, during/after a chase, or when a guy starts wailing on the cops, then all bets are off. That’s when you’ve got your actual reality show on.

    • Replies: @anon
  28. @eah

    Do you think you have a reasonable expectation of privacy when you step, uninvited, on the property of people you don’t know? Or, in the alternative, do you just not believe in the concept of private property to begin with? I also thought that appellate courts have ruled that when people are circulating at large in the public sphere, they can be audio-video recorded by others with or without their consent.

    • LOL: eah
    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @eah
  29. mmack says:
    @415 reasons

    Thanks for posting the link. I think I damaged my optic muscles and nerves rolling my eyes reading the story. Of course the problem isn’t a Diverse person stealing items to sell to get money for drugs, it’s the rich white and (unsaid) Asian tech workers and professionals and their outdated views on property rights. Don’t these people know it’s racist to demand a thief be arrested? Besides, you people have money, just buy new stuff to replace what was stolen.

    Yeah, that’s the ticket. 🙄

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  30. Bodycams are a great idea.

    Cops face less hostility when the perps know they are being filmed.

    TBH, teachers should be wearing bodycams too.

  31. KunioKun says:

    It is now immoral to publish/expose anything that could cause harm* so the argument in the future is going to be that body cam footage (or any footage) can only be used when it makes cops look bad or if the criminal is not in a protected class. I am not exaggerating.

    *harm is what you would expect with who/whom context based morality.

  32. RudyM says:

    And now some police-reform advocates argue that recent technological advances mean these cameras are increasingly used not to scrutinize police, but to surveil the public.

    Who could have imagined that body cameras would be a two way street?!

    Maybe they could make some laws so that body camera footage can only be used to prosecute police, and not for any other purpose.

    • Replies: @David
  33. TWS says:
    @Kronos

    Nobody except people who knew that cops were not deliberately committing heinous crimes knew what body cams would show. They just assumed it would be all-brutality all-the-time. Instead it was mostly overworked guys in contact with people under the influence or chronically stupid.

    The drunks and druggies did what drunks and druggies do. The criminal underclass act like criminals. It quickly became an embarrassment a reminder to all the good whites and activists why they had to cook the books in the first place to hide black and Hispanic crime.

    If they could selectively edit the tapes they would but they won’t record what isn’t happening.

    • Agree: Hibernian
  34. ic1000 says:

    > In 2014, when Police Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown on a street in Ferguson, Missouri, police brutality rocketed to the center of the national discourse on race.

    In 2014, the 6’4″ 292 lb. teenager Michael Brown attacked Ferguson Police Officer Darren Wilson, attempting to gain control of his service handgun. The confrontation ended when Wilson shot Brown in self defense. With the help of media like The Atlantic, race activists distorted the facts of the case to ensure that police brutality would rocket to the center of the national discourse on race.

    • Replies: @Barnard
    , @David In TN
  35. Ano says:

    This reminds me of Jesse Jackson’s efforts to have Facebook Live and the like (e.g. Periscope, etc) banned.

    He was threatened/embarrassed by social media live streams because in the hands of his racial brethren, rather than propogating liberal/progressive/grievance narratives, their broadcasts showcase the true face of Black Amerika to the world (i.e. whites).

    http://narrative-collapse.com/2017/04/23/jesse-jackson-demands-moratorium-on-facebook-live/

    iSteve readers will remember…

    The negroes in Florida who rather than going to his aid, just live-streamed a black man as he drowned in a retention pond (jeered at his cries for help as he went under).

    The negroes who livestreamed their torture of a mentally-retarded boy in Chicago because he was white (the NYT spun this as a hate crime against the handicapped).

    But my fave is…

    The drug-dealer negro who livestreamed where he hid the drugs in his car, at the precise moment the cops were pulling a traffic stop on him to search his car for stashed drugs.

  36. Rob McX says:

    As a rule, police don’t want to shoot anyone, but I’d say every cop prays that any person he does shoot will be white.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  37. Collecting evidence was supposed to prove my world view correct. So what went wrong? Clearly the evidence was collected badly since there is no other explanation.

  38. Anon[163] • Disclaimer says:

    Test: Is Ron letting strikethrough text get through his filter?

    It seems so.

    What else can we do that is not documented?

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  39. Cato says:
    @eah

    In public spaces, one is not entitled to escape the scrutiny of others. Including photographic scrutiny.

  40. As the country becomes increasingly surveilled by smart doorbell cameras (like it or not), it’s going to be harder and harder to ignore the shenanigans of the Dindus.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  41. anon[142] • Disclaimer says:
    @Kronos

    Seriously, the smart white liberals must’ve realized this would happen

    The what? The unicorns?

    • Replies: @Kronos
  42. Anon[271] • Disclaimer says:

    In 2014, when Police Officer Darren Wilson fatally shot an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown on a street in Ferguson, Missouri, police brutality rocketed to the center of the national discourse on race.

    As long as they repeat this false cause and its pretended effect in history, any objective person looking into the events in question will be able to discern this clown age’s real injustice.

    Keep repeating it, Atlantic. For continued documentation and posterity’s inevitable condemnation of any group involved with your politics.

    But then again, people widely believe that the post civil war lynchings were without the actual cause that was rooted in the widespread and legally undeterable raping and murdering by recently freed slaves.

  43. @eah

    But according to the “civil libertarians,” only black criminals seem to have a right to absolute privacy, while whites have no such right.

  44. “an unarmed black teenager named Michael Brown”

    Mike Brown was neither unarmed nor a teenager.

    The term “teenager” always referred to minors; Brown was 18.

    Brown was also not unarmed: At 6’4,” 292 lbs. (after bleeding out), his body was a weapon, plus he had sought to seize Officer Darren Wilson’s weapon, in order to murder him. Finally, a cop does not know until after the fact (unless the perp is naked) that a perp is unarmed, and “unarmed” perps murder people all the time.

    All this garbage about “unarmed black teens” is part of a campaign to engage in mass slaughter and/or mass incarceration, and/or run off as many competent white policemen as possible.

    • Agree: jim jones, Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @David In TN
  45. Mr. Grey says:

    Body Cameras are a failure. They failed to prove that Blacks are relentless victims of white racism.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  46. Barnard says:
    @ic1000

    Today there are over 1,000 young men who are technically teenagers, with the physical strength to overpower 85-90% of cops, playing in college football games across the country. Legally he was an adult, his age had no relevance to what happened in his encounter with Darren Wilson. They should never get away attempting to the manipulate the narrative like this.

  47. Likely they are “successful” in finding dirty cops preying on civilians….in places like Detroit, or the south side of Chicago, or Newark.

    You know, the black cops. The affirmative action hires.

    So, again, the cameras are a “failure.” Because facts keep contradicting the Narrative.

  48. Clyde says:
    @The Alarmist

    Read between the lines: Body cams tend to show less police brutality and more crime reality.

    Precisely. These police body cams were supposed to be showcasing THE MAN (the police edition) punching down// and that somewhere down the line be gibs mo’ lawsuits and cash money to the most favored 360 degrees of blackitude races. Instead they expose the black-brown lumpen criminals for the nitwit, belligerent, intoxicated (alcohol drugs) low lifes that they are.

  49. Art Deco says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    About half the Black population is incapable of productive work in an industrial society due to low cognitive ability.

    The employment-to-population ratio for the the various racial categories was as follows as of June 2019: ‘Asians’, 0.622; whites, 0.61; blacks, 0.58. I don’t know how to break this to you, but most blacks have been employed outside the agricultural sector since 1880.

  50. Clyde says:
    @Mr. Grey

    Body Cameras are a failure. They failed to prove that Blacks are relentless victims of white racism.

    Instead they show the reverse. That white, black, Hispanic officers are the victims of black racism and wacked out black misbehavior. By and large Latinos/Mexicans/whatever behave themselves publicly though they rip off the welfare systems on all levels. State County Federal.

  51. Schrodinger’s Civil Rights: We must record police to protect the civil rights of blacks err citizens no wait we must NOT record to protect the civil rights of blacks err citizens.

    The NPC meme strikes again as everyone is getting online with the new programming.

  52. What went wrong is exactly what everyone with half a brain knew would go wrong at the beginning of all this:

    As O’Brien passed the telescreen a thought seemed to strike him. He stopped, turned aside and pressed a switch on the wall. There was a sharp snap. The voice had stopped.

    Julia uttered a tiny sound, a sort of squeak of surprise. Even in the midst of his panic, Winston was too much taken aback to be able to hold his tongue.

    ‘You can turn it off!’ he said.

    ‘Yes,’ said O’Brien, ‘we can turn it off. We have that privilege.’

  53. Art Deco says:
    @Laurence Whelk

    About 300,000 blacks are remanded to state prison each year. Their misdeeds aren’t ignored. It’s just that there’s insufficient police present in slums and places adjacent.

    • Replies: @bigdicknick
  54. Yeah. They take the cameras off when they shoot somebody (more whites than blacks). Or they shoot people when they’re off-duty.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  55. @Counterinsurgency

    Man, that’s depressing. We have in fact been decapitalizing cities and industry for over 60 years. Except for the military, of course.

  56. S says:
    @anon

    From the wikipedia article on the Gibson Bakery vs Oberlin College libel case stemming from a shop lifting incident.

    What a great way to build good student/community relations? Geeez…:-/ :

    Local merchants are reportedly frequent targets by shoplifting students of the school.

    The school’s newspaper had previously published an article describing shoplifting as a rite of passage among Oberlin students.

    The entire situation was Trump’s fault, ie ‘White people’, and not the shop lifter’s…

    Longtime African-American Oberlin resident Eric Gaines testified, “The election occurred the night before… People were anxious and it was like a time bomb ready to explode.”

    In a November 2016 letter to faculty and students, Oberlin College President Marvin Krislov said, “This has been a difficult few days for our community, not simply because of the events at Gibson’s Bakery, but because of the fears and concerns that many are feeling in response to the outcome of the presidential election.”

    Slightly disappointed with the jury award reduction. Oh well..;-) :

    The jury later awarded the plaintiffs (Gibson’s) $33 million in punitive damages, for a total award of $44 million. At the end of the month, Judge John Miraldi reduced the total award to $25 million because state law limits punitive damages. In July 2019, the court ordered Oberlin to pay an additional $6.5 million as reimbursement for Gibson’s legal expenses.

    On October 8, 2019, the college filed a Notice of Appeal appealing the case to the Ninth District Court of Appeals in Akron, Ohio.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gibson%27s_Bakery_v._Oberlin_College

  57. @ic1000

    I wonder why the Christian-Newsom torture murders (still an ongoing story for nearly 13 years) did not “rocket to the center of the national discourse on race?”

  58. I think elected officials should have to wear body cameras 24/7.

  59. getaclue says:
    @Kronos

    “the smart white liberals”–LOL… I guess some could be “smart” then instead of stupid the word “evil” accounts for them?

  60. David says:
    @RudyM

    Police body cameras should always be pointed at the officer’s face so we can see if he looks racist.

    • Replies: @E. Rekshun
  61. @Nicholas Stix

    Yes, Brown was after Wilson’s gun for the purpose of murdering him. With Brown reaching for his gun, Wilson was fighting one-handed.

  62. @Anonymous

    That already exists. They use it on that TV show, Law and Order.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  63. Charon says:
    @Anonymous

    Brilliant. And likely in the works.

    Think how many problems it would solve! Because as we’re always told, crime isn’t the problem…it’s the perception of crime.

  64. Charon says:
    @Arclight

    Well, except that these same people are changing the “letter of the law” to eliminate enforcement of minority crime. So it can still be a win for them, so to speak.

  65. @Art Deco

    Hey Art Deco, can you share your source with us?

    Not doubting your numbers, but it is always good to know where to look for reliable data. Thx.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  66. @David In TN

    Just as the media was about to cover it, a new detail on the Emmit Till case surfaced so they had to cover that instead.

  67. Kronos says:
    @anon

    I’m referring to neoliberals. The ones who realized and accepted that allowing blacks into the inner cities was a catastrophic mistake. Long before Charles Murray’s 1994 “The Bell Curve,” the “realistic” faction realized inner city blacks were a turd that they constantly needed to sell as victimized souls with potential. A lot of MSM effort is invested toward portraying them in a good light. Also, in preventing a Crown Heights showdown between blacks and another coalition of the fringes demographic.

    They know black low IQ and aggression is a major driver in crime statistics. They’ve spent decades covering it up. (Also, with the increased ferocity of the intellectually cornered.) The higher-ups must’ve realized that body cameras would just further demonstrate that blacks often behave badly. But either they went with the political tide or wanted this documentation for some reason. (In the long term, the MSM will dump the black boyfriend for the Hispanic one.)

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  68. @The Alarmist

    Footage meant to show one problem actually ends up showing another, taboo problem, and is therefore suppressed.

    Has happened before:

  69. anon[397] • Disclaimer says:

    I’m referring to neoliberals. The ones who realized and accepted that allowing blacks into the inner cities was a catastrophic mistake.

    Unicorns.

    They know black low IQ and aggression is a major driver in crime statistics.

    Unicorns.

    The higher-ups must’ve realized that body cameras would just further demonstrate that blacks often behave badly.

    Lol.

    But either they went with the political tide or wanted this documentation for some reason.

    Occam’s razor: the higher ups, the liberals (neo, paleo, oreo, whateer) have been getting high on their own supply for years. They were and are true believers in the Narrative, especially those in the government-media complex who maintain the Narrative.

    tldr
    They fully expected cop cams to show lots of crimes against helpless People of Color. They believe their own stories and cannot explain any behavior of dindus except by RAYCISM. Of explanations, there can be only one.

    Liberalism rests on delusions and lies.

    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  70. @Anonymous

    World must conform to the reigning myths.

    Or, as in this case, the reining-in myths.

  71. @David In TN

    I wonder why the Christian-Newsom torture murders (still an ongoing story for nearly 13 years) did not “rocket to the center of the national discourse on race?”

    For the same reason dog bites, fare evasions, and school closings don’t. They’re everyday occurrences, not news.

    • Replies: @David In TN
  72. @anon

    Liberalism rests on delusions and lies.

    The first being that there is anything liberal about these people.

    True liberals would be steeped in the liberal arts. Progressives prefer the dark arts.

  73. @David

    Police body cameras should always be pointed at the officer’s face so we can see if he looks racist.

    Or smirking.

  74. bomag says:
    @Kronos

    the smart white liberals must’ve realized this would happen

    No, they just figured they could cram it down our throats.

    I can’t blame them. They’ve got most everybody on their knees, worshiping various Others as some overlooked source of talent. This was just one more incremental step in their laugh-a-thon of getting society to do stupid things.

  75. @Altai_2

    I saw the trailer for this when I went to see Terminator yesterday, and you could tell that the movie had almost every possible cliche in it, with the possible exception of the recently released Harriet. Harriet too will go down the drain in theaters, but will make its money back when every library and school district in the country purchases DVDs for “history” classes.

    The new Charlies Angels also looks like it stinks.

  76. Art Deco says:
    @Kronos

    The ones who realized and accepted that allowing blacks into the inner cities was a catastrophic mistake.

    What, you fancy the State of Illinois, ca. 1925, was going to adopt South African pass laws?

    • LOL: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Kronos
  77. Kronos says:
    @Art Deco

    They really didn’t need to. The role of housing convents and de facto segregation presented ample protection (or they thought.) But when the courts started to dismantle such laws it opened the floodgates.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Shelley_v._Kraemer

    Also, Steve wrote some superb articles on illegal “One black per block” rules that saved many neighborhoods.

  78. @mmack

    Yeah, there was one woman who said about Michael Brown (something like), “He was just stealing. You didn’t have to shoot him.”

    Maybe low class blacks don’t think that stealing from YT is that big a deal. Day rich, and can afford to by new stuff.

    Certainly California’s raising the misdemeanor limit to $900 has not helped things.

    Yet the Atlantic author maintains the on-the-one-hand and on-the-other-hand style through out the article.

    On a happier note, an Antifa asswipe is going to jail for six years for clobbering some guy with a baton:
    https://pjmedia.com/instapundit/347110/

    • Replies: @bigdicknick
  79. Anonymous[219] • Disclaimer says:
    @obwandiyag

    Right, the Brazilian solution. Uniformed cop by day – death squad member by night.

  80. eah says:
    @eah

    Likely the more obvious problem with police bodycams:

  81. @Reg Cæsar

    One day black on white atrocities are downplayed as “just another crime that happens all the time so we don’t report it.”

    Another day its “black on white crime rarely happens so we don’t report it.”

    • Agree: Nicholas Stix
  82. anon[397] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    As per the video in Anon #360’s comment above, lots of the video is pretty mundane, and, if you can sit through 35 minutes of that, you may realize that life is pretty boring, even for cops.

    Oberlin, Ohio is a small town. It’s Niceville, not Cleveland, so bodycam vids are more likely to involve barking dogs or fender benders. Much of policing is boring stuff anywhere. I used to have some distant friends in SoCal policing, and where one worked made a difference. Dealing with drunks on the streets of Huntington Beach is not quite the same as in Downey or Riverside. But even in places where there’s a lot of bad people doing bad things, much of police work is repetition; paperwork, looking at people, interacting with scammers, and so forth.

    However, when those exciting moments happen, I’m guessing that any cop who wears these cameras regularly already has it ingrained in hm to talk and act differently than if there were no cameras around (that he KNOWS of).

    Could be. But view both of them, paying attention to both the Students of Color and the Students of Whiteness, watch the body language and listen to the vocal tonality. The white girl who called the cops has that quavering tone of voice the GenZ girls get when they are displaying emotion; likely she’s sincere in her Wokeness defending the helpless Poindexter against The Man. Poindexter is probably acting, but it’s pretty good acting.The Nubian Princess is a classic example of “sullen”.

    That’s the raw material the Dean of Students had to work with to whip up a lynch mob Red Guard brigade righteously angry protest. Hyper emotional and credulous. Perfect sock puppets. Printing out fliers on Oberlin machines was not a good idea, but who knew they could be traced? Well, who within the Obie admin knew, anyway.

    I’d guess that you won’t hear as bad of the insulting language, or see the “stop resisting” (while he beats the guy in hand-cuffs on the back of the head) business that you would have with a camera unknown to the cops in the past. Of course, when the adrenaline is really pumping, during/after a chase, or when a guy starts wailing on the cops, then all bets are off. That’s when you’ve got your actual reality show on.

    I’m aware of a couple of convictions of police officers in which either dashcams or body cams provided evidence. Some of that proprietary / OS stuff is designed into bodycams to make tampering more difficult. Therefore I’d guess you are talking through your hat.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  83. @Rob McX

    ” I’d say every cop prays that any person he does shoot will be white.”

    And in the main, they are.

  84. Lurker says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    Join the club. I find myself attracted to watching older stuff to escape, only to realise The Agenda was already in force decades ago, though more subtle.

    Still, there’s the compensation of hate watching.

    • Agree: HammerJack
  85. Kinda weird how the black riots that were regular occurrences from 2008-2016 just completely stopped right after the Most Racist President Ever was elected.

    Come to think of it, for the last 3 years under Trump there have been no more instances of the terror attack/security state escalation dance either

    Weird

  86. @anon

    No, I’m not talking about tampering. Where’d you get that out of what I just wrote and you even excerpted??

    I’m talking about adrenaline. Once that really kicks in, all those thoughts about what might appear on TV later go out the window. You’d forget it’s even there, is what I’m getting at. Adrenaline is amazing (and often necessary) stuff, and I can see anyone whose been recorded in a rage or a fight being just amazed watching himself later.

    No, I didn’t watch Anon’s 2 videos, but I’ve watched others of traffic stops, etc, that just went on and on. Usually the cops are very reasonable, and the whole thing seems a waste of someone’s tax money.

  87. @IC

    This is actually one of the examples of the videos I’ve watched (in reply to Anon-something-or-other). It’s just tedious, all because this lady is trying to get out of a ticket, and the cops DON’T want it to escalate via the race card. Just go to traffic court and see if you can get a break there.

    Yeah, this footage exonerated them pretty well, I’d say.

  88. Moses says:
    @Jus' Sayin'...

    This is just another example of why I’ve stopped going to the (((movies)))

    Yeah, same.

    Re-watching older films like Best Picture winner American Beauty I’m struck by the overt anti-White, anti-Straight, anti-Gentile messages in that film:
    – Gay couple next door are super wholesome and monogamous (Gays are more wholesome!)
    – Villain is ex-military, White religious Christian, loves to listen to Andrews Sisters (military, Christian, wholesome 1940s America bad)
    – Villain acts out against his son and gays because he represses his own homosexuality (any anti-gay sentiment flows from own gay repression — just let it out and we’ll be ok!)
    – Hero infatuated with and has sex with his daughter’s underage friend

    And so on.

    Recently watched “Deadpool 2” on a plane. Loaded with anti-Christian, anti-White messages (super bad pedophile villian a bible-thumping caricature). White character doesn’t like loud Indian music so Deadpool accuses him of being racist. It’s basically an anti-White, anti-Christian comic book in film form. Scorcese was right — superhero films are not cinema.

    Once you see the subversive messages built into Hollywood you see them everywhere.

    • Replies: @NobodyKnowsImADog
  89. @MikeatMikedotMike

    I’m old enough to think of Nipsey Russell, from whom Hussle ripped off that name.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nipsey_Russell

    Really more my parents’ generation, but I remember him from watching TV with my parents as a young child. He got his start doing routines as a carhop at The Varsity. He lived to a ripe old age.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
  90. J1234 says:
    @Altai_2

    Hollywood hasn’t yet received the memo from journalism that the official opinion on body cams for cops is morphing from “good” to “bad.” A new episode must be written!

  91. @Moses

    You might like this channel.
    https://www.invidio.us/watch?v=rLfIhQarmq4

    I first noticed the overt anti-white agenda from watching Django Unchained, and it really sunk in with The Boy in the Striped Pajamas. In the first, there’s no good white guy except for an anti-white jew, and in the second the message of the film is that the children deserve to suffer for the sins of their parents. The SJWs on twitter and occasional nutty marxist professors can be dismissed as one-offs, but what can you say about movies that required millions of dollars and thousands of employees to make, all to make viciously anti-white propaganda that then gets applause and awards from all of Hollywood? You can only conclude that very powerful people and their servants want us to suffer and die, and are powerful enough to punish any prominent person who speaks out against them.

    • Replies: @Moses
    , @Jim Don Bob
  92. @The Anti-Gnostic

    Yeah he was on a lot of the old Dean Martin Celebrity Roasts. Not bad, but I felt like someone was writing his bits for him.

  93. @Anon

    The underlying issue is that Garner was “arrested” for a non arrestable offense. He should have been cited not assaulted and was illegally killed.
    If Pantaleo had not been a paid employee of the City he’d have been charged, and convicted of murder.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
    , @Anon
    , @AceDeuce
  94. Moses says:
    @NobodyKnowsImADog

    Tks for the link. I watched it. Guess I’m not the only one who saw anti-White, pro-Gay, anti-Christian and anti-marriage and anti-military themes in “American Beauty.”

    He deconstructs anti-1950s America film “Pleasantville” too: https://www.invidio.us/watch?v=OvSDIbikprY

    “Pleasantville” jumped right out at me years ago as having thinly veiled anti-White, anti-Christian, anti-family, pro-promiscuity themes. It’s about two 1998 teens who are transported into the world of a black and white 1950s “Leave it to Beaver” type sitcom. Over-the-top themes like:

    – Divorce is good
    – 1950s White Americans and their culture were bad and deficient (everything literally black and white, everyone closed-minded)
    – Only when the wife masturbates to get in touch with her sexuality (as taught by the 1998 teen daughter) in the tub does color (representing leftist goodthink) make an appearance in the film as she transforms from black and white to color
    – As color spreads, some people love it and others are against it and remain black and white (you can guess who is who symbolically)
    – Sign in window of eatery says “No colored” as in no people who appear in color rather than black and white (get it?)
    – Black and white holdouts devoid of humanity, of feeling
    – Eventually everyone is colorized, bad backward 1950s culture swept away
    – and so on

    You’ll be shocked at the background of the writer and director.

  95. Hibernian says:
    @Jim bob Lassiter

    “I also thought that appellate courts have ruled that when people are circulating at large in the public sphere, they can be audio-video recorded by others with or without their consent.”

    Wait till SCOTUS is Kagan and eight clones of Kagan.

    As a property owner you ought to be able to do the above especially when the recording is done automatically, with no focus on a particular person unless they create it themselves, from a base on your own property at the boundary between indoors and outdoors. And your sharing it with the cops is between you and the cops.

  96. Hibernian says:
    @Anon

    Like all caps, it’s annoying, but not that big of a deal because few people do it.

  97. Hibernian says:
    @Art Deco

    As industrial society advances, manufacturing becomes more high tech, and basic manufacturing gets offshored, US manufacturing jobs require more and more education. Manufacturing in the US now is very unlike what it was in 1880.

    • Replies: @Art Deco
  98. Art Deco says:
    @Hibernian

    Most people work in the service sector.

    That aside, what do you think blacks were doing to put bread on the table in 1925? You think half of them were holed up in asylums, tuberculosis sanitoriums, and state poorhouses? (About 1/4 of the black heads of household were employed as a ‘laborer’ or ‘servant’ at that time).

  99. @Jim Don Bob

    ghetto blacks actually say this stuff even in the case of ARMED robbery. For instance a dollar general clerk shot and killed a robber who was pointing a gun in his face:

    The robber’s family is like “why did they kill him???!!!!”

    They seem to have an inability to imagine the experiences of others. I.e. a store clerk with a gun in his face may fear being killed.

  100. Hibernian says:
    @Don't Look at Me

    The early episodes with George Dzundza or Paul Sorvino as the senior detective and Michael Moriarty as the Executive Assistant DA (Working prosecutor with one assistant.) are not so politically correct as the later ones. They got rid of Dann Florek, Moriarty, and Chris Noth (who at one point in either the 1st or 2nd season got a cop killer to confess by pointing a gun at this head) as time went on. Sorvino left after a season and part of another, to preserve his voice for opera, and for other reasons.

    Moriarty got into a freedom of speech controversy with Janet Reno, and, also, alcoholism was said to be involved. (No comment whatsoever.) Florek returned in one of the spinoffs, I think SVU. Moriarty definitely never returned in any way, and I don’t think he starred in anything else after that. Noth was written out of the show by having him punch out an acquitted defendant, somehow keep his job, and get transferred to Staten Island. (And possibly demoted.)

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  101. @Art Deco

    Not ignored by police, but by the media. Hence white shitlibs have bizarre views on the criminal justice system. Social media allows random people to be inform the world which wasn’t possible before.

  102. countenance says: • Website

    I predicted it from the get-go of the post-Ferguson demands for body cams that, once they started showing more black misbehavior than police misbehavior, that Wokeville would quickly do a 180 and start demanding their removal, because social justice, or some other contrived reason.

    It only took a little more than three years.

    November 2017:

    https://www.yahoo.com/news/police-body-cameras-threaten-civil-215851117.html

    • Replies: @David In TN
  103. @Hibernian

    I liked the Jerry Orbach / Chris Noth Law & Orders a lot.

  104. Art Deco says:
    @Bill Jones

    He was neither assaulted nor killed. He was subject to an ordinary police tackle consequent to being noncompliant with lawful instructions. He had a crisis and died because he was morbidly obese, diabetic and had asthma. Unless you fancy police officers have to ask for a subject’s medical records ‘ere moving him about, they were not at fault.

    While we’re at it, can you point to me the section of the New York Penal Law which identifies ‘non-arrestable’ offenses?

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  105. @countenance

    About that time Mr. Obama said something like “Bodycams don’t tell the whole story.”

  106. @NobodyKnowsImADog

    The new Terminator movie has a long sequence where the good girls must get from Mexico to the USA. Of course the new Johnettez Connor has an uncle who leads a middle class life but who is a smuggler. The smugglees are portrayed as just wanting a better life. The US detention center sequence goes out of its way to show illegals confined to chain link cages.

    The movie is doing badly. It cost $150 – 200 million. The Mexico scenes were shot in Spain partly out of fear of the Mexican cartels.

    I read about American Beauty when it came out and resolved to never see it.

  107. Think more deviously

    It was the plan all along

  108. Anon[331] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill Jones

    The underlying issue is that Garner was “arrested” for a non arrestable offense.

    I don’t think this is true. He had been cited multiple times for selling loosies. The policing policy as set by city hall and the police bigwigs, was broken windows. You can disagree with broken windows policing, but that’s what was in force and the officers didn’t choose that.

    The biggest problem with blacks is that they think that they can choose whether or not to be arrested, that they can talk or misbehave their way ouf of an arrest. The ultimate outcome of that would be that only people who passively accept being arrested could be arrested, so it obviously isn’t tolerated. When a cop decides to arrest you, rightly or wrongly, you are getting arrested. There is no case in the history of the universe where a cop decided to arrest someone and gave up because the guy was belligerent. If you make it hard, then it will be a more foreful, violent process for you. If you want to complain, you need to let them arrest you and file a complaint or lawsuit later.

  109. @eah

    from a civil liberties standpoint, the interesting and important questions are: When does a person have a reasonable expectation of privacy? — And does a surveillance system unduly infringe on this reasonable expectation of privacy?

    If you want the civil liberty of being free from from police abuse you have to compromise on your civil liberty to have total privacy in your interactions with the police. “Civil liberties” sound great, but you just don’t get to have them all. There are trade offs.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  110. @Hypnotoad666

    Dear God.

    This reasoning is bad logic, bad policy, bad ethics, and bad law. There is absolutely nothing mutually exclusive whatsoever about reasonable expectations of privacy and one’s right not to be harassed or abused by the government’s agents under colour of law.

    That anyone remotely otherwise reasonable advances this kind of false dichotomy and Hobeson’s choice demonstrates how unsalvageable the whole mess has become.

  111. ogunsiron says:
    @Anonymous

    They need a software to Hollywoodize the police cameras

    They’re probably working on that. They stop at nothing.
    Some smart people in SF will invest time and money on “unbiasing” algorithms for live video. Don’t think it’s too ridiculous for these people. They always double down. They’re far from having reached the floor of the social justice abyss.

  112. eah says:
    @Jim bob Lassiter

    Do you think … do you just not believe …

    Dude, I did not say one word about what I believe or do not believe, including/especially in the two contexts I mentioned (police bodycams and AMZN’s Ring system) — I simply said there are reasonable questions one can ask about these surveillance systems, and these revolve around the basic question of privacy, ie when a person has or should have a reasonable expectation of privacy.

    You hysterical ass.

    I’m aware of some legal precedent about this, eg filming in a public space, where obviously there is not really a reasonable expectation of privacy — but I’m not a lawyer and do not follow the issue.

    Police bodycams seem generally OK — and while I don’t see a big problem with AMZN’s Ring system, it should be obvious that, depending on the angle and resolution of the camera, it could film eg the inside of a house across the street.

    Generally, I regard surveillance as just another aspect of anarcho-tyranny — people should question the need for it rather than just passively accept more and more of it, or even worse demand more of it, the latter points being generally what is happening today, unfortunately.

    • Replies: @eah
  113. eah says:
    @eah

    People everywhere don’t like surveillance.

  114. AceDeuce says:

    “The camera photographs what’s there.”

    Jack Nicholson

  115. AceDeuce says:
    @Bill Jones

    Garner had been told repeatedly to stay away from the entrance to the store, where he not only illegally sold illegal cigarettes, but had threatened store customers. He was out on bail at the time for a litany of offenses:

    STATEN ISLAND, N.Y. Eric Garner had run afoul of the law several times for allegedly selling untaxed cigarettes before his fatal confrontation with police on Thursday, court records show.

    Garner died as officers tried to arrest him in Tompkinsville on suspicion of selling illegal smokes, said police.

    Cops said Garner died of a heart attack, although video shows a plainclothes officer putting him in a chokehold and bringing him to the ground.

    At the time of his death, the Port Richmond resident had three misdemeanor cases pending in Stapleton Criminal Court. He was free on $2,000 bail.

    On Aug. 22 of last year, Garner was arrested on School Road and Bay Street, Fort Wadsworth, for allegedly driving without a license, according to a criminal complaint.

    Garner, 43, gave cops a phony name and put himself in more hot water when officers allegedly found untaxed cigarettes and a small amount of marijuana in the 1998 Lincoln Navigator he was driving, the complaint said.

    He was charged with aggravated unlicensed vehicle operation, false impersonation, possession or sale of untaxed cigarettes and marijuana possession, according to information from District Attorney Daniel Donovan’s office.

    Seven months later, while out on $1,000 bail, Garner was busted on March 28 for allegedly selling unstamped cigarettes on the street outside of 200 Bay St., Tompkinsville. He had 24 packs of untaxed smokes in his possession, police said.

    The location is next door to 202 Bay St., where the fatal confrontation occurred Thursday between cops and Garner.

    Garner was charged with a misdemeanor count of violating the cigarette and tobacco products tax and posted $1,000 bail, online state court records show.

    Garner was arrested again on May 7 on Victory Boulevard and St. Marks Place, Tompkinsville. The site is across the block from Bay Street.

    Cops accused him of possessing six packs of untaxed cigarettes.

    Garner last appeared in court to answer the three cases on July 2. The matters were all adjourned then to Oct. 7, online state court records show.

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