The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
The Argentos
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

This whole story about aged starlet Asia Argento, involving #MeToo, Harvey Weinstein, JT Leroy, and Anthony Bourdain’s suicide, sounds like it was custom-made to support my call for banning child actors * when it becomes possible in the near future to replace them economically with CGI, the way no actual apes were used in the latest Planet of the Apes movie, just human grown-ups like Andy Serkis jumping around in motion-capture suits.

Argento is the daughter of Dario Argento, director of grotesque Italian horror films. She once said:

I never acted out of ambition; I acted to gain my father’s attention. It took a long time for him to notice me – I started when I was nine, and he only cast me when I was 16. And he only became my father when he was my director. I always thought it was sick to choose looking at yourself on a big screen as your job. There has to be something crooked in your mind to want to be loved by everybody. It’s like being a prostitute, to share that intimacy with all those people.

Indeed.

Dennis Dale has more on the #MeToo hypocrisy of Argento and Rose McGowan.

* I claim that Shakespeare would be on my side, judging from what an extraordinary amount of Hamlet is devoted to denouncing the recent fashion on the London stage for troupes of boy actors. (Tom Stoppard might disagree with my assessment of Shakespeare’s views on the subject, however.)

 
Hide 39 CommentsLeave a Comment
39 Comments to "The Argentos"
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
  1. OT:
    Mollie Tibbets was murdered by an illegal immigrant. So that means the gigantic story propped up by the media (to show the world that murders and bad things take place in rural white communities, too) will disappear in five, four, three, two….

    https://www.yahoo.com/lifestyle/charges-filed-against-mollie-tibbett-223000183.html

    I’d actually give it about two days to go away completely. Any alternate estimates are welcome.

  2. Steve is a modern day William Lloyd Garrison.

    BTW – if you Google “abolitionist New England” William Lloyd Garrison is #7. Mass murderer John Brown is #3.

  3. Dennis Dale? He appears on Luke Ford’s YouTube show BTW. So does what’s his name, smoking man, Grace, who used to do a podcast that Steve was a guest on. Hey Steve, do an interview with those guys! Ford is a good interviewer. I bet they’d love to have you on. I recall them mentioning you.

  4. Another bizarre dimension to this story is that Dario Argento directed his daughter being raped in his films, such as the Stendhal Syndrome.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I remember reading about the Argento family maybe 16 years ago when reviewing some Vin Diesel movie in which she had a big role and thinking: "Oh boy ..."
  5. I don’t necessarily feel bad for Bourdain; he seemed like a decent but damaged guy. With that said, the circumstances around his suicide make it seem like Argento was probably manipulating a guy with some serious issues.

    I suppose on some level these toxic Hollywood personalities deserve each other and the consequences that come with associating with such scum.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    I knew Tony Bourdain slightly, and I'd say your assessment is about right.

    I met him the night Princess Diana died, when he was chef at Sullivan's, which was a not very interesting bar-and-grill restaurant in I think the same building as the Ed Sullivan Theater, where David Letterman's show was shot at the time.

    Friends of mine who are brothers and were then producing movies together had gotten a bunch of guy friends together for dinner, and they had optioned one or more of Bourdain's (not very distinguished) novels, so they knew him. He came out from the kitchen a couple of times during our meal, and when service was over we all went with him to Siberia, which was a famous and short-lived incredibly debauched bar in I think the 50th St. subway station.

    We were within eyeshot of the Times Square news crawl when the news hit that Diana had been confirmed dead. That was weird. I spent a lot of that night talking to Bourdain at the bar at Siberia, and he was a good conversationalist. I think maybe Kitchen Confidential was about to come out, but that his celebrated New Yorker piece had already made waves--but I may be wrong on the timing. Don't remember.

    I do remember that he had a very complete recall of NYC gangland history--smart guy, I thought, but with something to prove about being tough or whatever. I asked him why he was looking to get into writing and he said very plainly that he was getting too old to be in the kitchen, and it was a way out.

    Later when he was cheffing at Les Halles we used to go by to see him and chat a bit. I think the last time I saw him was at the opening of the new location of Siberia Bar: he was wandering around the joint seeming super-coked with Mario Batali, and he didn't seem to recognize his old acquaintances. Understandably enough, I suppose. His life had turned into something else.

    Anyway, my view of him is of a very insecure guy who was in the habit of painting himself into a corner and seeing if he could escape. This Argento woman strikes me as one of those corners--a bad puppy who took her toll on him, in this case fatally.
  6. @Clement Pulaski
    Another bizarre dimension to this story is that Dario Argento directed his daughter being raped in his films, such as the Stendhal Syndrome.

    I remember reading about the Argento family maybe 16 years ago when reviewing some Vin Diesel movie in which she had a big role and thinking: “Oh boy …”

    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    Did a quick image check since didn't know who she was.

    She was a fairly attractive young woman with a very nice womanly body. Now she's all tatted up, like a low-IQ whore. Case closed.
  7. She now claims she never touched him and Anthony paid him off.

    OK…sure.

  8. Off Topic…

    Mexican NAFTA handshake deal to be announced Thursday.

  9. I still don’t understand why McGowan kept working for Weinstein after he supposedly raped her.

    • Replies: @TheMediumIsTheMassage
    She's clearly fucked up so *something* probably happened. I believe her, although if I was part of a jury that would not be enough for me to convict. But I empathize with her. The brain does funny things when confronted with a situation like that, people's ability to rationalize things in order to protect their own sanity (until it's too late) is surprising. Some people tell themsleves it wasn't really rape and that everything is ok and continue with business as usual, and sure, a big paycheck and a glamorous career helps. But it's not as clear cut as 'he raped me therefore I must run away from him forever'. Remember Hwood is kind of a cult and a tight knit club. There aren't many places to run.
  10. @Polynikes
    I don't necessarily feel bad for Bourdain; he seemed like a decent but damaged guy. With that said, the circumstances around his suicide make it seem like Argento was probably manipulating a guy with some serious issues.

    I suppose on some level these toxic Hollywood personalities deserve each other and the consequences that come with associating with such scum.

    I knew Tony Bourdain slightly, and I’d say your assessment is about right.

    I met him the night Princess Diana died, when he was chef at Sullivan’s, which was a not very interesting bar-and-grill restaurant in I think the same building as the Ed Sullivan Theater, where David Letterman’s show was shot at the time.

    Friends of mine who are brothers and were then producing movies together had gotten a bunch of guy friends together for dinner, and they had optioned one or more of Bourdain’s (not very distinguished) novels, so they knew him. He came out from the kitchen a couple of times during our meal, and when service was over we all went with him to Siberia, which was a famous and short-lived incredibly debauched bar in I think the 50th St. subway station.

    We were within eyeshot of the Times Square news crawl when the news hit that Diana had been confirmed dead. That was weird. I spent a lot of that night talking to Bourdain at the bar at Siberia, and he was a good conversationalist. I think maybe Kitchen Confidential was about to come out, but that his celebrated New Yorker piece had already made waves–but I may be wrong on the timing. Don’t remember.

    I do remember that he had a very complete recall of NYC gangland history–smart guy, I thought, but with something to prove about being tough or whatever. I asked him why he was looking to get into writing and he said very plainly that he was getting too old to be in the kitchen, and it was a way out.

    Later when he was cheffing at Les Halles we used to go by to see him and chat a bit. I think the last time I saw him was at the opening of the new location of Siberia Bar: he was wandering around the joint seeming super-coked with Mario Batali, and he didn’t seem to recognize his old acquaintances. Understandably enough, I suppose. His life had turned into something else.

    Anyway, my view of him is of a very insecure guy who was in the habit of painting himself into a corner and seeing if he could escape. This Argento woman strikes me as one of those corners–a bad puppy who took her toll on him, in this case fatally.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    Oh yeah, and writers from the Post were hanging out at Siberia that night that Diana died, as was apparently their habit. I remember haranguing them about how the paper had to run my brilliant idea for the front-page headline (the "wood"): Di, Dodi: Dead.

    When I finally saw the paper the next day I learned that they'd instead gone with something respectful like: Diana Princess of Wales Dead at 30-[whatever]. They were of course right, and I was no longer drunk.

    , @Steve Sailer
    I only saw Asia Argento in a Vin Diesel movie in 2002. She radiated Trouble.

    I wonder what Vin thought of her? Diesel is kind of the opposite of Bourdain: a guy who has become very successful without ever denying himself an escape route.

    , @Obsessive Contrarian
    I never knew him but I did observe him during one of my jobs. He would leave the studio and immediately become quite morose, and stuck a cig in his mouth as soon as taping was over. Not mean, just sad to the bone. He was married to his first wife at the time.

    Bourdain always struck me as a closeted gay man, and I am not the type who says that often. His relationship with the first wife ("high school sweetheart") was clearly a caretaker-beard type thing. Well, at least caretaker, not 100% sure about the beard.

    RIP. He was a decent guy.
  11. Anon[126] • Disclaimer says:

    Every perceptive, prophetic genius has his Achilles heel, and pursuing this crackpot CGI child actor idea is Steve’s.

    The Argento director father-daughter situation is hardly typical; go ahead and ban that. But it’s not rocket science to protect child actors from sexual abuse. There could be licensed minders and strict no-outside-contact rules that the child and adults are indoctrinated on. Heck, the LAUSD pays adults to follow autistic kids around all day long. And it doesn’t need to be a perfect system. Once in a while shit happens in the real world.

    Also, remember the abused kid was 17. Seriously?

    If the kids otherwise get screwed up by not having same-age friends or discovering that nobody wants to hire them when they grow up, and they don’t particularly have any other talent, who cares? There are plenty of deadbeat stoner kids who didn’t start out as child actors. And think of a pianist or elite swimmer or figure skater. Life patterns differ. Childhoods differ. The wonderful variety of life! You give up something, you gain something. You’re a kid and you don’t make all the decisions about your life.

  12. @slumber_j
    I knew Tony Bourdain slightly, and I'd say your assessment is about right.

    I met him the night Princess Diana died, when he was chef at Sullivan's, which was a not very interesting bar-and-grill restaurant in I think the same building as the Ed Sullivan Theater, where David Letterman's show was shot at the time.

    Friends of mine who are brothers and were then producing movies together had gotten a bunch of guy friends together for dinner, and they had optioned one or more of Bourdain's (not very distinguished) novels, so they knew him. He came out from the kitchen a couple of times during our meal, and when service was over we all went with him to Siberia, which was a famous and short-lived incredibly debauched bar in I think the 50th St. subway station.

    We were within eyeshot of the Times Square news crawl when the news hit that Diana had been confirmed dead. That was weird. I spent a lot of that night talking to Bourdain at the bar at Siberia, and he was a good conversationalist. I think maybe Kitchen Confidential was about to come out, but that his celebrated New Yorker piece had already made waves--but I may be wrong on the timing. Don't remember.

    I do remember that he had a very complete recall of NYC gangland history--smart guy, I thought, but with something to prove about being tough or whatever. I asked him why he was looking to get into writing and he said very plainly that he was getting too old to be in the kitchen, and it was a way out.

    Later when he was cheffing at Les Halles we used to go by to see him and chat a bit. I think the last time I saw him was at the opening of the new location of Siberia Bar: he was wandering around the joint seeming super-coked with Mario Batali, and he didn't seem to recognize his old acquaintances. Understandably enough, I suppose. His life had turned into something else.

    Anyway, my view of him is of a very insecure guy who was in the habit of painting himself into a corner and seeing if he could escape. This Argento woman strikes me as one of those corners--a bad puppy who took her toll on him, in this case fatally.

    Oh yeah, and writers from the Post were hanging out at Siberia that night that Diana died, as was apparently their habit. I remember haranguing them about how the paper had to run my brilliant idea for the front-page headline (the “wood”): Di, Dodi: Dead.

    When I finally saw the paper the next day I learned that they’d instead gone with something respectful like: Diana Princess of Wales Dead at 30-[whatever]. They were of course right, and I was no longer drunk.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Say what you want about Variety, you had to chuckle over some of their headlines, like "Stix Nix Hix Pix" and "No MM No Martin".

    But I think it was the New York Post who had the all time classic:
    http://gawker.com/333399/ike-beats-tina-is-posts-classiest-headline-ever

    IKE 'BEATS' TINA TO DEATH
  13. @slumber_j
    I knew Tony Bourdain slightly, and I'd say your assessment is about right.

    I met him the night Princess Diana died, when he was chef at Sullivan's, which was a not very interesting bar-and-grill restaurant in I think the same building as the Ed Sullivan Theater, where David Letterman's show was shot at the time.

    Friends of mine who are brothers and were then producing movies together had gotten a bunch of guy friends together for dinner, and they had optioned one or more of Bourdain's (not very distinguished) novels, so they knew him. He came out from the kitchen a couple of times during our meal, and when service was over we all went with him to Siberia, which was a famous and short-lived incredibly debauched bar in I think the 50th St. subway station.

    We were within eyeshot of the Times Square news crawl when the news hit that Diana had been confirmed dead. That was weird. I spent a lot of that night talking to Bourdain at the bar at Siberia, and he was a good conversationalist. I think maybe Kitchen Confidential was about to come out, but that his celebrated New Yorker piece had already made waves--but I may be wrong on the timing. Don't remember.

    I do remember that he had a very complete recall of NYC gangland history--smart guy, I thought, but with something to prove about being tough or whatever. I asked him why he was looking to get into writing and he said very plainly that he was getting too old to be in the kitchen, and it was a way out.

    Later when he was cheffing at Les Halles we used to go by to see him and chat a bit. I think the last time I saw him was at the opening of the new location of Siberia Bar: he was wandering around the joint seeming super-coked with Mario Batali, and he didn't seem to recognize his old acquaintances. Understandably enough, I suppose. His life had turned into something else.

    Anyway, my view of him is of a very insecure guy who was in the habit of painting himself into a corner and seeing if he could escape. This Argento woman strikes me as one of those corners--a bad puppy who took her toll on him, in this case fatally.

    I only saw Asia Argento in a Vin Diesel movie in 2002. She radiated Trouble.

    I wonder what Vin thought of her? Diesel is kind of the opposite of Bourdain: a guy who has become very successful without ever denying himself an escape route.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
    I know nothing of Vin Diesel, but the Fast and Furious franchise must have been inspired by those same brother/producers' Gone In 60 Seconds, which Bruckheimer hijacked from them.

    They got some money and lame Associate Producer credits on that as I recall, but it was originally their project.

    , @O'Really
    If you look at all 3 women in Bourdain's life - his two wives and Argento - he was always looking for Trouble. After many decades, he finally found it. RIP

    http://www.dailylife.com.au/dl-food/celebrity-chefs/interview-anthony-bourdain-20120206-1r1iy.html
  14. @Steve Sailer
    I only saw Asia Argento in a Vin Diesel movie in 2002. She radiated Trouble.

    I wonder what Vin thought of her? Diesel is kind of the opposite of Bourdain: a guy who has become very successful without ever denying himself an escape route.

    I know nothing of Vin Diesel, but the Fast and Furious franchise must have been inspired by those same brother/producers’ Gone In 60 Seconds, which Bruckheimer hijacked from them.

    They got some money and lame Associate Producer credits on that as I recall, but it was originally their project.

  15. It’s little known that Bourdain was 1/2 Jewish (his mother). I think that this explains a lot about him (high verbal IQ atypical of chefs, tendency toward depression) which doesn’t make as much sense for a pure French guy.

    • Replies: @Anon
    It takes a particular kind of studied ignorance to think of the French of all people as either illiterate or inarticulate, relatively speaking.

    And to extend the judgment to French chefs, of all classes of people, is simply bizarre. The French ability to describe, classify, and write about food is what gave French food the premier position it still mostly enjoys; it's not like your average French chef produces, or produced in 1850 or 1950, objectively better food than his Italian or Chinese counterpart.
    , @tomv
    If a goyishe kop had said this, you'd deride the iSteve commentariat in general for making everything about "the Joos".

    If I could wish for one thing for a better world, it wouldn't be more intelligence, but more self-awareness.
  16. @slumber_j
    Oh yeah, and writers from the Post were hanging out at Siberia that night that Diana died, as was apparently their habit. I remember haranguing them about how the paper had to run my brilliant idea for the front-page headline (the "wood"): Di, Dodi: Dead.

    When I finally saw the paper the next day I learned that they'd instead gone with something respectful like: Diana Princess of Wales Dead at 30-[whatever]. They were of course right, and I was no longer drunk.

    Say what you want about Variety, you had to chuckle over some of their headlines, like “Stix Nix Hix Pix” and “No MM No Martin”.

    But I think it was the New York Post who had the all time classic:
    http://gawker.com/333399/ike-beats-tina-is-posts-classiest-headline-ever

    IKE ‘BEATS’ TINA TO DEATH

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    Say what you want about Variety, you had to chuckle over some of their headlines, like “Stix Nix Hix Pix” and “No MM No Martin”.
     
    I worked for the school paper when the theater department staged The Diary of Anne Frank. We ran a picture, but they scotched my proposed caption, "Anne doesn't live here anymore."

    I should have applied to work for Variety.
    , @slumber_j
    Historically speaking there's a lot of quality in the Post's wood. On the Petraeus resignation e.g.: "Cloak and Shag Her."

    And of course the all-time undisputed champion, "Headless Body in Topless Bar."
  17. Anon[202] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D
    It's little known that Bourdain was 1/2 Jewish (his mother). I think that this explains a lot about him (high verbal IQ atypical of chefs, tendency toward depression) which doesn't make as much sense for a pure French guy.

    It takes a particular kind of studied ignorance to think of the French of all people as either illiterate or inarticulate, relatively speaking.

    And to extend the judgment to French chefs, of all classes of people, is simply bizarre. The French ability to describe, classify, and write about food is what gave French food the premier position it still mostly enjoys; it’s not like your average French chef produces, or produced in 1850 or 1950, objectively better food than his Italian or Chinese counterpart.

    • Replies: @tomv
    Not ignorance, just chauvinism and provincialism.

    Right-winged traits, I guess, but that doesn't make them less annoying.
  18. Dario Argento was pretty insane. When the whole #METOO thing broke and well before Bourdain’s suicide, I spent about ten minutes perusing Asia Argento’s Instagram account and it is pretty apparent that she was bad news. Dark and twisted individual.

  19. @Jack D
    It's little known that Bourdain was 1/2 Jewish (his mother). I think that this explains a lot about him (high verbal IQ atypical of chefs, tendency toward depression) which doesn't make as much sense for a pure French guy.

    If a goyishe kop had said this, you’d deride the iSteve commentariat in general for making everything about “the Joos”.

    If I could wish for one thing for a better world, it wouldn’t be more intelligence, but more self-awareness.

    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @utu

    If I could wish for one thing for a better world, it wouldn’t be more intelligence, but more self-awareness.
     
    The 4th deadly sin prevents people form gaining self-awareness. This is the weakest Jewish spot as Judaism is build on pride and directly leads to suprematism. I would not expect much self-awareness among Jews.
  20. @Steve Sailer
    I only saw Asia Argento in a Vin Diesel movie in 2002. She radiated Trouble.

    I wonder what Vin thought of her? Diesel is kind of the opposite of Bourdain: a guy who has become very successful without ever denying himself an escape route.

    If you look at all 3 women in Bourdain’s life – his two wives and Argento – he was always looking for Trouble. After many decades, he finally found it. RIP

    http://www.dailylife.com.au/dl-food/celebrity-chefs/interview-anthony-bourdain-20120206-1r1iy.html

  21. custom-made to support my call for banning child actors * when it becomes possible in the near future to replace them economically with CGI…

    Or pit bulls in motion-capture suits.

  22. @Anonymous
    Say what you want about Variety, you had to chuckle over some of their headlines, like "Stix Nix Hix Pix" and "No MM No Martin".

    But I think it was the New York Post who had the all time classic:
    http://gawker.com/333399/ike-beats-tina-is-posts-classiest-headline-ever

    IKE 'BEATS' TINA TO DEATH

    Say what you want about Variety, you had to chuckle over some of their headlines, like “Stix Nix Hix Pix” and “No MM No Martin”.

    I worked for the school paper when the theater department staged The Diary of Anne Frank. We ran a picture, but they scotched my proposed caption, “Anne doesn’t live here anymore.”

    I should have applied to work for Variety.

  23. If you want the full Asia Argento experience, rent her movie “Scarlet Diva.” I wrote about it (2nd of three movies reviewed) at my old blog: http://www.2blowhards.com/archives/2003/07/bad_boy_film_viewing.html

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Argento is tight with Joe Coleman, which should tell you something.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=r-z7VYDIYgc

    Coleman is an "outsider artist" and used to do a stage show where he would blow himself up , amid comments like "Give Christ back to the Martians", and on one occasion bit the heads off mice onstage.

    Given that this is the man who achieved notoriety by blowing himself up in public spaces, it is amazing that Joe Coleman is in one piece. "Somehow I was more creative in my destructive acts than the average Joe," he says.

    These days, everyone wants a piece of Coleman. Collectors wait up to 18 months for a new painting - each an insanely detailed journey into the diseased heart of Western culture. Coleman has been referred to as a latter-day Hieronymous Bosch, and it is an influence he doesn't deny. He paints a motley pantheon of luminaries and dark forces, the inbred backwoods cousins of Norman Rockwell and Outsider Art. Mass murderers like Carl Panzram and Ed Gein people his iconography, alongside Harry Houdini, Louis Ferdinand Celine, the Outsider artist (and convicted paedophile) Adolf Wolfli, the Elephant Man, and Jayne Mansfield, his first and only historical portrait of a female subject.

    A resolute throwback to turn-of-the-century New York, he wears the red stripe of the Irish street gang, the Dead Rabbits, on his trousers. "One of the only modern inventions that has value to me is dynamite," he says. "Maybe the Irish have some kind of political justification, but in my case, I just like making bombs."

    In 1989 he was charged with "being in possession of an infernal machine", a charge not brought for over a century. The machine in question was Coleman himself, loaded with fireworks and detonating himself in front of an audience at the Boston Film and Video Arts Foundation.


    Coleman discovered this way to vent his feelings as a teenager. Protecting himself with a baking tray, he strapped fireworks to his chest and concealed them beneath his shirt. He would gatecrash parties and insult the guests before detonating himself and exiting. By the late Eighties, prankster had become performance artist, under the guise of his maniacal alter ego, Professor Momboozoo, a neologism alluding to his "mom" and alcoholic father.

    Professor Momboozoo was laid to rest at a 1989 Boston performance which served as a memento mori to his parents, who had died that year - Joseph Snr, a disillusioned Second World War veteran, of massive coronary failure, and his mother, Jacqueline, a devout Catholic who was excommunicated for marrying Joe's father after separating from her first husband, of pancreatic cancer.


    First projecting some old porn films, Coleman burst through the screen attached to a harness and blew himself up in mid-air. He bit the heads off two mice, one named "Daddy", the other "Mommy", then spat "Daddy's" head into the audience and swallowed "Mommy's" - thus incorporating her essence, as is supposed to happen with the Communion host she was denied by excommunication. Then, to recreate the fires of hell that she had feared being consumed by, he set fire to the venue.
     

    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/the-great-exploding-artist-1158387.html
  24. @Anon
    It takes a particular kind of studied ignorance to think of the French of all people as either illiterate or inarticulate, relatively speaking.

    And to extend the judgment to French chefs, of all classes of people, is simply bizarre. The French ability to describe, classify, and write about food is what gave French food the premier position it still mostly enjoys; it's not like your average French chef produces, or produced in 1850 or 1950, objectively better food than his Italian or Chinese counterpart.

    Not ignorance, just chauvinism and provincialism.

    Right-winged traits, I guess, but that doesn’t make them less annoying.

  25. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Paleo Retiree
    If you want the full Asia Argento experience, rent her movie “Scarlet Diva.” I wrote about it (2nd of three movies reviewed) at my old blog: http://www.2blowhards.com/archives/2003/07/bad_boy_film_viewing.html

    Argento is tight with Joe Coleman, which should tell you something.

    Coleman is an “outsider artist” and used to do a stage show where he would blow himself up , amid comments like “Give Christ back to the Martians”, and on one occasion bit the heads off mice onstage.

    Given that this is the man who achieved notoriety by blowing himself up in public spaces, it is amazing that Joe Coleman is in one piece. “Somehow I was more creative in my destructive acts than the average Joe,” he says.

    These days, everyone wants a piece of Coleman. Collectors wait up to 18 months for a new painting – each an insanely detailed journey into the diseased heart of Western culture. Coleman has been referred to as a latter-day Hieronymous Bosch, and it is an influence he doesn’t deny. He paints a motley pantheon of luminaries and dark forces, the inbred backwoods cousins of Norman Rockwell and Outsider Art. Mass murderers like Carl Panzram and Ed Gein people his iconography, alongside Harry Houdini, Louis Ferdinand Celine, the Outsider artist (and convicted paedophile) Adolf Wolfli, the Elephant Man, and Jayne Mansfield, his first and only historical portrait of a female subject.

    A resolute throwback to turn-of-the-century New York, he wears the red stripe of the Irish street gang, the Dead Rabbits, on his trousers. “One of the only modern inventions that has value to me is dynamite,” he says. “Maybe the Irish have some kind of political justification, but in my case, I just like making bombs.”

    In 1989 he was charged with “being in possession of an infernal machine”, a charge not brought for over a century. The machine in question was Coleman himself, loaded with fireworks and detonating himself in front of an audience at the Boston Film and Video Arts Foundation.

    Coleman discovered this way to vent his feelings as a teenager. Protecting himself with a baking tray, he strapped fireworks to his chest and concealed them beneath his shirt. He would gatecrash parties and insult the guests before detonating himself and exiting. By the late Eighties, prankster had become performance artist, under the guise of his maniacal alter ego, Professor Momboozoo, a neologism alluding to his “mom” and alcoholic father.

    Professor Momboozoo was laid to rest at a 1989 Boston performance which served as a memento mori to his parents, who had died that year – Joseph Snr, a disillusioned Second World War veteran, of massive coronary failure, and his mother, Jacqueline, a devout Catholic who was excommunicated for marrying Joe’s father after separating from her first husband, of pancreatic cancer.

    First projecting some old porn films, Coleman burst through the screen attached to a harness and blew himself up in mid-air. He bit the heads off two mice, one named “Daddy”, the other “Mommy”, then spat “Daddy’s” head into the audience and swallowed “Mommy’s” – thus incorporating her essence, as is supposed to happen with the Communion host she was denied by excommunication. Then, to recreate the fires of hell that she had feared being consumed by, he set fire to the venue.

    https://www.independent.co.uk/life-style/the-great-exploding-artist-1158387.html

  26. Alright the boy was only 17 when she had sex with him and in California the age of consent is 18 (strangely enough). I would see that as a technicality. It was years after they had worked together. At 17, it would have been my dream to get seduced by a woman like that and I think I am in good company there. I very much doubt a helpless boy has been traumatized for life in this story. More likely, a failing actor needed some money.

    • Replies: @Pericles

    At 17, it would have been my dream to get seduced by a woman like that and I think I am in good company there.

     

    Sure, and it might have been your dream at 12 too. But age of consent is intended to protect you from making such foolish decisions.
  27. @Jean Ralphio
    I still don’t understand why McGowan kept working for Weinstein after he supposedly raped her.

    She’s clearly fucked up so *something* probably happened. I believe her, although if I was part of a jury that would not be enough for me to convict. But I empathize with her. The brain does funny things when confronted with a situation like that, people’s ability to rationalize things in order to protect their own sanity (until it’s too late) is surprising. Some people tell themsleves it wasn’t really rape and that everything is ok and continue with business as usual, and sure, a big paycheck and a glamorous career helps. But it’s not as clear cut as ‘he raped me therefore I must run away from him forever’. Remember Hwood is kind of a cult and a tight knit club. There aren’t many places to run.

    • Replies: @Anonymous

    She’s clearly fucked up so *something* probably happened. I believe her...I empathize with her.
     
    Sabrina! I wondered when you were going to come back out and play again.
  28. @narrenspeise
    Alright the boy was only 17 when she had sex with him and in California the age of consent is 18 (strangely enough). I would see that as a technicality. It was years after they had worked together. At 17, it would have been my dream to get seduced by a woman like that and I think I am in good company there. I very much doubt a helpless boy has been traumatized for life in this story. More likely, a failing actor needed some money.

    At 17, it would have been my dream to get seduced by a woman like that and I think I am in good company there.

    Sure, and it might have been your dream at 12 too. But age of consent is intended to protect you from making such foolish decisions.

  29. @TheMediumIsTheMassage
    She's clearly fucked up so *something* probably happened. I believe her, although if I was part of a jury that would not be enough for me to convict. But I empathize with her. The brain does funny things when confronted with a situation like that, people's ability to rationalize things in order to protect their own sanity (until it's too late) is surprising. Some people tell themsleves it wasn't really rape and that everything is ok and continue with business as usual, and sure, a big paycheck and a glamorous career helps. But it's not as clear cut as 'he raped me therefore I must run away from him forever'. Remember Hwood is kind of a cult and a tight knit club. There aren't many places to run.

    She’s clearly fucked up so *something* probably happened. I believe her…I empathize with her.

    Sabrina! I wondered when you were going to come back out and play again.

  30. Dennis Dale has more on the #MeToo hypocrisy of Argento and Rose McGowan.

    Are you saying that Weinstein isn’t a rapist?

    • Replies: @Dennis Dale
    Not of McGowan or Argento. McGowan at least distanced herself from Weinstein after--but took her settlement money and sat silent while this "monster" was free to rape others (we are to presume), so she could work in Hollywood. How in the hell is she getting away with it?
  31. @Anonymous
    Say what you want about Variety, you had to chuckle over some of their headlines, like "Stix Nix Hix Pix" and "No MM No Martin".

    But I think it was the New York Post who had the all time classic:
    http://gawker.com/333399/ike-beats-tina-is-posts-classiest-headline-ever

    IKE 'BEATS' TINA TO DEATH

    Historically speaking there’s a lot of quality in the Post‘s wood. On the Petraeus resignation e.g.: “Cloak and Shag Her.”

    And of course the all-time undisputed champion, “Headless Body in Topless Bar.”

    • Replies: @black sea
    New York Post on Putin's alleged affair: "Vlad the Impaler"

    On Trump's primary run in the South: "Big Swingin' Dixie"


    And of course, they absolutely went to town on Anthony Weiner:

    https://www.businessinsider.com/new-york-post-covers-anthony-weiner-2016-10
  32. @slumber_j
    Historically speaking there's a lot of quality in the Post's wood. On the Petraeus resignation e.g.: "Cloak and Shag Her."

    And of course the all-time undisputed champion, "Headless Body in Topless Bar."

    New York Post on Putin’s alleged affair: “Vlad the Impaler”

    On Trump’s primary run in the South: “Big Swingin’ Dixie”

    And of course, they absolutely went to town on Anthony Weiner:

    https://www.businessinsider.com/new-york-post-covers-anthony-weiner-2016-10

  33. @slumber_j
    I knew Tony Bourdain slightly, and I'd say your assessment is about right.

    I met him the night Princess Diana died, when he was chef at Sullivan's, which was a not very interesting bar-and-grill restaurant in I think the same building as the Ed Sullivan Theater, where David Letterman's show was shot at the time.

    Friends of mine who are brothers and were then producing movies together had gotten a bunch of guy friends together for dinner, and they had optioned one or more of Bourdain's (not very distinguished) novels, so they knew him. He came out from the kitchen a couple of times during our meal, and when service was over we all went with him to Siberia, which was a famous and short-lived incredibly debauched bar in I think the 50th St. subway station.

    We were within eyeshot of the Times Square news crawl when the news hit that Diana had been confirmed dead. That was weird. I spent a lot of that night talking to Bourdain at the bar at Siberia, and he was a good conversationalist. I think maybe Kitchen Confidential was about to come out, but that his celebrated New Yorker piece had already made waves--but I may be wrong on the timing. Don't remember.

    I do remember that he had a very complete recall of NYC gangland history--smart guy, I thought, but with something to prove about being tough or whatever. I asked him why he was looking to get into writing and he said very plainly that he was getting too old to be in the kitchen, and it was a way out.

    Later when he was cheffing at Les Halles we used to go by to see him and chat a bit. I think the last time I saw him was at the opening of the new location of Siberia Bar: he was wandering around the joint seeming super-coked with Mario Batali, and he didn't seem to recognize his old acquaintances. Understandably enough, I suppose. His life had turned into something else.

    Anyway, my view of him is of a very insecure guy who was in the habit of painting himself into a corner and seeing if he could escape. This Argento woman strikes me as one of those corners--a bad puppy who took her toll on him, in this case fatally.

    I never knew him but I did observe him during one of my jobs. He would leave the studio and immediately become quite morose, and stuck a cig in his mouth as soon as taping was over. Not mean, just sad to the bone. He was married to his first wife at the time.

    Bourdain always struck me as a closeted gay man, and I am not the type who says that often. His relationship with the first wife (“high school sweetheart”) was clearly a caretaker-beard type thing. Well, at least caretaker, not 100% sure about the beard.

    RIP. He was a decent guy.

    • Replies: @slumber_j

    Bourdain always struck me as a closeted gay man, and I am not the type who says that often.
     
    Interesting. Who knows?

    He didn't strike me that way, but that doesn't mean you're mistaken. And it would explain a lot about him if true.
  34. @Joe Walker
    Dennis Dale has more on the #MeToo hypocrisy of Argento and Rose McGowan.

    Are you saying that Weinstein isn't a rapist?

    Not of McGowan or Argento. McGowan at least distanced herself from Weinstein after–but took her settlement money and sat silent while this “monster” was free to rape others (we are to presume), so she could work in Hollywood. How in the hell is she getting away with it?

  35. @tomv
    If a goyishe kop had said this, you'd deride the iSteve commentariat in general for making everything about "the Joos".

    If I could wish for one thing for a better world, it wouldn't be more intelligence, but more self-awareness.

    If I could wish for one thing for a better world, it wouldn’t be more intelligence, but more self-awareness.

    The 4th deadly sin prevents people form gaining self-awareness. This is the weakest Jewish spot as Judaism is build on pride and directly leads to suprematism. I would not expect much self-awareness among Jews.

  36. @Obsessive Contrarian
    I never knew him but I did observe him during one of my jobs. He would leave the studio and immediately become quite morose, and stuck a cig in his mouth as soon as taping was over. Not mean, just sad to the bone. He was married to his first wife at the time.

    Bourdain always struck me as a closeted gay man, and I am not the type who says that often. His relationship with the first wife ("high school sweetheart") was clearly a caretaker-beard type thing. Well, at least caretaker, not 100% sure about the beard.

    RIP. He was a decent guy.

    Bourdain always struck me as a closeted gay man, and I am not the type who says that often.

    Interesting. Who knows?

    He didn’t strike me that way, but that doesn’t mean you’re mistaken. And it would explain a lot about him if true.

  37. Don’t keep up with this sort of thing but male age 17 complaining?
    Either homosexual or after money.

    Revelation after accepting stfu money means, i think, weinswines are on the attack.

  38. @Steve Sailer
    I remember reading about the Argento family maybe 16 years ago when reviewing some Vin Diesel movie in which she had a big role and thinking: "Oh boy ..."

    Did a quick image check since didn’t know who she was.

    She was a fairly attractive young woman with a very nice womanly body. Now she’s all tatted up, like a low-IQ whore. Case closed.

  39. Actors are narcissists who feel they weren’t loved by their fathers and need the admiration of strangers to fill the gap.

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS