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From the New York Times:

The Black Chef Who Dared to Charge Nearly $200 for Dinner

Race/Related is a weekly newsletter focused on race and identity, with provocative stories from around The New York Times.

By Lauretta Charlton
April 20, 2019

When Kwame Onwuachi announced that dinner at Shaw Bijou, his multimillion-dollar dream restaurant in Washington, would cost $185 a person, critics balked. “Who was I, the city’s critic class howled, to charge so much?” Mr. Onwuachi writes in the introduction to his new memoir, “Notes From a Young Black Chef.”

That’s a very good question.

Mr. Onwuachi cut his teeth in some of the most respected restaurants in the country. He was on “Top Chef,” and worked at Per Se and Eleven Madison Park. But he also grew up in the Bronx and was smoking Newport Lights and getting high by the time he was 10. He was a bad student. He was black.

Anyone who charges nearly $200 a person for dinner is going to raise eyebrows, but especially if that person grew up black and poor and had never had a more exalted position in a restaurant than line cook.

Mr. Onwuachi was suddenly a hot young chef with investors behind him, but he was still very much an outsider. So who exactly was he, a 29-year-old black man, to charge so much for dinner?

The question made me think of the assumptions that we make about who belongs where and how ambitious outsiders and minorities are allowed to be when they enter elite spaces that historically excluded them — in this case, fine dining. If it weren’t Mr. Onwuachi charging $185 a person for dinner, surely it would be someone else — and chances are, that person would not be black.

Shaw Bijou is now closed. It flopped after just 11 weeks. But Mr. Onwuachi continues to cook food informed by his identity and experience as a black man.

The New York Times increasingly reads like a high school newspaper. This piece, for example, is exactly like what the smart girl with glasses who works on her high school paper writes about the cool boy she secretly has a crush on.

 
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  1. TWS says:

    Just admit we should pay this as reparations and move on to the next gushing article from slims blog.

  2. ic1000 says:

    I’m confused. Had Onwuachi been a top chef in some of the most respected restaurants in the country? Or had Onwuachi never been more than a line cook?

    Paragraph 3: “Mr. Onwuachi cut his teeth in some of the most respected restaurants in the country. He was on “Top Chef,” and worked at Per Se and Eleven Madison Park.”

    Paragraph 4: “Anyone who charges nearly $200 a person for dinner [i.e. Onwuachi] is going to raise eyebrows, but especially if that person grew up black and poor and had never had a more exalted position in a restaurant than line cook.

    Get me rewrite.

    Unless Ms. Charlton’s phrase “cut his teeth” is how hipsters now say “brush his teeth”. In which case I hope he spits in the sink, rather then on the food.

  3. Escher says:

    What she is saying is that we need a “Too Black to Fail” category for businesses

  4. 216 says:
    @TWS

    The NYT can credit its revival to Trump.

    A surge in SWPLlib subscribers has made the Slim issue irrelevant, the company is profitable again.

  5. It’s striking that there’s no discussion of whether he could cook worth a damn.

  6. Mungerite says:

    Sailer’s Law of Female Journalism will probably be getting a food critic corollary sometime soon …

    https://www.google.com/amp/s/www.eater.com/platform/amp/2019/2/20/18226478/the-grill-restaurant-critics

    As a student of food criticism and restaurant goer, I’ve often thought about how being a black woman impacts my dining experience, and wished that more critics understood that experience.

    From being asked for a drink by white patrons to being told a different wait time for a table (or told there are none at all), restaurant dining rooms too often act in accordance with the same racial hierarchy as the rest of the world. I’ve been cut in front of as if I didn’t exist and been grabbed by a diner who thought I was ignoring her when she wanted another drink, or whatever she felt she needed at the moment. I’ve been handed the dessert wine menu at a bar because the bartender assumed I liked sweet wines, and been asked, “Have you had a Negroni before?” when ordering one — and even after assuring them that yes, I had, still suffered through a lecture explaining the concept of bitter flavor profiles. Experiences like these are constant reminders to people of color that they’re an “other” in dining spaces.

    As a student of food criticism and restaurant goer, I’ve often thought about how being a black woman impacts my dining experience, and wished that more critics understood that experience.

    From being asked for a drink by white patrons to being told a different wait time for a table (or told there are none at all), restaurant dining rooms too often act in accordance with the same racial hierarchy as the rest of the world. I’ve been cut in front of as if I didn’t exist and been grabbed by a diner who thought I was ignoring her when she wanted another drink, or whatever she felt she needed at the moment. I’ve been handed the dessert wine menu at a bar because the bartender assumed I liked sweet wines, and been asked, “Have you had a Negroni before?” when ordering one — and even after assuring them that yes, I had, still suffered through a lecture explaining the concept of bitter flavor profiles. Experiences like these are constant reminders to people of color that they’re an “other” in dining spaces.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Hoyt Thorpe
    , @guest
    , @Alden
  7. Shaw Bijou is now closed. It flopped after just 11 weeks.

    That pretty much says it all.

  8. The New York Times increasingly reads like a high school newspaper.

    Gotta start somewhere.

    High school’s a step up for both Pinch and most of his hires.

    • Replies: @Anon87
  9. indocon says:

    I wonder what the average IQ of a top chef is?

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  10. @TWS

    move on to the next gushing article from slims blog.

    I think you misspelled slimy’s blog.

  11. songbird says:

    “New, super-overpriced restaurant fails, but wait – the chef was black!”

    What, did they run out of diversity mad libs? Did the arrow fly off the racism plotwheel?

  12. J1234 says:

    The Black Chef Who Dared to Charge Nearly $200 for Dinner

    Well, it’s better than sticking a gun in someone’s face and demanding “nearly” $200, so in that sense, it’s a step forward for blacks.

    • LOL: jim jones, Kylie, Forbes
  13. AKAHorace says:

    Could they at least say what you got for 185 $ ?

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Mr McKenna
    , @Realist
    , @Forbes
  14. “The question made me think of the assumptions that we make about who belongs where and how ambitious outsiders and minorities are allowed to be when they enter elite spaces that historically excluded them — in this case, fine dining. If it weren’t Mr. Onwuachi charging $185 a person for dinner, surely it would be someone else — and chances are, that person would not be black.”

    The New York Times also reads as if it’s written and edited by people who think it’s 1959, not 2019. In what realm do we not allow minorities when it comes to elite spaces? The U.S. had a minority President and First Lady in the White House. You don’t get more elite than that.

    The only “assumptions” people make about where others “belong” are in this writer’s imagination, which seems as if it’s comprised entirely of PBS documentaries about the Civil Rights era.

    • Replies: @Forbes
  15. Hail says: • Website

    OT: definitely of iSteve interest; for immediate filing under Coalition of the Fringes “in”fighting:

    Black college Howard University (an urban campus in Washington D.C.) has now formally banned Whites from walking dogs on their campus. (Even though those Whites all loyally voted for Obama and all.)

    The Root sez:

    Washington, DC, is in the midst of a culture war between the new residents who want to mold the city into their own version of VanillaTown and the folks who didn’t ask for any of this s*** but now have to defend their ways of life. Yes, we’re talking gentrification.

    the “good” liberal white folks, (like the type that inhabit Washington, DC, and walk their dogs on our yard – while NOT representing the Wu, mind you), in particular love them a good “safe space,” so why we have to explain why Howard is one is dumb, but whitefolks gon’ whitefolks

    Really iSteve gold.

    A little longer excerpt for those too lazy to click through to The Root:

    [MORE]

    _________________

    Howard U’s President Dropped a Statement About Walking Dogs On The Yard; Here’s How It Reads In My Head

    By Panama Jackson
    April 20, 2019

    Washington, DC, is in the midst of a culture war between the new residents who want to mold the city into their own version of VanillaTown and the folks who didn’t ask for any of this s*** but now have to defend their ways of life. Yes, we’re talking gentrification. From new residents of Chinatown trying to stop the kids from playing music near the Gallery Place Metro, DC’s current mayor (who is black), Muriel Bowser ignorantly trying to erase quintessential DC culture, the #DontMuteDC movement near Howard University’s campus to the recent issue ON Howard’s campus where residents have taken to using Howard’s Yard as a dog park, with one resident even suggesting that if Howard doesn’t like it, the university should move. Read that again.

    Well, Howard University’s President, Dr. Wayne A.I. Frederick issued a statement regarding the recent shenanigans. It’s a very solid statement. I also feel like it would be perfect for a Key & Peele Anger Translator sketch. I won’t go the anger translator route myself, but I do hear his statement differently in my head. I figured I’d share that with you.

    (Howard University Statement “Update on the Howard University Upper Quadrangle” as per Howard University’s Newsroom in bold; how I hear it in my head in italics)

    Dear Howard University Family,

    Le sigh, Family, Howard Family, my folks, and the rest of black America, I hate to have to address this Plymouth Rock landed on us bullshit but you already know what it is, so here’s the situation

    Our campus is a beautiful, sacred space that provides comfort and, in many ways, sanctuary in a place that feels more like a second home than merely an academic institution.

    I don’t even know why I have to say this; but I know I do: the “good” liberal white folks, (like the type that inhabit Washington, DC, and walk their dogs on our yard – while NOT representing the Wu, mind you), in particular love them a good “safe space,” so why we have to explain why Howard is one is dumb, but whitefolks gon’ whitefolks. I know that you know that Howard is not just a school, it’s a state of mind, it’s a bedrock institution of blackness, it is a place where you should be able to come for four years (or more, no Length-of-Stay Shaming here!) and embrace and wrap your heart and soul in black thought, love and excellence without having to worry about some white person who values their pets over Black Lives walking through campus and letting their dogs pee on sacred plots, trees and culture.

    Why they (and by ‘they’ I mean white people like that ignorant-ass-white-man who said maybe Howard should move – bruh, f*** that white man) feel like our beloved institution belongs to DC more than it belongs to the Black Community is beyond me, especially because I’d bet good money if a bunch of black folks started walking their dogs through American University, Georgetown, or their outdoor Save the Black Community FroYoYogurt Meetup that doesn’t actually include any black people, it would be a “woop woop, that’s the sound of da police” problem.

    But white entitlement issues are a real thing —

    __________________

    It goes on like that for a while more, including the line:

    Dearest colonizers, you all f*** up everything you come into contact with.

    (The poor “Irony Alert” button is bound to wear out through overuse.)

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @jon
  16. Anonymous[203] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hail

    • Replies: @Mr McKenna
    , @guest
  17. @Cloudbuster

    If only the Obamas had made it a point to dine there once a week. Help a brutha out.

  18. [H]e also grew up in the Bronx and was smoking Newport Lights and getting high by the time he was 10. He was a bad student. He was black.

    Wow, they really don’t realize they’re reinforcing negative stereotypes of African Americans, do they? This string of sentences sounds like some sort of logical deduction from a Sherlock Holmes story.

  19. bucky says:

    The reason is simple: blacks do not draw upon a deeply rooted and respected culture. Chefs who charge $200 for dinner are doing so by promising the patron an experience with the food that evokes emotions of the great orders of human history. So what comes to mind? The French Gauls. The Italians. The Japanese.

    What do blacks draw upon? Cheap friend chicken and sugar powder? This is the Cold brutal truth why a black cannot charge $200 for dinner. That is why he failed.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Reg Cæsar
    , @Jack D
  20. CCZ says:

    Diversity and Inclusion, please.

    “They’re young and diverse, both front and back of the house. Executive chef Kwame Onwuachi and head sommelier David Blackburn are Culinary Institute of America (CIA) grads in their mid-twenties; Gisell Paula, the winning pastry chef, is 25. Onwuachi and Blackburn are African-American; Paula is Latina.* Such demographics are rare in the upper echelons of the fine-dining world.”

    Must have been a white guy review:

    “Too many dishes, though, are tepid….Other dishes misfire entirely. The greatest deflation is the final savory course. You’re offered an option of two meats at the beginning: roast squab or lamb jowl. Seven courses later, you’re ushered back into the kitchen in the presence of Onwuachi, who presents a gleaming copper pan with the squab or lamb’s head nestled amid lustrous halves of charred citrus and onions. More cult-leader references: Two servers claimed that Onwuachi discovered how to remove all the spicy capsaicin from the habanero, leaving just the sweet-savory flavor. In fact, the “habanada” is a mild pepper developed at Cornell. So you return to the dining room and gear up for a feast. Instead, you receive a couple of pallid, unidentifiable slices of brown meat: squab breast or fatty but choice strips of the jowl. The size is in keeping with the rest of the courses, the flavor okay, the slices barely tepid. It’s a letdown.”

    https://www.washingtonian.com/2017/01/04/restaurant-review-shaw-bijou/

    The reviewer noted that a dinner meal was originally priced about $240 per person, including tax and tip but not including wine or cocktails, and, including wine and drinks, the total could edge close to $500 a person.

    “Humility creeps up on you when least expected,” said chef Kwame Onwuachi and the result was a new menu served for $95 per person, which included a welcome cocktail (tax, tip, and additional drinks extra), but ultimately the restaurant closed.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @peterike
  21. The reviewer noted that a dinner meal was originally priced about $240 per person, including tax and tip but not including wine or cocktails, and, including wine and drinks, the total could edge close to $500 a person.

    “Humility creeps up on you when least expected,” said chef Kwame Onwuachi and the result was a new menu served for $95 per person, which included a welcome cocktail (tax, tip, and additional drinks extra), but ultimately the restaurant closed.

    If you are going to charge top dollar, you have to deliver top value. Or so I assume, as I don’t have the disposable income to blow $$$$ on a meal. The only time I’ve eaten a super-pricey meal is when someone else was footing the bill and the menu didn’t have prices listed on it.

    Since I live in a coastal city known for its foodies and high prices, $185 for a dinner doesn’t strike me as stratospheric by local standards, especially if you factor in a good bottle of wine. Order up a bunch of Tapas or several courses at any number of restaurants and you could be looking at $100 each by dinner’s end. The jump from $100 to $185 is not that much.

    Still, if you are going to charge $185, you damn well better make the diner feel like it was worth it. If you don’t, your restaurant will close in 11 weeks and you have to figure out your next hustle.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist
  22. Passages that stay with me:

    Mr. Onwuachi was suddenly a hot young chef with investors behind him, but he was still very much an outsider. So who exactly was he, a 29-year-old black man, to charge so much for dinner?

    What difference does it make unless the food is no good?

    The question made me think of the assumptions that we make about who belongs where and how ambitious outsiders and minorities are allowed to be when they enter elite spaces that historically excluded them — in this case, fine dining.

    It makes me wonder if the food was any good.

    If it weren’t Mr. Onwuachi charging $185 a person for dinner, surely it would be someone else — and chances are, that person would not be black.

    …. unless the food was really, really good.

    Shaw Bijou is now closed. It flopped after just 11 weeks.

    Not wondering anymore.

    But Mr. Onwuachi continues to cook food informed by his identity and experience as a black man.

    Ah, backed to wondering, this time if he learned anything from his experience as a failed entrepreneur.

    People with money may go to a restaurant and pay $185 for a meal just b/c the proprietor is a poor, black man from the Bronx, but if the food is no good, they will not go a second time.

  23. Lot says:
    @AKAHorace

    You got nothing for $185, as that’s the price before tax and tip and doesn’t include drinks.

    It also doesn’t include parking and was located in the Shaw ghetto.

    The chef was 26 at the time and also had a plan for a social club above the restaurant that would exclude “frat boys.”

    • Replies: @guest
  24. Anon[136] • Disclaimer says:

    Ah, but the NYT knows that if they hire high school students, or rather writers so immature and simple-minded they might as well be high school students, they won’t ask for decent pay as long as they have a platform. I wonder what these NYT grievance writers are getting paid? I bet Slim noticed that Huffpo got by for a very long time with zero pay for many of its writers. They were so flattered to have eyeballs that they just sucked it up when it came to working for nothing.

    Some of this also may be the Hispanic culture effect. My parents used to live in an Hispanic region of the country, and the local newspaper was written at a 6th grade reading level. It seemed as if it was being dumbed down to fit the average IQ of the local Hispanics. Slim probably thinks dumbing down the NYT and making it appeal to the sort of dull-witted, minority teenage girl who doesn’t tackle anything more difficult than Cosmopolitan is a good way to expand its readership.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    , @Desiderius
  25. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    Slate used to have a series called “A Fine Whine” in which failed entrepreneurs wrote about their experiences. I remember one by a woman who started a coffee bar (Austrian-style?). That would be a more appropriate venue for this sort of thing.

  26. Anon[136] • Disclaimer says:

    Most restaurants fail. It’s not the cooking that does them in for the most part, but the fact that the menu items are priced so that the business doesn’t turn a profit. A lot of restaurants make the majority of their profit off an expensive wine list, because gourmet food items at wholesale prices are already expensive before they even enter the restaurant.

    The cost of renting a restaurant-sized space in New York City, doing the necessary renovations, buying all the kitchen equipment, and buying all the high-end decorations is absolutely outrageous. In New York, gourmet food at 200 bucks a plate is cheap. If he charged 400-500 a plate, he might have made it.

  27. @Laugh Track

    $185 per person set meals can still be found in some 3-star Michelin Guide restaurants, which apparently includes Per Se; so Onwuachi thought he could charge as much or more than his former chef de cuisine, the man who earned the stars, with the big question being, “Based on what?”

    He would have likely fared better if he had targeted getting into Michelin’s Bib Gourmand listings, but why shoot for something reasonable? Kind of reminds me of all the black kids at my old school who were sure they would end up in the NBA.

    • Agree: Brutusale
    • Replies: @Brutusale
  28. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:

    What does “getting high” mean in this context? Marijuana, or something else?

    Is anyone else creeped out by people with tattoos handling food? I wonder if this is the evolutionary “disgust” trait surfacing, that occurs to a different degree in different people. Also, smokers handling my food.

    Yeah, I know, I have to just stop eating out.

  29. jon says:
    @Hail

    Why they (and by ‘they’ I mean white people like that ignorant-ass-white-man who said maybe Howard should move – bruh, f*** that white man)

    They found that white man’s instagram account. At least the end of America is an entertaining thing to watch sometimes.

    (NSFW) https://twitter.com/NonProblematic/status/1119249852511211527

  30. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:

    To: David Brooks

    From: Someone whose time you wasted

    Re: Your pie hole

    Her Twitter feed looks like it might be worth an archeological dig.

  31. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @bucky

    Blacks do well in the BBQ business. Here in KC, the best BBQ places are Gates’ and Arthur Bryant’s.

    The reason his restaurant failed is the food wasn’t worth the asking price.

  32. $200?

    “Reparations… It’s what’s for dinner!”

    Should have at least thrown in a t-shirt or tote bag so the virtue signaling SWPL victims of the Emperor’s New Dinner can at least show off.

    If modern art & performance can get away with minting a fortune out of hype… as well as multiculturalism & diversity… then it shouldn’t be too hard for a self-confident chef grifter with the the right complexion to get in on the game.

  33. @bucky

    So what comes to mind? The French Gauls. The Italians. The Japanese.

    Sheri’s Ranch?

  34. Alfa158 says:

    “critics balked. “Who was I, the city’s critic class howled, to charge so much?””
    Anyone know if there is any evidence at all that this “howling” even happened? Are we expected to believe that liberal big city food critics actually wrote “who’s this uppity n****r think he is, charging this kind of money”?
    Or was this some critics saying; “just so you know, food at this place is expensive”.?

  35. BenKenobi says:

    “Hmmm, $185 to have Chef We Wuz spit in my food? I’m going to click ‘decline’.”

    OMG WHITE FRAGILITY MUCH?!

  36. A day’s worth of stories in the New York Times:

    Blackety black. Blackety black. Persons of color. Nazis. Women. Blackety. Hitler. White privilege. Black black. Diversity. Of color. Nazis. Multicultural. Racists. Blackety black. White privilege. Multicultural. Women. Blackety black. Persons of color. Racism. Diversity. Hate speech. Multicultural. Blackety black. Hitler. White privilege. Race. Of color. Feminist. Black black. Nazis. White nationalism. Diversity. Blackety. Persons of color. Racism. Blackety black. Feminist. Hitler. Multicultural. Blackety black …

    • Replies: @anonymous
    , @Grace Jones
  37. @AKAHorace

    Could they at least say what you got for 185 $ ?

    Somehow I heard Matthew Modine’s voice right there…

  38. El Dato says:

    Article defending high-price chefs performing cultural appropriation spotted at RT:

    Don’t stop Gordon Ramsay cooking tasty ‘pan-Asian’ food because it is ‘cultural appropriation’

    Locally-known gastronomical website Eater London shot to international fame this week, when it sent one of its reviewers to a free preview tasting of the Scottish chef’s soon-to-open restaurant Lucky Cat.

    Chinese-British journalist Angela Hui repaid the hospitality by Instagramming the event with snarky comments about the authenticity of the food served (“Japanese? Chinese? It’s all Asian who cares” and “I can only drink through the pain of this ‘Asian’ event”) and posted the screenshots alongside her review, where she complained that she “was the only east Asian person in a room full of 30-40 journalists and chefs.”

    ,,, As often with latest media controversies there was talk of what Ramsay “needed to do.” Reporters said he must “defend himself”, and brought up other supposed misdemeanors (like a past show where he cooked his version of regional classics, next to chefs from the origin country) to out him as a serial cultural appropriator.

    In this case, it has been refreshing that rather than apologizing (insincerely) or going radio silent, Ramsay took the narrative under his own control, and “called out” Hui and others – though of course this was portrayed as him “dismissing” supposedly valid contributions.

    It’s as if completely irrelevant “reporters” actually think they have to be taken seriously.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  39. @James Speaks

    The question made me think of the assumptions that we make about who belongs where and how ambitious outsiders and minorities are allowed to be when they enter elite spaces that historically excluded them — in this case, fine dining.

    So true, sister, so true. Preach it! With MEGAPHONES!

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @James Speaks
  40. @Anonymous

    white owners user their pets to socialize with other white owners excluding minorities.

    It’s like just the other day, I saw one white person talking to another. Right out in public! In the Current Year, even! I don’t even know how this can still be happening. Can’t wait til tomorrow, ya feel me? Real talk, fam.

    PS: Negroes are notoriously scared of dogs.

    • Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil
  41. @El Dato

    Those who can, do. Those who can’t, teach. Those who can’t teach, report.

  42. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:
    @Mr McKenna

    Where is that photo from? I can’t find it with TinEye.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Mr McKenna
  43. Anon[314] • Disclaimer says:

    Is there a Nipsey Hustle connection?

  44. Realist says:
    @AKAHorace

    Could they at least say what you got for 185 $ ?

    Screwed.

  45. @Cloudbuster

    Having read through the comments, I have to take a contrarian approach. I applaud Mr. Onwuachi’s ability to hustle liberal investors (and who other than a rich liberal would give money to a twenty-something black chef on his first restaurant foray) into a venture so outrageously stupid.

    He didn’t fail. He’s much more famous than he would have been had he not pulled this caper off.

  46. Ed says:

    I’ve eaten at his new restaurant at the Wharf in DC. The food was good, I’d go again.

  47. “Mr. Onwuachi continues to cook food informed by his identity and experience as a black man.”

    Scary to speculate what kind of “identity and experience” might be going into that food. And, how does food get “informed”?

    • Replies: @Tex
  48. Dr. X says:

    Shaw Bijou is now closed. It flopped after just 11 weeks.

    I hear Popeye’s is hiring, though…

  49. anon[393] • Disclaimer says:

    Being a’ steamfitter’ whos union has been in courts as high as the supreme court as far back as the early 70s and has been under the courts boot ever since I sometimes wonder what the hell more do they want they have had free jobs for almost 70 years

    but then i remember thats only union and blue collar jobs. good whites were exempt until recently they got to decide if they wanted any blacks or hispanics then hand pick the blacks they wanted and how many. Wait until the “laws” they voted for begin to effect them and some judge tell them to give back pay to every black who ever applied for a job and extra pay to any blacks you hired who earned any less than any white you hired for any reason and to hire immediately the same percentage of blacks and browns as are counted in the census area of your business, dont worry they will set up scouts at the prisons for you, they being the office building floor of jew lawyers and social workers to pre treat the blacks and browns so they can count to ten and write their names and understand they cant be fired that the jew judge will appoint as special masters over you. and wait till you realize some businesses will be exempted mainly ones who hire exclusively illegal aliens that will be your competition your blacks and browns paid what you used to pay highly skilled whites but now pay gangbangers ex cons and

    • Agree: South Texas Guy, JMcG
    • Replies: @Hibernian
  50. @Mr McKenna

    Caption: “I washed my hands for nuttin. NUTTIN!”

    • LOL: Mr McKenna
  51. Arclight says:

    Maybe the question ought to be whether a white former line chef would have gotten investors for the same business model. Possibly, but possibly not – I wonder who these investors were? Running a restaurant is not the same thing as cranking out entrees for a living.

  52. I’m white, and I worked as a cook in my college cafeteria for a year, in exchange for room and board. IIRC my food there cost students something like $600 ($1,500 today, adjusted for inflation) — but they got to eat it all semester.

    My white privilege enabled me to be a cafeteria cook, and people paid $600 to eat my food.

    I am so damned happy to be white.

    Every other Thursday was pizza night, very popular. I made 96 pizzas every time, on those very-large, industrial-sized baking sheets (won’t fit into your home oven).

    • Replies: @CCZ
  53. Anyone who charges nearly $200 a person for dinner is going to raise eyebrows, but especially if that person grew up black and poor and had never had a more exalted position in a restaurant than line cook.

    So this is just traditional, bread and butter (heh) affirmative action.

    It’s not really different than admitting or hiring a candidate two or more standard deviations below the minimum requisites you impose on whites, and then being surprised at the failure. But, of course, the failure presents the world with fodder for these sorts of navel-gazing white hate takes. It’s never about the outsized self-esteem endemic to blacks, of course.

    It wasn’t the under-qualified black line cook charging Michelin three star prices without the stars who failed, but really, all of us.

    At least it was only the gullible, virtue-signalling investors who lost in this fiasco.

  54. Is this $200/meal chef our very own commenter here under unz posts? I never have even tried to figure out his name, as I don’t speak with the ‘tards, just my upper-crust WASP upbringing coming out, I’m ashamed to say. I just know that it also starts with an “O” and looks a lot like this one – and I know it wasn’t “O’Reilly.

    From a quick scan I see that our commenting-African has not chimed in so far. Perhaps he is too busy cooking right now, and at $200 a meal, I can’t blame him one bit. Chef Obeajoiugimbo, I’ll take the Maple Sausage, fruit loops, and an English muffin, and, for 200 bucks, can you please not overcook the muffins this time?!

    • Replies: @JimS
  55. JimS says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I think it’s “ObiWanDog” or maybe “OggieBenDoggie.”
    Either way, smart not to feed the sea lions (of all stripes):
    http://wondermark.com/1k62

  56. Gabe Ruth says:

    I’m sad I only learned of this clown recently. A few selections from https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/16/dining/chef-kwame-onwuachi.html:
    “The tasting courses were so tightly focused on that story that they included a Butterfinger mignardise, a small pastry inspired by the best-selling item from his days hawking candy, and a fisherman’s pie, the dish his mother used to make for him on his birthday, gussied up with charcoal-roasted madai and lobster foam.

    … He had begun writing his memoir. “I thought it was going to end with me opening the Shaw Bijou and getting three Michelin stars — like, this is it!” he said.

    But after all the hype, his fortunes tumbled: The restaurant ran out of money, Mr. Onwuachi clashed with his investors and The Washington Post published a negative review that drew nearly 500 comments. “Honestly, though, a real Butterfinger is better than the chocolate-robed salt lick served here,” the review said.

    Mr. Onwuachi says he had become too caught up in his own vision. “I think about what if I had asked more questions, if I were more experienced in business, if I had asked about the budget in the beginning,””

    “But soon, he accepted an offer to run a restaurant in the InterContinental Washington D.C., a hotel under development at the Wharf, a huge commercial and real estate project along the Potomac River.

    …“My initial thought was, ‘Let’s do the same thing I did before,’ and show that no one understood what I was doing, that whole ‘cry me a river’ story,” he said.

    Yet as he researched the history of the waterfront, he became fascinated by a history other than his own: Here, in 1838, Georgetown University infamously shipped off 272 enslaved African-Americans that it had sold to pay off its debts. After the Civil War, many former slaves moved to the area to work.

    “I could either do an elaborate tasting menu, or I could do something to honor my ancestors,” Mr. Onwuachi said. “I hadn’t seen anything representing them in that vein — a place to celebrate our food while celebrating a special occasion.””

    ““There is a ceiling for chefs of color that I want to change,” Mr. Onwuachi said. “I can give people opportunities to move up.”

    In his book, he writes that he encountered systemic racism while working at Per Se and Eleven Madison Park. In 2014, he says, he tried to explain to Chris Flint, then the chef de cuisine of Eleven Madison Park, that when servers referred tableside to the cylindrical grater they used — a Mouli — black customers might take offense because the word is similar to a racial slur. He says Mr. Flint was dismissive, responding, “No black people eat here anyway.”

    In an interview, Mr. Flint denied saying that. Eleven Madison Park issued a statement saying that it was investigating the incident.”

    But the best line in the piece comes in a caption to this photo:
    “From left: Richard Williams, the sous chef at Kith and Kin; Mr. Onwuachi; and Martel Stone, the executive sous-chef. Mr. Stone used to commute to the restaurant from Philadelphia every day because the kitchen was so noticeably diverse.”

    And there we have it, as our host has long suspected: that word doesn’t mean what we think it means.

    • Replies: @Gabe Ruth
  57. Gabe Ruth says:
    @Gabe Ruth

    From the comments:
    “This story resonates with me.

    We lived in Brooklyn for many years and belonged to a well-known black civic organization. My husband is a chef and one year they asked my husband to cater a small event. When I gave them a quote, they turned us down flat because they thought our price was too high — “Chicken only costs 59 cents a pound!” — was how they put it. Instead they solicited food donations and we contributed.”

  58. Jack D says:
    @Mungerite

    How much do you want to bet that she always leaves lousy tips for white servers because she always feels that she has been mistreated because she is black? Apparently leaving lousy tips is black people’s way of getting revenge on 400 years of mistreatment by whitey.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  59. anonymous[955] • Disclaimer says:
    @Pretzel Yardstick

    Emmett Till?

  60. @Cloudbuster

    It closed, alright…over two years ago.

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/going-out-guide/wp/2017/01/15/shaw-bijou-one-of-the-most-expensive-restaurants-in-d-c-has-closed-after-less-than-three-months/?utm_term=.e8d26bc1ebdc

    This article was written Saturday, though, some 27+ months after the fact. Has the well for these kinds of schmaltzy navel-gazing diversity thinkpieces really run that dry?

  61. CCZ says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    OUCH

    “Washington Post Food Reporter Tom Sietsema Needs a Pizza Run After a Pricey Dinner at The Shaw Bijou”

    “Despite paying close to $2,000 for a dinner for four, the critic and his dining companions leave the meal still hungry. “Dinner at the Shaw Bijou feels more like extended hors d’oeuvres,” Sietsema writes.”

    “I take a vote to see how many would return on their own dime. Head shakes all around confirm my hunch. We’re also of one mind when it comes to our mood: Pizza, anyone? [WaPo]”

    At least Mr. Onwuachi got a book deal out of the failure.

    “Kwame Onwuachi’s new memoir is a must-read on what it’s like to be a young, black chef in America” [with an abusive architect father]:

    “Onwuachi’s life was also filled with terror. After his parents divorced when he was young, Onwuachi sometimes spent the weekend with his father, who lived 20 minutes away. His father, Onwuachi writes, taped a poster board to a wall in the kitchen. Every time young Onwuachi committed an “infraction” — it could be as minor as sloppy handwriting — the child would have to mark an X on the chart. When Onwuachi “earned” enough infractions, his father would beat him with a wooden-handled whip that the elder bought in Africa.”

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/lifestyle/food/kwame-onwuachis-new-memoir-is-a-must-read-on-what-its-like-to-be-a-young-black-chef-in-america/2019/03/29/51164000-50d6-11e9-88a1-ed346f0ec94f_story.html?utm_term=.4cab056149fd

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  62. Jack D says:
    @CCZ

    Kummer is a standard issue white lib goodthinker:

    For him to write a semi-scathing review like this must have been difficult. He still gave the place 2 stars out of pity. If a white guy had tried this, he would have savaged the place to no end and given it zero stars.

  63. Jack D says:
    @bucky

    It has nothing to do with black or white – it has to do with the quality of the food on the plate. Chef Marcus Samuelsson charged high $ for his Scandinavian food at Aquavit and no one minded that he was Ethiopian (adopted to Sweden as a child). In Japan, Japanese guys cook French food, Italian food, etc. at high $, Michelin starred places and their food is as good as any European chef cooking the same food. It turns out that you don’t actually have to be French to cook French fries.

    • Replies: @Ragno
  64. @Mr McKenna

    PS: Negroes are notoriously scared of dogs.

    Wait, aren’t Negros in the ‘hood and elsewhere big into pit bulls and other breeds with that kind of rep?

    White owners use their pets to socialize with other white owners excluding minorities.

    Is the author implying that minorities are eager to socialize with whites? Why the heck would they want to do that when whites are so horribly racist and oppressive? How in the world would they have any kind of safe space around white dog owners?

    • Replies: @guest
    , @Mr McKenna
  65. @Harry Baldwin

    The former First Lady had more pressing matters to attend to, like a Seine river cruise, as Steve pointed out during the Notre Dame fire.

  66. @Harry Baldwin

    I don’t think the Obamas go out to dinner together very often. I think Barack prefers the company of men who enjoy sodomy.

  67. peterike says:
    @CCZ

    That review is hilarious, though it doesn’t try to be in its painful earnestness.

    The experience is billed as a kind of dinner party over multiple rooms in the rowhouse of co-owner and Immortal Beloved salon founder Kelly Gorsuch…. The meal is meant to be a culinary tour of the young chef’s world travels in far-flung places like Chiang Mai and Hong Kong. Onwuachi also stops closer to home: a childhood spent in the Bronx with his mother, a caterer, plus two years living with his grandfather in Nigeria.

    In other words, they make you move your seat several times during the meal, all in order to present to you the life story of the chef his-self! What a concept.

    The stories don’t add up to a narrative flow through the meal—particularly when the chef isn’t even introduced at the start, physically or by name. (His first formal meeting with diners sometimes comes toward the end of the meal.) Instead, you get the uneasy sense that you’ve wandered into a cult when servers sincerely relate the story of the time Onwuachi discovered a dish of crabs prepared by a wise old Indian cook or practically brush back tears when describing the fisherman’s pie Onwuachi’s mother made for his birthday when money was tight and she couldn’t afford a gift.

    Pure comedy gold. The entire “dining experience” is a long homage from the chef to his very own wonderful self. It’s not about the food, see, its about Onwuachi.

    “Long story short,” one server began another episode of the chef’s life: a reminder that none of the tales are short, and the often already-tepid food just gets colder during the enthralled recitation.

    I’ve been to a lot of restaurants but I have never come across this daring new concept in fine self-centered hagiography… I mean, dining. The food could have been free and this gigantic, delusional train wreck would have closed anyway.

    • Replies: @Hibernian
    , @HammerJack
  68. @Mungerite

    Let me tell you how hard it is to be paid to dine finely.

  69. Some black guy fails in his attempt to loot the looters looting the rest of us in the imperial capital.

    Yawn.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  70. baythoven says:
    @James Speaks

    “But Mr. Onwuachi continues to cook food informed by his identity and experience as a black man.”

    I’m wondering how food can learn from such information.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
  71. Grades aside, I worked on one high-school newspaper, writing progressive political articles that were not even close to fashionable in the 1980s. I also wrote features articles, glorifying various peers for fascinating aspects of their sophisticated bios.

    You’re right. The NYT replaced their fabulous Book Review, which, in my memory, was not so political in the Nineties with a PC Yearbook collection of high schoolish features articles. A little of it sounds like commercial content.

    If newspeople can help out small businesses with publicity, they will be helping to slay the monopolistic Goliath. But you get into issues of fairness, assuming the articles aren’t ads but just favors. Most journalists haven’t had money on the line in a struggling business, where you never know how many customers will walk through the door to help you keep your doors open from month to month.

    Why is one small business featured over another?

    You can beg your bottom dollar that most small businesses have bigger business loans to pay back than most of the Millennials’ college debt (except for the medical students).

    Those fledgling small businesspeople have to pay it all back, sacrificing retirement savings, decent living quarters, car and phone upgrades, trips, eating out and all of the other luxuries in many cases, doing that for years to pay back the bank.

    They have twice-as-high SS taxation, their fees, etc,. whether or not they get anything out of their businesses other than a roof over their heads and a paid-off debt. There is no reward for it in the marketplace, either, no reward for paying all of that back, rather than reneging on it. There is no financial reward and not even any respect.

    Any non-income-tax-paying single mom, working part time to stay under the earned-income limits for monthly welfare that covers all of her major household bills and refundable child tax credits up to $6,431, is much more celebrated by this society than small businesspeople, struggling to pay two sets of bills (business and home) and to come up with thousands in taxes.

    There will be no Elizabeth Warren to step in on behalf of small businesses in any real way other than dissing Amazon, verbally.

    She won’t be calling for taxpayers to forgive the business loans of small businesspeople whose enterprises did not pay off any more than most bachelor’s degree holders’ degrees are paying off today or back in the day. Most small businesspeople hold on and pay it back, rather than walking away from it.

    It has been awhile since most bachelor’s degrees guaranteed a decent income. .Gov did not pay the student loans of underemployed Xers, now working 1099 or starting no-guarantee businesses due to way the job pool dries up when you are older.

    Pochahantas won’t be calling for any bailout of the 52% of American citizens 55 and over with no retirement savings, many of whom paid off student loans or business loans.

    Many people go into small business even after they finish a worthless degree, not realizing how hard it is to compete with the behemoths, even when you have a great, loyal clientele. In addition to all of those big chains that soak up most of the business, there are also small businesses on every corner, cutting down on your profits in any niche market.

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  72. @Jack D

    I’ll double whatever you’ve got on: She probably leaves small tips for black servers too, as she knows that the guilty white folks will tip extra for them and they’ll still come out ahead. This way, she can keep that savings to bolster up her bank account, because, Lordy, Lordy, black women have it so hard running in the black. (Accounting joke there at the end. Anyone, anyone?)

    Oh, and don’t feel bad lady, people hurt my feelings too when I ask them what’s a Negroni, and does it go with macaroni, and they pay me back by serving me up snail-infested food. Chaps my white ass, it do…

    Sorry guys, I know I keep doing this, but it’s truly an all-American classic piece of humor by an All-American comedian.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  73. … was smoking Newport Lights and getting high by the time he was 10. He was a bad student. He was black.

    Now that’s getting awfully racist, Miss Charlton, even for a guy like ME. We don’t KNOW that this chef was a bad student just because he was black. It’s only, like a 96.375% chance.

    Steve, I know there are many who rightly feel that this making fun of the extreme stupidity of the ctrl-left is really not stopping any of it and not doing any good in the big scheme of things. Personally, these are still my favorite posts, especially when you get your snark level up high. This one was good for the quick paragraph of good insight on news-reporting at the high-school-clique level, but the snark level was down in the indigo range.

    I really enjoy this stuff as a break, whether writing about it does any good or not. Keep it up!

  74. Tex says:
    @Stephen Paul Foster

    “Mr. Onwuachi continues to cook food informed by his identity and experience as a black man.”

    Scary to speculate what kind of “identity and experience” might be going into that food. And, how does food get “informed”?

    Based on experience, I’d advise against informing. Snitches get stitches.

  75. So that’s supposed to be my takehome: yet another racist attack by Nationalist Towheads.

  76. Anon[508] • Disclaimer says:

    And how many blacks will be able to afford to eat there? Obviously this fancy food is meant for the guilty white liberals, who will praise the food to high heaven no matter how it actually tastes.

  77. @indocon

    indo, top chefs who make money are astute business men and cooks. Did to know what to order and how much. best way to run a restaurant is to take out your pay first, be generous, pay your staff next and suppliers last. This works until your suppliers want cash on delivery. Then you blame the cretins clientale that are to unsophisticated to appreciate your meals. Wait six months, open new restaurant.

  78. Buffalo had a Soul Food restaurant, Gigi’s, that was quite popular, but I never ate there. The restaurant burned a few years back and then the owner, Blondine Harvin, died. The City of Buffalo refitted a new Gigi’s in the government funded Northland Training Center, $350K in equipment, and handed it over to Blondine’s son Darryl. It open with great fanfare, overwhelmed the staff and supplies and Darryl closed down after the first day to resupply and assess his staffing needs. Two weeks later it re-opend, one day of overwhelming business and then closed for good. Too much work and stress for Darryl. Not everyone can run a business, let alone a restaurant. Buffalo now looking for a new operator for the shuttered restaurant, but maybe the new operator won’t be black.

  79. Add to my list of reparations…any black chef can charge $200 for his meals. Good luck finding people to pay for those meals.

  80. Ragno says:
    @Jack D

    It turns out that you don’t actually have to be French to cook French fries.

    And if it’s freedom fries on the menu, you can’t be French at all.

  81. guest says:
    @Mungerite

    Flavor-profile ‘splaining? Oh no he di-in’t.

  82. guest says:
    @Anonymous

    Well, I use an actual stalking horse when I hunt minority property. But a dog would do in a pinch.

  83. guest says:
    @Ripple Earthdevil

    Yeah, they’re into tough dogs. That’s why they’re afraid of them.

  84. guest says:
    @Lot

    So homo? Or wait, are frats stereotypically straight or homo these days? I forget.

  85. @Anon

    Wish I knew where it came from! It goes perfectly with this one:

    PS: I can’t read the link Jack supplied. Settings etc.

  86. @Ripple Earthdevil

    Wait, aren’t Negros in the ‘hood and elsewhere big into pit bulls and other breeds with that kind of rep?

    Of course. Negroes with dogs are a really good reason (other) negroes are afraid of dogs.
    White people are to blame.

    Is the author implying that minorities are eager to socialize with whites? Why the heck would they want to do that when whites are so horribly racist and oppressive? How in the world would they have any kind of safe space around white dog owners?

    The goal is to wreck anything white people like, up to and including civilization itself.

  87. @baythoven

    I’m wondering how food can learn from such information.

    In some Central African societies, and in New Guinea, food is sometimes known to walk around, talk, even perhaps beg for its life, before righteous consumption by the cooks. See Jameson’s account of his experiences. Also read the account of David Rockefeller’s probable demise. In these cases, the food was truly informed, but to no avail.

    • Replies: @James Speaks
  88. Forbes says:
    @Colin Wright

    What’s striking to you was probably a purposeful omission.

    A substantive article discussing his cooking acumen defeats the point of the article–a discourse on the meaning of the superficial identity of a “black chef.” Were she to dig deep, it’s likely there’s nothing there.

  89. Forbes says:
    @Days of Broken Arrows

    which seems as if it’s comprised entirely of PBS documentaries about the Civil Rights era.

    Yes! PBS–where time stand still. It’s either 1864 or 1964. Slavery and the Civil War, or the legacy of slavery and the Civil War.

  90. @Colin Wright

    Well, of course, since that’s beside the main point, which is race in America. Chez Wakanda: we wuz chefs, yo! A tip on $200 is forty bucks, my brother; more, if you make a nuisance of yourselves for hours. Eleven weeks ’til fail? Whitey wins again. That’ll be another trillion dollars of .gov reparations, please. And yes, that NYT article is awful as journalism, The Narrative notwithstanding. Watch the ‘hood make Michelin into a verb any minute now: “Yo, crackaz be keepin’ a brother from Michelin’ again!” He was an aspiring ratatouille artist . . .

  91. J.Ross says: • Website

    This is kind of like the success of Hamilton in that this is really about bubbled-within-bubbled elites pretending that their exclusive event has meaning outside their security cordon.
    Also, $200 for a very good, occasional celebratory dinner is not really notable. I’m not rich and I’ve paid that and near that for occasional (and worth it) meals, and the only people patronizing this guy are probably used to paying more for their normal restaurant evenings. A little over $100 would be cheap for a very nice multi-course high-end dinner with drinks and dessert. There was a radio host (I think it was Tom Leykis?) who paid $1400 for a dinner, but this was in Venice, and he was getting his money’s worth.
    The excerpt argues that the chef’s background makes the price meaningful, but haven’t kitchen staff always historically been scum? The cooks Orwell washed pans for in Down and Out in Paris and London were hardly from middle class backgrounds. So for all the Sailer’s Law type pieces the essential question is: is there a news story here in the first place, or is this a dust devil of slogans chasing each other?

    • Replies: @Forbes
  92. Forbes says:
    @Anon

    Slim probably thinks dumbing down the NYT and making it appeal to the sort of dull-witted, minority teenage girl who doesn’t tackle anything more difficult than Cosmopolitan is a good way to expand its readership.

    Slim (or whomever) better work on a new strategy because: 1) no one under 40 (50?) reads a newspaper, and 2) phone/device users on the subway are playing games and watching videos, certainly not reading the NYT on-line.

  93. Cooking while black (CWB).

    Un chef de couleur,
    born in da Bronx.
    A darling de rigueur,
    said the dilettante wonks.

    But the food often sucked,
    and at two Bens per plate,
    many upchucked,
    and this dive met its fate.

  94. Forbes says:
    @J.Ross

    This is kind of like the success of Hamilton in that this is really about bubbled-within-bubbled elites pretending that their exclusive event has meaning outside their security cordon.

    A friend of mine, a few years ago when it was the talk if the town, would tell me about his two grandchildren (Ethical Culture Fieldston students, tuition: $48K per) could recite/sing all of Hamilton’s songs as if it were a coming-of-age ritual event, instead of the pop culture propaganda as a substitute for education that it was.

  95. @CCZ

    CCZ, told this story before but…Years ago my wife and I and two other couples waited months to reserve a table at the newest gourmet restaurant. The setting was nice the service fine and the portions microscopic. The three guys waited, hoping our ladies would leave some scraps for us, but every plate was bread wiped clean. The maitre de stopped at our table, smiled and asked…”And how did you find your meal tonight.” I looked him in the eye and replied…”I moved the fucking parsley and it was under it.” Paid the tab and found the closed WNY staple “Might Taco.”

    • Replies: @Kibernetika
  96. Anon87 says:
    @Desiderius

    Steve is right, and it’s not just the NYT. Whenever you read some really cringeworthy article in a formerly serious publication, it is from usually from someone you wouldn’t trust taking directions from let alone adult analysis of serious topics.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    , @J.Ross
  97. @Anon

    The target audience is the same as it’s ever been: the nation’s newsrooms and rich white snobs (look at their ads). The nation’s newsrooms run on the same economic model and rich white snobs like to feel like they’re down with the concerns of people of color so they can feel superior to regular whites.

  98. dan smith says:

    You want fries with that?

  99. @James Speaks

    It flopped after just 11 weeks.

    bored identity knows a thing or two about Mr.Onwuachi’s line of business; French Money Laundry process, aka investing usually takes around 2-3 years…

    Without any – $185 a pop – reservation, bored identity can assure y’all that 11 weeks period is not long enough for Mr. Onwunachi to be even considered being introduced to the epicurean world as a restaurant proprietor.

    There are only two lingering questions left:

    Did Mr. Onwuachi had an early. or a late miscarriage?

    For how long will he still be eligible for the Planned Restauranthood assistance?

  100. @Endgame Napoleon

    You are so right, the multiple kinds of taxes a business has to pay has little relationship to the amount of income. The taxing entities are relentless in their collection efforts and failure to pay means an agent knocking on your door. In desperation, perhaps, some owners fail to withhold quarterly social security tax, for instance, hoping to make it up later. Or fail to withhold hoping to get away with it. Doesn’t work, you have now engaged in criminal activity. So many dreamers, so many failures.

  101. @Buffalo Joe

    🙂

    But the best, most unique taste of New York City (and here I include all of the boroughs): A slice of pizza, folded in half, with grease dripping down the center onto a paper plate (I make the sign of the cross). Gimme Brooklyn pizza. Gimme your guido, greasy pizza parlor pie, oh ye of little faith. Oh come ye, you Tonies and Brunos, oh gimme some real friggin’ pizza.

    Next comes a hard-seeded roll fresh from a bakery, with just butter. Or a real, fresh bagel so treated. With coffee. On the beach.

    And some halva for dessert! Brooklyn Dodgers rule!

    • Replies: @Hibernian
  102. @Anon87

    Pinch is a cultural mulatto desperately trying to shore up his street cred with the (post-) Jewish half of his identity by going over the top woke. If only his weren’t the newspaper of record. Punch falling for that shiksa really turned out to be bad for America.

    • Replies: @Anon87
  103. @Pretzel Yardstick

    You forgot gays, lesbians, and trannies.

  104. Anon87 says:
    @Desiderius

    I think I realized what they all remind me of. First year college students coming home for Thanksgiving break. We could just roll our eyes at them before, maybe enjoy an uncle egging them on. Now they shape public discourse! Minor upside is print media is dead without rich liberal subsidies so only a matter of time, but seeing Hollywood implode is taking much longer.

    I’d love to see how long any of these writers would survive on the Sailer funding model.
    Which should remind everyone to donate.
    For less than the cost of a cup of coffee you can be treated to multiple daily blog posts!

  105. Alden says:
    @Mungerite

    I don’t believe a word of her article, especially a customer asked her for a drink.

    What did she do, wear black pants white shirt and little black apron and carry a little order pad?

    Not a word of truth.

    • Agree: Hibernian
    • Replies: @HammerJack
  106. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon87

    There was a pretty good story on NPR today about the new generation of robocalls that use technology to sidestep the rare legitimate government action banning them. The guy talking is a senior editor at the Atlantic and gives the example that one robocall was clearly illegitimate because it claimed to be his car dealer, and he doesn’t own a vehicle. He doesn’t have a moped, he doesn’t have a bike. He probably lives in New York City or a similar Eastern Seaboard metropolis where this is entirely sensible, but it still struck me as a remarkable admission.

    • Replies: @Anon87
    , @Jonathan Mason
  107. Hibernian says:
    @anon

    I was a construction field engineer for 2 1/2 years in Chicago, not all that long ago; half of each day inspecting and half in a field office tapping on the computer keys. I very rarely saw any black and/or women personnel in any union job except Laborers, who have a shorter apprenticeship (2 years) and lower pay. Hispanic guys were another story. Not saying its not different, maybe a lot different, in some other cities.

  108. Hibernian says:
    @peterike

    Is Kelly related to Neil?

    • Replies: @CCZ
  109. Brutusale says:
    @The Alarmist

    Indeed. When young chefs leave their last sous job to strike out on their own, many soon discover that working in a kitchen is light years away from actually running a kitchen. They don’t start with a kitchen, menu, and staff that they can manage while they’re getting their feet wet as a boss.

  110. CCZ says:
    @Hibernian

    He is a high end “luxury brand” cosmopolitan cultural entrepreneur, whose trade is actually “hair dresser.”

    “Gorsuch Holdings is a luxury brand company spanning several industries, including hair care, construction, hospitality, and design. Each Gorsuch Holdings brand was developed with the highest end customer service and product in mind. Our driving force behind entering any new market is the creation of unique products and concepts that introduce a fresh angle to existing industries. The goal of each of these brands is to innovate constantly and to create new and modern practices that will benefit consumers and team members.”

    http://www.gorsuchholdings.com/

    https://thehairnerds.com/kelly-gorsuch/

  111. Anon87 says:
    @J.Ross

    Plenty of SSN scam calls saying your identity was stolen, but some must work because every week I see on the police blotter at least one person fooled into sending a stranger money. Sometimes in the thousands. Probably an elderly person.

    Unless I know the number I won’t pick up. Most don’t leave a message, which then gets the number blocked. My favorite robocall that does leave a message is a Chinese woman just screaming into the phone.

  112. @James Speaks

    Not David Rockefeller, Michael Rockefeller.

  113. When you pay a lot for a meal, a large part of the price is related to location, ambience, individual service, and so on. Although $180 sounds like a lot for a meal, compared to, say, Golden Corral, the price would be quite reasonable if it meant you could get a decent meal in an expensive place where people get hungry, like an airport or at a Disney attraction, or a football stadium where even a humble hot dog goes for 10 bucks.

    I paid about $300 including tip a few months ago for a birthday meal for two adults and two small children in a Brazilian restaurant in Jacksonville, FL (one of the most pitiful cities in North America) that had an ambience that I would rate at about 0/10, though the waiters were pleasant and helpful and the food was acceptable.

    The kids would actually have preferred Golden Corral, even though it doesn’t serve desserts with birthday candles, so I would expect the prices in any kind of decent restaurant in Washington, DC to be higher since there are so many well-paid jobs in Washington, not to mention lobbyists, whereas Jacksonville is knows as an $11 per hour town.

    As far as the black thing goes, my observation is that most of the food in pretentious restaurants in the US is cooked by black people, but they are usually behind the scenes.

  114. @J.Ross

    The guy talking is a senior editor at the Atlantic and gives the example that one robocall was clearly illegitimate because it claimed to be his car dealer, and he doesn’t own a vehicle.

    I once took my car to a Honda dealership about 35 miles away so that I could obtain a new (absurdly expensive) remote control key for it. A few months later I had a call from a young lady who said she was calling “for” that dealership (not “from” that dealership), saying that my vehicle was overdue for servicing, and she could give me an appointment for next week.

    Naturally I told her to fuck off, but after hanging up, it appeared to me that the dealership was outsourcing its appointment-making to someone else, and I made a mental note not to go back there again since they were abusing the phone number that I had given to them so that they could call me when the work was ready.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  115. @Jonathan Mason

    I’ve just been using my key. Nice touch of nostalgia here and there.

  116. @peterike

    The entire “dining experience” is a long homage from the chef to his very own wonderful self. It’s not about the food, see, its about Onwuachi.

    It’s almost as if Ta-Nehisi opened up a diner.

  117. @Alden

    In the Current Year marketplace of ideas, their fictions beat our truths. And don’t imagine they don’t know it.

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