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From the LA Times:

The working witches of Los Angeles just want you to be your best self
By DEBORAH NETBURN
JUN 11, 2019 | 3:00 AM

The Oracle of Los Angeles was feeling frazzled.

It was already 2 p.m. and she hadn’t had time to prepare lunch, much less wipe the ash from her altar. A tarot card client had just left her yellow Craftsman house in West Adams, evidenced by the smell of incense still lingering in the air. Within an hour, she was scheduled to meet with another client who was struggling to complete a PhD thesis.

In the meantime, she still had to prepare for her weekly podcast, create a purifying ceremony for a new business–and get her nails done for a reality TV appearance. Any downtime would be consumed with writing. The second draft of her memoir was due to her publisher in a week.

The Oracle, who also goes by Amanda Yates Garcia, is a former arts educator with a master of fine arts in writing, film and critical theory from California Institute of the Arts. For the past eight years she has made her living as a professional witch, performing “energetic healings,” “intuitive empowerment sessions” and the occasional exorcism, while also teaching workshops on the art of magic online and at her home, independent stores, and sites like the J. Paul Getty Museum.

The Oracle understands the value of marketing, so she also devotes several hours each week to outreach: writing newsletters, updating her website and sharing tips on social media on topics such as how to break a curse using the ”disruptive energy of a lunar eclipse.”

“If you think being a witch is just sitting around doing spells all the time, you think wrong,” she says. “Half my business is being on Instagram.” …

If you think all this witch-talk is fringe thinking, it isn’t.

A 2017 survey from the Pew Research Center that examined New Age beliefs in America found that 40% of respondents believe in psychics and another 40% believe that inanimate objects like mountains and trees are imbued with spiritual energy.

It also found that 33% of Americans believe in reincarnation, 29% believe in astrology, and 60% say they hold at least one of these New Age beliefs.

Anecdotal evidence seems to indicate the number of people who call themselves witches is growing.

“Interest in witchcraft waxes and wanes, but it is waxing, again, particularly among young women,” says Helen Berger, a professor at Brandeis University who has been studying witches and pagans for 30 years.

Eras of Female Empowerment in which everybody is supposed to uncritically Believe Women often end up with women doing what they’ve always, deep down, really wanted to do: casting hexes on other women, those Basic Becky Bitches.

And then there this accompanying essay by the reporter who wrote the article above:

Behind the story: She was researching an article on witches — and found a path to self-empowerment
By DEBORAH NETBURN
JUN 11, 2019 | 3:00 AM

… A few days later, I pitched a story to my editor, an article that would explore how working witches in Los Angeles make a living. I thought it would be fun. I didn’t expect it to change my life.

When I started reporting this story I was (and still am) dealing with a personal crisis of enormous proportion. I just couldn’t let it go. But after spending months talking to witches in L.A., I gained new perspectives on how to deal with the deep and painful feelings I was experiencing. …

We talked about why it seems that interest in witches and witchcraft is growing, and she suggested that it had to do with more women seeking environments where they feel respected.

“Women are not empowered in the majority of major religions,” she said. But in witchcraft, “they are accepted as powerful and [are] literally seen as the root of power in the feminine form.”

The next witch I met was Loba Loca, a bruja-healer-activist, who uses the pronouns they/them. We spoke about colonialism and people who burn sage and use crystals without considering where those materials come from. ,,,

On a phone call, the witch and spirit guide Aja Daashuur talked about the power of word magic — repeating mantras to yourself. “We read things every day that affect how we see ourselves,” she said. “Why shouldn’t I tell myself [that] I’m powerful, I’m beautiful, I love myself?”

,,, The Oracle of Los Angeles has her own take on the appeal of witchcraft.

“A lot of people, specifically women, who are attracted to witchcraft were taken to the underworld against their will, usually through trauma, and had to find their way out. Now they are a traveler between two worlds.”

I thought a lot about trauma while I worked on this story; I thought about struggles around love, work and equality and the toll they take on our humanity and sense of self.

I bought a strength candle, placed it atop an altar that I set up at home and sat in front of it for 10 minutes twice a day until it burned down. I told myself that I am strong, powerful and courageous.

I’ve got a foolproof idea for making money. It’s called a Pyramid Scheme. I’ve made a pyramid out of coat hangers and crepe paper. You come over to my house and sit under my pyramid so you can absorb the Pyramid Power. While we’re sitting under the pyramid, I’ll give your own official Build-a-Pyramid kit (some coathangers and crepe paper) and you’ll give me a lot of cash. I’m not really good at math, so here’s Time Magazine on June 16, 1980 explaining the Pyramid Power pyramid scam the swept Southern California for a few delirious weeks in the spring of 1980.

For $1,000 each, 32 newcomers buy slots on the bottom row of a pyramid-shaped roster. Each new player pays half of his $1,000 to the person at the pinnacle, who ends up with $16,000. The new player also pays his remaining $500 to the person directly above him on the next tier, which contains 16 people. Since each person on that tier gets paid by two of the newcomers, he ends up with $1,000, thus recouping his original investment. As more people buy in, the players move up the chart. In time, theoretically, each person reaches the top—and $16,000.

But let’s just add another zero to all the amounts. Wouldn’t you want $160,000?

The great thing about the Pyramid Power pyramid scheme was that it was hard to debunk. It was already pre-debunked. Anti-fraud authorities would go on the local TV news to denounce the pyramid schemes as “pyramid schemes,” which just served as good advertising. “Well, duh, of course it’s a pyramid scheme,” participants would laugh. “How do you think those Egyptian pharaohs got so rich that they could afford those giant pyramids? Through tapping the secret energy of Pyramid Power!”

Now this isn’t 1980 anymore, so I’ll add a few up to date touches like first asking everybody who sits with me under the pyramid their pronouns. Also, feminism. And no microaggressions.

 
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  1. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    The witches say to turn th tables on the other witches;

    • Replies: @Dube
  2. vinny says:

    “The next witch I met was Loba Loca, a bruja-healer-activist, who uses the pronouns they/them.”

    “Crazy Wolf-bitch”? This can’t be real, this can’t be real…

  3. Twinkie says:

    She was researching an article on witches — and found a path to self-empowerment

    I was visiting a friend of mine from high school who was at Brown University (about 30 years ago) and thumbed through his course catalog and found “Magic in the Middle Ages.” Apparently, in that course, students learned to look for ingredients at night to make potions and cast spells.

    I said, “Seriously? This is why your parents are spending $25,000 a year to go to Brown?”

    Apparently what I hadn’t realized was Brown was ahead of its time. This was about female empowerment! After all, it does have the color of poop as its name.

  4. Female writer: ‘When I started reporting this story I was (and still am) dealing with a personal crisis of enormous proportion.”

    Aren’t they all?

    • Disagree: Old Prude
    • LOL: Sextus Empiricus
  5. Not surprising that this scheme is attractive to women, who traditionally have borne children, who bore children, etc. Now nubile young women bear, excuse me, regurgitate ideology. The attraction of AOC in a nutshell.

    • Agree: fish
  6. Bill P says:

    A friend of mine is a big believer in astrology. His dad was a really big player in Hollywood, which is about all I can say without giving it away.

    I assumed that his belief in astrology was an LA thing, but acording to the above numbers it’s pretty widespread. It’s kind of sad, really, to see religion degenerating into superstition here. That’s pretty much what it was in the PRC when I lived there. I never ran across more superstitious folks than people who live in atheist or recently atheist countries.

    The human religious instinct is irrepressible. If you ban religion, this is the kind of garbage you get.

    • Agree: utu, OEMIKITLOB
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  7. ‘…A 2017 survey from the Pew Research Center that examined New Age beliefs in America found that 40% of respondents believe in psychics and another 40% believe that inanimate objects like mountains and trees are imbued with spiritual energy.

    It also found that 33% of Americans believe in reincarnation, 29% believe in astrology, and 60% say they hold at least one of these New Age beliefs…’

    I’d love to see all that broken down by race, religion, and gender.

  8. anon[335] • Disclaimer says:

    Not many people can get through life thinking and reasoning for themselves. This is not an insult to people. How many of us can shoot 30 free throws in a row? Can you take your car apart and put it back together? Thinking for yourself is a specialty, for the few.
    That’s why we need organized religion. People need beliefs to hold their brains together, and religion gives them the glue. Far better if everyone believes in the same superstition and is led by organized clergy. Christianity produced a great ethic and civilization. It doesn’t matter if the Resurrection is as unreal as Pyramid Power.
    What doesn’t work is the anything goes, do your own thing, crazy quilt of many superstitions. I really hate the Astrology nuts. Catholic priests have much more gravitas by comparison.

    • Agree: Cortes, Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  9. Last November I went on an Ayahuasca retreat with four middle aged women. After drinking the medicine and talking to spirit animals, most of them believed that there are aliens living inside of Mount Shasta at the insistence of our female abuelita spanish-speaking shaman who charges $225 per Ayahuasca drink. Afterwards while the girls are cruising around the crystal shops buying their magical minerals, I was hitting the local bars in Weed, California. Most women really do believe in this new age nonsense. It’s mostly harmless, until you realize how much money they spend on this crap.

  10. Bishop Fulton Sheen, the famous Catholic TV Evangelist from the 60s, used to say that secular society rushes in to fill a vacuum left where the Church retreats. The post-Vatican II retreat from the cult of the saints and the old emphasis on hellfire/demons created a vacuum that this witchcraft rushed to fill.

    I realize most of you don’t take this supernatural stuff seriously, but as a believer I know these women are seriously putting themselves and their clients in great danger. They are putting their immortal souls into the hands of demons, all for the hope of some earthly, transitory rewards. All based on some man-hating, typical female insecurity, and some revisionist history about what “witches” actually were.

    You’d be surprised how many left-wing secular women scoff at the “ridiculousness” of Catholic mysticism and yet whole heartedly buy into this. They feel a need to deny Truth in order to follow the Father of Lies. In fact, its surprising how most people into “occult” or “weird” subjects disparage Catholic/Orthodox beliefs as “a magical sky wizard” —they will accept anything but Jesus Christ, to paraphrase Chesterton. The gang at Last Podcast on the Left (which I have since stopped listening to for this reason) are brazen about it.

    And the media influences them. Many girls of the 80s and 90s saw movies like The Craft or TV shows like Charmed and tried out spells and such, and some got well more than they bargained for. One seemingly absolutely hard-bitten and secular girl confided in me that she once brought a demon into her house via a spell and had to banish it the next day, and also used a spell to get her high school boyfriend to date her. In fact, the black chick from The Craft quit being an actress and went on to become a tarot card reader/witch in LA.

    Guard your daughters and save their souls.

  11. @Known Fact

    Female writer: ‘When I started reporting this story I was (and still am) dealing with a personal crisis of enormous proportion.”

    Aren’t they all?

    Every story a woman tells is really about herself.

    • Replies: @Tyto Alba
    , @bomag
    , @Noman
  12. @Twinkie

    I said, “Seriously? This is why your parents are spending $25,000 a year to go to Brown?”

    “My child doesn’t go to college, my child goes to Brown.”

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  13. Anonymous[732] • Disclaimer says:

    Does Mr Sailer’s Law of Female Journalism need updating?
    When the patriarchy is smashed, not only will Deborah be hotter, but she’ll be able to turn all her ex’s into frogs and make her blonde Becky girlfriends be covered in boils.

  14. @Colin Wright

    It also found that 33% of Americans believe in reincarnation,

    All but hardcore atheists believe in some kind of afterlife.

    29% believe in astrology,

    Not completely nuts. Most of the great scientists/ thinkers throughout history before the 18th Century studied astrology. St. Augustine was one of the notable exceptions—he disparaged astrology in his Confessions—but anyone in Confucian China or the Persian Empire or Medieval Europe who had an education studied the heavens not just for astronomical phenomenon but for clues about the future—this is why the ancients kept such detailed information about year length, lunar cycles, solar cycles, etc.

    Astronomy and astrology went hand in hand.

    But modern astrology has as much to do with the rigorous ancient astrology as modern witchcraft has to do with ancient pagan religious practice.

  15. Dube says:
    @Anonymous

    If this is Eve, no wonder Adam took a break and let her go off by herself.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  16. @petit bourgeois

    Heinlein wrote a sci-fi story pre-WWII about the Spirit Energy or something living inside Mt. Shasta.

    In New Age, there’s nothing new under the sun.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
    , @JimB
    , @Dube
    , @Dube
  17. anon[335] • Disclaimer says:

    I bought a strength candle, placed it atop an altar that I set up at home and sat in front of it for 10 minutes twice a day until it burned down. I told myself that I am strong, powerful and courageous.

    I want to make a million dollars selling strength candles to batty women. I’ll throw in a self affirmation tape. Oh wait – Richard Simmons beat me to it.

  18. @vinny

    Strange that his pronouns are ‘they/them’ in English yet he is fine with gendered nouns and adjectives in Spanish

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  19. Witches are real.

    Instead of poisoning wells and so forth, they use the tools of the modern world to encourage abortion, promiscuity or lesbianism among women, out-group bias, destruction of the nuclear family, the cult of the self, disloyalty to kin, worship of the exotic and primitive, etc

    • Agree: R.G. Camara, Hail, Daniel H
    • Replies: @Whitey Whiteman III
  20. It also found that 33% of Americans believe in reincarnation, 29% believe in astrology, and 60% say they hold at least one of these New Age beliefs.

    Reincarnation, regardless of its truth or falsity, is hardly an outré belief. Most of the eastern half of the ecumene assumes it, and many intelligent Westerners have taken to the idea as well. I wouldn’t put it in the same class as witchcraft.

    Even astrology was taken seriously for the longest time in the West, by the educated. It took centuries of failure to consign it to the fringe.

    The West is split among a handful of faiths, and a handful of secularisms. What they all have in common, though, is the belief that we only go around once. The Line of Control seems to be the divider.

    • Agree: Achmed E. Newman
  21. @vinny

    “The next witch I met was Loba Loca, a bruja-healer-activist, who uses the pronouns they/them.”

    I have decided that henceforward, the pronouns referring to me shall be “God/God’s.”

    Anyone who finds this religiously offensive, please continue to refer to me using “he/him/his.”

    But the rest of you… we have laws! Remember: it is “God/God’s.”

    (Surely I’m not the first to think of this???)

  22. Anon[252] • Disclaimer says:

    The late, great Martin Gardner gets my vote as the originator of the pyramid power myth in his tongue-in-cheek 1974 column (“Mathematical Games”) in the pre-SJW version of Scientific American, although Gardner graciously credited antecedents, and wrote about pyramid power in a 1952 book of his, chapter 15 of this:

    https://archive.org/details/fadsfallaciesinn00gard/page/n9

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramid_power
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pyramidology

    Within a couple of years of the column, at least a couple of books on pyramid power came out, taking it seriously.

    La Griffe du Lion took obvious inspiration from Gardner, who used a conversational writing style and a cast of imaginary characters and sock puppets, including Dr. Matrix (a “ficticious polymath,” Irving Joshua Matrix, born 1906) and his Japanese wife and their precocious daughter:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Irving_Joshua_Matrix

    Dr. Matrix was chased out of town on one occasion for running a pyramid scheme with his assistant, One-Tooth Rhee. Not PC.

    • Replies: @Impolitic
  23. @petit bourgeois

    Hucksters and the gullible go hand-in-hand—as the entire Gypsy culture can tell you. The problem, however, is significantly worse here with the demonic. It’s the equivalent of someone selling “radiation-blocking vegan charms”just on site of the Chernobyl plant.

  24. @Twinkie

    Apparently what I hadn’t realized was Brown was ahead of its time. This was about female empowerment! After all, it does have the color of poop as its name.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
  25. @Reg Cæsar

    I believe bunnies can talk. They don’t want us to know because reasons.

    • Replies: @al anon
  26. Tyto Alba says:
    @R.G. Camara

    @Known Fact & @R G Camera,

    Keep in mind, this is the LA Times “science” reporter…

  27. Anon[252] • Disclaimer says:

    Following a link from Steve’s decrepit, in-need-of-a-major-cleanup blogroll, I went to Kevin MacDonald’s site, and followed a link from there to a fascinating website I’d never heard of. Google tells me that it has only been linked to once from iSteve, from a comment, so I thought I’d introduce it.

    Ideas and Data
    https://ideasanddata.wordpress.com/

    Some posts are a bit like Audacious Epigone, but using data other than the GSS, and some cite published or original research. Posts go back to April 2017, and are ongoing.

    Some posts:

    Jewish Overrepresentaiton Among Influential Liberals and Conservatives

    https://ideasanddata.wordpress.com/2018/03/01/jewish-overrepresentaiton-among-influential-liberals-and-conservatives/

    29 percent of influential liberals are Jewish, 8 percent for conservatives, using a methodology similar to Steve’s recent “Jews and the Benjamins” (that might not be the actual title) post at Taki.

    Slavery and Modern Black Poverty

    https://ideasanddata.wordpress.com/2019/06/11/slavery-and-modern-black-poverty/

    It turns out there is a data set of blacks born free during the slavery period, and their income and how their descendants fared can be tracked.

    On Racial Discrimination in Hiring

    https://ideasanddata.wordpress.com/2019/05/20/on-racial-discrimination-in-hiring/

    An examination of the “identical resumes with black and white names” genre of research. Spoiler: it turns out that black employees are less productive than white with identical resumes, and hiring companies know this from experience. The blogger quantifies this.

    Nassim Taleb on IQ

    https://ideasanddata.wordpress.com/2019/01/08/nassim-taleb-on-iq/

    A takedown.

    • Replies: @res
  28. @anon

    I’ve got so bad news about the Church……

  29. @Tyto Alba

    “Women are totally as capable at science and logic as men!”

    Honk Honk.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  30. @Dube

    Old joke:

    The Lord tells Adam he wants to make him a mate. “She always be obedient, subservient, loving, caring, sexy, horny, nurturing, in-shape, and wonderful in every way to you.”

    Adam: “What’s the catch?”

    The Lord: “To make her, I need to remove one of your testicles.”

    Adam thinks for a moment.

    Adam: “What can I get for a rib?”

  31. @R.G. Camara

    Yeah, I wonder many of these women would, oh say, try to use herbal medicine to get a 19year-old to conceive, since it’s the duty of women to bear children for their tribe? Probably not many.

  32. Ha, ha. I have commented here numerous times on what could be called the Late Obama Age Occult Revival. I first noticed it in the streets of Venice and Silver Lake in Los Angeles, but it soon reached Brooklyn and other hipper urban nabes. Thanks to the internet, it is now a nationwide phenomenon. Los Angeles is still really ground zero for this. LA is kind of spacey to begin with Hollywood and all the fads, but the crystal shops and wiccans have taken off in recent years. Not to come off as too New Agey myself (kind of guilty as charged), but LA definitely has an energy about it, especially in the Hollywood Hills and places like Los Feliz. It might be the crosswinds, the fault lines or something else

    I think the popularity of yoga among women is a major vector of occult influence. Yoga and growing up reading Harry Potter books. The Late 19th Century Occult Revival, an amazing historical period, likely arose from the British occupation of India which introduced the Western world to yoga and gurus (both real and charlatan). The interaction with eastern mysticism lead to a greater interest western mysticism indigenous to the British Isles and Europe.

    As noted on this website, there definitely seems to be two branches to the New New Age female occultism. Ladies of The Light or Glendas, basically really hot women who are into yoga, meditation, crystals, astrology and tarot card readings. They generally are good natured and positive people, if a little spacey. I happen to have a soft spot for hot, spacey women in yoga pants who fall into this category. If you apply a little strategic influence, I find that you can get a woman to ease off the New Age Gas Pedal a bit and focus on meditation and yoga which I think are overall healthy and positive activities.

    Then there are the Ladies of the Dark or Brenda branch, women who are disproportionately obese, bad natured, covered in off-putting tattoos, angry, who identify as lesbians or “polyamory”. This faction tends to be more into witchcraft, radical feminism and spellcasting. Best avoided if possible. The Goth Hottie is common in this faction, but unfortunately most are broken beyond repair. You can find a Goth Hottie that you can turn to more traditional thinking, they certainly exist, but they are few and far between.

    The Age of Trump has ushered in a new era of irrationality as the cognitive dissonance of Trump’s election has lead many to double down on the occult. The general media bias of our age encourages people to seek solace in magical thinking.

    As to the Crystal Game, it has really gone upscale in recent years. What was once the parlance of the fringe is now seeping into elite culture. I think the hedge fund crowd has even gotten into crystals or at least hedge fund managers have married some Glendas. (I personally think one reason for the rise of New Ageism and moral degeneracy can be tied back to the 2008 Financial Crisis when money was printed out of nothing to bail out all the scams, but that is a discussion for another time). There are art galleries in Venice, California and New York City that sell crystals worth tens of thousands of dollars. This gallery is in the Chelsea Art District is one of my favorites if you like to look at pretty rocks.

    https://www.wilenskyminerals.com/gallery

    As Hunter S. Thompson noted:

    “When the going gets weird, the weird turn pro.”

  33. Pericles says:
    @vinny

    “Crazy Wolf-bitch”? This can’t be real, this can’t be real…

    Lol, the pronouns indicate a bonus surprise.

  34. @Colin Wright

    Self-delusion is very underated. It’s mostly just a burden to be unable to do it.

    • Agree: Random Smartaleck
  35. Women are by and large creatures of emotions, moods, feelings and appetites. They have an endless appetite for romance, gossip, intrigue, drama and psychological speculation. They have a gigantic need to have their feelings and emotions “validated,” whatever that means. They play with their feelings and their speculations the way guys play with computers and cars. (Some of it’s real and necessary; much it’s purely for fun.) They’re herd animals who can be unbelievably cruel to other women who try to stray from the herd. Astrology, witchcraft, psychotherapy and women’s journalism cater to their swampy, mystical natures and to their huge needs for emotional affirmation. Just try telling a woman with a grievance not to be so emotional. You’ll learn a fast lesson in how important a woman’s emotions are to her.

    Women were the main drivers behind a couple of recent-ish previous witchhunts — the Satanic Ritual Abuse at daycare centers hysteria, and the Repressed Memory fad of the early ’90s. During the latter outbreak, thousands of American women came to believe that they’d been “incested” by their dads before they were three. They persuaded themselves that those repressed-and-now-“recovered” events explained their current grownup unhappinesses. (Ever notice how seldom women are happy? And how much time they spend analyzing their dissatisfactions and unhappinesses?) Thousands of families broke up when the women accused their fathers of having incested them. In fact, it was all made up. The “memories” were created by irresponsible therapists, and the women believed the absurd stories because, well, their friends were in therapy too and all the women’s magazines were full of articles about recovered memories.

    We guys spend a lot of time having our worlds upended by women, and we spend a lot of our energy trying to manage our ladies and their often nutty emotions.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @Kylie
  36. Olorin says:
    @Twinkie

    I have several unpublished (actually only partly drafted) stories about Ivy League and Big Ten witches, warlocks, and shamans. Also about 30 years ago.

    FWIW my teacher shared that in the 1930s and 1940s a favorite football cheer at Penn was, “What’s the color of horsesh!t? BROWN BROWN BROWN!”

  37. Pericles says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Hillary Clinton is apparently a witch now. Perhaps she can add a chapter to the next edition of What Happened.

    Hillary Clinton appeared as a guest speaker at a witch’s coven in New York City on April 3, 2018 and was awarded a lifetime membership in the coven, known as “The Wing.”

    http://www.americanlibertyreport.com/articles/hillary-can-no-longer-sue-you-if-you-call-her-a-witch/

    https://www.thecut.com/2018/04/last-night-the-wing-welcomed-hillary-clinton-into-the-coven.html

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/11/11/style/the-wing-womens-social-club-magazine.html

    The instagram account of ‘The Wing’ seems to be generic poz, LGBT blacks, wrinkled old white women posing for some protest, etc. No witchy stuff, I’m disappointed to report.

    Coven founders include women named ‘Gelman’ and ‘Kassan’. I wonder what they tell their rabbi?

  38. @Reg Cæsar

    It seems like through the ages intellectuals and theologians were always attracted to a tidy monotheism.

    But the folk impulse is always to multiply, personalize, and mysticize the spiritual forces.

    That’s how you go from Catholicism to Santorini.

  39. @Bill P

    The human religious instinct is irrepressible. If you ban religion, this is the kind of garbage you get.

    The Chinese are perhaps a good example of this, Bill. Their Buddhist/Taoist beliefs and any others they may have had were pretty much beat out of them by the Communists. Everything that resembles religion there seems to be nothing but superstition by this point.

    You know, I wrote this, Bill, before I just now realized your PRC was China. I’ll keep it posted just to show my agreement.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  40. JimB says:

    The working witches of Los Angeles just want you to be your best self

    Will they work pro bono for the homeless on skid row?

  41. The New Age stuff has always been dominated by women, and the men have just gotten into it to get laid, as is the case with many stupid political movements too.

    About pyramid schemes versus pyramid healing, I don’t think those areas overlap very much. The “holistic” healers and such, like the guy in Seinfeld below, would be the last to be the operators of pyramid schemes, who’d be your smooth-talking business school graduates. They are two entirely different sets of people with probably no overlap whatsoever.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  42. Well, duh, of course it’s a pyramid scheme,” participants would laugh. “How do you think those Egyptian pharaohs got so rich that they could afford those giant pyramids? Through tapping the secret energy of Pyramid Power!”

    Haha! I really liked that whole paragraph – funny stuff, Steve. You must have been invited to a pyramid scheme meeting or two (it’s normally just being invited over by a friend you’d thought you’d lost touch with, probably for a good reason, who tells you “oh, this one guy you don’t know will be there too, he’s in some kind of business deal …”)

    Yes, the salesman will start off telling you why you deserve the really fine house that this friend of his has. This all turned me off, as I remember thinking, nah my house is fine.

  43. @Achmed E. Newman

    But the pyramid power and pyramid scam folks teamed up for a few wacky weeks in the spring of 1980 in Los Angeles.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  44. @petit bourgeois

    I have seen some weird stuff on Mt. Shasta that I will keep to myself. Mysticism aside, it’s simply an amazing mountain.

    Mt. Shasta and Weed are two of my favorite places. Definitely along with Petrolia and Garberville, the last outpost of the 1970’s. I was in line at the Rite Aid in Mount Shasta once and the two guys in front of me were both gurus from different cults in long flowing robes, long white beards and various crystal necklaces. One guy had a giant walking staff like he was Gandolf or something. As a tourist, it was a highlight.

    I also met adherents of a Mt. Shasta based religion from Israel. They seemed nice enough, if perhaps a bit out there.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  45. @Pericles

    Hillary Clinton is apparently a witch now

    Great.

  46. @Known Fact

    Female writer: ‘When I started reporting this story I was (and still am) dealing with a personal crisis of enormous proportion.”

    Aren’t they all?

    No, some are dealing with a secondary crisis caused by the primary crisis not being huge enough.

  47. In the Current Day, the Nerium Pyramid Scheme has the Current Most Profitability among older Beckys:

    https://www.lazymanandmoney.com/neora-scam/

    I never knew Heinlein was interested in Mount Shasta. I’ve been reading you since 2002, and you never mentioned him in that context. Unfortunately, I’ve been reading nonfiction for the last 35 years, so I have no breadth in Science Fiction. We could not ever dispel the notion of the prophecies?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  48. @Steve Sailer

    Ahaaa! Duckduckgo sent me to your article on isteve.blogspot from a decade ago with the full story. Thank you. I’d never heard of this deal. I like how the mob was reported to have gotten in at the end – they’d be the last crowd to get into the New Age stuff.

    That was a hell of a marketing job by the schemers oops, “salesmen” to link up their out-in-the-open Multi-Level Marketing Plans (let’s get the term right this time) to the New-Agey stuff, and of course, in California with the wealth and high crazy-count all concentrated in one place. Genius!

    I will read your iSteve blogspot post more thoroughly and the comments with it later on.

  49. RobUK says:

    It also found that 33% of Americans believe in reincarnation, 29% believe in astrology

    The great thing about this is that if it was about Trump supporters, this would be presented by the author as evidence of their credulity and stupidity.

    • Replies: @David
  50. @Pericles

    It’s kind of a step down from being the AntiChrist though. Oh, “witch” with a double-you. Never mind….

  51. Anon[129] • Disclaimer says:

    The urge to believe in something supernatural is innate. Most people on the planet do. There’s just a segment of the female population who can’t connect with a religion about a bunch of desert nomads long ago, and want something that’s more up to date, and in which they can insert themselves and becomes mystical forces themselves instead of just hanging around and watching someone else be the center of power and attention.

    Being a witch means you never have to go to the bother of having to visit sick kids in the hospital or anything altruistic like that. It’s the religion of narcissistic, selfish assholes.

    • Agree: jim jones
    • Replies: @Old Prude
  52. @Clifford Brown

    The election of Trump over Hillary really snapped many of the man-haters’ brains specifically. For one, they really truly worship Hillary, despite all her evil—they see her as the Ultimate Feminist Breaking The Glass Ceiling.

    And Trump—with his trophy wives, masculine pride, big spending ways, and lack of fear to insult them to their face—is like this throwback from a Mad Men fantasy episode—Dom Draper meets Frank Sinatra meets their divorcee mother’s tales about their “evil patriarchal father.”

    Their “good witch” religion was supposed to bring St. Hillary. Instead, it’s their own nightmare demon-monster. How to react?

    The Lefty narrative is always This is the Dawn of the New Age. So when Trump foiled that, they feel like they’re in a wrong, alternative universe. Hence the increase in feminazism religion, such as witchcraft—-“we must not have worshiped Baphoment hard enough, girls. Bring on the Furies and the curses!”

    How did we lose to these snowflakes for so long?

  53. @Pericles

    Hillary Clinton is apparently a witch now.

    Was there ever really doubt?

  54. @petit bourgeois

    Heinlein’s second of three wives was a script girl at a movie studio in Hollywood. She was a bright intellectual into leftism and New Age stuff, who had a lot of influence on Heinlein. His third wife also had a lot of influence on Heinlein, pushing him in a libertarian and anti-Communist direction. Personally, I think these various influences on Heinlein were good for keeping him interesting. Sure, he’s doesn’t make a very consistent cult figure, but then he never all that much wanted to follow his readers’ demands that he be their cult leader.

    Anyway, his second wife’s interest in magic manifests itself in some fun ways in early Heinlein sci-fi, like in 1940’s “Magic, Inc.” Heinlein wasn’t all that interested in his wife’s interest in magic, so he writes it into his stories from an engineer’s perspective.

    This one is set in a world like ours but it has recently been discovered that magic really works and now magic has been fully incorporated into the work-a-day economy. The narrator is a hilariously down to earth Rotary club businessman, a building contractor, who now has to decide between digging the basement on his latest project using a leased steamshovel or hiring an expensive warlock to cast a spell.

  55. @Achmed E. Newman

    Relatedly: Pope Francis recently completed a twofer: he both sold out Chinese Christians to the Chicoms and decided to revisit the Investiture Controversy to deliberately throw it this time, allowing the Chinese Communist government to choose the new Catholic bishops in China:

    https://thefederalist.com/2018/02/12/accepting-communist-chosen-bishops-pope-francis-betrays-chinese-christians/

    I thought Francis’s bumbling public errors on set dogma and his massive protection of homosexual predators in the church would be his worst sins as Pope, but this could be far larger.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  56. @Steve Sailer

    Many have copied Heinlein’s mix. Piers Anthony’s series The Incarnations of Immortality is pretty good, even if it does trail off into nonsense and blasphemy by the seventh book (spoiler alert: a “good” female deposes the old Christian God, who “isn’t doing his job correctly”).

    The series’ highlight is the First and Third books, which focus on the physical manifestations/office holders of the offices of Death (First Book) and Time (the Third Book).

    https://infogalactic.com/info/Incarnations_of_Immortality

    • Replies: @guest
  57. Living in New York City at the time, 1980, I guess I completely missed this.

    Googling around to educate myself, I found a poster for the girl band, L.A. Witches, who played at a club called The Pyramid Scheme in Michigan, in 2016. They’re not bad.

    Seriously, though, as Mr. Sailer points out, witch-crafting one’s way to success really appears to be a thing among some women these days. This came up, too.

    With apologies for the visual clutter.

  58. Old Prude says:
    @Anon

    Just so. Many of the “I don’t believe in ” crowd just don’t want the hassle of rules, restrictions, obligations….and the mental work of apologetics.

  59. Not to mention Afura Nefertiti Fareed’s The Way of the Wealthy Witch website with its many podcasts, including S2E9—From Grunge Witch To Gucci, B!tch!

    http://workitwitchradio.libsyn.com/

  60. @petit bourgeois

    “It’s mostly harmless”

    I know a woman who in her 20s was a major Ayahuasca gobbler. Straight up paranoid schizo/psycho now.

    Also, I keep hearing about young women who go down to the Amazon or somewhere similarly colorful for Ayahuasca retreats who somehow mysteriously end up getting raped. I know, young woman getting high in the jungle with a bunch strangers and gets raped, who could have foreseen this?

    If only she had tarot carded the trip beforehand, perhaps then she could have had a premonition of danger! Because obviously there is no other way to foresee these things.

    • Replies: @Lot
  61. kihowi says:

    The women I’ve known who were born early enough for the 1960s to ruin their personalities had a major chip on their shoulder about witches. The sexual memory was never far away. Get them angry enough, and there would be references to both innocent women being killed by crazy superstitious men, and all women being borderline supernatural creatures who have “powers” that men should justly be afraid of.

    Bottom line, the principles of rationality and not holding grudges were artifacts of white male-dominated civilization. Everybody else (and a lot of white men too) now realize you cherish wrongs done to you and keep them in your ammunition belt for all time, whether they make sense or not.

    • Replies: @Anon
  62. @R.G. Camara

    “How did we lose to these snowflakes for so long?”

    Snowflake vote counts the same as a real vote.

    • Replies: @R.G. Camara
  63. @Clifford Brown

    “that I will keep to myself”

    That’s too bad. It was just getting interesting.

  64. Anon[320] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Neil Stephenson’s book before the current one, co-written with a woman, is about magic being real. It wasn’t my favorite Stephenson novel.

  65. @Tyto Alba

    Wow. Just wow.

    I can’t even.

  66. @R.G. Camara

    There was a strand of 1970s feminism/hippiedom which looked to a myth of the pre-Christian days when we all apparently worshipped moon goddesses and were peaceful and into equality. I seem to remember Labrys (Cretan double-headed axe) jewellery being advertised in Spare Rib alongside the usual crystals and moon necklaces.

    This stuff is still around in one form or another – from dreamcatchers to Reiki massage. My excuse is that very attractive young women were disproportionately represented among devotees.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goddess_movement

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dreamcatcher#Modern_uses

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Circle_dance#Sacred_Circle_Dance

    • Replies: @Keypusher
  67. @R.G. Camara

    The Craft is an awesome movie though. Should be kept on the shelf right next to The Lost Boys.

  68. @Almost Missouri

    It’s not just the voting. We’ve been losing the culture war against them. They are the weakest, fragilest little things such that any push back sends them into a depression spiral for a month and causes them to be unable to function for a month.

    If we’d just slightly pushed back years ago they never could’ve gotten off the ground.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    , @bomag
  69. @Steve Sailer

    Notice that no one but the devil is ever said to inhabit Lassen Peak, on the other hand. It’s all about aesthetics.

  70. David says:
    @RobUK

    In Vermont, Christians keep a very low profile. Being a Christian is more derided here than is supporting Trump. But in my town, except for The Picnic, our biggest annual event is centered on building little houses in the woods for fairies. Every year — sometime soon I believe — hundreds of cars converge on the village and their pretty white occupants spill into the woods to set up and decorate little shrines that provide, we’re told, much appreciated shelter for woods-spirits.

    But if you said you were a Christian, nearly all of these fairy people would regard you as a loon.

    • LOL: fish
  71. Anon[390] • Disclaimer says:

    Yet another reason to repeal the 19th amendment.

  72. Dr. X says:

    I bought a strength candle, placed it atop an altar that I set up at home and sat in front of it for 10 minutes twice a day until it burned down. I told myself that I am strong, powerful and courageous.

    You’ve got to be f–ing kidding me, right??? This a a professional journalist working at a major U.S. paper?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  73. The next witch I met was Loba Loca, a bruja-healer-activist, who uses the pronouns they/them. We spoke about colonialism and people who burn sage and use crystals without considering where those materials come from. ,,,

    …and then we fried few of our remaining brain synapses with some more sage and crystals.

  74. @Ghost of Bull Moose

    >Instead of poisoning wells and so forth

    You are confusing witches and jews. But, with the noses, easy mistake.

  75. Arclight says:

    The comment from the witch who talks about how this religion puts women in a position of power is exactly why this is popular in some quarters – just like little girls play at witches or princesses where they are special and powerful, this provides an outlet for emotionally immature women.

    That said, as another commenter noted, if these were Trump supporters the mockery would be front and center and held up as evidence that his voters are morons who play make believe – but to those that are paying attention, the fact that these are all progressive women who very much want their political preferences imposed on the rest of us should tell you a lot about how grounded our supposed moral superiors are.

  76. Mr. Anon says:
    @Tyto Alba

    I liked one of the replies to that tweet:

    “I f**king love science…………….because I’m a Sagittarius.”

  77. As I’ve said before, Toronto is a giant, walk-through pyramid scheme. So is Vancouver and a bunch of other cities. Toronto’s pyramid is fuelled by mass immigration, not magic candle sales.

  78. “But after spending months talking to witches in L.A., I gained new perspectives on how to deal with the deep and painful feelings I was experiencing. …“

    Again, an example that no matter what subject a woman reporter or writer may be ostensibly writing about, deep down, “it’s all about me. And maybe my hair. Which is part of me.”

  79. Luke Lea says:

    All traits have a genetic component. Of course superstition has been an important feature of human psychology for as far back as we have any evidence. Moreover, according to V. Gordon Childe it may have played a constructive role in transmitting early metallurgical recipes, which were complex and had many steps which were mysterious but worked.

    Now however we live in a materialistic age in which the workings of nature are scientifically understood, though not perhaps the workings of human psychology. Yet I see no serious scholarly research on what makes some people superstitious to the point of making serious life decisions on the basis of it. Is it entirely genetic? Have there been identical twin studies of the phenomenon?

  80. bomag says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Every story a woman tells is really about herself.

    While jobs and careers tend to be therapy sessions.

  81. @vinny

    My lovely wife noted something about the pronoun annoyance. Isn’t it only fair and consistent for someone who asks you to refer to them as “they/them” to refer to themselves as “we/us”?

    But I guess THAT would just be silly.

  82. @Triumph104

    Thank you, Triump! Somebody had to put this up. That is about the best Michael Scott scene out of so many.

    “You know what, Toby, when the son of the deposed King of Nigeria emails you directly, asking for help, you help! His father ran the freaking country, OK?!” Continual LOLs!

    • Replies: @fish
  83. @Clifford Brown

    The Secret – Law Of Attraction

    I blame this. At one time Oprah was peddling it at least every week but I believe Oprah’s power has shrunk a tiny little bit since then.

  84. @Tyto Alba

    1) She’s got bangs — red flag for eccentricity
    2) Look at all the other sections she’s bounced around to, entertainment, “rich kids” etc. Doubt she’s exactly CalTech material
    3) They’re all just Lifestyle reporters now, no matter what page the story may appear.
    4) Makes you wonder what Amy Harmon’s into, New-Ageywise
    5) Drudge picked up the story so she’s probably on her way to a movie deal

  85. @Kent Nationalist

    That’s because he knows that the Hispanics are not quite so tolerant as White people and will laugh in his face at the genderbender stupidity. Witches, superstitions, and images of Jesus appearing on the sides of fish-taco carts are A-OK though.

  86. Thea says:

    New-age and witchcraft are religions that require no personal sacrifice on the part of the follower so in return they can’t deliver much to that person either .

    “Live however you want and find your own truth” can’t ever be a unifying ethic. This problem has roots in Enlightenment liberalism which will always end is a cacophony of autonomous individuals incapable of cooperation.

    • Replies: @guest
  87. @Clifford Brown

    Ladies of The Light or Glendas,…

    In MY DAY, we just called them hippie chicks, but I do take to these kind. Speaking of these ladies, I think they should never have let those yoga pants get out into the general population. 95% of the time … nah …

    That was a very interesting comment though, Clifford. Where in the heck did they get Brendas as the name, Rhoda Morgenstein’s sister? Or was it just to rhyme, speaking of which, where did they get Glendas from, the Wizard of Oz?

    One more thing – I do think the Glenda branch is fairly feminist itself, but probably not radical and not angry about it all. When they get angry, they can just slide off those yoga pants and hit up another sweat lodge. It’ll sweat the livin’ out of you. You’ll see visions … of chicks in bikini underwear … if you’ve got good night vision.

  88. @Clifford Brown

    Are these the girls you meant, Clifford?

    I’ve got a new age girl
    (Tell us what she’s like)
    An environmentalist girl
    (Does she ride a bike)
    She has crystal necklace
    (She spend a lot of cash)
    Though her vibes are rather reckless
    (She’s heading for a crash)
    Oh her flowing skirt is blowing in a transcendental wind
    And she wonders without knowing where did she begin.

    Mary Moon.. she’s a vegetarian
    (Mary Moon, Mary Moon, Mary Moon)
    Mary Moon.. will outlive all the septuagenarians
    (Mary Moon, Mary Moon, Mary Moon)
    Oh, she loves me so
    She hates to be alone
    She don’t eat meat
    But she sure like the bone.

    You knew she drives a wind car
    (How does she like it)
    It doesn’t get her far
    (Why doesn’t she bike it)
    But it gets her to where she’s going to
    (I don’t know, I don’t know, I don’t know)
    Where that is, I wish I knew
    I don’t know where she’s going
    And I don’t know where she’s been
    All I know that loving her has gotta be a sin.

    Mary Moon will you hesitate
    Don’t segregate your thought from your emotions
    I know that devotion isn’t way up there .

    Mary Moon.. she’s a vegetarian
    (Mary Moon, Mary Moon, Mary Moon)
    Mary Moon.. will outlive all the septuagenarians
    (Mary Moon, Mary Moon, Mary Moon)
    Mary Moon.. She’s an intellectual
    (Mary Moon, Mary Moon, Mary Moon)
    Mary Moon.. Despite that fact remains quite sexual
    (Mary Moon, Mary Moon, Mary Moon)
    Mary Moon.. She’s the one for me, me, yeah.

  89. The 1970s Called

    Indeed.

    John Dean 2019:

    John Dean 1974:

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  90. Kylie says:
    @Paleo Retiree

    “We guys spend a lot of time having our worlds upended by women, and we spend a lot of our energy trying to manage our ladies and their often nutty emotions.”

    It has always been thus. What I simply cannot fathom is what early 20th century Western men when they gave women 1) the vote and 2) all those labor-saving devices.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    , @Kylie
  91. Ibound1 says:

    We are really regressing into freakishness. This must be a result of the overall lowering of IQ. However we do need capable people to take care of the clean water and electricity. Those things cannot be produced by magic or the magical belief that engineering degrees can be awarded by ethic or racial or gender quota.

  92. @Buzz Mohawk

    Aww Christ!… John Dean gave his Watergate testimony in 1973, not 1974. I compulsively must correct that. Sorry.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  93. So many people getting into ayahausca / DMT and its dangerous stuff.

  94. @Kylie

    Would you give up the vote and labor-saving devices?

    (White) men arguably gave them to you because they love you and enjoy giving to you, so would you do the converse, give them back, out of love and a desire to help men?

    Note: I am not old-fashioned enough to want that.

    • Replies: @Kylie
  95. Kylie says:
    @Kylie

    “What I simply cannot fathom is what early 20th century Western men when they gave women 1) the vote and 2) all those labor-saving devices.”

    This should read: What I simply cannot fathom is what early 20th century Western men were thinking when they gave women 1) the vote and 2) all those labor-saving devices.”

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  96. JimB says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Heinlein wrote a sci-fi story pre-WWII about the Spirit Energy or something living inside Mt. Shasta.

    It’s an Indian legend told by locals to intrigue tourists. There are similar legends about Devil’s Tower, which Steven Spielberg blended with Erich von Däniken’s kook theories in Chariots of the Gods (1973) and Clarke and Kubrick’s 2001: A Space Odyssey (1968) to produce the storyline of Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977).

    • Replies: @El Dato
  97. Whiskey says: • Website

    Exactly why women should not vote, hold office, or indeed work in many jobs.

    Most women most of the time are the natural and eternal enemy of the White beta male.

    Witchcraft? Is there anything more contemptuous and reprellent to men?

  98. @Kylie

    I know the feeling… 🙂

  99. Kylie says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    “Would you give up the vote and labor-saving devices?”

    I made a general observation, not a condemnation, which you made personal. But I’ll answer it.

    I’d give up the vote tomorrow if it meant all other women were likewise disenfranchised.

    Labor-saving devices are a bit different. I am house proud and due to health problems, very low energy. I wouldn’t be able to do laundry or keep up my house and yard according to my standards without labor-saving devices. I would note that many women today seem to outsource laundry and housework and yardwork. There are quite a few women living alone in my neighborhood. The 89 y/o divorced farm woman and I are the only ones who work in their yards and keep their houses clean. We are also the only ones not overweight.

    “White) men arguably gave them to you because they love you and enjoy giving to you, so would you do the converse, give them back, out of love and a desire to help men?”

    I am a very bad example, having possibly the worst taste in husbands outside of Nicole Simpson. That has not been my experience of white men at all.
    Nevertheless, I have always done everything in my power to help the men I loved.

    “Note: I am not old-fashioned enough to want that.”

    I may not be either. But the empowerment of modern women has been an unmitigated disaster.

  100. syonredux says:

    The Oracle, who also goes by Amanda Yates Garcia, is a former arts educator with a master of fine arts in writing, film and critical theory from California Institute of the Arts.

    Beyond parody….

  101. syonredux says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Anyway, his second wife’s interest in magic manifests itself in some fun ways in early Heinlein sci-fi, like in 1940’s “Magic, Inc.” Heinlein wasn’t all that interested in his wife’s interest in magic, so he writes it into his stories from an engineer’s perspective.

    Fritz Leiber did something similar in his classic, Conjure Wife, which depicts a world where witchcraft works and is secretly practiced by all women. However, women, being weak when it comes to abstract reasoning, are not really getting the full benefit of the art. Their understanding of the “rules” of magic is purely intuitive and rule-of-thumb.Towards the novel’s end, though, the husband of the eponymous wife gets into the witchcraft business and starts applying the male faculty for formal logic and mathematics to the casting of spells……..

  102. Ray P says:
    @Twinkie

    Providence is the birthplace and home of H. P. Lovecraft (who set ‘The haunter of the dark’ there) so it is good to see Brown keeping the weird tradition alive.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  103. El Dato says:
    @Anonymous

    “Witches taking up profitable economic activities to make traditional Europe Great Again!”

    Meanwhile, looking up Hillary Clinton before Google:

  104. Ray P says:
    @syonredux

    There were also the adventures of Harold Shea, collected in The Incomplete Enchanter (1941), originally written by Fletcher Pratt and L. Sprague de Camp for John W. Campbell’s UNKNOWN in nineteen forty, which treat magick in a mathematically and logically rigorous way.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  105. El Dato says:
    @syonredux

    https://tvtropes.org/pmwiki/pmwiki.php/Literature/TheMagicGoesAway

    Larry Niven’s The Magic Goes Away stories tell of an ancient civilization based on Functional Magic powered by “Mana”, but there’s only a finite amount present on Earth. That nobody seems to be aware of or acknowledge this fact causes the magi, magical creatures and gods that use mana to eventually “go mythical” (a very obvious allegory aimed at modern civilization’s reliance on fixed resources).

    The device that first proves this effect, and later becomes the most dangerous weapon in the world, is the “Warlock’s Wheel”, a simple copper disk with two spells on it: one that makes it spin ever faster without limit, and a second that makes the disc indestructible so long as there is mana available. This rapidly uses up all of the mana in the area. Small versions of the device can be used to block scrying by making a wall of magic-free areas around a fortification, but a sufficiently large one could ruin an entire nation. In later books, the Warlock’s Wheel becomes a sort of Memetic Badass, as a mage refuses to even draw a picture of one because even a drawing of one would suck all the magic out of him.

  106. Anon7 says:

    Hold on – Amanda Yates Garcia hasn’t been cooking the weather, has she?

    Unusual weather must be someone’s fault; in 1562, disastrous weather was found to be caused by women in league with Lucifer!

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  107. @R.G. Camara

    How did we lose to these snowflakes for so long?

    Obviously, they’ve got some old chants that are not forward compatible. Just like the still-invoked “hey, hey, ho, ho, blah, blah, blah has got to go!”, these things rot out over the years and lose their potency.

    “We’re gonna need a bigger chant, bitches.” – Chief Witch Brody to the coven, after Donald Trump surfaced in 2015.

  108. @syonredux

    It sounds like a great book, or is it a short story, Syon? Have you seen The Witches of Eastwick with Jack Nicholson? It’s a pretty fun movie that fits in with the theme here. I don’t know if those ladies (Cher was one of them) could be called Glendas or Brendas. They were not really hippy chicks, but not fat nasty SJWs by any means either.

    • Replies: @syonredux
    , @syonredux
  109. L Woods says:

    I often wonder for how much longer white men can cling to the fiction that “gender equality” is anything but a farce. 50 more years? 500? I guess being able to accuse anyone who notices the absurdity of being a “loser” makes it all worth it.

  110. anon[795] • Disclaimer says:
    @Colin Wright

    A demographic break down would be very interesting. And what correlation is there with those who have a positive view of socialism?

  111. @R.G. Camara

    I am not at all surprised, R.G. There’s also a link in John Derbyshire’s latest post (near the bottom) on the Catholic church’s refusal to speak up about the Chinese prison system’s use of live (paralyzed) prisoners for organ donation – sick, sick stuff.

    Pope Francis is a semi-retarded liberation-theology Commie. I guess I couldn’t say that out loud were I a member of the Catholic Church in good standing. Peak Stupidity has not had much in the way of kind words for this so-called-pope (scroll down) unfortunately.

  112. ValdIII says:

    The Oracle of LA is obviously not a real witch–too thin, too attractive.

  113. Anon7 says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Heinlein’s 1942 novella Waldo combines elements of science fiction and engineering with a Pennsylvania Dutch hex doctor. Vehicles that make use of broadcast power are failing, but ol’ Gramps Schneider fixes them up so they reach out for power to the Other world.

    This story features “waldoes”, which are haptic, teleoperating robotic gloves of Heinlein’s own invention. The nuclear power industry went on to create these in reality, using Heinlein’s name for them.

    Jeff Bezos recently tried on something similar at a conference; this is the Shadow Robot and HaptX Dexterous Hand.

    • Replies: @Anon7
  114. @Buzz Mohawk

    It doesn’t matter, Buzz. That’s not gonna help get Nixon back.

    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
  115. @Kylie

    Kylie, I agree with you that there’s no reason for the vote and the labor-saving engineered devices to go together. It’s only the vote I’d like to take back. You asked how this happened. “The stupid you will always have with you”, that’s how.

    I don’t want to pry at all, but since you mentioned your husband, I am under the impression that the guy does all the yard work, and I’ve got big logs in the back that I need to rent a hydraulic splitter for – I’m long done with hand splitting 2.5 ft diameter cut logs. For the divorced ladies it’s different and good on that 89 y/o, but she’d better hire someone before she hurts herself.

  116. I graduated high school in 1980, so my adolescent and teen years were 1970s America. The ghost/witch/demon/occult thing was going full bore in popular culture – movies, books, TV, music. It was pretty creepy. There’s a lot not to like about the 1980s but I was glad to see all the spooky stuff just kind of go away suddenly. I guess it’s coming back (like a creepy murderous ghoul).

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Lot
  117. anon[795] • Disclaimer says:

    And shamans are chopped liver? Well to the Matriarchy, they are.

    Here’s Shaman Durek (squeeze of Princess Märtha Louise of Norway) facilitating an impromptu healing session in his surprise guest appearance at this year’s AmRen conference.

    • Replies: @El Dato
  118. guest says:

    “feeling frazzled” is the basis of like 80% of all advertisements I’ve ever seen aimed at women. Maybe these witches are just, ya know, women.

  119. guest says:

    It’s not “fringe” because 60% of respondents to some poll expressed belief in at least one of many phenomena described as New Age. Even though they could fit into other belief systems that happen to overlap with New Ageism.

    That is, if New Age is a legitimate category and not a catchall for esoterica after some arbitrary date.

  120. res says:
    @Anon

    Interesting site. Thanks! Looks like it would be worth spending more time looking through those archives.

  121. guest says:
    @R.G. Camara

    I read like a million Xanth books as a kid and didn’t realize how, well, I don’t want to say subversive they were. But one entry was called the Color of Her Panties, which gave my parents pause.

  122. guest says:
    @Thea

    Medieval monster Gilles de Rais knew transmuting base metal into gold required sacrifice. Blood sacrifice! And the blood of children, to boot. Which you may or may not sexually abuse beforehand.

  123. El Dato says:
    @Sextus Empiricus

    Well there was the X-Files (and probably others maybe the Outher Limits) in … early to mid 90s?

    There has always been a ready buffet of paranormal stuff in media, hasn’t there?

    Nowadays we can have Poltergeist Proof On YouTube all day, every day …

  124. @ValdIII

    Hmmm… too thin yes but she looks a lot post-op dude-to-chick tranny to me.

  125. El Dato says:
    @anon

    So … dit it heal or what?

  126. @ValdIII

    Also her name is A-MAN-da…

  127. El Dato says:
    @JimB

    That’s the first time I hear that Close Encounters of the Third Kind might anything to do with the fantasist of “ancient astronauts” Däniken (avoid!) or Kubrick’s 2001 (watch multiple times!). Däniken I could perchance imagine, but 2001 certainly not.

    It definitely has to do with Allen Hynek’s reviews of UFO encounters up to the 70s. I once read “The UFO Experience: A scientific enquiry (1972)”, which is not bad, and wherein, IIRC, Hynek relates various sightings from afar and even reluctantly talks about rumors that people have encountered humanoids.

    There is also Jacques Vallée’s very much uh … “alternative” speculations. Indeed we read:

    Jacques Vallée – Film appearance

    Vallée served as the real-life model for Lacombe, the researcher portrayed by François Truffaut in Steven Spielberg’s Close Encounters of the Third Kind. He also attempted to interest Spielberg in an alternative explanation for the phenomenon. In an interview on Conspire.com, Vallée said, “I argued with him that the subject was even more interesting if it wasn’t extraterrestrials. If it was real, physical, but not ET. So he said, ‘You’re probably right, but that’s not what the public is expecting — this is Hollywood and I want to give people something that’s close to what they expect.’”

    and possibly Aimé Michel’s writings (who discovered that UFO sightings would form “spoke and wheel / large circle” patterns on a map in spite of people reporting the sightings being well separated in space and time; I haven’t checked whether this is pattern recognition in random noise, but it sounds interesting

    UFOs were still big in the 70s.

    • Replies: @Thea
    , @JimB
  128. Lot says:
    @Sextus Empiricus

    Weren’t the 80s the peak of horror movies? My vague recollection is they peaked around 1988 and blockbuster horror movies started to be rare by around 1993.

    I never liked any of these movies, though reruns of the shorter and non-gory Hitchcock and Twilight Zone were good.

    • Replies: @syonredux
  129. fish says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thank you, Triumph! Somebody had to put this up. That is about the best Michael Scott scene out of so many.

    This just the thousandth reason I love this site and these comment threads!

  130. Lot says:
    @Almost Missouri

    “…Ayahuasca gobbler. Straight up paranoid schizo/psycho now.”

    Very unlikely to be caused by the ayahuasca itself. But when you feel the need to try something so exotic you’ve probably abused other things that can promote psychosis, like strong marijuana and cocaine. Or you’re talking it because you are already nuts.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  131. @Kylie

    Thank you for your thoughtful answer. Nothing personal intended. I am just curious about the general concept we sometimes touch on here: The unintended consequences of things that were considered progress at the time.

    For example, I sometimes mention that modern transportation has been “an unmitigated disaster” for Americans with regard to immigration. It made it too easy for people to get here from anywhere.

    An interesting question for all of us here is if there is any time in history when we would rather live? I think I might choose the 1950s.

  132. syonredux says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It sounds like a great book, or is it a short story, Syon?

    Short novel; Like Heinlein’s Magic, Inc and The Unpleasant Profession of Jonathan Hoag it was published in John W Campbell’s brilliant Unknown. Campbell favored a logically rigorous type of fantasy for the magazine, one where magic was treated in a scientific manner. L Sprague de Camp and Fletcher Pratt’s witty Harold Shea stories* exemplify the style.

    *Harold Shea is a psychologist who transports himself to various magical realms (Asgard, Spenser’s The Faerie Queene, Ariosto’s Orlando Furioso) via symbolic logic (“If P equals not-Q, then Q implies not-P…”)

  133. syonredux says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Have you seen The Witches of Eastwick with Jack Nicholson?

    Seen it and liked it quite a bit. Updike’s novel is better, though. It’s also slyly anti-feminist…..

  134. syonredux says:
    @Ray P

    There were also the adventures of Harold Shea, collected in The Incomplete Enchanter (1941), originally written by Fletcher Pratt and L. Sprague de Camp for John W. Campbell’s UNKNOWN in nineteen forty, which treat magick in a mathematically and logically rigorous way.

    Yeah, I’m a big fan the series, particularly The Castle of Iron.

    Poor Pratt; he seems to be something of a forgotten man in terms of the fantasy genre, which is a real shame. His solo fantasy novels , The Well of the Unicorn and The Blue Star are quite good, especially the latter, which effectively utilizes an unusual setting (Instead of the typical quasi-Medieval world, it’s set in a land strongly reminiscent of Maria Theresa’s Austria).

  135. syonredux says:
    @Twinkie

    I was visiting a friend of mine from high school who was at Brown University (about 30 years ago) and thumbed through his course catalog and found “Magic in the Middle Ages.”

    Humph! They’ll never out-compete Miskatonic. Their courses in Medieval Metaphysics are the gold standard in the field….

    • Replies: @El Dato
  136. syonredux says:
    @Lot

    I never liked any of these movies, though reruns of the shorter and non-gory Hitchcock and Twilight Zone were good.

    Ever seen the horror movies produced by Val Lewton at RKO in the ’40s?Great stuff, all sinister atmosphere and mood and no gore. The Seventh Victim is my personal favorite…..

    • Replies: @Lot
  137. @syonredux

    Hey, she has to do something to pay off that mountain of student debt from CalArts! (It’s a pricey place)

  138. Clyde says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Country Honk by The Stones

    • Replies: @PiltdownMan
  139. Anonymous[338] • Disclaimer says:

    Eras of Female Empowermen… women doing what they’ve always, deep down, really wanted to do: casting hexes on other women, those Basic Becky Bitches.

    Hex and the City. Not everyone equal in the field of Sex, but everyone can do Hex.

    But even if Hexes are useless in terms of doing, being a ‘witch’ is ’empowering’ as a state of being. Being a witch means you’re a member of a special kind of womanhood. Even if you never do hex, you feel as part of a mysterious community(that is until tranny witches come along with their oversized broomsticks).

    PC has been about specialness of being for certain groups. As a Jew, you are special simply because you’re a Jew, a Holy Holocaust person. As a black, you are special because you are a Magic Negro. Just being black is enough. Being homosexual, you’re special as a rainbow fairy. It’s a kind of group neo-nobility. No need to do, just be. But not all identifies come with special magic.

    Being a woman, esp white woman, isn’t enough. To be a good white woman, you must DO a lot, and that is tiring. Being ‘woke’ all the time burns up lots of hystericalories.
    But being a witch is so easy. Once you’re a witch, there you go, you’re a member of a special mysterious society. You may hex or not hex. What matters is you’re special because you’re a witch.

    Being special is easier than doing something that is special.

    This mentality exists among Alt Right members as well. Why the appeal of Nietzsche? Because being a white man means you’re a Nitch, a Faustian special man that Richard Spencer thinks he is because he is what he is.

  140. El Dato says:

    OT: the 1986s called. Chernobyl is now mainstream:

    Oblivious ‘influencers’ work on 3.6-roentgen tans in Chernobyl after realising TV show based on real nuclear TITSUP: Not great, not terrible – but downright diabolical

    Hnggg… dat ass (NSFW!). I mean, dat radiation!!

    It’s just that, since the show was streamed last month, the nearby town of Pripyat and surrounds have “seen a 35 per cent rise in bookings”, tour guide Victor Korol told CNN.

    Literally camp. Time for campfire songs.

    RT is a fan of the HBO dramatization, btw:

    What HBO got wrong: Chernobyl general gives hit TV show a reality check

    ‘Chernobyl’ is a blast of a TV series – but don’t call it ‘authentic’

    There WAS a black soldier in Chernobyl, and he is Russian (PHOTOS)

    However, according to QUALITY reporting in medja, Putin is looking personally at unleashing the dogs of propaganda, implicating the CIA in the Bouncing Betty reactor core event. It’s good that Hollywood would never stoop to such lows. Never:

    Russia is making its own version of Chernobyl to counter-program HBO’s “caricature”

  141. @petit bourgeois

    Most women really do believe in this new age nonsense. It’s mostly harmless, until you realize how much money they spend on this crap.

    Two of my female employees (both single) were, for a good while, spending big chunks of their paychecks on this stuff when a “metaphysical shop” opened nearby. Several times a week they would come back from lunch with new crystal doodads and bubbly talk of psychic readings and auras. Probably $150 minimum each per visit. It ended when the financial drain it was causing finally dawned on them.

    If nothing else, it definitely underscored to me the importance of BUNZ –> OVEN.* Women get a little nutty when they don’t have kids to focus on.

    * RIP Heartiste

    • Replies: @AnotherGuessModel
  142. @syonredux

    a master of fine arts in writing, film and critical theory from California Institute of the Arts.

    Wrong major, wrong coast, wrong CIA.

  143. anon[388] • Disclaimer says:

    American witches, along with gays, Jews, should be among the most fanatical of immigration restrictionists considering how often witches are murdered in India, and African and Muslim countries. Google images gives a nice contrast between “American witches” and “African witches.”

    But, no. The witch lobby is more likely to push for asylum status both for witches being persecuted for being witches and for claimants begging for asylum because they’re being persecuted by witches.

    And of course being flooded by migrants who believe in witches, devils and djinns would be good for the charlatan industry, and that would be good for the economy.

  144. “A lot of people, specifically women, who are attracted to witchcraft were taken to the underworld against their will, usually through trauma, and had to find their way out. Now they are a traveler between two worlds.”

    But then 10 minutes later the witch/journalist denounces anti-vaxxers on social media as right wing backward rednecks, never seeing the irony.

  145. Lot says:
    @syonredux

    No, but I find movies from before 1960 or so very hard to watch. Oldest movies I like are Exodus and Lawrence of Arabia.

    I’ll just get fidgety sitting in front of old black and white movies.

  146. @Lot

    Could be, Ayahuasca was hardly her first rodeo. Yet, her Ayahuasca usage dwarfed everything else. She is the only person I ever met who I would classify as a hallucinogen addict: willing to subvert everything else to be trippin’.

    • Replies: @Lot
  147. @R.G. Camara

    It’s never too late to RealTalk the WhiteLeft.

  148. Anon[175] • Disclaimer says:
    @kihowi

    That’s the biological breeding imperative speaking. Men forgive, for doing so means they maintain friendly contact with a large group of people and thus improve their chances of having more offspring by sexual cheating.

    By contrast, women benefit by feuding forever with anyone who is hostile to them, and they try to get their enemies kicked out of the tribe. The biological imperative for women is that they need to preserve their own lives and that of the very few children they’re ever going to bear in life, so any threat to themselves and their children cannot be forgiven, but must be utterly destroyed if they’re going to maintain their chances of passing on their genes.

    It’s the main reason why SJW women never quit. Women don’t forgive their enemies, and they never get over it when someone offends them.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  149. @Ray P

    Lovecraft is being drummed out of The Canon because ray-ciss.

  150. Dube says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Drop some a, man. You’ll see with your own eyes that it’s plausible. Or peyote. Didn’t you see Little Big Man, with Chief Dan White saying, “The rocks are alive?” Mt. Shasta, obviously, with or without psychedelics. Your stretch of LA, one might hope not.

  151. Dube says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Ahem, Chief Dan George.

  152. @R.G. Camara

    One notable exception was Kepler.

    He didn’t believe one word of that astrology crap, but he was an expert at making/reading charts.

    A guy’s gotta earn a living.

    • Replies: @felix M
  153. @Whiskey

    Voting rights are far, too broad.

    We should disenfranchise women; or men.

  154. @Dr. X

    This a a professional journalist …

    Haha .. “professional” “journalist” heheheee! I know some professional sex workers too.

  155. @Anon7

    There was a whole coven of weather scolds ladies* over at The Weather Channel, but since anyone can look at the wx-radar on his phone, the channel (last I checked) had morphed into a channel on plane crash stories. It’s very interesting now and beats hell out of being told to bring your umbrella or make sure you drink lots of water today. I can hear that at home with the TV off (which it always IS!)

    .

    * Yes, it’s “Women of the Weather Channel”, but no, contrary to what one might expect, they are not naked.

    • Replies: @Anon7
    , @Captain Tripps
  156. @Lot

    I’ll just get fidgety sitting in front of old black and white movies.

    Now that’s prissy. There are probably still more good movies available in black and white than in color.

    Though I myself can’t get into silents, except the comedies.

    • Replies: @Lot
  157. Lot says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Ayahuasca is different than other psychedelics in that it includes an MAOI in order to make the DMT herb be orally active.

    Taking a strong herbal maoi frequently at random dosages is a recipe for depression and possibly a hypertensive crisis.

    No obviously reason why it would cause psychosis too, but its causes are not well understood.

  158. Lot says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    “There are probably still more good movies available in black and white than in color.“

    Maybe, but I don’t lack for post 1960 movies to watch either, and probably only watch 2 or 3 a month.

    Beyond the slow pace of older movies, the affected overdramatic way the actors say their lines I don’t like either. That’s still an issue even in Exodus and Lawrence, but their other positive qualities make up for it.

    I also enjoy subtitled movies and TV in Western European languages as much as English movies, so that’s even more sedentary entertainment that I’ll ever consent to watch.

  159. @Clyde

    Wouldn’t Honky Tonk Women be the appropriate track version?

  160. @Lot

    No, but I find movies from before 1960 or so very hard to watch. Oldest movies I like are Exodus and Lawrence of Arabia.

    I’ll just get fidgety sitting in front of old black and white movies.

    Old movies, especially black and white ones, are much easier to watch in a movie theater than at home, on a flatscree TV. The movie theater’s darkened ambience ensures that you get enveloped by the experience of the movie, and annoyances such as cadence of speech, accents, and sundry other old-timey idiosyncracies simply fall away.

    Unfortunately, short of having a revival movie theater near you, or a college film club, there’s almost no way to do that in 2019.

    In the pre-VCR, pre TV-rerun era, some movie theaters used to screen oldies on weekday afternoons and Saturday mornings.

    Short of that, one of the most enjoyable ways to watch an old movie, I’ve found, is to watch it on a large desktop computer screen with decent desktop speakers, with the lights turned down.

    If you sit up close to the desk, the field of view of a 27″ computer monitor fills up your field of view to a degree that an LCD TV, even a large one, in a living room or den simply doesn’t.

  161. @Lot

    Try the old screwball/Howard Hawks’ comedies. His Girl Friday is the best, but I also like the undersung The Libeled Lady. They work to this day.

    Hawks and other screwball specialists made their jokes rapid-fire so that you didn’t realize it was funny until after the moment had passed, making you laugh doubly—at what was funny and the fact that you missed it. This trick also worked to lessen the effect of duds. Hawks personally was famous that every page of dialogue in his comedies was repeated twice as fast as the average film—-it’s very modern when you watch it.

    Also, Hawks presented actual strong women, not feminazis. His women would have eaten feminazis alive.

    Here’s my review of His Girl Friday:

    http://www.returnofkings.com/193125/his-girl-friday-is-a-red-pill-classic-that-most-men-have-never-seen

    • Replies: @Alden
  162. Anon7 says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    This page is a hoot.

    “Females can look to these seven women and feel encouraged to pursue careers that involve science, technology, engineering, and mathematics, and know that they can succeed!”

    “They can succeed…” if they are reasonably attractive and quite photogenic, that is. Of the two attributes “attractive” and “good at STEM”, which do you think will get a woman on TV quickest?

  163. Impolitic says:
    @Anon

    And Gardner died not long after the last La Griffe-attributed essay was published. Hmm….

  164. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Clifford Brown

    The Late 19th Century Occult Revival, an amazing historical period, likely arose from the British occupation of India which introduced the Western world to yoga and gurus (both real and charlatan).

    That period is indeed fascinating. I think you’re right in connecting it to the British occupation of India. Actually it was probably a consequence of European colonialism in general. The French would have come into contact with Muslim mysticism through their occupation of Algeria and their other Middle Eastern possession. And in Indo-China they would have encountered other eastern mysticisms. The occult thing was very big in late 19th century France.

    19th century France is well worth giving some attention to. A period of vicious anti-Catholic agitation, of militant and bigoted atheism on the rise, with Christianity in rapid decline. Very similar to the modern USA. The Decadence of the 1890s is also worth studying.

    Late 19th century western Europe was a culture increasingly embracing atheism and moral depravity, and occultism. The three always seem to go together.

  165. El Dato says:
    @syonredux

    Though it is unwholesome how Miskatonic U’s librarians all look like Pepe the Frog.

  166. felix M says:
    @syonredux

    “… a master of fine arts in … critical theory”.

    The prefix “un” has somehow been dropped off.

  167. felix M says:
    @Abolish_public_education

    I’ve not previously heard that the assertion that Kepler was, uh, duplicitous.

    I thought there were several indications that he bought the astrology deal. (As did Isaac Newton, for that matter.)

    Source please.

  168. El Dato says:

    This whole thread

  169. @El Dato

    However, according to QUALITY reporting in medja, Putin is looking personally at unleashing the dogs of propaganda, implicating the CIA in the Bouncing Betty reactor core event.

    Yeah, I read that too. I understand how some of the Russian political elite have their noses out of joint with the portrayal of the Soviet system in “Chernobyl”, but I’ll bet it’s because it hits too close to home to how badly the Russian “can-do” spirit of grim determination that enabled them to defeat Nazi Germany had decayed by the 1970’s/1980’s. I think its misplaced.

    In fact, my takeaway from watching it was that Mazin pays remarkable tribute to the Russian people throughout, showing how the first responders and the folks responsible for assessing the problem, devising solutions and executing them got the job done, IN SPITE OF the banal Soviet system that contributed to the creation of the emergency in the first place, were able to stop Chernobyl from becoming something far worse.

    The defining scene of the series (for me) is when Stellan Skarsgaard (that guy is a friggin’ awesome actor) gives the motivating speech to the Chernobyl plant workers whom they need to volunteer to go underneath the burning reactor and open the sluice gate so they can drain the water tanks (and prevent the megaton steam explosion). I know its a bit of Hollywood high drama, but I’d like to think that in bits and pieces and other discussions as it was really happening, those folks on the ground said words of encouragement to each other in a similar vein.

    And, in spite of the banality of political Communism, Russia, Ukraine, et all still produced fine scientists and leaders (such as Legasov, Colonel General Pikalov, Scherbina) able to size up the situation, come up with workable solutions on the fly, and get it done to prevent the disaster from becoming far worse. In other words, communism could never displace the underlying solid social capital built up through centuries of Russian/Eastern European cultural evolution.

  170. @Achmed E. Newman

    The wholesale degeneration of the Weather Channel since its inception has been remarkable to watch. I used to love early Weather Channel – it gave you the weather, and some tips for planning ahead, and that was it! In the ’90’s they starting covering the tropical season (June to November) which added a bit of spice, but it was still sort of a “just the weather facts, ma’am” channel. Then, it seems after Y2K, it was completely co-opted by the neo-pagan Cult of Global Warmi- er – Climate Change, and now it seems to be nothing more than “tornadoes and blizzards and hurricanes, oh my! We’re all gonna die unless you do something about global climate change!”.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  171. @El Dato

    This is an even better mash-up, with sufficiently forlorn/grim music (very Russian):

  172. @Random Smartaleck

    I once applied for a job as a sales assistant at one of those “metaphysical shops” with crystals and jewelry and organic cosmetics. I thought it was about selling pretty, girly things, but they were dead serious the supernatural aspect. They even asked for my birth date, time, and location so that they could determine if my astrological profile would be a good fit. I never got a callback.

    • Replies: @Noman
  173. Thea says:
    @El Dato

    China is a real void of UFO really reports but they talk a lot about ghosts. Just different ways of explaining strange events perhaps?

  174. El Dato says:
    @Thea

    For Jacques Vallée, it would be the same reality-bending “thing” in action, interpreted locally. This is how he connected old-time appearances of “gnomes”, “lutins” and “dames blanches” to modern-day “UFO occupants”, though not exactly in a scientific fashion.

  175. @R.G. Camara

    Long ago I sat in a meeting with a man who participated very little in the discussion but I noticed he spent all his time doodling on sheets of paper. After the meeting he left the papers and out of curiosity I took a look at his doodling. I was amazed to see the most intricate symmetric drawings I had ever seen, all by free hand. I learned later he was a graduate of Brown.

  176. @Thea

    China is a real void of UFO really reports but they talk a lot about ghosts. Just different ways of explaining strange events perhaps?

    Maybe they assume that any UFO phenomena are government activity and thus it’s best to keep quiet about them.

  177. JimB says:
    @El Dato

    2001 is about aliens intervening in man’s physical evolution. CotG is about alien’s intervening in man’s cultural evolution. CE3K is about man making contact with aliens through telepathy and a shared tendency to make music. Naturally, we assume that this contact will change both man’s cultural and physical evolution. So all three oeuvres are related.

  178. There are pyramids in my head /
    There’s one underneath my bed /
    And my lady’s getting cranky…

    I’ve consulted all the sages /
    I could find in Yellow Pages /
    But there aren’t many of them…

    The Alan Parsons Project – Pyramania

  179. bomag says:
    @R.G. Camara

    If we’d just slightly pushed back years ago they never could’ve gotten off the ground.

    Good point, in that small effects build up over time.

    But quite a lot lined up against us; the arc curves away, partly from: more leisure, more wealth, politics as a give-away program.

  180. Keypusher says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The idea of a female-dominated Cretan and Greek mainland civilization is brilliantly presented in Mary Renault’s reimagining of the Theseus myth, The King Must Die. She was a lesbian, of course, but so much so that she idolized men — the novel is basically about cheering on Theseus as he puts down the matriarchies. Margaret Yourcenar’s Memoirs of Hadrian has a similar vibe.

    Unfortunately I think Camille Paglia is the last lesbian of the Renault-Yourcenar ilk we’ll ever see.

    • Replies: @Alden
  181. Noman says:

    “The next witch I met was Loba Loca, a bruja-healer-activist, who uses the pronouns they/them. ”

    “loba loco” -> Crazy female wolf -> “Crazy bitch.”

    I’m a white male, if I used “they/them”, I would be accused of marginalizing somebody’s special victim group.

  182. Noman says:
    @R.G. Camara

    Male writers don’t write about themselves?

  183. Noman says:
    @AnotherGuessModel

    “They even asked for my birth date, time, and location so that they could determine if my astrological profile would be a good fit. I never got a callback.”

    Might have been an EEO complaint waiting to be unleashed.

    • Replies: @AnotherGuessModel
  184. @Steve Sailer

    Steve,

    I’m sorry, but I “work-a-day.” Every day.

    Usually my writing focuses on 4th amendment jurisprudence. Sometimes in the Ninth Circuit.

    One question: Who is going to pay for a expensive warlock to cast a spell?:

  185. @Anon

    “By contrast, women benefit by feuding forever with anyone who is hostile to them, and they try to get their enemies kicked out of the tribe. The biological imperative for women is that they need to preserve their own lives and that of the very few children they’re ever going to bear in life, so any threat to themselves and their children cannot be forgiven, but must be utterly destroyed if they’re going to maintain their chances of passing on their genes.”

    Kipling

    ” Man, a bear in most relations—worm and savage otherwise,—
    Man propounds negotiations, Man accepts the compromise.
    Very rarely will he squarely push the logic of a fact
    To its ultimate conclusion in unmitigated act.

    Fear, or foolishness, impels him, ere he lay the wicked low,
    To concede some form of trial even to his fiercest foe.
    Mirth obscene diverts his anger—Doubt and Pity oft perplex
    Him in dealing with an issue—to the scandal of The Sex!

    But the Woman that God gave him, every fibre of her frame
    Proves her launched for one sole issue, armed and engined for the same;
    And to serve that single issue, lest the generations fail,
    The female of the species must be deadlier than the male.”

  186. Alden says:
    @vinny

    What I don’t understand about they and them is that people are addressed either by name or as you. We use they and them when we’re talking about 2 or more persons with another person.

    How is it possible to use plural pronouns for one person. Might be better to just refer to the creature as the crazy bitch or crazy shithead. Or by first name. Or is it now transphobic to refer to a weirdo by their first name?

    My sister is in deep trouble for using the word hermaphrodite. Seems the current word is intersex. That doesn’t make sense. I thought sex was replaced by the grammar term gender 50 years ago. A PC dictionary is needed; revised weekly to keep up with the latest changes.

    Living in a neighborhood of Persians and Israelis isn’t so bad. I’m spared all this liberal insanity.

  187. Alden says:
    @Keypusher

    I read a few Mary Renault novels. They were all about gay men, hardly any women. One of the heroes had a sister and mother I remember. She emphasized the worst of the ancient world. Starvation, slavery, bull dancing and dying. One man was enslaved as a miner for 20 years and finally staggered back home to find everyone dead.

  188. Alden says:
    @petit bourgeois

    Most men who believe that most women believe new age crap are ignorant assholes. You must be a liberal new age weirdo yourself.

    • Replies: @Random Smartaleck
  189. Alden says:
    @R.G. Camara

    My favorite old movies are the cheap film noir movies. Favorite is Key Largo. I love them all.
    Favorite chick flick is Stage Door even though the loathsome lesbian communist Katharine Hepburn is in it. There’s a film noir with Humphrey Bogart and Ida Lupino. She’s married to a trucking company owner and wants to have an affair with Bogart. It’s very realistic about the trucking industry and the farmers and wholesale food markets.

    Unfortunately Turner Classic has been running nothing but WW2 propaganda movies since the middle of May and hasn’t stopped. So I’m deprived of my favorite film noir.

  190. @Alden

    Most men who believe that most women believe new age crap are ignorant…

    It does depend on where you live. Here in SoCal it’s hard not to assume that “most women” believe in it. In saner parts of the country, though, I’m sure it seems an absurd claim.

  191. Anon7 says:
    @Anon7

    Steve, I thought you might be amused by this editorial comment in the July 1942 Astounding Science Fiction about the receipt of the Anson MacDonald (Heinlein) story Waldo.

    “Waldo”, one of the last Anson MacDonald stories we’re apt to get for some time, will lead off the August Astounding. It was, as a matter of fact, a pleasant surprise to get this manuscript – completed during the interim between going up for active duty and receiving an assignment. MacDonald is now, very definitely engaged full-time in pounding Japs and Nazis instead of typewriter keys.”

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