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Something seasonal, from my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

Surfer Privilege
by Steve Sailer

July 11, 2018

How high of a standard of living did young baby boomers enjoy, especially those of us fortunate to grow up on the then lightly populated West Coast? That question kept coming to mind while reading the acclaimed 2015 memoir of a youth spent at the beach in California and Hawaii, Barbarian Days: A Surfing Life, by William Finnegan, now a veteran war correspondent for The New Yorker.

Comedian Garry Shandling’s most reliable joke was about taking a drive in the country and doing what everybody does when he first sees a cow: rolling down the window and shouting, “Moo.” But, Shandling asked, “What’s the cow thinking?”

“Oh, look, there’s a cow driving a car…. How can he afford that?”

Similarly, while reading Finnegan’s account of his quintessential boomer life of freedom, security, and opportunity enjoying himself in some of the most desirable real estate in the world, I kept asking from my 2018 perspective: How could he afford that?

Surfing may be even more addictive than its counterparts, such as skiing, mountain climbing, and golf. While the waves are free (which, I learned from Barbarian Days, causes surfers no end of grief), the real estate values of adjoining coastal property have only gone up and up over Finnegan’s lifetime. The roll call of places where Finnegan surfed as a boy and young man—Malibu, Newport Beach, Topanga Canyon, Santa Barbara, Honolulu, Santa Cruz, Maui, Australia’s Gold Coast, Cape Town, and San Francisco—reads like a real estate speculator’s fever dream.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. wren says:

    What’s going on with Cape Town real estate?

    Are they still in a bubble?

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  2. I wonder if he ever considered calling his book “Finnegan’s Wake?”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Finnegan says he spent a year at UC Santa Cruz studying "Finnegans Wake" under Norman O. "Nobby" Brown.
    , @danand


    'I wonder if he ever considered calling his book “Finnegan’s Wake?”'

     
    Father, that would be the appropriate title for Finnegan's other book; about being at the end of his rope, behind a boat.

    Steve, thank you. For me "Surfer Privilege" hits on all cylinders. The reality of surfing is tough:

    "Still, Finnegan is a bit of a Gloomy Gus, and his prose isn’t quite adequate to reproduce the level of ecstasy his surfing must have elicited in him."
     
    Even the best ride, one with minimal stress/panic, is short. Not as much ecstasy as might be imagined. Really a lot of surfings best times are those boring ones, spent slow paddling on the board.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. @Father O'Hara
    I wonder if he ever considered calling his book "Finnegan's Wake?"

    Finnegan says he spent a year at UC Santa Cruz studying “Finnegans Wake” under Norman O. “Nobby” Brown.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill Jones
    What a waste.
    , @Spotted Toad
    I, and then two of my friends, read Finnegan’s book Cold New World one summer during college- it’s a well-reported but unfocused book, my guess is because he wanted to tie the stories to one Old Left narrative about the end of the old welfare state and how that leaves American poor people. But the 90s economic expansion was pretty good for poor people, and his subjects- a 15 year old black drug dealer in New Haven, some bored teens in Antelope Valley who say they want to be white supremacists- are suffering from anomie and emptiness of community more than economics. But he was clearly someone who liked talking to teenagers and getting them to tell about themselves, and when my barely-no-longer-teenagers friends wrote to him about a somewhat poorly conceived investigative project they planned to do right after college (and half-did) he was excited to meet with them, and correspond with them. I don’t think this was conscious sleaziness, and he strikes me as someone who would smoke a joint with his journalistic subjects but not sleep with them, but what do I know.

    As Steve notes, Finnegan is definitely a High Boomer, and his passion for trying to find the perfect wave and to find authenticity in the young, the poor, the non-white, the far away, both are pretty Boomerific life pursuits.
    , @Spotted Toad
    I, and then two of my friends, read Finnegan’s book Cold New World one summer during college- it’s a well-reported but unfocused book, my guess is because he wanted to tie the stories to one Old Left narrative about the end of the old welfare state and how that leaves American poor people. But the 90s economic expansion was pretty good for poor people, and his subjects- a 15 year old black drug dealer in New Haven, some bored teens in Antelope Valley who say they want to be white supremacists- are suffering from anomie and emptiness of community more than economics. But he was clearly someone who liked talking to teenagers and getting them to tell about themselves, and when my barely-no-longer-teenagers friends wrote to him about a somewhat poorly conceived investigative project they planned to do right after college (and half-did) he was excited to meet with them, and correspond with them. I don’t think this was conscious sleaziness, and he strikes me as someone who would smoke a joint with his journalistic subjects but not sleep with them, but what do I know.

    As Steve notes, Finnegan is definitely a High Boomer, and his passion for trying to find the perfect wave and to find authenticity in the young, the poor, the non-white, the far away, both are pretty Boomerific life pursuits.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there’s been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren’t into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the “Cohens”) with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    We’ve had this discussion before. Surfing is still popular; what you’re defining as “surfer culture” is really something narrower, and akin to the mid-20th century interest in Hawaii Steve mentions. Maybe Hawaii’s exoticism was more interesting to Southern Californians when Southern California was less diverse?
    , @The Alarmist

    "Americans, especially young people, just really aren’t into it anymore."
     
    Check the line-up at your local spot and you'll see plenty of surfers. And a lot of us are Team Gold Card, i.e. older and with money. But to your point, it doesn't seem so exotic anymore, so it has faded from a lot of the cultural media.
    , @Steve Sailer
    Tiki bars are back recently.

    My impression is that surf clothes brands like Hollister (named after a surf region out past Santa Barbara) were big about a decade ago, and Abercrombie and Fitch was heavily into surf styles back then. But not these days.

    , @AndrewR
    Stopped watching after the cheesy "Welcome to the OC, bitch!" part
    , @Prof. Woland
    We live in a much more competitive resource scarce society then we did in the post ww2 period. That includes taking time off to indulge in travel or pass time activities. College used to be considered a birthright and if someone took off a couple of years to 'experiment' then they did and then got back into some sort of career path. There is now a squeeze with hoards of "grinds" at the top doing anything they can to get ahead while easy jobs are either being eliminated or saved for the kind of people who don't surf. A lifestyle of working to live is becoming thing of the past and even taking time for a family is a luxury.
    , @boomstick
    In the 90's there was a small, active surf music movement. It was reasonably popular. The Heartbreakers (minus Tom Petty) did an album as the Blue Stingrays. I think they did a disguised concert.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gkForsLdWU

    , @Brutusale
    Surf culture shifted from Gidget/Frankie & Annette to the gritty POP/Z Boys.
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  5. danand says:
    @Father O'Hara
    I wonder if he ever considered calling his book "Finnegan's Wake?"


    ‘I wonder if he ever considered calling his book “Finnegan’s Wake?”’

    Father, that would be the appropriate title for Finnegan’s other book; about being at the end of his rope, behind a boat.

    Steve, thank you. For me “Surfer Privilege” hits on all cylinders. The reality of surfing is tough:

    “Still, Finnegan is a bit of a Gloomy Gus, and his prose isn’t quite adequate to reproduce the level of ecstasy his surfing must have elicited in him.”

    Even the best ride, one with minimal stress/panic, is short. Not as much ecstasy as might be imagined. Really a lot of surfings best times are those boring ones, spent slow paddling on the board.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. But Steven Pinker tells me things have never been better!

    However, this doesn’t square with what tons of boomers tell me. If things on many fronts are worse, we need to keep pointing this out to counter the feel-good diversity mantra.

    Read More
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  7. black sea says:

    Surfboarding is not a way of life. People are free to think it is because the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts. People who make a life of surfboarding are living off other people. They’re leeches of the affluent society. They’re parasites of a parasite.

    –Wendell Berry

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous coward
    Replace 'surfboarding' with any other modern affliction and the quote is still true.
    , @Highlander
    Guilty as charged and calling surfing "surfboarding" is about as Ho-Daddy as it gets.
    , @Jack D

    the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts
     
    This is nonsense. Occupational specialization has been the mark of civilization for the last 5,000 years. The American frontier (at least the mythical version of it) was something of an exception in that the frontiersman had to be a jack of all trades, but even colonial American (urban) society was filled with various highly skilled specialists - Revere the silversmith, Franklin the printer, etc. This includes occupations that are responsible for caring for society - clergymen, constables, doctors, etc.

    Some surfers were trust fund babies but most were not parasites. They were not into material possessions (other than their surfboards) and in those simpler times could live cheaply and support themselves pumping gas or as a night watchman or something when they were not surfing. Believe it or not, there once was a time when you could pay the rent on a shared apartment or house in Southern California (maybe not the greatest place but something that would sell for $1M today) on your earnings from some modest job. They were young unattached men, most of whom later settled down and got real jobs. Maybe a few became permanent teenagers but most didn't.

    That America had the kind of prosperity that allowed young men to pursue their leisure activities on an (almost) full time basis was a GOOD thing, whereas today you have to put in 80 hours/week in the software mines if you want to live within 50 miles of the California coast.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Surfboarding is not a way of life.

    –Wendell Berry
     
    Well, no, Wendell, not in Kentucky. Riding horses is not a way of life, either, on SoCal beaches, unless you're Bo Derek.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there's been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren't into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-YsN0y7vZI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYoK-VSuvL0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJb2MrZFjBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOrOMuo-9o

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the "Cohens") with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9paPT4iuC4

    We’ve had this discussion before. Surfing is still popular; what you’re defining as “surfer culture” is really something narrower, and akin to the mid-20th century interest in Hawaii Steve mentions. Maybe Hawaii’s exoticism was more interesting to Southern Californians when Southern California was less diverse?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Proof that the sport is very much alive, to the extent that quite a lot of money is being devoted to celebrating its history:

    https://www.facebook.com/DanaPointSurfStatues/
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. O/T — Here we go. It’s the same in every white country.

    Irish-speaking schools far less likely to have overseas students
    Irish Times

    Irish-speaking schools are significantly less likely to have non-Irish national students than other schools, new figures show.

    A Department of Education analysis of school enrolment for 2015/2016 shows non-Irish nationals accounted for 10.6 per cent of pupils in primary education. By contrast, among all-Irish primary schools, this fell to 1.6 per cent. A similar pattern is repeated at second level.

    The statistics are likely to be seized on by critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.

    Caoimhín Ó hEaghra, the patron body’s general secretary, said the figures for all-Irish schools include those in more peripheral Gaeltacht areas which have not experienced an influx of newcomers.

    He said a survey conducted among its non-Gaeltacht schools earlier this year indicated that 9.6 per cent of its students were from an “other background”.

    It defines this as as a student who themselves or at least one parent were from another country.

    Gaelscoileanna, along with multidenominational schools, have surged in popularity in recent years with more than a third oversubscribed.

    The struggle to secure non-whites the basic human right of unfettered access to white people must go on.

    Read More
    • Troll: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    My San Francisco cousins went to an Irish prep school in the 1960s, I think it was the one James Joyce went to. They got extra credit for doing papers in Gaelic. They were always complaining about all the Irish language emphasis.
    , @DFH
    Non-whites must be getting desperate if they really want access to taigs
    , @dearieme
    "critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups." That may well be part of the attraction of such schools but there is probably at least one other effect. Any school that selects by ability and interest - even a largely unimportant interest in studying in a moribund language - will become attractive simply by virtue of being selective.

    I learnt this decades ago: the tip for people going to live in North Wales was to get their children into a school where they would learn Welsh. This wasn't a matter of speaking Welsh giving them advantages in life (though it might) but a matter of youngsters from families who weren't much interested in education, or were a bit dim, being kept out.

    If you open a selective school with apparently arbitrary entrance requirements - being able to catch a ball would probably do - then you'll end up with a better cut of pupils than an unselective school, and your school will thereby be in demand. Maybe that's one of the attractions of choir schools too.

    It's not all that different a point from the phenomenon of firms preferring to hire university graduates in subjects that have little relevance to the jobs on offer.

    , @Seamus Padraig
    Obviously, the solution is to ban Irish so that the 'new Irish' will feel more welcome in Ireland.

    BTW, what's your source on that? The Irish Times? It's obviously not an American paper.

    , @Tiny Duck
    Whatever racist

    I hope you know that white girls ADORE Men of Color and see white men for the weak theinving fragile morons that they are

    The future is diverse, Of Color, Muslim, and female

    GET USED TO IT
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Mish, I grew up in Buffalo on the edge of Polonia and went to an all boys Catholic HS after attending Catholic grade school. If the nuns and priests could have taught us in Latin they would have. Many of my HS classmates attended all polish grammar schools where they were taught, to some degree, in Polish. Their accents were so "tick dat you cud cut dem wid a nif." Loveable guys though, and after a few years their accents had phased out. I don't think their parents minded that no non Poles attended school with them.
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  10. Dan Hayes says:

    Steve,

    FWIW, Roger McGrath has discussed that era’s Southern California youth culture in many Chronicles magazine articles – covering surfing, motorcycling but, sorry Steve, no golfing.

    Like you, he conveys the feeling to be young and Californian at that time was to have won life’s lottery.

    Read More
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  11. Anon[274] • Disclaimer says:

    Catch a Wave:

    Either Brian Wilson’s ode to evil imperialism or maybe an enthographical, avant-garde critique of surfer privilege?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  12. @Dave Pinsen
    We’ve had this discussion before. Surfing is still popular; what you’re defining as “surfer culture” is really something narrower, and akin to the mid-20th century interest in Hawaii Steve mentions. Maybe Hawaii’s exoticism was more interesting to Southern Californians when Southern California was less diverse?

    Proof that the sport is very much alive, to the extent that quite a lot of money is being devoted to celebrating its history:

    https://www.facebook.com/DanaPointSurfStatues/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. @JohnnyWalker123
    Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there's been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren't into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-YsN0y7vZI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYoK-VSuvL0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJb2MrZFjBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOrOMuo-9o

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the "Cohens") with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9paPT4iuC4

    “Americans, especially young people, just really aren’t into it anymore.”

    Check the line-up at your local spot and you’ll see plenty of surfers. And a lot of us are Team Gold Card, i.e. older and with money. But to your point, it doesn’t seem so exotic anymore, so it has faded from a lot of the cultural media.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Don't you worry about sharks?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Marat says:

    Surfers at Malibu are a very optimistic lot! Every morning they sit bobbing, waiting for a semi-serious wave or two. Yesterday they got lucky, but mostly it takes patience, a lot of patience!

    Malibu could (at last!) increase their property values by dredging the sea floor in select areas to create decent wave conditions like near Palos Verdes.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. @Mishima Zaibatsu
    O/T — Here we go. It’s the same in every white country.

    Irish-speaking schools far less likely to have overseas students
    Irish Times

    Irish-speaking schools are significantly less likely to have non-Irish national students than other schools, new figures show.

    A Department of Education analysis of school enrolment for 2015/2016 shows non-Irish nationals accounted for 10.6 per cent of pupils in primary education. By contrast, among all-Irish primary schools, this fell to 1.6 per cent. A similar pattern is repeated at second level.

    The statistics are likely to be seized on by critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.

    ...

    Caoimhín Ó hEaghra, the patron body’s general secretary, said the figures for all-Irish schools include those in more peripheral Gaeltacht areas which have not experienced an influx of newcomers.

    He said a survey conducted among its non-Gaeltacht schools earlier this year indicated that 9.6 per cent of its students were from an “other background”.

    It defines this as as a student who themselves or at least one parent were from another country.

    Gaelscoileanna, along with multidenominational schools, have surged in popularity in recent years with more than a third oversubscribed.

    ...

     

    The struggle to secure non-whites the basic human right of unfettered access to white people must go on.

    My San Francisco cousins went to an Irish prep school in the 1960s, I think it was the one James Joyce went to. They got extra credit for doing papers in Gaelic. They were always complaining about all the Irish language emphasis.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alec Leamas
    I boarded at an Irish secondary school in Dublin in the 1990s and by then every Irish born pupil was required to take classes in the Irish language. The classes were universally loathed by schoolboys. The stated purpose was to bring the language back from the brink of extinction. Perhaps it has worked on a localized basis. There were a few boarders from Kerry who were native speakers/bilingual from birth though.
    , @Altai
    You still get extra marks for doing your final year exams in Irish. (A maximum of about 10%) But hilariously it was considered unfair that only languages on the school curriculum got exams. (Irish, French, German, Italian and Latin)

    Now they have exams for every official EU language and others besides. IE, essentially Polish students get to take a Polish language paper for free points. Free jobs for those who craft these exams and sign off on them.

    It's not insignificant to be able to drop the non-Irish language requirement (A lot of universities like Trinity won't accept an applicant who hasn't passed a non-Irish language exam, no matter the applied subject of study.) when studying and Irish is compulsory for everyone except those who came to the Irish school beyond the age of 12 or something. So they often get to drop two subjects.

    I can see the logic inasmuch as 'Well they can speak another language', but that's not really the point of the exams. They test you on the basis of studying for them not your base skills, you could have two people of the same IQ and if you speaks English as their first language they're generally not going to be good at speaking a second language. And the languages they speak aren't economically valuable either.

    , @Rohirrimborn
    My Irish immigrant grandparents met at an Irish language class in Boston MA in the early 20th century. My grandfather from Kerry was the teacher and my grandmother from Limerick was a student. My brother and I were backpacking around Ireland in 1974. I remember early one morning waking from a night of camping out in a west coast town hearing some nearby old fellas talking in a foreign language. I think I was too groggy and not aware that Irish was still a viable language that I at first thought I was hearing Russian. I had heard a lot of Russian in my youth in NY so that was the first thing that popped into my mind. Only after a few moments did it dawn on me that they were speaking Irish. I was embarrassed then and I'm still embarrassed to admit it now.
    , @Rapparee
    The year her father dragged his American-born children back home to Ireland with him, my mother nearly failed eighth grade Math and had to get special tutoring- because class was conducted entirely in Irish, a language hitherto known to her only as the medium of her parents' indecorous gossip at Mass. English-language classes weren't much better, the highlight being a sharp-tongued scolding incurred in History after attempting to correct Sister's adamant contention that Abe Lincoln was the first President of the United States.
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  16. DFH says:
    @Mishima Zaibatsu
    O/T — Here we go. It’s the same in every white country.

    Irish-speaking schools far less likely to have overseas students
    Irish Times

    Irish-speaking schools are significantly less likely to have non-Irish national students than other schools, new figures show.

    A Department of Education analysis of school enrolment for 2015/2016 shows non-Irish nationals accounted for 10.6 per cent of pupils in primary education. By contrast, among all-Irish primary schools, this fell to 1.6 per cent. A similar pattern is repeated at second level.

    The statistics are likely to be seized on by critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.

    ...

    Caoimhín Ó hEaghra, the patron body’s general secretary, said the figures for all-Irish schools include those in more peripheral Gaeltacht areas which have not experienced an influx of newcomers.

    He said a survey conducted among its non-Gaeltacht schools earlier this year indicated that 9.6 per cent of its students were from an “other background”.

    It defines this as as a student who themselves or at least one parent were from another country.

    Gaelscoileanna, along with multidenominational schools, have surged in popularity in recent years with more than a third oversubscribed.

    ...

     

    The struggle to secure non-whites the basic human right of unfettered access to white people must go on.

    Non-whites must be getting desperate if they really want access to taigs

    Read More
    • Replies: @celtic warrior
    DFH how are the shitty little rangers getting on ya wee hun bar steward. Spoke like a ugly orange turd who will soon be the minority in the north. Get it right up ya ya orange knob
    , @JMcG
    You have it backwards, as I’m sure you know.
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  17. One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 – you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ganderson
    I was born in 1954 . We got draft numbers, but no one from ‘54 was drafted. Only a few ‘53s were taken.
    , @CJ
    I was born in 1953. I believe that you are correct that no one turning 20 in 1973 was actually drafted. That is how it actually worked -- they could have drafted 18-year-olds but the policy was they didn't. 19-year-olds sometimes got drafted if they were turning 20 later in the calendar year. The last "callup" was in December 1972. However, people at the time did not know that was the last; they expected to be drafted if they had a lottery number lower than 195.
    , @Bragadocious
    And believe it or not, there is a surfing connection to this. The draft dodging scene in box office flop "Big Wednesday."

    https://youtu.be/gUeHamRZkSY
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Hap, I was born in 1946, turned 18 in my senior year of HS and registered for the draft as the law required. I was surprised that I was sent for a physical the same day. I also had to take an IQ (?) test. The classified me 1-A and after scoring my test asked me if I was interested in OCS. Shit, I was only interested in graduating and finding a date for the prom. Married at 19, while in college, yeah, you know, one child soon after, very soon and I graduated in 68 from college and was still classified 1A. Guess I was lucky, never applied for any deferments.
    , @MBlanc46
    It was indeed a serious drawback.
    , @Lucas McCrudy
    Of course the same administration (LBJ) that gave us the Vietnam debacle also sowed the seeds that led to the decline of the good life of California with the Immigration Act of 1965. Sure the population would've still gone up as from where it was back then through the internal migration of Americans spellbound by life in the Golden land, but I doubt it would be the crowded 40 million of today.

    The Boomers had a CA with low housing costs and mostly "nice" neighborhoods, (sure there were some sketchy spots even then like Watts) but any Millennial who wants to live there now can be expected to cough up half a million just for a simple 2 bed ranch in a decent area. Mass Third World immigration has driven up housing costs not only by increasing general housing demand but also by reducing the number of desirable areas available in the state. Compare the San Fernando Valley of the 1950s with today...

    , @Reg Cæsar

    I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.
     
    The draft is in standby status since 1980, as it was from 1973-5.

    The ones who were "home free" were those, like our host Steve, between the end of March, 1957 and the last day of the 1950s. They weren't even required to register. That's called "deep standby".

    Every other American man born since sometime in the 1870s until 2000 who grew to adulthood here would have been required to register at some time or other. No exceptions. Not even in an iron lung.

    So the effect of the draft is nuanced. I registered at 18, while my slightly younger brother wasn't asked (told) to. Our much-older half-brother was called up, sent to Vietnam, and didn't make it back. My registration was a reminder that it could be revived at any time. The class after ours didn't get the reminder.
    , @Rex Little

    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 – you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments.
     
    Oh man, does that bring back memories! I was born in 1949, and graduated college in 1970. One year earlier, and I could have gotten a deferment for graduate school, or a job with a defense contractor (my major was electrical engineering). One year later, and my lottery number would have been high enough to avoid being drafted. As it was, the only way I could avoid being drafted into the Army was to enlist in the Air Force.
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  18. @black sea

    Surfboarding is not a way of life. People are free to think it is because the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts. People who make a life of surfboarding are living off other people. They're leeches of the affluent society. They're parasites of a parasite.
     
    --Wendell Berry

    Replace ‘surfboarding’ with any other modern affliction and the quote is still true.

    Read More
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  19. @Marat
    Surfers at Malibu are a very optimistic lot! Every morning they sit bobbing, waiting for a semi-serious wave or two. Yesterday they got lucky, but mostly it takes patience, a lot of patience!

    Malibu could (at last!) increase their property values by dredging the sea floor in select areas to create decent wave conditions like near Palos Verdes.

    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    You are looking at huge $$$, and no one is going to pay for it. At least, AFAICT. You are familiar with Nazare, right? That's a lot of dirt, concrete, whatever to make that happen, better to just use what's in nature.

    https://youtu.be/74pnrYPozcU

    Golf, I would think you would be moving mounds of earth around a more 2 dimensional space. Probably. And you don't have a bunch of water and huge waves to mess things up on you.

    The wealth was real in the 1950s, 1960s. Peak muscle car era was say, Chevy Camaro 1967-1969. Then it was all about beauty and acceleration in a straight line, who cares about fuel economy. People then had resources to burn. Real estate was cheap.

    Back then you didn't have a million ethnic groups willing to sleep 20 to a house, cram for every entrance examination, fighting every day just to drink your milkshake. You have to be a trustifarian or just someone with not much motivation I think to be into surfing. These days if you want economical fun, you buy a computer or a console. It's a lot cheaper and easier to play video games. Less risky too.

    And if you have kids, who has the time? This surfer dude has one child? lol, typical baby boomer "me" generation. Your descendents will look back on you, the silent generation and the worst generation, and think - you had it made, all you had to do was sit back in your decadence and maintain the immigration laws. But no, that was too hard. Out of the several hundred years of people who built up everything you had, you threw it all away. Thank god that this surfer dude New Yorker writer had only one child, that's Nature's way of saying the gene pool is better off without you, we can't have too many more like that otherwise it really will be an unrecoverable disaster.

    Ironically, the weather prediction these days for surfing is awesome in its capability. Offshore winds, ideal swell periods, height of waves, direction of swell etc. - you can predict it all and waste no time at all just going out to check out the waves.
    , @Cowboy shaw
    They try:

    https://www.google.co.uk/amp/www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-3903046/amp/On-rocks-3million-artificial-reef-supposed-create-waves-surfers-finally-declared-useless-left-sunken-memorial-council-incompetence.html
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?
     
    Unlike the golf courses, the seabed may be prone to all being knocked around again by the ocean, even after a bunch of precision work on it. I'm neither an oceanographer nor geologist, but I'd figure the waves and currents may put things back just the way they were before, unless some jetties were built to change things. I'm sure you've seen the projects to augment the beach in LA areas (certain places I mean), as some places gain sand and some lose it, but property owners and realtors want it to stay JUST WTF IT WAS! Haha, nature doesn't care about your investments.

    With modern computer simulations though, maybe some engineers could make a model of what it would take not only to make the waves break as desired (the EASY part) but what the landscape must look like to KEEP IT that way.

    Or, we can just set up some huge caissons, pave it all in concrete, let the ocean back in, and require all surfers to wear helmets and padding. No more of that cowboying by guys like Jeff Spicolli. Surfing Regulation Now! Before we lose one more child to the waves!

    Nothing against the Beach Boy's surfing songs, but this Jan&Dean classic fits in just as well with the post.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERrwjR4ZlfI
    , @Anon
    I don't know, but if not, I guess one reason would be the risk of lawsuit: surfing's dangerous, and if someone drowns at your man-made surf haven - especially someone who wasn't there to surf...
    , @alaska3636
    The Superbank has some manmade qualities:
    https://www.surfertoday.com/surfing/11482-the-superbank-a-joint-venture-between-man-and-nature

    But ocean currents and sand build-up are super fickle, bro.

    Dumping an artificial reef somewhere would be cool but I'm not sure how easy it would be to predict the effects of undertaking such a project.

    Kelly Slater's Wave Ranch is the closest thing to creating super waves:
    http://www.kswaveco.com/

    Surfing is large industry in California. I have several friends making a career with varying degrees of success. This article estimates that riding waves is a $50 billion dollar industry worldwide:

    https://samuelwills.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/mcgregorwills2017.pdf

    I love surfing, but I would give it up in a minute or two for affordable houses.
    , @res

    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?
     
    http://www.surfscience.com/topics/waves-and-weather/wind-and-weather/artificial-surfing-reefs/

    Conclusion

    Artificial surfing reefs aren't a new concept but the idea has come a long way in the past decade. With groups like ASR Limited and conferences like the International Artificial Surfing Reef Symposium, it is obvious that there is momentum growing. Even with the combined knowledge of ocean floor experts, building a reef that will create a surfable wave isn't easy. There are many factors to take into account such as how the reef accounts for swell direction, local conditions and year round wave resources. Then there is the cost which can be in the $1-10 Million rage. For now the experts will keep researching and testing ideas, practicing on smaller scale modification and maintenance projects but within our lifetimes we are going to see this idea come to prevalence. It won't be long before local surfing groups are rallying to raise money for a reef, petitioning to get projects on city ballots and maybe even surfing a world class break just outside your local beach break.
     
    I wish they would date articles like this. A look at the internet archive indicates it was probably written in 2010.
    , @manton
    About 100 miles off San Diego there is a natural rise in the ocean floor called Cortes Bank. It's basically a submerged Channel Island. Winter storms far to the east and north can send waves across thousands of miles and when they hit the Bank, they rise up high. Surfers will watch the weather forecasts and boat out there when conditions are right. You can go out there on boats to watch them. It's pretty cool.

    When I was in high school and obsessed with the Navy, the captain of the nuclear carrier Enterprise whacked the Bank and had to take the ship to San Francisco, where she was in drydock for months under repairs. The dock was in Hunter's Point right by Candlestick, so I saw the ship often.

    , @Alan Mercer
    The Army Corps of Engineers. Years ago I remember hearing that they at least once dredged Torrance/Redondo Beach for better waves. Indeed, in my youth I remember those breaks being much better than they are now.

    I can't find any documentation, but here is something about them doing the same in NJ.
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  20. @JohnnyWalker123
    Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there's been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren't into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-YsN0y7vZI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYoK-VSuvL0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJb2MrZFjBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOrOMuo-9o

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the "Cohens") with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9paPT4iuC4

    Tiki bars are back recently.

    My impression is that surf clothes brands like Hollister (named after a surf region out past Santa Barbara) were big about a decade ago, and Abercrombie and Fitch was heavily into surf styles back then. But not these days.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    See also:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollister_riot
    , @The Alarmist
    Skateboarding has become the rad fad. Don't need an ocean, and the gear is more affordable. I see lots of Vans-wear around the world, which is funny because their logo is very similar to Vans Aircraft, a maker of experimental aircraft kits, of which I built an RV-7. I never thought to see if there is a relationship. I walked up to a young guy wearing a Vans tee and asked him what he was building, and he actually started describing his latest board build ... deck, trucks, wheels... the whole nine yards.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    One of Buffalo's best party bars in the 60s was a Tiki bar in Williamsville, at the edge of farm country. Lots of bamboo, a small bridge over a faux stream and dark booths. Lots of exotic drinks, some in coconut shell and most featuring those tiny umbrellas. Most food was serves as kabobs. I think it was replaced by a TGI Fridays, which had walls and rafters covered in garage sale chic. Old pedal car? Got that. Rowing shell ? Got that. Miss those days a little.
    , @snorlax
    There was a big "extreme sports" fad (skateboarding, snowboarding, surfing, BMX, motocross, etc) in the 90's and 00's.
    , @MEH 0910
    http://www.tampabay.com/storyimage/HI/20180205/ARTICLE/302059674/AR/0/AR-302059674.jpg
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  21. @Steve Sailer
    My San Francisco cousins went to an Irish prep school in the 1960s, I think it was the one James Joyce went to. They got extra credit for doing papers in Gaelic. They were always complaining about all the Irish language emphasis.

    I boarded at an Irish secondary school in Dublin in the 1990s and by then every Irish born pupil was required to take classes in the Irish language. The classes were universally loathed by schoolboys. The stated purpose was to bring the language back from the brink of extinction. Perhaps it has worked on a localized basis. There were a few boarders from Kerry who were native speakers/bilingual from birth though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    I think it worked pretty well for Israel, bringing back Hebrew.

    The Micks are a strange race, a race of high-functioning quasi-nationalistic retards who go to the trouble of speaking Gaelic and forming a literal terrorist organization with actual bombs and death and stuff against people who are practically indistinguishable from them in a DNA test. Who does that these days? And yet now they give their land away to foreigners through immigration.

    At this stage, having your language be the lingua franca is a downside, like it would have been in the later Roman era. Other people know your tech, know the way you think, know your weaknesses, and use it against you. Meanwhile they have the advantage of having their own language for secret discussions.
    , @Corn
    I don’t follow Irish society close enough to know if Irish is still endangered but I’m not surprised the lessons were loathed. As far as the written language goes spelling and pronunciation are strangers to one another.

    Mom and Dad went to Ireland once. Dad’s mom was an Irish immigrant (and Irish speaker). Dad’s cousin he met over there was named Padraig. Reading that you’d think Pad-rayg? Pod-rig?

    Nope. It’s pronounced Porrick. Patrick in the original Irish.
    , @(((They))) Live
    Yes everyone in Ireland is required to study Irish from starting primary school at age four until finishing second level at about 16/17 , you will also study another European language usually French or German, but the Gaelscoil is very different since they teach every subject using only Irish, this means any pupil who spending 8 years daily speaking Irish should be fluent by the time they reach second level

    I think in the past most people sent their children to the Gaelscoil because they are generally smaller schools with smaller classes, I suspect changing demographics might be influencing some people
    , @Altai
    It's extremely difficult when the other language you're combating is English. Most universities now have so many foreign faculty that they conduct business through English be it Denmark or France. And now with so many foreigners from so many places, English gets cemented even further.

    The teaching of Irish suffers the same problems teaching any language in an Anglophone environment. (Ie, It's done exceedingly poorly and emphasis is placed on grammar and not conversation.)
    , @Ian M.
    I was in Dingle back in May, and the locals I talked to there all spoke Irish as their first language (though of course all were fluent in English as well). I went to a mass there, and the sermon was in English, but nearly all of the rest of it was in Gaelic, including the Scripture readings.

    Also, all the signs there (throughout Ireland, not just Kerry County) are in both English and Gaelic.
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  22. Anonym says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    You are looking at huge $$$, and no one is going to pay for it. At least, AFAICT. You are familiar with Nazare, right? That’s a lot of dirt, concrete, whatever to make that happen, better to just use what’s in nature.

    Golf, I would think you would be moving mounds of earth around a more 2 dimensional space. Probably. And you don’t have a bunch of water and huge waves to mess things up on you.

    The wealth was real in the 1950s, 1960s. Peak muscle car era was say, Chevy Camaro 1967-1969. Then it was all about beauty and acceleration in a straight line, who cares about fuel economy. People then had resources to burn. Real estate was cheap.

    Back then you didn’t have a million ethnic groups willing to sleep 20 to a house, cram for every entrance examination, fighting every day just to drink your milkshake. You have to be a trustifarian or just someone with not much motivation I think to be into surfing. These days if you want economical fun, you buy a computer or a console. It’s a lot cheaper and easier to play video games. Less risky too.

    And if you have kids, who has the time? This surfer dude has one child? lol, typical baby boomer “me” generation. Your descendents will look back on you, the silent generation and the worst generation, and think – you had it made, all you had to do was sit back in your decadence and maintain the immigration laws. But no, that was too hard. Out of the several hundred years of people who built up everything you had, you threw it all away. Thank god that this surfer dude New Yorker writer had only one child, that’s Nature’s way of saying the gene pool is better off without you, we can’t have too many more like that otherwise it really will be an unrecoverable disaster.

    Ironically, the weather prediction these days for surfing is awesome in its capability. Offshore winds, ideal swell periods, height of waves, direction of swell etc. – you can predict it all and waste no time at all just going out to check out the waves.

    Read More
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  23. Anonym says:
    @Alec Leamas
    I boarded at an Irish secondary school in Dublin in the 1990s and by then every Irish born pupil was required to take classes in the Irish language. The classes were universally loathed by schoolboys. The stated purpose was to bring the language back from the brink of extinction. Perhaps it has worked on a localized basis. There were a few boarders from Kerry who were native speakers/bilingual from birth though.

    I think it worked pretty well for Israel, bringing back Hebrew.

    The Micks are a strange race, a race of high-functioning quasi-nationalistic retards who go to the trouble of speaking Gaelic and forming a literal terrorist organization with actual bombs and death and stuff against people who are practically indistinguishable from them in a DNA test. Who does that these days? And yet now they give their land away to foreigners through immigration.

    At this stage, having your language be the lingua franca is a downside, like it would have been in the later Roman era. Other people know your tech, know the way you think, know your weaknesses, and use it against you. Meanwhile they have the advantage of having their own language for secret discussions.

    Read More
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  24. @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    Read More
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  25. Ganderson says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    I was born in 1954 . We got draft numbers, but no one from ‘54 was drafted. Only a few ‘53s were taken.

    Read More
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  26. dearieme says:
    @Mishima Zaibatsu
    O/T — Here we go. It’s the same in every white country.

    Irish-speaking schools far less likely to have overseas students
    Irish Times

    Irish-speaking schools are significantly less likely to have non-Irish national students than other schools, new figures show.

    A Department of Education analysis of school enrolment for 2015/2016 shows non-Irish nationals accounted for 10.6 per cent of pupils in primary education. By contrast, among all-Irish primary schools, this fell to 1.6 per cent. A similar pattern is repeated at second level.

    The statistics are likely to be seized on by critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.

    ...

    Caoimhín Ó hEaghra, the patron body’s general secretary, said the figures for all-Irish schools include those in more peripheral Gaeltacht areas which have not experienced an influx of newcomers.

    He said a survey conducted among its non-Gaeltacht schools earlier this year indicated that 9.6 per cent of its students were from an “other background”.

    It defines this as as a student who themselves or at least one parent were from another country.

    Gaelscoileanna, along with multidenominational schools, have surged in popularity in recent years with more than a third oversubscribed.

    ...

     

    The struggle to secure non-whites the basic human right of unfettered access to white people must go on.

    “critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.” That may well be part of the attraction of such schools but there is probably at least one other effect. Any school that selects by ability and interest – even a largely unimportant interest in studying in a moribund language – will become attractive simply by virtue of being selective.

    I learnt this decades ago: the tip for people going to live in North Wales was to get their children into a school where they would learn Welsh. This wasn’t a matter of speaking Welsh giving them advantages in life (though it might) but a matter of youngsters from families who weren’t much interested in education, or were a bit dim, being kept out.

    If you open a selective school with apparently arbitrary entrance requirements – being able to catch a ball would probably do – then you’ll end up with a better cut of pupils than an unselective school, and your school will thereby be in demand. Maybe that’s one of the attractions of choir schools too.

    It’s not all that different a point from the phenomenon of firms preferring to hire university graduates in subjects that have little relevance to the jobs on offer.

    Read More
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  27. @Mishima Zaibatsu
    O/T — Here we go. It’s the same in every white country.

    Irish-speaking schools far less likely to have overseas students
    Irish Times

    Irish-speaking schools are significantly less likely to have non-Irish national students than other schools, new figures show.

    A Department of Education analysis of school enrolment for 2015/2016 shows non-Irish nationals accounted for 10.6 per cent of pupils in primary education. By contrast, among all-Irish primary schools, this fell to 1.6 per cent. A similar pattern is repeated at second level.

    The statistics are likely to be seized on by critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.

    ...

    Caoimhín Ó hEaghra, the patron body’s general secretary, said the figures for all-Irish schools include those in more peripheral Gaeltacht areas which have not experienced an influx of newcomers.

    He said a survey conducted among its non-Gaeltacht schools earlier this year indicated that 9.6 per cent of its students were from an “other background”.

    It defines this as as a student who themselves or at least one parent were from another country.

    Gaelscoileanna, along with multidenominational schools, have surged in popularity in recent years with more than a third oversubscribed.

    ...

     

    The struggle to secure non-whites the basic human right of unfettered access to white people must go on.

    Obviously, the solution is to ban Irish so that the ‘new Irish’ will feel more welcome in Ireland.

    BTW, what’s your source on that? The Irish Times? It’s obviously not an American paper.

    Read More
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  28. Lagertha says:

    I believe that surfing will become another hot, retro activity of the bored elite; the Gen X & Y, older Millennials looking for excitement and meaning/purpose to counter their un-sexy office – 24/7- existence. Cortez Bank is the best; yet Rockaway, NY is really, where some of these bordoes surf. Very few people (strictly, Laird-level) could surf at Cortez…you also need someone to take you there, too, and pay for them to hang-out, so, gnarly Pokemon bragging points.

    Surfing lessons are way up at the usual beaches. Plus, you look less ridiculous learning to surf than skate board/snowboard/ski/white water kayak/rock climb. The adrenaline junkies and the women who want to look just as cool and be where the boys are, are turning to surfing in droves. And, both men and women can hide their not-so-great-bodies in wet suits. There is a purpose to those Tiki Bars, too – apre’s surf.

    It is also, now, cool to brag about surfing in Norway, Japan, Oman, etc.. I roll my eyes when I hear the usual brag-talk on Icelandair on the way back to USA…always by NYC or Bay Area/SV 30-somethings.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    Todos Santos in Baja used to be the place to brag about.
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  29. Corn says:
    @Alec Leamas
    I boarded at an Irish secondary school in Dublin in the 1990s and by then every Irish born pupil was required to take classes in the Irish language. The classes were universally loathed by schoolboys. The stated purpose was to bring the language back from the brink of extinction. Perhaps it has worked on a localized basis. There were a few boarders from Kerry who were native speakers/bilingual from birth though.

    I don’t follow Irish society close enough to know if Irish is still endangered but I’m not surprised the lessons were loathed. As far as the written language goes spelling and pronunciation are strangers to one another.

    Mom and Dad went to Ireland once. Dad’s mom was an Irish immigrant (and Irish speaker). Dad’s cousin he met over there was named Padraig. Reading that you’d think Pad-rayg? Pod-rig?

    Nope. It’s pronounced Porrick. Patrick in the original Irish.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    Nope. It’s pronounced Porrick.

    Alas... Porrick.
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  30. @Alec Leamas
    I boarded at an Irish secondary school in Dublin in the 1990s and by then every Irish born pupil was required to take classes in the Irish language. The classes were universally loathed by schoolboys. The stated purpose was to bring the language back from the brink of extinction. Perhaps it has worked on a localized basis. There were a few boarders from Kerry who were native speakers/bilingual from birth though.

    Yes everyone in Ireland is required to study Irish from starting primary school at age four until finishing second level at about 16/17 , you will also study another European language usually French or German, but the Gaelscoil is very different since they teach every subject using only Irish, this means any pupil who spending 8 years daily speaking Irish should be fluent by the time they reach second level

    I think in the past most people sent their children to the Gaelscoil because they are generally smaller schools with smaller classes, I suspect changing demographics might be influencing some people

    Read More
    • Replies: @JMcG
    From what I understand, it’s not immersive all the way through what would be called primary school in the US. Some subjects can’t be taught in Irish as there simply aren’t the words needed.
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  31. Young Americans of European Christian ancestry will retaliate against the treasonous nation-wrecking White scum born before 1965.

    Mass immigration is an inter-generational attack on young people of European Christian ancestry.

    The baby boomers and the generations before the baby boomers treasonously used mass immigration to attack the future ancestral core of the United States. This has happened in many European Christian nations. The United States, Germany, France, Australia, England, Canada, the Netherlands and other European Christian nations are all under attack from mass immigration and multicultural mayhem.

    Stupid young people will smarten up when they gain control of the central banks in all European Christian nations and then refuse to pay ALL of the government debt fraudulently stacked up by the evil nation-wreckers born before 1965.

    OK, now I’ll read Sailer’s bit. The surfer guy harassed by non-Europeans while he was younger has a tall wife with a magnificent can, that’s my opinion, and I got lots of them.

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Young Americans of European Christian ancestry will retaliate against the treasonous nation-wrecking White scum born before 1965....the evil nation-wreckers born before 1965...
     
    The voting age was 21 at the time so you have to go back well before 1944 to have even a glimmer of an argument. And guess what those people call themselves?
    , @Highlander
    The ant-white Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that opened the borders was proposed by Rep. Imanuel Celler (born 1888) sponsored by Sen. Philip Hart (born 1912) land passed by a Congress largely made up of the WWII generation.
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  32. Anon7 says:

    Here’s the clip you want ;-)

    The 1966 Movie “The Endless Summer”

    Its title comes from the idea, expressed at both the beginning and end of the film, that if one had enough time and money it would be possible to follow the summer up and down the world (northern to southern hemisphere and back), making it endless.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Anon, Best movie with "Summer" in the title..."Summer of 42'" featuring a memorable, almost non forgettable theme song.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    That's it, The Endless Summer. I posted my own reference to it before I saw yours.

    Now here's Dick Dale playing his song "Misirlou" on surf guitar, in case no one has already posted that too. The man invented the sound and the equipment that makes it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTTmJKbAIsE
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  33. njguy73 says:

    I was born in 1973, and boy, I wouldn’t make that mistake again.

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    • LOL: Highlander
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  34. So, leftists and boomers are hypocrites? Who knew?

    But seriously, it’s the same dynamic with every obsession like hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, water skiing, birding, photography, etc. And while your article teaches nothing to those who jealously guard the prime hunting spots and who are red-pilled, it may help awaken others who haven’t thought clearly on the subject. The tragedy thus is that it’s published in Takimag rather than something with far wider circulation.

    Have you ever considered writing something like this for specialty pubs like hunting, fishing, skiing, or surfing mags?

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Stan, The writers for Outdoors Life, Hunting and Fishing magazines of my youth could connect you with the writers experience even if you only visited a woods or fished on a lake occasionally. Are there surfer magazines ?
    , @prosa123
    "But seriously, it’s the same dynamic with every obsession like hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, water skiing, birding, photography, etc. And while your article teaches nothing to those who jealously guard the prime hunting spots and who are red-pilled, it may help awaken others who haven’t thought clearly on the subject."

    Hunting is another sport which has seen declining participation. There are a variety of factors, but the biggest one is the simple lack of suitable hunting areas. As the population grows, especially the suburban population, fewer people can find hunting areas within a reasonable distance.

    One thing that might help keep hunting relevant is the increasing participation of women. Although reliable statistics are hard to come by, according to some estimates about 20% of hunters are women, at least 5X the rate of just a couple decades ago. Women are at least partly responsible for fueling the massively rising popularity of the 6.5 (mm) Creedmoor cartridge,* which has a perfect combination of power, accuracy, and female-friendly low recoil.
    * = which shares its name with a large mental hospital
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  35. cthoms says:

    Surfers tend to be localists, who are like nationalist nativists, only more tribal.

    And not always in a non-violent way. From 1991, and including one of its best quotes (“Better not be trying to pick up any babes.”)

    Point Break tribalism.

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  36. @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Unlike the golf courses, the seabed may be prone to all being knocked around again by the ocean, even after a bunch of precision work on it. I’m neither an oceanographer nor geologist, but I’d figure the waves and currents may put things back just the way they were before, unless some jetties were built to change things. I’m sure you’ve seen the projects to augment the beach in LA areas (certain places I mean), as some places gain sand and some lose it, but property owners and realtors want it to stay JUST WTF IT WAS! Haha, nature doesn’t care about your investments.

    With modern computer simulations though, maybe some engineers could make a model of what it would take not only to make the waves break as desired (the EASY part) but what the landscape must look like to KEEP IT that way.

    Or, we can just set up some huge caissons, pave it all in concrete, let the ocean back in, and require all surfers to wear helmets and padding. No more of that cowboying by guys like Jeff Spicolli. Surfing Regulation Now! Before we lose one more child to the waves!

    Nothing against the Beach Boy’s surfing songs, but this Jan&Dean classic fits in just as well with the post.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    I’d think with advances in computer modeling and 3-D printing, it should be pretty doable today. Model the reef, print it in concrete in sections on a barge, with steel spikes on the bottom, and lower it in place.
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  37. Highlander says: • Website
    @black sea

    Surfboarding is not a way of life. People are free to think it is because the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts. People who make a life of surfboarding are living off other people. They're leeches of the affluent society. They're parasites of a parasite.
     
    --Wendell Berry

    Guilty as charged and calling surfing “surfboarding” is about as Ho-Daddy as it gets.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XzcCCOC77Wc
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  38. psmith says:

    blond beasts reclaim tropical urheimat in fully NUDE amphibious assault, mounted on war longboards….men of vital power initiating new age of sun-drenched piracy….you must SUBMIT!

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  39. A good friend of mine has always maintained that the best period/place to have been on this earth is 1950′s California. I might go for 1960′s northern CA (I mean well north of the bay) vs. his ’50′s SoCal, but that’s a good choice to have (in your dreams).

    I pulled up your article and look forward to reading the rest of it later on.

    They called it Paradise. I don’t know why .. you call some place Paradise … and kiss it goodbye.”

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Ach, My wife moved, with some girl friends, to San Francisco in the 60s, reasonable living and beau coup jobs. She says it was the greatest place to be, Ever ! She lived in Haight-Ashbury for a while, but our kids turned out ok, they each have ten fingers and ten toes, but not evenly distributed. Visited California a lot when we were first married, shame what has happen to that state in the last couple of decades.
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  40. Anon[156] • Disclaimer says:
    @The Alarmist

    "Americans, especially young people, just really aren’t into it anymore."
     
    Check the line-up at your local spot and you'll see plenty of surfers. And a lot of us are Team Gold Card, i.e. older and with money. But to your point, it doesn't seem so exotic anymore, so it has faded from a lot of the cultural media.

    Don’t you worry about sharks?

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    • Replies: @The Alarmist
    I'm wary and pay attention, but more people are killed each year taking selfies than by shark attacks.
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  41. Anon[680] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    I don’t know, but if not, I guess one reason would be the risk of lawsuit: surfing’s dangerous, and if someone drowns at your man-made surf haven – especially someone who wasn’t there to surf…

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  42. Anon[680] • Disclaimer says:

    I like it. So, California boomers lucked out, real-estate-wise, and invented environmentalism to protect their treasure. Then, California millennials, not so lucky, had to invent open borders so they could get past the gates to the emerald city.

    Californian is therefore remarkably influential: the lies Californians use to gussy up their prosaic local pissing contests have totally reshaped the world twice.

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  43. @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    The Superbank has some manmade qualities:

    https://www.surfertoday.com/surfing/11482-the-superbank-a-joint-venture-between-man-and-nature

    But ocean currents and sand build-up are super fickle, bro.

    Dumping an artificial reef somewhere would be cool but I’m not sure how easy it would be to predict the effects of undertaking such a project.

    Kelly Slater’s Wave Ranch is the closest thing to creating super waves:

    http://www.kswaveco.com/

    Surfing is large industry in California. I have several friends making a career with varying degrees of success. This article estimates that riding waves is a $50 billion dollar industry worldwide:

    https://samuelwills.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/mcgregorwills2017.pdf

    I love surfing, but I would give it up in a minute or two for affordable houses.

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    • Replies: @Highlander
    WannaSurf is for barneys and their "ratings" pimping is a joke.
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  44. res says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    http://www.surfscience.com/topics/waves-and-weather/wind-and-weather/artificial-surfing-reefs/

    Conclusion

    Artificial surfing reefs aren’t a new concept but the idea has come a long way in the past decade. With groups like ASR Limited and conferences like the International Artificial Surfing Reef Symposium, it is obvious that there is momentum growing. Even with the combined knowledge of ocean floor experts, building a reef that will create a surfable wave isn’t easy. There are many factors to take into account such as how the reef accounts for swell direction, local conditions and year round wave resources. Then there is the cost which can be in the $1-10 Million rage. For now the experts will keep researching and testing ideas, practicing on smaller scale modification and maintenance projects but within our lifetimes we are going to see this idea come to prevalence. It won’t be long before local surfing groups are rallying to raise money for a reef, petitioning to get projects on city ballots and maybe even surfing a world class break just outside your local beach break.

    I wish they would date articles like this. A look at the internet archive indicates it was probably written in 2010.

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  45. Tiny Duck says:
    @Mishima Zaibatsu
    O/T — Here we go. It’s the same in every white country.

    Irish-speaking schools far less likely to have overseas students
    Irish Times

    Irish-speaking schools are significantly less likely to have non-Irish national students than other schools, new figures show.

    A Department of Education analysis of school enrolment for 2015/2016 shows non-Irish nationals accounted for 10.6 per cent of pupils in primary education. By contrast, among all-Irish primary schools, this fell to 1.6 per cent. A similar pattern is repeated at second level.

    The statistics are likely to be seized on by critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.

    ...

    Caoimhín Ó hEaghra, the patron body’s general secretary, said the figures for all-Irish schools include those in more peripheral Gaeltacht areas which have not experienced an influx of newcomers.

    He said a survey conducted among its non-Gaeltacht schools earlier this year indicated that 9.6 per cent of its students were from an “other background”.

    It defines this as as a student who themselves or at least one parent were from another country.

    Gaelscoileanna, along with multidenominational schools, have surged in popularity in recent years with more than a third oversubscribed.

    ...

     

    The struggle to secure non-whites the basic human right of unfettered access to white people must go on.

    Whatever racist

    I hope you know that white girls ADORE Men of Color and see white men for the weak theinving fragile morons that they are

    The future is diverse, Of Color, Muslim, and female

    GET USED TO IT

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    • Replies: @Jack D

    The future is ... female

    GET USED TO IT
     
    I realize TD is a parody account but sometimes it is beyond parody.

    How will they make future little POCs if the future is female? Will they abort all the male fetuses? Kill them at birth? Will men be presumptively me-tooed and forbidden to work so that females will have to do all the work as in African societies? Or will the females get all the nice cushy office jobs in man-free workplaces and men will still be allowed to work on the garbage trucks and so on? I keep getting the feeling that TD and his ilk have not really thought this through so that the glorious brown Muslim female future he imagines will not be so glorious.
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  46. Surfing is still popular; what you’re defining as “surfer culture” is really something narrower, and akin to the mid-20th century interest in Hawaii Steve mentions.

    Where is Rat Fink these days?

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    • Replies: @Shingas the Terrible
    Unfortunately, that culture as well as motorcycle culture is dying with the boomers. You can’t rip apart a modern car and customize it yourself in a backyard garage with a blowtorch like an old car with a big block V8.

    Same with the MC culture. It’s geriatric. Go to any bike night and if you see anyone riding in under 30, it’s a miracle. Maybe the gen z kids will resurrect it, because unlike modern cars, working on bikes (real bikes, like Harley and Triumph) is still very much a DIY thing and affordable. By then, the market will be glutted with cheap used bikes sitting in garages that belonged to old boomers that their kids don’t want.
    , @DFH
    The perspective on the woman's bottom and legs is really off
    , @Big Bill
    Remember?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYi8jk6gPXk
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  47. Altai says:
    @Steve Sailer
    My San Francisco cousins went to an Irish prep school in the 1960s, I think it was the one James Joyce went to. They got extra credit for doing papers in Gaelic. They were always complaining about all the Irish language emphasis.

    You still get extra marks for doing your final year exams in Irish. (A maximum of about 10%) But hilariously it was considered unfair that only languages on the school curriculum got exams. (Irish, French, German, Italian and Latin)

    Now they have exams for every official EU language and others besides. IE, essentially Polish students get to take a Polish language paper for free points. Free jobs for those who craft these exams and sign off on them.

    It’s not insignificant to be able to drop the non-Irish language requirement (A lot of universities like Trinity won’t accept an applicant who hasn’t passed a non-Irish language exam, no matter the applied subject of study.) when studying and Irish is compulsory for everyone except those who came to the Irish school beyond the age of 12 or something. So they often get to drop two subjects.

    I can see the logic inasmuch as ‘Well they can speak another language’, but that’s not really the point of the exams. They test you on the basis of studying for them not your base skills, you could have two people of the same IQ and if you speaks English as their first language they’re generally not going to be good at speaking a second language. And the languages they speak aren’t economically valuable either.

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  48. Altai says:
    @Alec Leamas
    I boarded at an Irish secondary school in Dublin in the 1990s and by then every Irish born pupil was required to take classes in the Irish language. The classes were universally loathed by schoolboys. The stated purpose was to bring the language back from the brink of extinction. Perhaps it has worked on a localized basis. There were a few boarders from Kerry who were native speakers/bilingual from birth though.

    It’s extremely difficult when the other language you’re combating is English. Most universities now have so many foreign faculty that they conduct business through English be it Denmark or France. And now with so many foreigners from so many places, English gets cemented even further.

    The teaching of Irish suffers the same problems teaching any language in an Anglophone environment. (Ie, It’s done exceedingly poorly and emphasis is placed on grammar and not conversation.)

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.
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  49. Jack D says:

    Fads come and go. It is the nature of fashion that no matter how good the concept, people are going to get sick of it after a while and want something different (and then after a number of years in the wilderness, the fashion comes back again, sometimes). The enduring thread of the last 100 years (at least) is that people like to adopt sports clothing for non-sports use but the particular sports involved change over time.

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  50. Clyde says:

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/tvshowbiz/article-5941013/Frank-Sinatras-former-oceanfront-Malibu-residence-rented-mere-110-000-month.html?ITO=1490

    Do it YOUR way: Frank Sinatra’s jaw-dropping seven bedroom and nine bathroom $3million oceanfront Malibu mansion available to rent for $110,000 a month

    *********Many great interior and exterior photos of this house. How the wealthy live in style in Malibu.

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  51. Jack D says:
    @black sea

    Surfboarding is not a way of life. People are free to think it is because the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts. People who make a life of surfboarding are living off other people. They're leeches of the affluent society. They're parasites of a parasite.
     
    --Wendell Berry

    the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts

    This is nonsense. Occupational specialization has been the mark of civilization for the last 5,000 years. The American frontier (at least the mythical version of it) was something of an exception in that the frontiersman had to be a jack of all trades, but even colonial American (urban) society was filled with various highly skilled specialists – Revere the silversmith, Franklin the printer, etc. This includes occupations that are responsible for caring for society – clergymen, constables, doctors, etc.

    Some surfers were trust fund babies but most were not parasites. They were not into material possessions (other than their surfboards) and in those simpler times could live cheaply and support themselves pumping gas or as a night watchman or something when they were not surfing. Believe it or not, there once was a time when you could pay the rent on a shared apartment or house in Southern California (maybe not the greatest place but something that would sell for $1M today) on your earnings from some modest job. They were young unattached men, most of whom later settled down and got real jobs. Maybe a few became permanent teenagers but most didn’t.

    That America had the kind of prosperity that allowed young men to pursue their leisure activities on an (almost) full time basis was a GOOD thing, whereas today you have to put in 80 hours/week in the software mines if you want to live within 50 miles of the California coast.

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    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    I doubt that Wendell Berry intended that "the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts" means occupational specialization. More likely he means that surfers have abandoned their primary obligation and allegiance to their culture in favor of seeking consummation through surfing.
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  52. The surfer’s experience in the USA from those years described by William Finnegan is more evidence of how much better life was before the 1965 Immigration Act plus tacitly-approved illegal immigration ruined America.

    My own sister went to high school in Huntington Beach then, and her locker was underneath the locker of one Corky Carroll, the most famous surfer around there at that time. He once dropped some books on her head. She thought it might have been on purpose.

    Corky appeared in a surfing film then. My sister knew the guys who made it. It is called The Endless Summer. It’s about a couple of guys who go around the world in search of “the perfect wave.”

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    What would California be like today if there was no '65 Immigration Act? Surely not as crowded as it is now, but not the same as it was in '65 in any case. People from other states would have kept coming for its paradisiacal qualities until the paradise was ruined. Whites would have had more children if conditions for doing so were better. Would the CA high tech economy be so high tech without fresh infusions of foreign tech talent? Maybe without cheap foreign labor (more of) agricultural production would have shifted to Mexico or you would have even more mechanized farming? It's impossible to know exactly what alternate history would be like but I'm not sure that "everything would be wonderful if only those immigrants hadn't come" is really a complete picture.
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  53. CJ says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    I was born in 1953. I believe that you are correct that no one turning 20 in 1973 was actually drafted. That is how it actually worked — they could have drafted 18-year-olds but the policy was they didn’t. 19-year-olds sometimes got drafted if they were turning 20 later in the calendar year. The last “callup” was in December 1972. However, people at the time did not know that was the last; they expected to be drafted if they had a lottery number lower than 195.

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  54. AndrewR says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there's been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren't into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-YsN0y7vZI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYoK-VSuvL0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJb2MrZFjBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOrOMuo-9o

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the "Cohens") with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9paPT4iuC4

    Stopped watching after the cheesy “Welcome to the OC, bitch!” part

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  55. It was great to be born in 1946? Not if you were a female, with fewer older guys but lots of younger girls following you.

    One cause of the divorce explosion in the ’70′s?

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    The younger girls had the boys born in 1946, as, shockingly, did the girls born in 1946.
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  56. AndrewR says:
    @anony-mouse
    It was great to be born in 1946? Not if you were a female, with fewer older guys but lots of younger girls following you.

    One cause of the divorce explosion in the '70's?

    The younger girls had the boys born in 1946, as, shockingly, did the girls born in 1946.

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    • Replies: @res
    But if you look at a window say from your own age to three years older, then the women born in 1946 definitely had a problem. Probably most evident in high school.

    Has anyone done an analysis of how demographic trends affect age of marriage by sex?
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  57. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    The surfer's experience in the USA from those years described by William Finnegan is more evidence of how much better life was before the 1965 Immigration Act plus tacitly-approved illegal immigration ruined America.

    My own sister went to high school in Huntington Beach then, and her locker was underneath the locker of one Corky Carroll, the most famous surfer around there at that time. He once dropped some books on her head. She thought it might have been on purpose.

    Corky appeared in a surfing film then. My sister knew the guys who made it. It is called The Endless Summer. It's about a couple of guys who go around the world in search of "the perfect wave."

    http://surfclassics.com/wp-content/tn3/0/64TheEndlessSummer21.jpg

    What would California be like today if there was no ’65 Immigration Act? Surely not as crowded as it is now, but not the same as it was in ’65 in any case. People from other states would have kept coming for its paradisiacal qualities until the paradise was ruined. Whites would have had more children if conditions for doing so were better. Would the CA high tech economy be so high tech without fresh infusions of foreign tech talent? Maybe without cheap foreign labor (more of) agricultural production would have shifted to Mexico or you would have even more mechanized farming? It’s impossible to know exactly what alternate history would be like but I’m not sure that “everything would be wonderful if only those immigrants hadn’t come” is really a complete picture.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    I don't know about you, Jack, but I've lived in places where the rightful, landowning Citizens decided to limit growth with zoning and the preservation of open spaces. They are all nice places. I live in one now. I'm glad my family left Southern California in 1968.
    , @Bernardo Pizzaro Cortez Del Castro
    Very true. Also the amnesty of 1986 had a bigger effect on the California demographics than the immigration act of 1965 (which kept immigration below 450,000 per year). In 1975 the majority of the 400,000 legal immigrants were still coming from Europe....but by 1986 there were millions of illegal aliens in California, they started a baby boom when granted Amnedty by the GOP in 1986
    , @AnotherDad

    What would California be like today if there was no ’65 Immigration Act? Surely not as crowded as it is now, but not the same as it was in ’65 in any case. People from other states would have kept coming for its paradisiacal qualities until the paradise was ruined. Whites would have had more children if conditions for doing so were better. Would the CA high tech economy be so high tech without fresh infusions of foreign tech talent? Maybe without cheap foreign labor (more of) agricultural production would have shifted to Mexico or you would have even more mechanized farming? It’s impossible to know exactly what alternate history would be like but I’m not sure that “everything would be wonderful if only those immigrants hadn’t come” is really a complete picture.
     
    Not a hard analysis. More people than 65, far fewer than today.

    Relative to '65--more crowded and expensive but with clean air and the Internet.

    Relative to today--yes, a somewhat smaller, way more white, tech industry with higher wages. Somewhat smaller, more mechanized agriculture … with higher wages.

    Much much lower housing costs, less traffic, less congestion, more affordable-family-formation, more open space, better schools, lower taxes and a Republican electorate. Sounds hellish!

    "Everything would be wonderful if those immigrants hadn't come?" … ok, i'll grant you'd with all the white kids around, you'd have to wait longer for your turn to drop in at your favorite surf spot. Still sound pretty effing wonderful to me.
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  58. @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    And believe it or not, there is a surfing connection to this. The draft dodging scene in box office flop “Big Wednesday.”

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    • Replies: @Rapparee

    And believe it or not, there is a surfing connection to this. The draft dodging scene in box office flop “Big Wednesday.”
     

    Perhaps that’s why surfing has tended to be one of the less literary of the outdoor sports...
     
    The macho, quasi-nationalist, violent side of surf culture did produce at least one eloquent and influential wordsmith.
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  59. jJay says:

    From the Beach Boys:

    You’d catch ‘em surfin’ at Del Mar
    Ventura County line
    Santa Cruz and Trestle
    Australia’s Narabine
    All over Manhattan
    And down Doheny Way

    Haggerties and Swamies
    Pacific Palisades
    San Anofree and Sunset
    Redondo Beach L. A.
    All over La Jolla
    At Waimia Bay

    Several of those beaches are in Los Angeles county and you’d have a hard time finding parking there on a summer afternoon these days. Ventura county is still fairly open but the water is noticeably colder north of Zuma.

    I can’t surf. And I have tried and failed. I just learned to snow board last winter at 57 yo. It worked. I even did some tricks after a few days practice. But the learning curve to surfing is too steep for me. My natural athletic ability is just average. On the HBD theme here, I suggest surfing is sport that requires a pre-wired genetic athletic ability that is a standard deviation or so above the mean. Sample of 1, so take with a grain of salt.

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  60. OT:

    When the Austrian Foreign Minister Congratulates Jean Raspail
    11/07/2018 07:17

    Jean Raspail, who celebrated his birthday this July 4th — 93 years on the counter — was given a surprise telephone call from Karin Kneissl, the Austrian Minister of Foreign Affairs.

    We learned of this from Le Figaro (09/07/18). Madame Kneissl went on to thank Jean Raspail for his novel, The Camp of the Saints, which came out in 1973 and presents the sudden invasion of Europe by a mass of migrants. The minister also expressed a particular interest in the preface to the new edition of the novel, in which Jean Raspail created the concept of the “Big Other”, the domineering Other.

    Karin Kneissl was named Foreign Minister in December 2017 in the government led by Sebastian Kurz, as an independent person proposed by the FPÖ. After her brilliant studies, this diplomat worked in the Foreign Ministry before launching a career as an independent journalist. Karin Kneissl is best known for the positions she has taken on immigration.
    …..

    https://www.breizh-info.com/2018/07/11/99344/ministre-affaires-etrangeres-autrichienne-kneissl-felicite-jean-raspail

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    What utterly magnificent news.
    I've been thinking of moving to Austria to spend my twilight years (or months ... you never know), and this only strengthens what is fast becoming a resolve.
    Britain is falling apart fast, and the prospect of a Trotskyite government under Corbin (a distinct possibility) is just too much for these old bones.

    If only I could believe that it will last.

    Those of you who read French should take a look at Sire, about the restored and legitimate monarch who will one day save France, and then L'Anneau du Pecheur, about the true line of popes (and boy do we need them now).
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  61. @Reg Cæsar

    Surfing is still popular; what you’re defining as “surfer culture” is really something narrower, and akin to the mid-20th century interest in Hawaii Steve mentions.
     
    Where is Rat Fink these days?

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_kKSxIQK3suQ/TSqTE9Kbn1I/AAAAAAAAAGw/yvhDbO9XyQI/s1600/rat%2Bfink%2Bjoy%2Bride%2Bcartoon.jpg

    Unfortunately, that culture as well as motorcycle culture is dying with the boomers. You can’t rip apart a modern car and customize it yourself in a backyard garage with a blowtorch like an old car with a big block V8.

    Same with the MC culture. It’s geriatric. Go to any bike night and if you see anyone riding in under 30, it’s a miracle. Maybe the gen z kids will resurrect it, because unlike modern cars, working on bikes (real bikes, like Harley and Triumph) is still very much a DIY thing and affordable. By then, the market will be glutted with cheap used bikes sitting in garages that belonged to old boomers that their kids don’t want.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Shing, I used to facilitate a local car event sponsored by the "Tri Five Car Club," featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.
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  62. Jack D says:
    @Altai
    It's extremely difficult when the other language you're combating is English. Most universities now have so many foreign faculty that they conduct business through English be it Denmark or France. And now with so many foreigners from so many places, English gets cemented even further.

    The teaching of Irish suffers the same problems teaching any language in an Anglophone environment. (Ie, It's done exceedingly poorly and emphasis is placed on grammar and not conversation.)

    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English – why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don’t think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

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    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    Exactly right. And they should be learning Mandarin.
    , @istevefan

    The question is why would you WANT to combat English?
     
    Here is a short essay by a professor in Japan from 1996, on why English should be taught in Japan.
    , @Clyde
    The French Canadians got their revenge. Due to bilingualism hiring laws they dominate the Federal bureaucracy. Relatively few Canadian English speakers learn French for a second language. While plenty of Quebecois learn English.
    , @Big Bill
    I had not realized the dominance of English as a common business language until I watched a cop show TV series produced in Sweden for the Swedish market. The conversation was in Swedish (English subtitles) until the Swedish cops traveled to France tracking down International Dope Dealers.

    When the Swedish cops appeared in Paris, walked into Paris police headquarters and opened their mouths, they instantly started speaking in English. It was startling. Why English and not Swedish or French?

    And then, mirabile dictu, the French cops spoke English right back at them without hesitation. There was no negotiation, no interpreter, no trying to find a common language, no loss of face or "cultural imperialism" by forcing everyone to speak Swedish or French. They immediately switched to English, the international lingua franca (lingua anglais?)
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.
     
    This is just a quibble, Jack, and is not an argument against your entire comment, but come on, you wonder why the French don't sell more of the ugliest cars every known to man?
    , @Cagey Beast
    The biggest problem with the English language is the culture that comes with it. I only know two languages: my native English and French. Via the web and broadcast media, I eavesdrop on the flow of cultural and political chatter in both languages.

    It's hard to describe how much more crass, sour, bitchy and needling the English language content is, when compared to the French. Francophones are hardly reaching new heights at the moment but they're still far more pleasant and interesting to hear from than Americans, Brits or Anglo Canadians. From the little I can pick up, the Russians better than the Anglophones as well. I don't think the Anglosphericals realize just how weird and repellent they've become.

    , @Stan Adams

    Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.
     
    You sound like a globalist. "National cultural boundaries are an impediment to the free movement of capital, and they must be abolished! Money uber alles! The precious cash must flow!"

    The economic argument works both ways. One of the rationales for offshoring jobs to India is that "They all speak English! They're part of the Anglosphere!"

    Monolingualism goes hand-in-hand with universalistic altruism. Once you allow outsiders to invade your cultural and lingustic landscape, you are much less inclined to exclude them from your physical environs.

    The Tower of Babel is a house of cards.
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  63. @Jack D
    What would California be like today if there was no '65 Immigration Act? Surely not as crowded as it is now, but not the same as it was in '65 in any case. People from other states would have kept coming for its paradisiacal qualities until the paradise was ruined. Whites would have had more children if conditions for doing so were better. Would the CA high tech economy be so high tech without fresh infusions of foreign tech talent? Maybe without cheap foreign labor (more of) agricultural production would have shifted to Mexico or you would have even more mechanized farming? It's impossible to know exactly what alternate history would be like but I'm not sure that "everything would be wonderful if only those immigrants hadn't come" is really a complete picture.

    I don’t know about you, Jack, but I’ve lived in places where the rightful, landowning Citizens decided to limit growth with zoning and the preservation of open spaces. They are all nice places. I live in one now. I’m glad my family left Southern California in 1968.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    This is a discussion for a different day, but to be honest I am really not that wild about the way our zoning laws and open space have been used in many places - it's one more way the Boomers have screwed the younger generations out of having what they had. There are lots of young Americans who can no longer even aspire to home ownership and zoning laws are part of the problem.
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  64. @Steve Sailer
    Tiki bars are back recently.

    My impression is that surf clothes brands like Hollister (named after a surf region out past Santa Barbara) were big about a decade ago, and Abercrombie and Fitch was heavily into surf styles back then. But not these days.

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    • Replies: @dwb
    Yeah - I live in the Bay Area, and my idea of "Hollister" is the down-market farming town south of San Jose. I had no idea that there is a surfing region in Santa Barbara.

    Whenever I travel and see kids in places decidedly not California wearing "Hollister" brand clothes, I think of "vibrancy" and strawberry picking.
    , @Benjaminl
    Yeah, I'm perplexed as to how Hollister came to be seen as a hip coastal surf brand too.

    Also, this event was possibly an example of the Media Megaphone at work, per Wiki:

    The small riot came to national prominence through media coverage of the event. However, the articles that were written about the riot were greatly exaggerated and sensationalized the actual events...However, the reliability of the striking photo has been debated, as many sources say that it was staged. The photograph was taken by Barney Petersen of the San Francisco Chronicle. The Chronicle did not run any images of the event. The bearded individual standing in the background of the photograph, Gus Deserpa, has said he is sure that the photograph was staged by Petersen, and gave the following account: "I saw two guys scraping all these bottles together, that had been lying in the street. Then they positioned a motorcycle in the middle of the pile. After a while this drunk guy comes staggering out of the bar, and they got him to sit on the motorcycle, and started to take his picture." ...The Hollister riot had little effect on the town itself. The nationwide fear of motorcyclists did not result in many changes in Hollister. Bikers were welcomed back... and rallies continued to be held in the years after the riot. In fact, the town held a 1997 50th anniversary rally to commemorate the event.
     
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  65. Jack D says:
    @Tiny Duck
    Whatever racist

    I hope you know that white girls ADORE Men of Color and see white men for the weak theinving fragile morons that they are

    The future is diverse, Of Color, Muslim, and female

    GET USED TO IT

    The future is … female

    GET USED TO IT

    I realize TD is a parody account but sometimes it is beyond parody.

    How will they make future little POCs if the future is female? Will they abort all the male fetuses? Kill them at birth? Will men be presumptively me-tooed and forbidden to work so that females will have to do all the work as in African societies? Or will the females get all the nice cushy office jobs in man-free workplaces and men will still be allowed to work on the garbage trucks and so on? I keep getting the feeling that TD and his ilk have not really thought this through so that the glorious brown Muslim female future he imagines will not be so glorious.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    I realize TD is a parody account but sometimes it is beyond parody.
     
    Xe needs to up xer game. Lately xer material has been repetitive.
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  66. DFH says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Surfing is still popular; what you’re defining as “surfer culture” is really something narrower, and akin to the mid-20th century interest in Hawaii Steve mentions.
     
    Where is Rat Fink these days?

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_kKSxIQK3suQ/TSqTE9Kbn1I/AAAAAAAAAGw/yvhDbO9XyQI/s1600/rat%2Bfink%2Bjoy%2Bride%2Bcartoon.jpg

    The perspective on the woman’s bottom and legs is really off

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    The perspective on the woman’s bottom and legs is really off
     
    Rat Fink will do that to you.
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  67. It’s funny you mention Ostrom as there was an article in the Journal of Law and Economics ten years ago using surf gangs as a case of how privatization can be pure expropriation, without improving the asset.

    https://www.jeffreycjohnson.org/app/download/764422080/surfgangs.pdf

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  68. @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    Exactly right. And they should be learning Mandarin.

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  69. res says:
    @AndrewR
    The younger girls had the boys born in 1946, as, shockingly, did the girls born in 1946.

    But if you look at a window say from your own age to three years older, then the women born in 1946 definitely had a problem. Probably most evident in high school.

    Has anyone done an analysis of how demographic trends affect age of marriage by sex?

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  70. istevefan says:
    @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    The question is why would you WANT to combat English?

    Here is a short essay by a professor in Japan from 1996, on why English should be taught in Japan.

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    Since 1996, English has become even more dominant. I recently visited Portugal and almost everyone (100% of those in tourism related industries, which are a big sector of the economy) spoke at least rudimentary English and many spoke it quite well (despite the fact that Portuguese is very different from English). Almost all signage was bi-lingual Portuguese and English. And this was not because there were all that many American (or even British) tourists. Rather, English is the common language that is used by visitors from many different (non-English speaking) countries. There are not enough Danes or Swedes or Norwegians for the Portuguese to learn their language but they can all converse with each other in English.

    Japan (and especially its tourist sectors) I think has been held back by the fact that the Japanese are behind on their English instruction vs. many other countries because you don't really need to be able to speak English to survive in Japan. In Portugal, even if you wanted to speak only Portuguese, it would be difficult. They only have 10 million people so they don't have enough to have a complete entertainment industry and rely on sub-titled (not dubbed) Hollywood movies, English rock music, imported products that are not labeled in Portuguese, etc. Whereas Japan is big enough and internally self-sufficient enough that the only English you really have to learn are those words that have made it into Japanese (which are quite a few but the pronunciation is so shifted than an English speaker might not even recognize them as English).
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  71. Anon[349] • Disclaimer says:

    Hoping to see no further New England winters, I went through a couple of brief periods of southern California dreamin’ but regrettably turned down decent job offers in LA in 1988 and again in 1998, and made it through three rounds of interviews with Intel in San Diego after finishing my MBA in 2000, but no job offer was forthcoming. Made it as far west as Kansas City for a couple of years. Sometimes I wonder how great it would have been to get in on some SoCal real estate back 20 to 30 years ago.

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  72. @Anon
    Don't you worry about sharks?

    I’m wary and pay attention, but more people are killed each year taking selfies than by shark attacks.

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    • Replies: @different anon
    Username doesn't check out... ;)
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  73. Personal investment in anything seems always to evoke reactionary sentiment about that thing. Apparently our enemies seem to think this is only a good thing when it’s urban blacks fighting development in their neighborhoods.

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  74. @Steve Sailer
    Tiki bars are back recently.

    My impression is that surf clothes brands like Hollister (named after a surf region out past Santa Barbara) were big about a decade ago, and Abercrombie and Fitch was heavily into surf styles back then. But not these days.

    Skateboarding has become the rad fad. Don’t need an ocean, and the gear is more affordable. I see lots of Vans-wear around the world, which is funny because their logo is very similar to Vans Aircraft, a maker of experimental aircraft kits, of which I built an RV-7. I never thought to see if there is a relationship. I walked up to a young guy wearing a Vans tee and asked him what he was building, and he actually started describing his latest board build … deck, trucks, wheels… the whole nine yards.

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  75. @Lagertha
    I believe that surfing will become another hot, retro activity of the bored elite; the Gen X & Y, older Millennials looking for excitement and meaning/purpose to counter their un-sexy office - 24/7- existence. Cortez Bank is the best; yet Rockaway, NY is really, where some of these bordoes surf. Very few people (strictly, Laird-level) could surf at Cortez...you also need someone to take you there, too, and pay for them to hang-out, so, gnarly Pokemon bragging points.

    Surfing lessons are way up at the usual beaches. Plus, you look less ridiculous learning to surf than skate board/snowboard/ski/white water kayak/rock climb. The adrenaline junkies and the women who want to look just as cool and be where the boys are, are turning to surfing in droves. And, both men and women can hide their not-so-great-bodies in wet suits. There is a purpose to those Tiki Bars, too - apre's surf.

    It is also, now, cool to brag about surfing in Norway, Japan, Oman, etc.. I roll my eyes when I hear the usual brag-talk on Icelandair on the way back to USA...always by NYC or Bay Area/SV 30-somethings.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cortes_Bank#/media/File:Peter_Mel_at_Cortez_Bank.jpg

    Todos Santos in Baja used to be the place to brag about.

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  76. The same year, 1972 I think, my family bought a 5 bedroom, 2 bath, full finished basement, house in rural MI, my Aunt bought a house in Huntington Beach and both paid ~20K.

    And today

    House in MI = ~$110K…..which actually seems absurd based on the area AND incomes

    House in HB = ~$850K ….which is beyond absurd based on incomes.

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  77. Big Bill says:

    Unlike his own parents, whose laissez-faire attitude toward their son’s surfing fanaticism seemed to be that while losing an heir to drowning would be tragic, they would still have plenty of spares, Finnegan, a typically cautious 21st-century father, is happy that his one child doesn’t surf.

    Is there any way to recover from this cultural/psychic deformation without a huge war (e.g. WWII) that destroys infrastructure and people and opens up opportunities for repopulation? Is the “one-perfect-child” syndrome inevitable in modern consumer societies?

    The Chinese deliberately engineered their own one-perfect-child (Little Emperor) culture, held on to it for too long, and are now desperately trying to change it by encouraging women to have two or more children, with very limited success.

    A Chinese/Japanese/Western only-child born today has to take care of two parents and four grandparents. But how can that child do this AND have two or three children (on a single income) of his own in order to reverse the shrinking demographics?

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  78. dwb says:
    @Desiderius
    See also:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollister_riot

    Yeah – I live in the Bay Area, and my idea of “Hollister” is the down-market farming town south of San Jose. I had no idea that there is a surfing region in Santa Barbara.

    Whenever I travel and see kids in places decidedly not California wearing “Hollister” brand clothes, I think of “vibrancy” and strawberry picking.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    http://www.hollister-ranch.com/
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  79. When you started talking surf gangs I was hoping to see this link.

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  80. Clyde says:

    Here is a short essay by a professor in Japan from 1996, on why English should be taught in Japan.

    If English is spoken more widely in Nippon, there would be more pressure to allow in immigrants with English as their second language. The Japanese are doing just fine the way things are.

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  81. Clyde says:
    @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    The French Canadians got their revenge. Due to bilingualism hiring laws they dominate the Federal bureaucracy. Relatively few Canadian English speakers learn French for a second language. While plenty of Quebecois learn English.

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  82. 1946

    David Lynch was born in 1946. George W Bush was too.

    Baby boomer David Lynch has the ultimate answer to baby boomer George W Bush’s assertion that most baby boomers didn’t protest against the Vietnam War or rebel against the ruling class.

    Unsaid by David Lynch, but the subtext of his movies, was that the baby boomers who didn’t protest strongly against the Vietnam War or rebel against the ruling class of the American Empire were much worse nation-wreckers than the ones who did protest the war and the ruling class.

    The baby boomers are the human monsters who will destroy the United States and other European Christian nations. Bill Clinton and George W Bush are the evil baby boomer mutants who could be called Globalizerhead instead of Eraserhead.

    Baby boomer scum George W Bush and Bill Clinton did everything they could to erase the borders of the United States and the sovereignty of the United States. Bill Clinton and George W Bush pushed open borders mass immigration and multiculturalism.

    The baby boomer generation has willingly pushed for the erasure of European Christendom in many different European Christian nations.

    It was the money-grubbing, regular baby boomers who are responsible for the civilizational disaster that is destroying the United States.

    Solution?

    Yep.

    Raise the federal funds rate to 10 percent and implode the asset bubbles in bonds, stocks and real estate and deport 50 million or so of the foreigners who have invaded the United States.

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    • Replies: @Highlander
    I'd be mad as hell and as envious as you are Charles if I too was blocked from promotion out of cubicle-land by boomers who refuse to retire. Hahahahaha!
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  83. Big Bill says:
    @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    I had not realized the dominance of English as a common business language until I watched a cop show TV series produced in Sweden for the Swedish market. The conversation was in Swedish (English subtitles) until the Swedish cops traveled to France tracking down International Dope Dealers.

    When the Swedish cops appeared in Paris, walked into Paris police headquarters and opened their mouths, they instantly started speaking in English. It was startling. Why English and not Swedish or French?

    And then, mirabile dictu, the French cops spoke English right back at them without hesitation. There was no negotiation, no interpreter, no trying to find a common language, no loss of face or “cultural imperialism” by forcing everyone to speak Swedish or French. They immediately switched to English, the international lingua franca (lingua anglais?)

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    • Replies: @Flip
    I've read that French and German Swiss sometimes use English to communicate with each other.
    , @Stan Adams
    And when the Swedish soccer team lost because their token brown player screwed up, they shouted "F**k racism!" (in English).

    What goes through your mind when you see a picture of a group of young Swedish women holding up a big sign (written in English) inviting "refugees" to come on in and make themselves at home? It depresses the hell out of me.

    It's sad to realize that the English tongue is the vector by which destructive ideas such as "White folks are evil racists who must atone for their sins by allowing the dregs of the Third World to invade their homelands" are spreading throughout Europe.
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  84. Big Bill says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Surfing is still popular; what you’re defining as “surfer culture” is really something narrower, and akin to the mid-20th century interest in Hawaii Steve mentions.
     
    Where is Rat Fink these days?

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_kKSxIQK3suQ/TSqTE9Kbn1I/AAAAAAAAAGw/yvhDbO9XyQI/s1600/rat%2Bfink%2Bjoy%2Bride%2Bcartoon.jpg

    Remember?

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    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    The 1963 album My Son the Surf Nut had a cover by teenaged surfer Rick Griffin:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyeI6T5Gg2k
    A few years later he drew the Aoxomoxoa album cover for the Grateful Dead:
    http://www.alexmathews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/aoxomoxoab.jpg
    I’m pretty sure Rick came up with the Aoxomoxoa title. In his comics, the characters were liable to say things like

    WOW GOD DOG!
    MOM,

    or

    E Y E
    A M
    T H E
    I

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  85. 1946 was the year of David Lynch’s birth.

    1930 was the year of Robert Loggia’s birth.

    I’m sorry about that, Pete.

    But tailgating is one thing I cannot tolerate.

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  86. Jack D says:
    @istevefan

    The question is why would you WANT to combat English?
     
    Here is a short essay by a professor in Japan from 1996, on why English should be taught in Japan.

    Since 1996, English has become even more dominant. I recently visited Portugal and almost everyone (100% of those in tourism related industries, which are a big sector of the economy) spoke at least rudimentary English and many spoke it quite well (despite the fact that Portuguese is very different from English). Almost all signage was bi-lingual Portuguese and English. And this was not because there were all that many American (or even British) tourists. Rather, English is the common language that is used by visitors from many different (non-English speaking) countries. There are not enough Danes or Swedes or Norwegians for the Portuguese to learn their language but they can all converse with each other in English.

    Japan (and especially its tourist sectors) I think has been held back by the fact that the Japanese are behind on their English instruction vs. many other countries because you don’t really need to be able to speak English to survive in Japan. In Portugal, even if you wanted to speak only Portuguese, it would be difficult. They only have 10 million people so they don’t have enough to have a complete entertainment industry and rely on sub-titled (not dubbed) Hollywood movies, English rock music, imported products that are not labeled in Portuguese, etc. Whereas Japan is big enough and internally self-sufficient enough that the only English you really have to learn are those words that have made it into Japanese (which are quite a few but the pronunciation is so shifted than an English speaker might not even recognize them as English).

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    • Replies: @Elsewhere

    . . . those words that have made it into Japanese (which are quite a few but the pronunciation is so shifted than an English speaker might not even recognize them as English).
     
    True. This is illustrated quite well in this music video "Makudonarudo" (=McDonald's). HT: Language Log.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    They only have 10 million people so they don’t have enough to have a complete entertainment industry and rely on sub-titled (not dubbed) Hollywood movies, English rock music, imported products that are not labeled in Portuguese, etc.
     
    There are nearly 200 million Brazilians to sell to. And Cape Verdeans. And the elites in their former colonies. Are these people too poor to buy movie tickets?
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  87. Jack D says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    I don't know about you, Jack, but I've lived in places where the rightful, landowning Citizens decided to limit growth with zoning and the preservation of open spaces. They are all nice places. I live in one now. I'm glad my family left Southern California in 1968.

    This is a discussion for a different day, but to be honest I am really not that wild about the way our zoning laws and open space have been used in many places – it’s one more way the Boomers have screwed the younger generations out of having what they had. There are lots of young Americans who can no longer even aspire to home ownership and zoning laws are part of the problem.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Why are the younger generations having a problem buying the properties we had? Don't you think a population that has grown from 200 million to over 330 million might have something to do with it? Most of that growth is immigration.

    No. Zoning laws are not part of the problem. Population is the problem. You need to get away from the laizez-faire feeling that our numbers are just whatever they are going to be. Think environmental biology.

    Yes, property values have gone up nicely where people like me have insisted on limited population through controlled development. This is because others see how nice it is and want to move in -- no different from why people from "shit-hole countries" will want to come to our country until it too becomes a shit hole.

    America is nice and has lots of land, protected by two oceans. Why ruin it by just allowing population to grow unchecked? You know, prices are part of how the market works. They are almost a part of natural law, keeping down the population.

    The deer population where I live has been growing in recent years, bringing ticks, Lyme disease, and eating what we plant. Guess what, last week I watched a New England coyote trot across my property. Last year I watched a cougar do the same thing. They are nature's way of controlling the deer population. We humans are so successful that there are no natural predators to control us. If we do not somehow limit growth ourselves, we will reach Malthusian limits.

    Jack, you and I are lucky to live where we do. Please don't make intellectual excuses for allowing a bunch of people in. Let's shut the damn doors now.

    , @Reg Cæsar

    ...the way our zoning laws and open space have been used in many places – it’s one more way the Boomers have screwed the younger generations out of having what they had.
     
    ¿Que pasa?

    Zoning in LA was already half a century old when our "boomer" Steve was born there. It became damn near universal in two-horse towns after Euclid, Ohio prevailed at the Supreme Court in 1926.

    Indeed, planners talk about "Euclidian" zoning. Sometimes puns have a basis in reality.

    Speaking of blame-boomers-first and real-life puns, read up on Reps Pickle and Pepper and their tug-of-war over Social Security funding some 35 years ago. That's right, Pickle (b. 1913) and Pepper (b. 1900) were already going stale about the time tail-end boomers Barry Obama and Sarah Palin cast their first votes.
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  88. @Jack D
    What would California be like today if there was no '65 Immigration Act? Surely not as crowded as it is now, but not the same as it was in '65 in any case. People from other states would have kept coming for its paradisiacal qualities until the paradise was ruined. Whites would have had more children if conditions for doing so were better. Would the CA high tech economy be so high tech without fresh infusions of foreign tech talent? Maybe without cheap foreign labor (more of) agricultural production would have shifted to Mexico or you would have even more mechanized farming? It's impossible to know exactly what alternate history would be like but I'm not sure that "everything would be wonderful if only those immigrants hadn't come" is really a complete picture.

    Very true. Also the amnesty of 1986 had a bigger effect on the California demographics than the immigration act of 1965 (which kept immigration below 450,000 per year). In 1975 the majority of the 400,000 legal immigrants were still coming from Europe….but by 1986 there were millions of illegal aliens in California, they started a baby boom when granted Amnedty by the GOP in 1986

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  89. @Steve Sailer
    My San Francisco cousins went to an Irish prep school in the 1960s, I think it was the one James Joyce went to. They got extra credit for doing papers in Gaelic. They were always complaining about all the Irish language emphasis.

    My Irish immigrant grandparents met at an Irish language class in Boston MA in the early 20th century. My grandfather from Kerry was the teacher and my grandmother from Limerick was a student. My brother and I were backpacking around Ireland in 1974. I remember early one morning waking from a night of camping out in a west coast town hearing some nearby old fellas talking in a foreign language. I think I was too groggy and not aware that Irish was still a viable language that I at first thought I was hearing Russian. I had heard a lot of Russian in my youth in NY so that was the first thing that popped into my mind. Only after a few moments did it dawn on me that they were speaking Irish. I was embarrassed then and I’m still embarrassed to admit it now.

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  90. @dwb
    Yeah - I live in the Bay Area, and my idea of "Hollister" is the down-market farming town south of San Jose. I had no idea that there is a surfing region in Santa Barbara.

    Whenever I travel and see kids in places decidedly not California wearing "Hollister" brand clothes, I think of "vibrancy" and strawberry picking.
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  91. @Jack D
    This is a discussion for a different day, but to be honest I am really not that wild about the way our zoning laws and open space have been used in many places - it's one more way the Boomers have screwed the younger generations out of having what they had. There are lots of young Americans who can no longer even aspire to home ownership and zoning laws are part of the problem.

    Why are the younger generations having a problem buying the properties we had? Don’t you think a population that has grown from 200 million to over 330 million might have something to do with it? Most of that growth is immigration.

    No. Zoning laws are not part of the problem. Population is the problem. You need to get away from the laizez-faire feeling that our numbers are just whatever they are going to be. Think environmental biology.

    Yes, property values have gone up nicely where people like me have insisted on limited population through controlled development. This is because others see how nice it is and want to move in — no different from why people from “shit-hole countries” will want to come to our country until it too becomes a shit hole.

    America is nice and has lots of land, protected by two oceans. Why ruin it by just allowing population to grow unchecked? You know, prices are part of how the market works. They are almost a part of natural law, keeping down the population.

    The deer population where I live has been growing in recent years, bringing ticks, Lyme disease, and eating what we plant. Guess what, last week I watched a New England coyote trot across my property. Last year I watched a cougar do the same thing. They are nature’s way of controlling the deer population. We humans are so successful that there are no natural predators to control us. If we do not somehow limit growth ourselves, we will reach Malthusian limits.

    Jack, you and I are lucky to live where we do. Please don’t make intellectual excuses for allowing a bunch of people in. Let’s shut the damn doors now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Your argument is - at it's core - about beauty. Natural beauty, too. And aesthetics.
    , @Anonymous
    Nature's way is for predators to prey on the old and sick and make way for the young and fertile. The situation prevailing now artificially propping up asset prices for the wealthy and old people at the expense of younger people obviously is not nature's way. It's profoundly unnatural.
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  92. Anonymous[138] • Disclaimer says:

    Completely off-topic, but very i-Steve

    Inside America’s Richest Self-Made Women

    https://www.forbes.com/self-made-women/#414f6b2f6d96

    I took a quick glance of the bios of the top two women, Diane Hendricks and Marian Ilitch; both co-founded the companies with their late husbands. I continued going through the bios of the top 10 and nearly all had the exact same bio. In other words, the husbands created the companies, but the wives are self-made women because they’re married to these men and had a secondary role at the companies’ founding

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  93. @DFH
    Non-whites must be getting desperate if they really want access to taigs

    DFH how are the shitty little rangers getting on ya wee hun bar steward. Spoke like a ugly orange turd who will soon be the minority in the north. Get it right up ya ya orange knob

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  94. Hemid says:

    The last famous guy who was a surfer was GenX SoCal Jew “Perry Farrell,” leader of Jane’s Addiction, the last true “rock star” band that really seemed unlike us (even to those of use who knew them), aristocratically distant from and royally above the audience like Led Zeppelin and the Beatles were.

    Steve’s a little too old to know, I think. But to me they’re the end of Old California.

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    • Replies: @black sea

    Steve’s a little too old to know, I think. But to me they’re [Jane's Addiction] the end of Old California.
     
    Perry Farrell -- the lead singer of Jane's Addiction -- and Steve are, as it turns out, the same age.
    , @Anon
    What about Eddie Vedder?
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  95. Elsewhere says:
    @Jack D
    Since 1996, English has become even more dominant. I recently visited Portugal and almost everyone (100% of those in tourism related industries, which are a big sector of the economy) spoke at least rudimentary English and many spoke it quite well (despite the fact that Portuguese is very different from English). Almost all signage was bi-lingual Portuguese and English. And this was not because there were all that many American (or even British) tourists. Rather, English is the common language that is used by visitors from many different (non-English speaking) countries. There are not enough Danes or Swedes or Norwegians for the Portuguese to learn their language but they can all converse with each other in English.

    Japan (and especially its tourist sectors) I think has been held back by the fact that the Japanese are behind on their English instruction vs. many other countries because you don't really need to be able to speak English to survive in Japan. In Portugal, even if you wanted to speak only Portuguese, it would be difficult. They only have 10 million people so they don't have enough to have a complete entertainment industry and rely on sub-titled (not dubbed) Hollywood movies, English rock music, imported products that are not labeled in Portuguese, etc. Whereas Japan is big enough and internally self-sufficient enough that the only English you really have to learn are those words that have made it into Japanese (which are quite a few but the pronunciation is so shifted than an English speaker might not even recognize them as English).

    . . . those words that have made it into Japanese (which are quite a few but the pronunciation is so shifted than an English speaker might not even recognize them as English).

    True. This is illustrated quite well in this music video “Makudonarudo” (=McDonald’s). HT: Language Log.

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  96. @Cagey Beast
    OT:

    When the Austrian Foreign Minister Congratulates Jean Raspail
    11/07/2018 07:17

    Jean Raspail, who celebrated his birthday this July 4th -- 93 years on the counter -- was given a surprise telephone call from Karin Kneissl, the Austrian Minister of Foreign Affairs.

    We learned of this from Le Figaro (09/07/18). Madame Kneissl went on to thank Jean Raspail for his novel, The Camp of the Saints, which came out in 1973 and presents the sudden invasion of Europe by a mass of migrants. The minister also expressed a particular interest in the preface to the new edition of the novel, in which Jean Raspail created the concept of the "Big Other", the domineering Other.

    Karin Kneissl was named Foreign Minister in December 2017 in the government led by Sebastian Kurz, as an independent person proposed by the FPÖ. After her brilliant studies, this diplomat worked in the Foreign Ministry before launching a career as an independent journalist. Karin Kneissl is best known for the positions she has taken on immigration.
    .....

     

    https://www.breizh-info.com/2018/07/11/99344/ministre-affaires-etrangeres-autrichienne-kneissl-felicite-jean-raspail

    What utterly magnificent news.
    I’ve been thinking of moving to Austria to spend my twilight years (or months … you never know), and this only strengthens what is fast becoming a resolve.
    Britain is falling apart fast, and the prospect of a Trotskyite government under Corbin (a distinct possibility) is just too much for these old bones.

    If only I could believe that it will last.

    Those of you who read French should take a look at Sire, about the restored and legitimate monarch who will one day save France, and then L’Anneau du Pecheur, about the true line of popes (and boy do we need them now).

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  97. Anon7 says:

    What destroyed the California of the 1950′s?

    California had its own version of Canada’s Century Initiative, which is a plan to increase Canada’s population from its current 35 million to 100 million by 2100. (The problem is that there is just too much of Canada, and what there is isn’t very likable real estate. I don’t think it will work.)

    However, in 1945 there were 9 million people in California; now there are 40 million. They outdid Canada’s globalists – that’s a 4-1 increase by century’s end.

    There was just too much money to be made in real estate in California, owing to 1) extreme desirability and 2) extreme scarcity. I often tell people that California is about 600 miles long and ten or twenty miles wide; that’s perfect for developers.

    Also, there are parts of interior California where fortunes could be made growing crops. But in that time, you needed a LOT of hands to pick those crops. And they didn’t call on European immigrants, they took a short cut to Mexico. And a lot of those people stayed; many of them built the houses, shingled the roofs, put out the sod on all those millions of houses. And had lots of kids. And invited in their relatives. Mexico did not send their best.

    Since 1990, California has spent more than a trillion dollars on welfare. If you want more of something, subsidize it; now California has one-third of the USA’s welfare recipients.

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    • Replies: @Grumpy
    Your comment reminded me of this short C-SPAN interview with Fresno writer Mark Arax about (among other things) agriculture in California's San Juaquin Valley. He says, "We basically imported a whole lower class."

    https://www.c-span.org/video/?423503-1/conversation-mark-arax
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  98. @Achmed E. Newman
    A good friend of mine has always maintained that the best period/place to have been on this earth is 1950's California. I might go for 1960's northern CA (I mean well north of the bay) vs. his '50's SoCal, but that's a good choice to have (in your dreams).

    I pulled up your article and look forward to reading the rest of it later on.

    "They called it Paradise. I don't know why .. you call some place Paradise ... and kiss it goodbye."

    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.

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    • Replies: @Alfa158
    The only downside was the horrible air in the Los Angeles basin. I remember a summer morning when I was on a bench waiting for the bus near USC. I was looking down the street and in only about 10 minutes the visibility shrank about three blocks as the brown photochemical smog materialized. If it wasn’t for that most of SoCal was paradise, and I have to emphasize most. Watts was already like today’s Detroit only with the buildings still there.
    , @Highlander
    (sigh...)
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Yeah, the shame of what's happening to California is not just that the culture is being destroyed, but that it's also the State with the most varied beautiful landscapes that can be found anywhere. I remember noting that one could camp out in a different type of environment about every weekend of the year. Too many people (think China) will destroy lots of that beauty anyway, but when you import a culture that doesn't have any respect for it also (think Latin American and Chinese), what do you expect to happen?

    If you read my blog post, you know how I feel about it anyway.
    , @JMcG
    Well done, sir. That was lovely, and sad.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    There were purple sea urchins, too, in those Laguna tide pools. You could drop a pebble and the urchin would close up around it. Cool stuff for a little kid. There was a field at the end of our street in Huntington where you could catch frogs. Imagine that.
    , @PiltdownMan
    Thank you.

    There are a few non-commercial video clips on YouTube from that time. It is striking, from the perspective of 2018, how spacious places in California were when the population was 10 million (1950) or 15 million (1960) rather than the 40 million it is today.

    For every four bodies walking around now, there was only one then, and it was almost definitely that of a Caucasian American.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwh8WkfnDZA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RgY2rdrauM

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  99. Anon7 says:

    Cali real estate stories abound; my favorite is about a couple of friends of ours who bought a regular 4 bedroom house in Cali in 1980 for about $100K.

    In 1990, they sold it for $1 million; since they didn’t want to lose their money to capital gains, when they moved back to the midwest they bought a 240 acre farm just outside of town and built a palatial 5 bedroom, 4200 square foot house on a little piece of it.

    When they retire, they will stop renting out the 235 acres they aren’t using to local farmers and sell out to a developer. Who will put 235 houses on one-acre lots. One acre lots in this area are selling for $150K apiece. You do the math.

    As Bruce Willis once said, “F***ing California!”

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  100. @JohnnyWalker123
    Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there's been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren't into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-YsN0y7vZI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYoK-VSuvL0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJb2MrZFjBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOrOMuo-9o

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the "Cohens") with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9paPT4iuC4

    We live in a much more competitive resource scarce society then we did in the post ww2 period. That includes taking time off to indulge in travel or pass time activities. College used to be considered a birthright and if someone took off a couple of years to ‘experiment’ then they did and then got back into some sort of career path. There is now a squeeze with hoards of “grinds” at the top doing anything they can to get ahead while easy jobs are either being eliminated or saved for the kind of people who don’t surf. A lifestyle of working to live is becoming thing of the past and even taking time for a family is a luxury.

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  101. I come from an Upper Midwest bad white viewpoint where surfing is a spring break thing. My 16 year old daughter is convinced that with her laguna beach tunnel hustler car stickers and Thalia surf shop t-shirts she has won relative to the great unwashed Ron Jon multitudes. Southern California may not be all it once was, but surfing and the beach still captures the teen age mind.

    https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&biw=1190&bih=521&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=QlxGW7HYLoH5wALK66SoDA&q=laguna+beach+tunnel+hustler+sticker&oq=laguna+beach+tunnel+hustler+sticker&gs_l=img.3…21367.24209.0.25262.8.8.0.0.0.0.204.1313.0j7j1.8.0….0…1.1.64.img..0.0.0….0.JmzXl_iYb9Y

    https://www.google.com/search?rlz=1C1GGRV_enUS751US751&biw=1190&bih=521&tbm=isch&sa=1&ei=XFxGW6PFI47ewAKn_624DA&q=Thalia+surf+shop+t+shirts&oq=Thalia+surf+shop+t+shirts&gs_l=img.3…747895.767873.0.769442.27.26.1.0.0.0.206.4481.0j24j2.26.0….0…1.1.64.img..0.19.3138…0j35i39k1j0i67k1j0i30k1j0i5i30k1j0i24k1j0i8i30k1.0.7mSjY2A_s2E

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  102. Alfa158 says:
    @Old Palo Altan
    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.

    The only downside was the horrible air in the Los Angeles basin. I remember a summer morning when I was on a bench waiting for the bus near USC. I was looking down the street and in only about 10 minutes the visibility shrank about three blocks as the brown photochemical smog materialized. If it wasn’t for that most of SoCal was paradise, and I have to emphasize most. Watts was already like today’s Detroit only with the buildings still there.

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  103. @Mishima Zaibatsu
    O/T — Here we go. It’s the same in every white country.

    Irish-speaking schools far less likely to have overseas students
    Irish Times

    Irish-speaking schools are significantly less likely to have non-Irish national students than other schools, new figures show.

    A Department of Education analysis of school enrolment for 2015/2016 shows non-Irish nationals accounted for 10.6 per cent of pupils in primary education. By contrast, among all-Irish primary schools, this fell to 1.6 per cent. A similar pattern is repeated at second level.

    The statistics are likely to be seized on by critics who claim Gaelscoileanna use soft barriers such as Irish-language admission rules which end up excluding foreign nationals or minority groups.

    ...

    Caoimhín Ó hEaghra, the patron body’s general secretary, said the figures for all-Irish schools include those in more peripheral Gaeltacht areas which have not experienced an influx of newcomers.

    He said a survey conducted among its non-Gaeltacht schools earlier this year indicated that 9.6 per cent of its students were from an “other background”.

    It defines this as as a student who themselves or at least one parent were from another country.

    Gaelscoileanna, along with multidenominational schools, have surged in popularity in recent years with more than a third oversubscribed.

    ...

     

    The struggle to secure non-whites the basic human right of unfettered access to white people must go on.

    Mish, I grew up in Buffalo on the edge of Polonia and went to an all boys Catholic HS after attending Catholic grade school. If the nuns and priests could have taught us in Latin they would have. Many of my HS classmates attended all polish grammar schools where they were taught, to some degree, in Polish. Their accents were so “tick dat you cud cut dem wid a nif.” Loveable guys though, and after a few years their accents had phased out. I don’t think their parents minded that no non Poles attended school with them.

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  104. @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    Hap, I was born in 1946, turned 18 in my senior year of HS and registered for the draft as the law required. I was surprised that I was sent for a physical the same day. I also had to take an IQ (?) test. The classified me 1-A and after scoring my test asked me if I was interested in OCS. Shit, I was only interested in graduating and finding a date for the prom. Married at 19, while in college, yeah, you know, one child soon after, very soon and I graduated in 68 from college and was still classified 1A. Guess I was lucky, never applied for any deferments.

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  105. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?
     
    Unlike the golf courses, the seabed may be prone to all being knocked around again by the ocean, even after a bunch of precision work on it. I'm neither an oceanographer nor geologist, but I'd figure the waves and currents may put things back just the way they were before, unless some jetties were built to change things. I'm sure you've seen the projects to augment the beach in LA areas (certain places I mean), as some places gain sand and some lose it, but property owners and realtors want it to stay JUST WTF IT WAS! Haha, nature doesn't care about your investments.

    With modern computer simulations though, maybe some engineers could make a model of what it would take not only to make the waves break as desired (the EASY part) but what the landscape must look like to KEEP IT that way.

    Or, we can just set up some huge caissons, pave it all in concrete, let the ocean back in, and require all surfers to wear helmets and padding. No more of that cowboying by guys like Jeff Spicolli. Surfing Regulation Now! Before we lose one more child to the waves!

    Nothing against the Beach Boy's surfing songs, but this Jan&Dean classic fits in just as well with the post.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ERrwjR4ZlfI

    I’d think with advances in computer modeling and 3-D printing, it should be pretty doable today. Model the reef, print it in concrete in sections on a barge, with steel spikes on the bottom, and lower it in place.

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  106. @Steve Sailer
    Tiki bars are back recently.

    My impression is that surf clothes brands like Hollister (named after a surf region out past Santa Barbara) were big about a decade ago, and Abercrombie and Fitch was heavily into surf styles back then. But not these days.

    One of Buffalo’s best party bars in the 60s was a Tiki bar in Williamsville, at the edge of farm country. Lots of bamboo, a small bridge over a faux stream and dark booths. Lots of exotic drinks, some in coconut shell and most featuring those tiny umbrellas. Most food was serves as kabobs. I think it was replaced by a TGI Fridays, which had walls and rafters covered in garage sale chic. Old pedal car? Got that. Rowing shell ? Got that. Miss those days a little.

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    • Replies: @JMcG
    Joe,
    I spent some nights in the summer of ‘73 in a tiki bar in the (barely) west of Ireland. It was actually called the Kon-Tiki; that’s how tiki it was. The band played on a little raft in the middle of a tiny pond inside the pub itself.
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  107. @Anon7
    Here’s the clip you want ;-)

    The 1966 Movie “The Endless Summer”

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=yZsuQXKkPdw

    Its title comes from the idea, expressed at both the beginning and end of the film, that if one had enough time and money it would be possible to follow the summer up and down the world (northern to southern hemisphere and back), making it endless.

    Anon, Best movie with “Summer” in the title…”Summer of 42′” featuring a memorable, almost non forgettable theme song.

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  108. @Stan d Mute
    So, leftists and boomers are hypocrites? Who knew?

    But seriously, it’s the same dynamic with every obsession like hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, water skiing, birding, photography, etc. And while your article teaches nothing to those who jealously guard the prime hunting spots and who are red-pilled, it may help awaken others who haven’t thought clearly on the subject. The tragedy thus is that it’s published in Takimag rather than something with far wider circulation.

    Have you ever considered writing something like this for specialty pubs like hunting, fishing, skiing, or surfing mags?

    Stan, The writers for Outdoors Life, Hunting and Fishing magazines of my youth could connect you with the writers experience even if you only visited a woods or fished on a lake occasionally. Are there surfer magazines ?

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  109. @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    This is just a quibble, Jack, and is not an argument against your entire comment, but come on, you wonder why the French don’t sell more of the ugliest cars every known to man?

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  110. manton says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    About 100 miles off San Diego there is a natural rise in the ocean floor called Cortes Bank. It’s basically a submerged Channel Island. Winter storms far to the east and north can send waves across thousands of miles and when they hit the Bank, they rise up high. Surfers will watch the weather forecasts and boat out there when conditions are right. You can go out there on boats to watch them. It’s pretty cool.

    When I was in high school and obsessed with the Navy, the captain of the nuclear carrier Enterprise whacked the Bank and had to take the ship to San Francisco, where she was in drydock for months under repairs. The dock was in Hunter’s Point right by Candlestick, so I saw the ship often.

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  111. @Achmed E. Newman
    A good friend of mine has always maintained that the best period/place to have been on this earth is 1950's California. I might go for 1960's northern CA (I mean well north of the bay) vs. his '50's SoCal, but that's a good choice to have (in your dreams).

    I pulled up your article and look forward to reading the rest of it later on.

    "They called it Paradise. I don't know why .. you call some place Paradise ... and kiss it goodbye."

    Ach, My wife moved, with some girl friends, to San Francisco in the 60s, reasonable living and beau coup jobs. She says it was the greatest place to be, Ever ! She lived in Haight-Ashbury for a while, but our kids turned out ok, they each have ten fingers and ten toes, but not evenly distributed. Visited California a lot when we were first married, shame what has happen to that state in the last couple of decades.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL about the toes - I guess the OB's aren't required to do anything but get an overall count. In my blog post I linked to above, I was mentioning how California was the place to go to get rid of your old life and start completely new, whether a new career, newly divorced, sick of life, whatever. Drugs didn't have to be a part of it. Sex with Joni Mitchell was probably a part of plan A for lots of guys, though. I'd settle for just a Jim Rockford single-wide, but up a few miles into a canyon, with any one of the "Ladies of the Canyon":

    "Don't it always seem to go,
    you don't know what you've got till it's gone."


    Perfect epitaph for the late great state of Californ-eye-ay:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgMEPk6fvpg
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  112. @Shingas the Terrible
    Unfortunately, that culture as well as motorcycle culture is dying with the boomers. You can’t rip apart a modern car and customize it yourself in a backyard garage with a blowtorch like an old car with a big block V8.

    Same with the MC culture. It’s geriatric. Go to any bike night and if you see anyone riding in under 30, it’s a miracle. Maybe the gen z kids will resurrect it, because unlike modern cars, working on bikes (real bikes, like Harley and Triumph) is still very much a DIY thing and affordable. By then, the market will be glutted with cheap used bikes sitting in garages that belonged to old boomers that their kids don’t want.

    Shing, I used to facilitate a local car event sponsored by the “Tri Five Car Club,” featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

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    • Replies: @Shingas the Terrible
    It’s a rich man’s hobby now, since the cars and the engines are now museum pieces, and you can’t wander down to the local junkyard and find parts.

    I’ve thought motorcycles might appeal to a new generation when they rediscover life by rejecting smartphones and video games and leftist cultural sterility, and in the cafe racer/cheap Harley subculture, a perfect match for a revived youth trend that rejects black cultural fetishes and behavior. They can pick up a used bone stock Harley Sportster or Triumph’s Thruxton or Speedmaster for as low as $2500, and do all kinds of chopping and bobbing yourself with some like minded buddies, and turn young ladies heads by doing their own thing instead of aping black culture. Us Gen X bikers would love to see an infusion of fresh blood. I’m tired of being the youngest biker around at age 42 on a Harley. Of course, that means these kids would have to unplug from the electronic teat and actually go outside, so I’m not holding my breath...

    , @Anon
    the “Tri Five Car Club,” featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

    In the late '70s, I bought my first car at age 15, a year before I could get my license - a '69 Camaro for $300, and worked on it until it was ready for the streets. Nearly all my friends and peers did the same thing. We'd race our street-legal muscle cars at New England Dragway on Wednesday nights. I received some accolades by turning a 14:00 flat.
    , @danand

    "Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more."
     
    Don't know about that Buffalo. I attend ~20 classic/hot rod shows up here in the SF Bay Area every year. In general the shows are more numerous, with greater attendance, as the years go by.

    But I would agree the cars of interest have shifted. Those from the '60's and early 70's are as popular as ever. And a vast array of late models are out at the shows. As enjoyable as the classic cars are to look at, these late models with added superchargers and computer tuning literally "blow the doors off" those classics. Heck a Camry will take most classics light to light; and happen to roll up on the ubiquitous Tesla "fuhgeddaboudit".

    Those Tri Five Chevys, '55-'57, do seem to have fallen out of favor. I guess guys born in Steve's magical year of '46, ~10 year olds when those Chevy came out; are now slowly fading towards irrelevance?
    , @JMcG
    I’m in a race against time Joe. I’m hoping 60’s Triumph motorcycles and Luger pistols get cheap enough in time for me to enjoy them before I roll a seven.
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  113. MBlanc46 says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    It was indeed a serious drawback.

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  114. @Buzz Mohawk
    Why are the younger generations having a problem buying the properties we had? Don't you think a population that has grown from 200 million to over 330 million might have something to do with it? Most of that growth is immigration.

    No. Zoning laws are not part of the problem. Population is the problem. You need to get away from the laizez-faire feeling that our numbers are just whatever they are going to be. Think environmental biology.

    Yes, property values have gone up nicely where people like me have insisted on limited population through controlled development. This is because others see how nice it is and want to move in -- no different from why people from "shit-hole countries" will want to come to our country until it too becomes a shit hole.

    America is nice and has lots of land, protected by two oceans. Why ruin it by just allowing population to grow unchecked? You know, prices are part of how the market works. They are almost a part of natural law, keeping down the population.

    The deer population where I live has been growing in recent years, bringing ticks, Lyme disease, and eating what we plant. Guess what, last week I watched a New England coyote trot across my property. Last year I watched a cougar do the same thing. They are nature's way of controlling the deer population. We humans are so successful that there are no natural predators to control us. If we do not somehow limit growth ourselves, we will reach Malthusian limits.

    Jack, you and I are lucky to live where we do. Please don't make intellectual excuses for allowing a bunch of people in. Let's shut the damn doors now.

    Your argument is – at it’s core – about beauty. Natural beauty, too. And aesthetics.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Thank you. I think you understand.

    It seems that there are many among us who, though bright, lack that appreciation. Maybe they have never lived that way and don't recognize what we have. They speak as if our land is infinite and our population can go on growing forever.

    Their argument that their unfortunate children will not be able to afford property is only valid if we do not control the growth of our population. If our numbers are stable, there is no reason at all that each generation cannot take its place where the former lived.

    They don't seem to understand this, and they seem comfortable living in a beehive of never-ending population growth and demands.

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  115. Flip says:
    @Big Bill
    I had not realized the dominance of English as a common business language until I watched a cop show TV series produced in Sweden for the Swedish market. The conversation was in Swedish (English subtitles) until the Swedish cops traveled to France tracking down International Dope Dealers.

    When the Swedish cops appeared in Paris, walked into Paris police headquarters and opened their mouths, they instantly started speaking in English. It was startling. Why English and not Swedish or French?

    And then, mirabile dictu, the French cops spoke English right back at them without hesitation. There was no negotiation, no interpreter, no trying to find a common language, no loss of face or "cultural imperialism" by forcing everyone to speak Swedish or French. They immediately switched to English, the international lingua franca (lingua anglais?)

    I’ve read that French and German Swiss sometimes use English to communicate with each other.

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  116. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:

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  117. @Buffalo Joe
    Shing, I used to facilitate a local car event sponsored by the "Tri Five Car Club," featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

    It’s a rich man’s hobby now, since the cars and the engines are now museum pieces, and you can’t wander down to the local junkyard and find parts.

    I’ve thought motorcycles might appeal to a new generation when they rediscover life by rejecting smartphones and video games and leftist cultural sterility, and in the cafe racer/cheap Harley subculture, a perfect match for a revived youth trend that rejects black cultural fetishes and behavior. They can pick up a used bone stock Harley Sportster or Triumph’s Thruxton or Speedmaster for as low as $2500, and do all kinds of chopping and bobbing yourself with some like minded buddies, and turn young ladies heads by doing their own thing instead of aping black culture. Us Gen X bikers would love to see an infusion of fresh blood. I’m tired of being the youngest biker around at age 42 on a Harley. Of course, that means these kids would have to unplug from the electronic teat and actually go outside, so I’m not holding my breath…

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  118. @Steve Sailer
    Does anybody yet shove undersea formations around to get better waves?

    Golf course architects started building artificial greens like the Road Hole at St. Andrews around 1840. Charles Blair Macdonald built his artificial sand dunes Lido course on Long Island about 1914.

    I gather the Kirra surf break in Australia has been restored after it got ruined by some work. And there are a few inland wholly artificial surf parks. But does anybody try to artificially build a great wave offshore?

    The Army Corps of Engineers. Years ago I remember hearing that they at least once dredged Torrance/Redondo Beach for better waves. Indeed, in my youth I remember those breaks being much better than they are now.

    I can’t find any documentation, but here is something about them doing the same in NJ.

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  119. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    Why are the younger generations having a problem buying the properties we had? Don't you think a population that has grown from 200 million to over 330 million might have something to do with it? Most of that growth is immigration.

    No. Zoning laws are not part of the problem. Population is the problem. You need to get away from the laizez-faire feeling that our numbers are just whatever they are going to be. Think environmental biology.

    Yes, property values have gone up nicely where people like me have insisted on limited population through controlled development. This is because others see how nice it is and want to move in -- no different from why people from "shit-hole countries" will want to come to our country until it too becomes a shit hole.

    America is nice and has lots of land, protected by two oceans. Why ruin it by just allowing population to grow unchecked? You know, prices are part of how the market works. They are almost a part of natural law, keeping down the population.

    The deer population where I live has been growing in recent years, bringing ticks, Lyme disease, and eating what we plant. Guess what, last week I watched a New England coyote trot across my property. Last year I watched a cougar do the same thing. They are nature's way of controlling the deer population. We humans are so successful that there are no natural predators to control us. If we do not somehow limit growth ourselves, we will reach Malthusian limits.

    Jack, you and I are lucky to live where we do. Please don't make intellectual excuses for allowing a bunch of people in. Let's shut the damn doors now.

    Nature’s way is for predators to prey on the old and sick and make way for the young and fertile. The situation prevailing now artificially propping up asset prices for the wealthy and old people at the expense of younger people obviously is not nature’s way. It’s profoundly unnatural.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    You are completely wrong when the population is balanced. Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die. Your point only makes sense in an infinitely growing population.

    Example: I inherited my family home when my father died. There is minimum two-acre zoning there and has been since my parents built our house in 1972. There are also huge mountain parks owned by the people. The population there is stable, with young families moving in when older people like my father leave. What, exactly is wrong with that, and what is keeping each new generation from replacing the old? Nothing.

    Where I live now has minimum three-acre zoning. We have a thriving community where new families with young children buy homes and move in all the time, mixed in with retired people.

    Americans will either "zone" their country and limit growth, or their descendants will live in a place that resembles India.

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  120. In The Life and Death of Great American Cities, Jane Jacobs claimed that Los Angeles had the highest murder rate in the country at the time. And she did not portray this as a surprising statistic – she talked as if this was a widely known fact, the way that today would one talk about Chicago or Detroit or St. Louis. Is that accurate?

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  121. Anon[349] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Shing, I used to facilitate a local car event sponsored by the "Tri Five Car Club," featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

    the “Tri Five Car Club,” featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

    In the late ’70s, I bought my first car at age 15, a year before I could get my license – a ’69 Camaro for $300, and worked on it until it was ready for the streets. Nearly all my friends and peers did the same thing. We’d race our street-legal muscle cars at New England Dragway on Wednesday nights. I received some accolades by turning a 14:00 flat.

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    • Replies: @danand

    In the late ’70s, I bought my first car at age 15, a year before I could get my license – a ’69 Camaro for $300, and worked on it until it was ready for the streets. Nearly all my friends and peers did the same thing. We’d race our street-legal muscle cars at New England Dragway on Wednesday nights. I received some accolades by turning a 14:00 flat.
     
    #349, Thanks for posting, brings back memories.

    Similar story, late '70's, up here in the SF Bay Area. But it was a $400 '65 Mustang fastback (11 months to street ready), our Wednesday track was in Fremont over in the East Bay, and we were thrilled when the 1st of our group broke 13.9!


    My wife bought me a new Mustang in '14. On a lark went up to Sonoma Raceway (now the Bay Area's nearest): clicked of an easy 12.93, no wrenching, and no sense of accomplishment. But still a fun throwback outing.
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  122. @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    Of course the same administration (LBJ) that gave us the Vietnam debacle also sowed the seeds that led to the decline of the good life of California with the Immigration Act of 1965. Sure the population would’ve still gone up as from where it was back then through the internal migration of Americans spellbound by life in the Golden land, but I doubt it would be the crowded 40 million of today.

    The Boomers had a CA with low housing costs and mostly “nice” neighborhoods, (sure there were some sketchy spots even then like Watts) but any Millennial who wants to live there now can be expected to cough up half a million just for a simple 2 bed ranch in a decent area. Mass Third World immigration has driven up housing costs not only by increasing general housing demand but also by reducing the number of desirable areas available in the state. Compare the San Fernando Valley of the 1950s with today…

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    • Replies: @Anonymous

    Mass Third World immigration has driven up housing costs not only by increasing general housing demand but also by reducing the number of desirable areas available
     
    That's an important and valuable insight.
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  123. danand says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Shing, I used to facilitate a local car event sponsored by the "Tri Five Car Club," featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

    “Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.”

    Don’t know about that Buffalo. I attend ~20 classic/hot rod shows up here in the SF Bay Area every year. In general the shows are more numerous, with greater attendance, as the years go by.

    But I would agree the cars of interest have shifted. Those from the ’60′s and early 70′s are as popular as ever. And a vast array of late models are out at the shows. As enjoyable as the classic cars are to look at, these late models with added superchargers and computer tuning literally “blow the doors off” those classics. Heck a Camry will take most classics light to light; and happen to roll up on the ubiquitous Tesla “fuhgeddaboudit”.

    Those Tri Five Chevys, ’55-’57, do seem to have fallen out of favor. I guess guys born in Steve’s magical year of ’46, ~10 year olds when those Chevy came out; are now slowly fading towards irrelevance?

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Dan, sigh, this irrelevant guy was born in '46.
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  124. @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    The biggest problem with the English language is the culture that comes with it. I only know two languages: my native English and French. Via the web and broadcast media, I eavesdrop on the flow of cultural and political chatter in both languages.

    It’s hard to describe how much more crass, sour, bitchy and needling the English language content is, when compared to the French. Francophones are hardly reaching new heights at the moment but they’re still far more pleasant and interesting to hear from than Americans, Brits or Anglo Canadians. From the little I can pick up, the Russians better than the Anglophones as well. I don’t think the Anglosphericals realize just how weird and repellent they’ve become.

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  125. Philip says:

    Best year to be born 1937. Avoid all wars. Climb the corporate,college or government ladder easily.

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    "Best year to be born 1937. Avoid all wars. Climb the corporate,college or government ladder easily."

    I remember hearing one of my great-grandfathers say that being born in 1900 served him very well in life. He just missed the World War I draft, climbed the corporate ladder in the Roaring Twenties (and was well enough established to make it through the Great Depression relatively unscathed), was over the age for the World War II draft, had a nice late stage career during the prosperous 1950's, and retired in the late 1960's when most corporations still had generous pensions. His only bit of hardship was in the last several years before he died in 1990, as by then his once-generous pension didn't amount to much and his Social Security wasn't too high because his lifetime earnings were modest by contemporary standards.
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  126. herp derp says:

    yeah, surfing is over. like many other things mostly only europeans were into, it’s gone from the national consciousness and is never coming back. the other groups don’t surf much. a lot of stuff like that will happen over the next couple decades. entire subcultures will disappear, never to return.

    Point Break, on the other hand, is forever.

    Have you ever fired your gun up in the air and gone ‘Ah’?

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  127. boomstick says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there's been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren't into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-YsN0y7vZI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYoK-VSuvL0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJb2MrZFjBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOrOMuo-9o

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the "Cohens") with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9paPT4iuC4

    In the 90′s there was a small, active surf music movement. It was reasonably popular. The Heartbreakers (minus Tom Petty) did an album as the Blue Stingrays. I think they did a disguised concert.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Thanks for the recommendation. I was reminded of these guys:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmU3FYlRZNM
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  128. herp derp says:

    this track from from 1994 is one of the last surfing related things i remember encountering.

    Weezer – Surf Wax America

    even then it seemed kind of late. and that was 24 years ago.

    from their first, and only good album.

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  129. @boomstick
    In the 90's there was a small, active surf music movement. It was reasonably popular. The Heartbreakers (minus Tom Petty) did an album as the Blue Stingrays. I think they did a disguised concert.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=5gkForsLdWU

    Thanks for the recommendation. I was reminded of these guys:

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    • Replies: @boomstick
    The Mermen were the other band I was trying to recall. Not famous, but they had some nice CDs if you wanted to listen while coding.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aNYf_kznDU
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  130. snorlax says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Tiki bars are back recently.

    My impression is that surf clothes brands like Hollister (named after a surf region out past Santa Barbara) were big about a decade ago, and Abercrombie and Fitch was heavily into surf styles back then. But not these days.

    There was a big “extreme sports” fad (skateboarding, snowboarding, surfing, BMX, motocross, etc) in the 90′s and 00′s.

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  131. @Jack D
    The question is why would you WANT to combat English? English is the lingua franca of the modern world so if your nation happens to speak English already this puts you automatically ahead in the economic sweepstakes. One of the reasons that the Irish economy has done well in recent decades is BECAUSE they speak English - why would you want to ruin that?

    Those who push some other language are shooting their nations in the foot for cheap nationalistic reasons. Montreal was once the business capital of Canada but once they started pushing the whole French only thing, all of the corporate headquarters decamped for Toronto. If you compare the German vs the French economies (and English skills), I don't think that the French have done themselves any favors by their (past) reluctance to learn English. Compare the # of Mercedes and BMWs and VWs sold in the US vs Peugeots and Renaults and Citroens (exactly zero). Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    Isolating yourself in a local language bubble may be culturally glorious but it is economically dubious.

    You sound like a globalist. “National cultural boundaries are an impediment to the free movement of capital, and they must be abolished! Money uber alles! The precious cash must flow!”

    The economic argument works both ways. One of the rationales for offshoring jobs to India is that “They all speak English! They’re part of the Anglosphere!”

    Monolingualism goes hand-in-hand with universalistic altruism. Once you allow outsiders to invade your cultural and lingustic landscape, you are much less inclined to exclude them from your physical environs.

    The Tower of Babel is a house of cards.

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    • Agree: Cagey Beast
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  132. @black sea

    Surfboarding is not a way of life. People are free to think it is because the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts. People who make a life of surfboarding are living off other people. They're leeches of the affluent society. They're parasites of a parasite.
     
    --Wendell Berry

    Surfboarding is not a way of life.

    –Wendell Berry

    Well, no, Wendell, not in Kentucky. Riding horses is not a way of life, either, on SoCal beaches, unless you’re Bo Derek.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL
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  133. Ian M. says:
    @Alec Leamas
    I boarded at an Irish secondary school in Dublin in the 1990s and by then every Irish born pupil was required to take classes in the Irish language. The classes were universally loathed by schoolboys. The stated purpose was to bring the language back from the brink of extinction. Perhaps it has worked on a localized basis. There were a few boarders from Kerry who were native speakers/bilingual from birth though.

    I was in Dingle back in May, and the locals I talked to there all spoke Irish as their first language (though of course all were fluent in English as well). I went to a mass there, and the sermon was in English, but nearly all of the rest of it was in Gaelic, including the Scripture readings.

    Also, all the signs there (throughout Ireland, not just Kerry County) are in both English and Gaelic.

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    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    Also, all the signs there (throughout Ireland, not just Kerry County) are in both English and Gaelic.
     
    I think the conspicuous labeling of places and things in Irish all over started well before many of the Irish regained much facility in the language. It was part of the program to bring the language back from extinction. I suppose it makes sense, because after a generation of compulsory Irish classes in schools it seems natural.

    I think Kerry may have had the highest proportion of native Irish speakers, so it is not typical in that regard.
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  134. @Big Bill
    I had not realized the dominance of English as a common business language until I watched a cop show TV series produced in Sweden for the Swedish market. The conversation was in Swedish (English subtitles) until the Swedish cops traveled to France tracking down International Dope Dealers.

    When the Swedish cops appeared in Paris, walked into Paris police headquarters and opened their mouths, they instantly started speaking in English. It was startling. Why English and not Swedish or French?

    And then, mirabile dictu, the French cops spoke English right back at them without hesitation. There was no negotiation, no interpreter, no trying to find a common language, no loss of face or "cultural imperialism" by forcing everyone to speak Swedish or French. They immediately switched to English, the international lingua franca (lingua anglais?)

    And when the Swedish soccer team lost because their token brown player screwed up, they shouted “F**k racism!” (in English).

    What goes through your mind when you see a picture of a group of young Swedish women holding up a big sign (written in English) inviting “refugees” to come on in and make themselves at home? It depresses the hell out of me.

    It’s sad to realize that the English tongue is the vector by which destructive ideas such as “White folks are evil racists who must atone for their sins by allowing the dregs of the Third World to invade their homelands” are spreading throughout Europe.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    Good points. Would the Germans and Swedes be less racially gormless if they hadn't been marinating in American pop culture for the last seventy years? I think so.

    The English language is now a civilizational disease vector, more than anything. Hopefully that will change in the decades to come but it's still true now.

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  135. @Jack D
    Since 1996, English has become even more dominant. I recently visited Portugal and almost everyone (100% of those in tourism related industries, which are a big sector of the economy) spoke at least rudimentary English and many spoke it quite well (despite the fact that Portuguese is very different from English). Almost all signage was bi-lingual Portuguese and English. And this was not because there were all that many American (or even British) tourists. Rather, English is the common language that is used by visitors from many different (non-English speaking) countries. There are not enough Danes or Swedes or Norwegians for the Portuguese to learn their language but they can all converse with each other in English.

    Japan (and especially its tourist sectors) I think has been held back by the fact that the Japanese are behind on their English instruction vs. many other countries because you don't really need to be able to speak English to survive in Japan. In Portugal, even if you wanted to speak only Portuguese, it would be difficult. They only have 10 million people so they don't have enough to have a complete entertainment industry and rely on sub-titled (not dubbed) Hollywood movies, English rock music, imported products that are not labeled in Portuguese, etc. Whereas Japan is big enough and internally self-sufficient enough that the only English you really have to learn are those words that have made it into Japanese (which are quite a few but the pronunciation is so shifted than an English speaker might not even recognize them as English).

    They only have 10 million people so they don’t have enough to have a complete entertainment industry and rely on sub-titled (not dubbed) Hollywood movies, English rock music, imported products that are not labeled in Portuguese, etc.

    There are nearly 200 million Brazilians to sell to. And Cape Verdeans. And the elites in their former colonies. Are these people too poor to buy movie tickets?

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  136. @Jack D

    the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts
     
    This is nonsense. Occupational specialization has been the mark of civilization for the last 5,000 years. The American frontier (at least the mythical version of it) was something of an exception in that the frontiersman had to be a jack of all trades, but even colonial American (urban) society was filled with various highly skilled specialists - Revere the silversmith, Franklin the printer, etc. This includes occupations that are responsible for caring for society - clergymen, constables, doctors, etc.

    Some surfers were trust fund babies but most were not parasites. They were not into material possessions (other than their surfboards) and in those simpler times could live cheaply and support themselves pumping gas or as a night watchman or something when they were not surfing. Believe it or not, there once was a time when you could pay the rent on a shared apartment or house in Southern California (maybe not the greatest place but something that would sell for $1M today) on your earnings from some modest job. They were young unattached men, most of whom later settled down and got real jobs. Maybe a few became permanent teenagers but most didn't.

    That America had the kind of prosperity that allowed young men to pursue their leisure activities on an (almost) full time basis was a GOOD thing, whereas today you have to put in 80 hours/week in the software mines if you want to live within 50 miles of the California coast.

    I doubt that Wendell Berry intended that “the care and responsibility for society has been broken up and parceled out to the experts” means occupational specialization. More likely he means that surfers have abandoned their primary obligation and allegiance to their culture in favor of seeking consummation through surfing.

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  137. @Reg Cæsar

    Surfboarding is not a way of life.

    –Wendell Berry
     
    Well, no, Wendell, not in Kentucky. Riding horses is not a way of life, either, on SoCal beaches, unless you're Bo Derek.

    LOL

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  138. @Jack D
    This is a discussion for a different day, but to be honest I am really not that wild about the way our zoning laws and open space have been used in many places - it's one more way the Boomers have screwed the younger generations out of having what they had. There are lots of young Americans who can no longer even aspire to home ownership and zoning laws are part of the problem.

    …the way our zoning laws and open space have been used in many places – it’s one more way the Boomers have screwed the younger generations out of having what they had.

    ¿Que pasa?

    Zoning in LA was already half a century old when our “boomer” Steve was born there. It became damn near universal in two-horse towns after Euclid, Ohio prevailed at the Supreme Court in 1926.

    Indeed, planners talk about “Euclidian” zoning. Sometimes puns have a basis in reality.

    Speaking of blame-boomers-first and real-life puns, read up on Reps Pickle and Pepper and their tug-of-war over Social Security funding some 35 years ago. That’s right, Pickle (b. 1913) and Pepper (b. 1900) were already going stale about the time tail-end boomers Barry Obama and Sarah Palin cast their first votes.

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  139. prosa123 says: • Website
    @Philip
    Best year to be born 1937. Avoid all wars. Climb the corporate,college or government ladder easily.

    “Best year to be born 1937. Avoid all wars. Climb the corporate,college or government ladder easily.”

    I remember hearing one of my great-grandfathers say that being born in 1900 served him very well in life. He just missed the World War I draft, climbed the corporate ladder in the Roaring Twenties (and was well enough established to make it through the Great Depression relatively unscathed), was over the age for the World War II draft, had a nice late stage career during the prosperous 1950′s, and retired in the late 1960′s when most corporations still had generous pensions. His only bit of hardship was in the last several years before he died in 1990, as by then his once-generous pension didn’t amount to much and his Social Security wasn’t too high because his lifetime earnings were modest by contemporary standards.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    was over the age for the World War II draft
     
    Think again:


    On September 16, 1940, the United States instituted the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, which required all men between the ages of 21 and 45 to register for the draft.


    https://www.nationalww2museum.org/students-teachers/student-resources/research-starters/draft-and-wwii
    , @Prof. Woland
    Both of my Grandfathers were born in 1900 also; October and December so they missed ww1. One was waiting to graduate from high school before enlisting and the other was on a train coming back from college when the armistice was signed. My father was even luckier. He signed up for the USAAF when he graduated from high school in 1944. He was in training to be a tail gunner on a b-29 and was made active duty the day the surrender announced. That meant that he technically he was part of the greatest event of his generation, something that my uncle who was born two years later was not. My oldest brother was in the Vietnam draft in 1971-72 but missed getting his number called.

    The opposite of that was my great great grandfathers and their brothers / cousins / uncles on both sides of my family and the war who fertilized much of Pennsylvania and Virginia.
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  140. @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    The draft is in standby status since 1980, as it was from 1973-5.

    The ones who were “home free” were those, like our host Steve, between the end of March, 1957 and the last day of the 1950s. They weren’t even required to register. That’s called “deep standby”.

    Every other American man born since sometime in the 1870s until 2000 who grew to adulthood here would have been required to register at some time or other. No exceptions. Not even in an iron lung.

    So the effect of the draft is nuanced. I registered at 18, while my slightly younger brother wasn’t asked (told) to. Our much-older half-brother was called up, sent to Vietnam, and didn’t make it back. My registration was a reminder that it could be revived at any time. The class after ours didn’t get the reminder.

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  141. Grumpy says:
    @Anon7
    What destroyed the California of the 1950's?

    California had its own version of Canada's Century Initiative, which is a plan to increase Canada's population from its current 35 million to 100 million by 2100. (The problem is that there is just too much of Canada, and what there is isn't very likable real estate. I don't think it will work.)

    However, in 1945 there were 9 million people in California; now there are 40 million. They outdid Canada's globalists - that's a 4-1 increase by century's end.

    There was just too much money to be made in real estate in California, owing to 1) extreme desirability and 2) extreme scarcity. I often tell people that California is about 600 miles long and ten or twenty miles wide; that's perfect for developers.

    Also, there are parts of interior California where fortunes could be made growing crops. But in that time, you needed a LOT of hands to pick those crops. And they didn't call on European immigrants, they took a short cut to Mexico. And a lot of those people stayed; many of them built the houses, shingled the roofs, put out the sod on all those millions of houses. And had lots of kids. And invited in their relatives. Mexico did not send their best.

    Since 1990, California has spent more than a trillion dollars on welfare. If you want more of something, subsidize it; now California has one-third of the USA's welfare recipients.

    Your comment reminded me of this short C-SPAN interview with Fresno writer Mark Arax about (among other things) agriculture in California’s San Juaquin Valley. He says, “We basically imported a whole lower class.”

    https://www.c-span.org/video/?423503-1/conversation-mark-arax

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  142. @prosa123
    "Best year to be born 1937. Avoid all wars. Climb the corporate,college or government ladder easily."

    I remember hearing one of my great-grandfathers say that being born in 1900 served him very well in life. He just missed the World War I draft, climbed the corporate ladder in the Roaring Twenties (and was well enough established to make it through the Great Depression relatively unscathed), was over the age for the World War II draft, had a nice late stage career during the prosperous 1950's, and retired in the late 1960's when most corporations still had generous pensions. His only bit of hardship was in the last several years before he died in 1990, as by then his once-generous pension didn't amount to much and his Social Security wasn't too high because his lifetime earnings were modest by contemporary standards.

    was over the age for the World War II draft

    Think again:


    On September 16, 1940, the United States instituted the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, which required all men between the ages of 21 and 45 to register for the draft.

    https://www.nationalww2museum.org/students-teachers/student-resources/research-starters/draft-and-wwii

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    I'm sure my great-grandfather registered for the WWII draft, but being 41 at the time of Pearl Harbor he was past the age when men were actually called up.
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  143. prosa123 says: • Website
    @Stan d Mute
    So, leftists and boomers are hypocrites? Who knew?

    But seriously, it’s the same dynamic with every obsession like hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, water skiing, birding, photography, etc. And while your article teaches nothing to those who jealously guard the prime hunting spots and who are red-pilled, it may help awaken others who haven’t thought clearly on the subject. The tragedy thus is that it’s published in Takimag rather than something with far wider circulation.

    Have you ever considered writing something like this for specialty pubs like hunting, fishing, skiing, or surfing mags?

    “But seriously, it’s the same dynamic with every obsession like hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, water skiing, birding, photography, etc. And while your article teaches nothing to those who jealously guard the prime hunting spots and who are red-pilled, it may help awaken others who haven’t thought clearly on the subject.”

    Hunting is another sport which has seen declining participation. There are a variety of factors, but the biggest one is the simple lack of suitable hunting areas. As the population grows, especially the suburban population, fewer people can find hunting areas within a reasonable distance.

    One thing that might help keep hunting relevant is the increasing participation of women. Although reliable statistics are hard to come by, according to some estimates about 20% of hunters are women, at least 5X the rate of just a couple decades ago. Women are at least partly responsible for fueling the massively rising popularity of the 6.5 (mm) Creedmoor cartridge,* which has a perfect combination of power, accuracy, and female-friendly low recoil.
    * = which shares its name with a large mental hospital

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    • Replies: @Stan d Mute

    simple lack of suitable hunting areas
     
    Folks will pay big bucks for big bucks.

    I hit ‘reply’ just so I could write that sentence, but I’ve made nearly as much leasing hunting rights as I have leasing arable acreage to corn/wheat/soy farmers. I know guys who spend absurd sums leasing places like King Ranch.
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  144. Highlander says: • Website
    @Old Palo Altan
    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.

    (sigh…)

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  145. prosa123 says: • Website
    @Reg Cæsar

    was over the age for the World War II draft
     
    Think again:


    On September 16, 1940, the United States instituted the Selective Training and Service Act of 1940, which required all men between the ages of 21 and 45 to register for the draft.


    https://www.nationalww2museum.org/students-teachers/student-resources/research-starters/draft-and-wwii

    I’m sure my great-grandfather registered for the WWII draft, but being 41 at the time of Pearl Harbor he was past the age when men were actually called up.

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  146. @DFH
    The perspective on the woman's bottom and legs is really off

    The perspective on the woman’s bottom and legs is really off

    Rat Fink will do that to you.

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  147. Dumb video, but some serious guitar playing.

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  148. Rapparee says:
    @Steve Sailer
    My San Francisco cousins went to an Irish prep school in the 1960s, I think it was the one James Joyce went to. They got extra credit for doing papers in Gaelic. They were always complaining about all the Irish language emphasis.

    The year her father dragged his American-born children back home to Ireland with him, my mother nearly failed eighth grade Math and had to get special tutoring- because class was conducted entirely in Irish, a language hitherto known to her only as the medium of her parents’ indecorous gossip at Mass. English-language classes weren’t much better, the highlight being a sharp-tongued scolding incurred in History after attempting to correct Sister’s adamant contention that Abe Lincoln was the first President of the United States.

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  149. Twinkie says:
    @Jack D

    The future is ... female

    GET USED TO IT
     
    I realize TD is a parody account but sometimes it is beyond parody.

    How will they make future little POCs if the future is female? Will they abort all the male fetuses? Kill them at birth? Will men be presumptively me-tooed and forbidden to work so that females will have to do all the work as in African societies? Or will the females get all the nice cushy office jobs in man-free workplaces and men will still be allowed to work on the garbage trucks and so on? I keep getting the feeling that TD and his ilk have not really thought this through so that the glorious brown Muslim female future he imagines will not be so glorious.

    I realize TD is a parody account but sometimes it is beyond parody.

    Xe needs to up xer game. Lately xer material has been repetitive.

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  150. Rapparee says:
    @Bragadocious
    And believe it or not, there is a surfing connection to this. The draft dodging scene in box office flop "Big Wednesday."

    https://youtu.be/gUeHamRZkSY

    And believe it or not, there is a surfing connection to this. The draft dodging scene in box office flop “Big Wednesday.”

    Perhaps that’s why surfing has tended to be one of the less literary of the outdoor sports…

    The macho, quasi-nationalist, violent side of surf culture did produce at least one eloquent and influential wordsmith.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In the 50 years that Hollywood has been making surf films, audiences have never been as enthused as wave-crazed executives and filmmakers thought they would. Nobody learned that lesson harder than Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Normally shrewd businessmen, they read John Milius’s script for Big Wednesday and got so swept up that they traded points on their own projects.

    “They gave John points in Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Star Wars for a piece of Big Wednesday,” said George, who got Spielberg to reminisce about the debacle. “Steven says, kind of sharply, `We only did that once, and it worked out better for some than others.’ Everyone assumed Big Wednesday was going to be a big summer blockbuster, and when Steven and George read the script, they thought this was a beach-bound American Graffiti, with Jaws mixed in. Big Wednesday was a disaster, and Close Encounters and Star Wars each grossed around $600 million.”

    https://deadline.com/2010/05/how-steven-spielberg-and-george-lucas-caught-surf-bug-and-waved-bye-to-points-on-close-encounters-and-star-wars-39792/

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  151. @The Alarmist
    I'm wary and pay attention, but more people are killed each year taking selfies than by shark attacks.

    Username doesn’t check out… ;)

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  152. Anonym says:
    @Corn
    I don’t follow Irish society close enough to know if Irish is still endangered but I’m not surprised the lessons were loathed. As far as the written language goes spelling and pronunciation are strangers to one another.

    Mom and Dad went to Ireland once. Dad’s mom was an Irish immigrant (and Irish speaker). Dad’s cousin he met over there was named Padraig. Reading that you’d think Pad-rayg? Pod-rig?

    Nope. It’s pronounced Porrick. Patrick in the original Irish.

    Nope. It’s pronounced Porrick.

    Alas… Porrick.

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  153. @Rapparee

    And believe it or not, there is a surfing connection to this. The draft dodging scene in box office flop “Big Wednesday.”
     

    Perhaps that’s why surfing has tended to be one of the less literary of the outdoor sports...
     
    The macho, quasi-nationalist, violent side of surf culture did produce at least one eloquent and influential wordsmith.

    In the 50 years that Hollywood has been making surf films, audiences have never been as enthused as wave-crazed executives and filmmakers thought they would. Nobody learned that lesson harder than Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Normally shrewd businessmen, they read John Milius’s script for Big Wednesday and got so swept up that they traded points on their own projects.

    “They gave John points in Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Star Wars for a piece of Big Wednesday,” said George, who got Spielberg to reminisce about the debacle. “Steven says, kind of sharply, `We only did that once, and it worked out better for some than others.’ Everyone assumed Big Wednesday was going to be a big summer blockbuster, and when Steven and George read the script, they thought this was a beach-bound American Graffiti, with Jaws mixed in. Big Wednesday was a disaster, and Close Encounters and Star Wars each grossed around $600 million.”

    https://deadline.com/2010/05/how-steven-spielberg-and-george-lucas-caught-surf-bug-and-waved-bye-to-points-on-close-encounters-and-star-wars-39792/

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    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
    Still, if forced to revisit any one of them, I would choose Big Wednesday.
    , @Highlander
    It's still a way better movie than Point Break despite the final totally hokey big wave scene where Malibu is filmed at Sunset.
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  154. @danand

    "Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more."
     
    Don't know about that Buffalo. I attend ~20 classic/hot rod shows up here in the SF Bay Area every year. In general the shows are more numerous, with greater attendance, as the years go by.

    But I would agree the cars of interest have shifted. Those from the '60's and early 70's are as popular as ever. And a vast array of late models are out at the shows. As enjoyable as the classic cars are to look at, these late models with added superchargers and computer tuning literally "blow the doors off" those classics. Heck a Camry will take most classics light to light; and happen to roll up on the ubiquitous Tesla "fuhgeddaboudit".

    Those Tri Five Chevys, '55-'57, do seem to have fallen out of favor. I guess guys born in Steve's magical year of '46, ~10 year olds when those Chevy came out; are now slowly fading towards irrelevance?

    Dan, sigh, this irrelevant guy was born in ’46.

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  155. Anon[193] • Disclaimer says:

    OT: Rosenstein Asks 100s Of Prosecutors To Review SCOTUS Pick’s Records

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07-11/unprecedented-move-rosenstein-asks-100s-prosecutors-review-scotus-picks-records

    This is a MAJOR power grab. It’s not Rosenstein’s job to vet Supreme Court nominees. It’s Trump’s job as president to pick the nominee, and the Senate’s job to review the nominee and vote yes or no. I’m very certain that neither Trump nor the Senate Republicans asked Rosenstein to butt in like this. They sure as heck wouldn’t want him to. If anybody at Justice was asked to do this, it has to be Sessions. Rosenstein has no authority to do this.

    The deputy attorney general has ZERO Constitutionally-designed role in this process whatsoever. Rosenstein is trying to force every US attorney in the country to dig into everything Kavanaugh has ever done in an attempt to find anything dubious, and then Rosenstein will send anything he can find to Mueller and have Mueller investigate Kavanaugh. Rosenstein is trying to kill the nomination by making Kavanaugh part of Mueller’s investigation.

    This is a major alert. Trump NEEDS TO FIRE ROSENSTEIN IMMEDIATELY. NO IF AND OR BUTS. And if Trump’s smart, he’ll realize Rosenstein has just handed him a legitimate reason to fire him-unconstitutional overreach and abuse of power, and get rid of the disgusting creep. It’s long past time to crush this cockroach underfoot.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Anon[193]:

    Where is Sessions on this? Out to lunch?

    Until now I've been a Sessions supporter because of his efforts in controlling out-of-control immigration. But good works in that one area seems to be overshadowed by woefully inadequate or delinquent performances in others.
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  156. trelane says:

    The correct video for this post is:

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  157. trelane says:

    And the correct followup is:

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican

    And the correct followup [video] is:
     
    Ackshully, it’s this. I posted late, so you get a mulligan. :)
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  158. @prosa123
    "But seriously, it’s the same dynamic with every obsession like hunting, fishing, snowmobiling, water skiing, birding, photography, etc. And while your article teaches nothing to those who jealously guard the prime hunting spots and who are red-pilled, it may help awaken others who haven’t thought clearly on the subject."

    Hunting is another sport which has seen declining participation. There are a variety of factors, but the biggest one is the simple lack of suitable hunting areas. As the population grows, especially the suburban population, fewer people can find hunting areas within a reasonable distance.

    One thing that might help keep hunting relevant is the increasing participation of women. Although reliable statistics are hard to come by, according to some estimates about 20% of hunters are women, at least 5X the rate of just a couple decades ago. Women are at least partly responsible for fueling the massively rising popularity of the 6.5 (mm) Creedmoor cartridge,* which has a perfect combination of power, accuracy, and female-friendly low recoil.
    * = which shares its name with a large mental hospital

    simple lack of suitable hunting areas

    Folks will pay big bucks for big bucks.

    I hit ‘reply’ just so I could write that sentence, but I’ve made nearly as much leasing hunting rights as I have leasing arable acreage to corn/wheat/soy farmers. I know guys who spend absurd sums leasing places like King Ranch.

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  159. @Steve Sailer
    In the 50 years that Hollywood has been making surf films, audiences have never been as enthused as wave-crazed executives and filmmakers thought they would. Nobody learned that lesson harder than Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Normally shrewd businessmen, they read John Milius’s script for Big Wednesday and got so swept up that they traded points on their own projects.

    “They gave John points in Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Star Wars for a piece of Big Wednesday,” said George, who got Spielberg to reminisce about the debacle. “Steven says, kind of sharply, `We only did that once, and it worked out better for some than others.’ Everyone assumed Big Wednesday was going to be a big summer blockbuster, and when Steven and George read the script, they thought this was a beach-bound American Graffiti, with Jaws mixed in. Big Wednesday was a disaster, and Close Encounters and Star Wars each grossed around $600 million.”

    https://deadline.com/2010/05/how-steven-spielberg-and-george-lucas-caught-surf-bug-and-waved-bye-to-points-on-close-encounters-and-star-wars-39792/

    Still, if forced to revisit any one of them, I would choose Big Wednesday.

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    • Replies: @Twinkie

    Still, if forced to revisit any one of them, I would choose Big Wednesday.
     
    I agree. It’s the least objectionable of the three, and I can nap through it more peacefully.
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  160. @Stan Adams
    And when the Swedish soccer team lost because their token brown player screwed up, they shouted "F**k racism!" (in English).

    What goes through your mind when you see a picture of a group of young Swedish women holding up a big sign (written in English) inviting "refugees" to come on in and make themselves at home? It depresses the hell out of me.

    It's sad to realize that the English tongue is the vector by which destructive ideas such as "White folks are evil racists who must atone for their sins by allowing the dregs of the Third World to invade their homelands" are spreading throughout Europe.

    Good points. Would the Germans and Swedes be less racially gormless if they hadn’t been marinating in American pop culture for the last seventy years? I think so.

    The English language is now a civilizational disease vector, more than anything. Hopefully that will change in the decades to come but it’s still true now.

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  161. Dan Hayes says:
    @Anon
    OT: Rosenstein Asks 100s Of Prosecutors To Review SCOTUS Pick's Records

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-07-11/unprecedented-move-rosenstein-asks-100s-prosecutors-review-scotus-picks-records

    This is a MAJOR power grab. It's not Rosenstein's job to vet Supreme Court nominees. It's Trump's job as president to pick the nominee, and the Senate's job to review the nominee and vote yes or no. I'm very certain that neither Trump nor the Senate Republicans asked Rosenstein to butt in like this. They sure as heck wouldn't want him to. If anybody at Justice was asked to do this, it has to be Sessions. Rosenstein has no authority to do this.

    The deputy attorney general has ZERO Constitutionally-designed role in this process whatsoever. Rosenstein is trying to force every US attorney in the country to dig into everything Kavanaugh has ever done in an attempt to find anything dubious, and then Rosenstein will send anything he can find to Mueller and have Mueller investigate Kavanaugh. Rosenstein is trying to kill the nomination by making Kavanaugh part of Mueller's investigation.

    This is a major alert. Trump NEEDS TO FIRE ROSENSTEIN IMMEDIATELY. NO IF AND OR BUTS. And if Trump's smart, he'll realize Rosenstein has just handed him a legitimate reason to fire him-unconstitutional overreach and abuse of power, and get rid of the disgusting creep. It's long past time to crush this cockroach underfoot.

    Anon[193]:

    Where is Sessions on this? Out to lunch?

    Until now I’ve been a Sessions supporter because of his efforts in controlling out-of-control immigration. But good works in that one area seems to be overshadowed by woefully inadequate or delinquent performances in others.

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  162. black sea says:
    @Hemid
    The last famous guy who was a surfer was GenX SoCal Jew "Perry Farrell," leader of Jane's Addiction, the last true "rock star" band that really seemed unlike us (even to those of use who knew them), aristocratically distant from and royally above the audience like Led Zeppelin and the Beatles were.

    Steve's a little too old to know, I think. But to me they're the end of Old California.

    Steve’s a little too old to know, I think. But to me they’re [Jane's Addiction] the end of Old California.

    Perry Farrell — the lead singer of Jane’s Addiction — and Steve are, as it turns out, the same age.

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  163. boomstick says:
    @Cagey Beast
    Thanks for the recommendation. I was reminded of these guys:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=cmU3FYlRZNM

    The Mermen were the other band I was trying to recall. Not famous, but they had some nice CDs if you wanted to listen while coding.

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    • Replies: @Cagey Beast
    ... if you wanted to listen while coding.

    It's literally like you read my mind. Surf guitar has a very tight sound to it -- like baroque music -- that makes it ideal as an accompaniment to coding or writing.
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  164. @Old Palo Altan
    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.

    Yeah, the shame of what’s happening to California is not just that the culture is being destroyed, but that it’s also the State with the most varied beautiful landscapes that can be found anywhere. I remember noting that one could camp out in a different type of environment about every weekend of the year. Too many people (think China) will destroy lots of that beauty anyway, but when you import a culture that doesn’t have any respect for it also (think Latin American and Chinese), what do you expect to happen?

    If you read my blog post, you know how I feel about it anyway.

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  165. @Buffalo Joe
    Ach, My wife moved, with some girl friends, to San Francisco in the 60s, reasonable living and beau coup jobs. She says it was the greatest place to be, Ever ! She lived in Haight-Ashbury for a while, but our kids turned out ok, they each have ten fingers and ten toes, but not evenly distributed. Visited California a lot when we were first married, shame what has happen to that state in the last couple of decades.

    LOL about the toes – I guess the OB’s aren’t required to do anything but get an overall count. In my blog post I linked to above, I was mentioning how California was the place to go to get rid of your old life and start completely new, whether a new career, newly divorced, sick of life, whatever. Drugs didn’t have to be a part of it. Sex with Joni Mitchell was probably a part of plan A for lots of guys, though. I’d settle for just a Jim Rockford single-wide, but up a few miles into a canyon, with any one of the “Ladies of the Canyon”:

    “Don’t it always seem to go,
    you don’t know what you’ve got till it’s gone.”

    Perfect epitaph for the late great state of Californ-eye-ay:

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    • Replies: @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Achmed, you may find this haunting song to be of interest:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPFNdaxraF8
    , @Dieter Kief
    Ach Achmed - I had almost the same idea - about Joni Mitchell. Wild Things Run Fast" has some worthwhile stuff in it, too. And Hejira and Paprika Plains on "Don Juan's Reckless Daughter"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgQNLEDAaWs

    Very liberal on your side - almost a tad aristocratic in it's liberty - -your remark, that "drugs didn't have to be part of it." That's - this kind of tolerance and respect for the minorities - -is of real noblesse, I have to say!

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  166. @Highlander
    Guilty as charged and calling surfing "surfboarding" is about as Ho-Daddy as it gets.

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  167. Danindc says:

    Steve did you mention he won a Pulitzer for this book? I missed it if so.

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    • Replies: @res
    http://www.pulitzer.org/winners/william-finnegan
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  168. JMcG says:
    @DFH
    Non-whites must be getting desperate if they really want access to taigs

    You have it backwards, as I’m sure you know.

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  169. @Anonymous
    Nature's way is for predators to prey on the old and sick and make way for the young and fertile. The situation prevailing now artificially propping up asset prices for the wealthy and old people at the expense of younger people obviously is not nature's way. It's profoundly unnatural.

    You are completely wrong when the population is balanced. Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die. Your point only makes sense in an infinitely growing population.

    Example: I inherited my family home when my father died. There is minimum two-acre zoning there and has been since my parents built our house in 1972. There are also huge mountain parks owned by the people. The population there is stable, with young families moving in when older people like my father leave. What, exactly is wrong with that, and what is keeping each new generation from replacing the old? Nothing.

    Where I live now has minimum three-acre zoning. We have a thriving community where new families with young children buy homes and move in all the time, mixed in with retired people.

    Americans will either “zone” their country and limit growth, or their descendants will live in a place that resembles India.

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    • Replies: @res

    You are completely wrong when the population is balanced. Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die.
     
    One problem with your point is the disconnect between inter-generation housing need timelines and average lifetimes. That was a mouthful. Put more simply, people generally don't inherit houses until after they are done raising their children, which is the period when having housing that is both spacious and has access to good schools is most important.

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable. Which I think is your primary point?

    It would be interesting to see numbers on how many older people in high real estate appreciation areas are cashing out and spending the money on themselves vs. leaving the properties to their children. Even with an inheritance there may be pricing issues with one sibling needing to effectively pay the price of the house to have it vs. the other assets.
    , @Anonymous
    No, that is indeed what happens. Unless old people were to have the habit of dropping dead once their children reached adulthood, or were forced to transfer their homes to their children and move to nursing homes or something upon their children reaching adulthood. In general, people tend to inherit property, if they do so at all, in late middle age and older.

    Those young families didn't appear out of thin air when your father left. They had to have a place to form long before your father left.
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  170. Anonymous[333] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lucas McCrudy
    Of course the same administration (LBJ) that gave us the Vietnam debacle also sowed the seeds that led to the decline of the good life of California with the Immigration Act of 1965. Sure the population would've still gone up as from where it was back then through the internal migration of Americans spellbound by life in the Golden land, but I doubt it would be the crowded 40 million of today.

    The Boomers had a CA with low housing costs and mostly "nice" neighborhoods, (sure there were some sketchy spots even then like Watts) but any Millennial who wants to live there now can be expected to cough up half a million just for a simple 2 bed ranch in a decent area. Mass Third World immigration has driven up housing costs not only by increasing general housing demand but also by reducing the number of desirable areas available in the state. Compare the San Fernando Valley of the 1950s with today...

    Mass Third World immigration has driven up housing costs not only by increasing general housing demand but also by reducing the number of desirable areas available

    That’s an important and valuable insight.

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    • Agree: res
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  171. JMcG says:
    @(((They))) Live
    Yes everyone in Ireland is required to study Irish from starting primary school at age four until finishing second level at about 16/17 , you will also study another European language usually French or German, but the Gaelscoil is very different since they teach every subject using only Irish, this means any pupil who spending 8 years daily speaking Irish should be fluent by the time they reach second level

    I think in the past most people sent their children to the Gaelscoil because they are generally smaller schools with smaller classes, I suspect changing demographics might be influencing some people

    From what I understand, it’s not immersive all the way through what would be called primary school in the US. Some subjects can’t be taught in Irish as there simply aren’t the words needed.

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  172. Anonymous[333] • Disclaimer says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Young Americans of European Christian ancestry will retaliate against the treasonous nation-wrecking White scum born before 1965.

    Mass immigration is an inter-generational attack on young people of European Christian ancestry.

    The baby boomers and the generations before the baby boomers treasonously used mass immigration to attack the future ancestral core of the United States. This has happened in many European Christian nations. The United States, Germany, France, Australia, England, Canada, the Netherlands and other European Christian nations are all under attack from mass immigration and multicultural mayhem.

    Stupid young people will smarten up when they gain control of the central banks in all European Christian nations and then refuse to pay ALL of the government debt fraudulently stacked up by the evil nation-wreckers born before 1965.

    OK, now I'll read Sailer's bit. The surfer guy harassed by non-Europeans while he was younger has a tall wife with a magnificent can, that's my opinion, and I got lots of them.

    Young Americans of European Christian ancestry will retaliate against the treasonous nation-wrecking White scum born before 1965….the evil nation-wreckers born before 1965…

    The voting age was 21 at the time so you have to go back well before 1944 to have even a glimmer of an argument. And guess what those people call themselves?

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  173. @Dieter Kief
    Your argument is - at it's core - about beauty. Natural beauty, too. And aesthetics.

    Thank you. I think you understand.

    It seems that there are many among us who, though bright, lack that appreciation. Maybe they have never lived that way and don’t recognize what we have. They speak as if our land is infinite and our population can go on growing forever.

    Their argument that their unfortunate children will not be able to afford property is only valid if we do not control the growth of our population. If our numbers are stable, there is no reason at all that each generation cannot take its place where the former lived.

    They don’t seem to understand this, and they seem comfortable living in a beehive of never-ending population growth and demands.

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  174. JMcG says:
    @Old Palo Altan
    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.

    Well done, sir. That was lovely, and sad.

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  175. JMcG says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    One of Buffalo's best party bars in the 60s was a Tiki bar in Williamsville, at the edge of farm country. Lots of bamboo, a small bridge over a faux stream and dark booths. Lots of exotic drinks, some in coconut shell and most featuring those tiny umbrellas. Most food was serves as kabobs. I think it was replaced by a TGI Fridays, which had walls and rafters covered in garage sale chic. Old pedal car? Got that. Rowing shell ? Got that. Miss those days a little.

    Joe,
    I spent some nights in the summer of ‘73 in a tiki bar in the (barely) west of Ireland. It was actually called the Kon-Tiki; that’s how tiki it was. The band played on a little raft in the middle of a tiny pond inside the pub itself.

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    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    JMcG, My wife tells me that the name of the local Tiki bar was the Mauna Kai.
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  176. JMcG says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Shing, I used to facilitate a local car event sponsored by the "Tri Five Car Club," featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

    I’m in a race against time Joe. I’m hoping 60’s Triumph motorcycles and Luger pistols get cheap enough in time for me to enjoy them before I roll a seven.

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  177. @Old Palo Altan
    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.

    There were purple sea urchins, too, in those Laguna tide pools. You could drop a pebble and the urchin would close up around it. Cool stuff for a little kid. There was a field at the end of our street in Huntington where you could catch frogs. Imagine that.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Absolutely right - thanks for reminding me.
    Frogs. And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.

    I was never a surfer,but my cousins on Beach Road in Capistrano Beach were obsessed, and one became a semi-professional.

    I'm sure they knew well the man called Bruce Brown you mention. It seems he died very recently, and is discussed on the site about the Dana Point statues I linked to earlier.
    , @Benjaminl
    Those urchins were also in the tide pools in Pacific Grove and Monterey. I had that experience before the Aquarium opened in 1984, when the area was still pretty sleepy.
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  178. @Anon7
    Here’s the clip you want ;-)

    The 1966 Movie “The Endless Summer”

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=yZsuQXKkPdw

    Its title comes from the idea, expressed at both the beginning and end of the film, that if one had enough time and money it would be possible to follow the summer up and down the world (northern to southern hemisphere and back), making it endless.

    That’s it, The Endless Summer. I posted my own reference to it before I saw yours.

    Now here’s Dick Dale playing his song “Misirlou” on surf guitar, in case no one has already posted that too. The man invented the sound and the equipment that makes it:

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    Dick Dale invented the sound but Leo Fender masterminded the equipment. And a lot of key pieces were subcontracted: the D-130-F speakers and OEM Triad output transformers.

    But without Dick Dale’s field testing, Jimi Hendrix would have been SOL.
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  179. @trelane
    And the correct followup is:
    https://youtu.be/omG-hZfN6zk

    And the correct followup is:

    Ackshully, it’s this. I posted late, so you get a mulligan. :)

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    • Replies: @trelane
    Thanks, I think ur right
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  180. @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL about the toes - I guess the OB's aren't required to do anything but get an overall count. In my blog post I linked to above, I was mentioning how California was the place to go to get rid of your old life and start completely new, whether a new career, newly divorced, sick of life, whatever. Drugs didn't have to be a part of it. Sex with Joni Mitchell was probably a part of plan A for lots of guys, though. I'd settle for just a Jim Rockford single-wide, but up a few miles into a canyon, with any one of the "Ladies of the Canyon":

    "Don't it always seem to go,
    you don't know what you've got till it's gone."


    Perfect epitaph for the late great state of Californ-eye-ay:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgMEPk6fvpg

    Achmed, you may find this haunting song to be of interest:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    I Remember California -- R.E.M.

    I remember redwood trees, bumper cars and wolverines

     


    The ocean's Trident submarines

     


    Lemons, limes and tangerines

     


    I remember this

     

    More Military Keynesianism Now
    For California and the USA and how
    Print up the loot, pay for anything that shoots
    Pizza pie a hundred bucks, purchasing power sensitive out of luck
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I DO remember this song, Jenner. I have this album on vinyl.

    It's got a bit of Michael Stipe whiny stuff, but Green still's got mostly that great REM sound, as exemplified by my favorite Geography song:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=AKKqLl_ZEEY

    I mean, how many geography songs are there to begin with?
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  181. Anon[680] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hemid
    The last famous guy who was a surfer was GenX SoCal Jew "Perry Farrell," leader of Jane's Addiction, the last true "rock star" band that really seemed unlike us (even to those of use who knew them), aristocratically distant from and royally above the audience like Led Zeppelin and the Beatles were.

    Steve's a little too old to know, I think. But to me they're the end of Old California.

    What about Eddie Vedder?

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  182. @Buzz Mohawk
    There were purple sea urchins, too, in those Laguna tide pools. You could drop a pebble and the urchin would close up around it. Cool stuff for a little kid. There was a field at the end of our street in Huntington where you could catch frogs. Imagine that.

    Absolutely right – thanks for reminding me.
    Frogs. And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.

    I was never a surfer,but my cousins on Beach Road in Capistrano Beach were obsessed, and one became a semi-professional.

    I’m sure they knew well the man called Bruce Brown you mention. It seems he died very recently, and is discussed on the site about the Dana Point statues I linked to earlier.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sparkon

    And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.
     
    More likely, those were Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna), the only year-round resident in California, although both Allen's (Selasphorus sasin) and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus) hummingbirds migrate through the state.

    The Ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) is found primarily east of the Rocky Mountains, and its normal range does not include California. Anna's is the only American hummingbird with an iridescent red crown, while in the RT, the iridescent red feathers are confined to the gorget, or throat area.

    In the CSN&Y classic "Suite Judy Blue Eyes," Stephen Stills sang about the "chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow" but they don't have those in California either, or anywhere else.

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  183. Bill Jones says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    Finnegan says he spent a year at UC Santa Cruz studying "Finnegans Wake" under Norman O. "Nobby" Brown.

    What a waste.

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  184. Medvedev says:

    coastal property have only gone up and up over Finnegan’s lifetime
    Malibu, Newport Beach, Topanga Canyon, Santa Barbara, Honolulu, Santa Cruz, Maui, Australia’s Gold Coast, Cape Town, and San Francisco—reads like a real estate speculator’s fever dream.

    California population skyrocketed from 10 to 39.5 million in less than a human life. In the meantime, California didn’t manage to grow coastal line to match population growth. Shocker!

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  185. MEH 0910 says:

    OT:

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    • Replies: @interesting
    rehash, redo, remake......anything to keep the profits rolling in.
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  186. @Old Palo Altan
    Your friend was right, and it was the whole state which was paradise, certainly not just southern California.
    Palo Alto without Asians, and without stress; Santa Monica with an empty beach at its feet; Laguna with pristine tide pools full of eels, crabs, and tiny and easily catchable fish; Yosemite, which you could drive into whenever you wanted and actually camp right next to the river for a week at a time; Carmel without mass tourism; Berkeley still a world-class university, with Stanford a sleepy and friendly backwater; San Francisco the place for coming out (in the old way) parties and concerts with Krips at the podium; hiking in the Sierras and seeing no other humans but maybe a deer or two; motoring through an Orange County still filled with orange groves and their unique, heady scent; Disneyland new and innocent, as were the children delighting in it; the Napa Valley still producing wine for 50 cents a gallon.
    And everywhere only our own kind, and not too many of them.

    Thank you.

    There are a few non-commercial video clips on YouTube from that time. It is striking, from the perspective of 2018, how spacious places in California were when the population was 10 million (1950) or 15 million (1960) rather than the 40 million it is today.

    For every four bodies walking around now, there was only one then, and it was almost definitely that of a Caucasian American.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res

    how spacious places in California were when the population was 10 million (1950) or 15 million (1960) rather than the 40 million it is today.
     
    One thing I think people in this thread are underestimating is how California of the time combined both a small population and extremely rapid growth. That is clearly an unsustainable combination (as we see now).

    Think about how much the economic boom generated by that extreme growth influenced the experience of California of the time as idyllic. I think one of the reasons there is resentment of the older generations is the way in which they were able to benefit from unsustainable situations. And the way in which the surrounding environment was rendered much less nice in the process.
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  187. @Steve Sailer
    Finnegan says he spent a year at UC Santa Cruz studying "Finnegans Wake" under Norman O. "Nobby" Brown.

    I, and then two of my friends, read Finnegan’s book Cold New World one summer during college- it’s a well-reported but unfocused book, my guess is because he wanted to tie the stories to one Old Left narrative about the end of the old welfare state and how that leaves American poor people. But the 90s economic expansion was pretty good for poor people, and his subjects- a 15 year old black drug dealer in New Haven, some bored teens in Antelope Valley who say they want to be white supremacists- are suffering from anomie and emptiness of community more than economics. But he was clearly someone who liked talking to teenagers and getting them to tell about themselves, and when my barely-no-longer-teenagers friends wrote to him about a somewhat poorly conceived investigative project they planned to do right after college (and half-did) he was excited to meet with them, and correspond with them. I don’t think this was conscious sleaziness, and he strikes me as someone who would smoke a joint with his journalistic subjects but not sleep with them, but what do I know.

    As Steve notes, Finnegan is definitely a High Boomer, and his passion for trying to find the perfect wave and to find authenticity in the young, the poor, the non-white, the far away, both are pretty Boomerific life pursuits.

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  188. @Steve Sailer
    Finnegan says he spent a year at UC Santa Cruz studying "Finnegans Wake" under Norman O. "Nobby" Brown.

    I, and then two of my friends, read Finnegan’s book Cold New World one summer during college- it’s a well-reported but unfocused book, my guess is because he wanted to tie the stories to one Old Left narrative about the end of the old welfare state and how that leaves American poor people. But the 90s economic expansion was pretty good for poor people, and his subjects- a 15 year old black drug dealer in New Haven, some bored teens in Antelope Valley who say they want to be white supremacists- are suffering from anomie and emptiness of community more than economics. But he was clearly someone who liked talking to teenagers and getting them to tell about themselves, and when my barely-no-longer-teenagers friends wrote to him about a somewhat poorly conceived investigative project they planned to do right after college (and half-did) he was excited to meet with them, and correspond with them. I don’t think this was conscious sleaziness, and he strikes me as someone who would smoke a joint with his journalistic subjects but not sleep with them, but what do I know.

    As Steve notes, Finnegan is definitely a High Boomer, and his passion for trying to find the perfect wave and to find authenticity in the young, the poor, the non-white, the far away, both are pretty Boomerific life pursuits.

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  189. Paul says:

    Many years have passed since I read “Tragedy of the Commons” (or what is known in economics textbooks as the imposing of externalities on others). So, I am relying on memory when I ask whether the guy spewing thick exhaust smoke from his dilapidated car really is going to respond to peer pressure and reform his ways. Or is privatizing the air supply going to work? Some problems can only be dealt with through state control.

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  190. @Ian M.
    I was in Dingle back in May, and the locals I talked to there all spoke Irish as their first language (though of course all were fluent in English as well). I went to a mass there, and the sermon was in English, but nearly all of the rest of it was in Gaelic, including the Scripture readings.

    Also, all the signs there (throughout Ireland, not just Kerry County) are in both English and Gaelic.

    Also, all the signs there (throughout Ireland, not just Kerry County) are in both English and Gaelic.

    I think the conspicuous labeling of places and things in Irish all over started well before many of the Irish regained much facility in the language. It was part of the program to bring the language back from extinction. I suppose it makes sense, because after a generation of compulsory Irish classes in schools it seems natural.

    I think Kerry may have had the highest proportion of native Irish speakers, so it is not typical in that regard.

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  191. Benjaminl says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    There were purple sea urchins, too, in those Laguna tide pools. You could drop a pebble and the urchin would close up around it. Cool stuff for a little kid. There was a field at the end of our street in Huntington where you could catch frogs. Imagine that.

    Those urchins were also in the tide pools in Pacific Grove and Monterey. I had that experience before the Aquarium opened in 1984, when the area was still pretty sleepy.

    Read More
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  192. Benjaminl says:
    @Desiderius
    See also:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hollister_riot

    Yeah, I’m perplexed as to how Hollister came to be seen as a hip coastal surf brand too.

    Also, this event was possibly an example of the Media Megaphone at work, per Wiki:

    The small riot came to national prominence through media coverage of the event. However, the articles that were written about the riot were greatly exaggerated and sensationalized the actual events…However, the reliability of the striking photo has been debated, as many sources say that it was staged. The photograph was taken by Barney Petersen of the San Francisco Chronicle. The Chronicle did not run any images of the event. The bearded individual standing in the background of the photograph, Gus Deserpa, has said he is sure that the photograph was staged by Petersen, and gave the following account: “I saw two guys scraping all these bottles together, that had been lying in the street. Then they positioned a motorcycle in the middle of the pile. After a while this drunk guy comes staggering out of the bar, and they got him to sit on the motorcycle, and started to take his picture.” …The Hollister riot had little effect on the town itself. The nationwide fear of motorcyclists did not result in many changes in Hollister. Bikers were welcomed back… and rallies continued to be held in the years after the riot. In fact, the town held a 1997 50th anniversary rally to commemorate the event.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    If you want to read about the media exaggerating the biker menace, I'd recommend Hunter Thompson's book about the Hell's Angels
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  193. Brutusale says:
    @JohnnyWalker123
    Good article.

    From the 50s through the early 90s, there used to be this fascination with surfing the waves, hanging out at beach, going to Tiki bars/clubs, and moving to either Hawaii or SoCal. You saw this reflected in tv shows, movies, and music (remember the Beach Boys?). Young people were especially into the culture.

    I definitely think there's been a huge decline in beach/surfer culture in the last 25 years. Americans, especially young people, just really aren't into it anymore.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=2s4slliAtQU

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X-YsN0y7vZI

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gYoK-VSuvL0

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EJb2MrZFjBs

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JDOrOMuo-9o

    By the early 2000s, the beach/surfer culture had fallen out of favor. This popular early/mid 2000s show about high school kids in Orange County (video below) often made it a point to frequently note how a lot of young people no longer liked surfing or the beach. The show actually stars a family (the "Cohens") with a father who loves surfing and the beach, while the son stays inside and plays video games.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d9paPT4iuC4

    Surf culture shifted from Gidget/Frankie & Annette to the gritty POP/Z Boys.

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  194. carol says:

    Reading the book…that haole is lucky the Hawaiians fought one on one! Usually with NAMs it’s not like that. You fight one and you fight the gang. That’s what people don’t understand. So the whites are intimidated into a fearful, cowardly demeanor.

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  195. res says:
    @Danindc
    Steve did you mention he won a Pulitzer for this book? I missed it if so.
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  196. Anon[680] • Disclaimer says:
    @Benjaminl
    Yeah, I'm perplexed as to how Hollister came to be seen as a hip coastal surf brand too.

    Also, this event was possibly an example of the Media Megaphone at work, per Wiki:

    The small riot came to national prominence through media coverage of the event. However, the articles that were written about the riot were greatly exaggerated and sensationalized the actual events...However, the reliability of the striking photo has been debated, as many sources say that it was staged. The photograph was taken by Barney Petersen of the San Francisco Chronicle. The Chronicle did not run any images of the event. The bearded individual standing in the background of the photograph, Gus Deserpa, has said he is sure that the photograph was staged by Petersen, and gave the following account: "I saw two guys scraping all these bottles together, that had been lying in the street. Then they positioned a motorcycle in the middle of the pile. After a while this drunk guy comes staggering out of the bar, and they got him to sit on the motorcycle, and started to take his picture." ...The Hollister riot had little effect on the town itself. The nationwide fear of motorcyclists did not result in many changes in Hollister. Bikers were welcomed back... and rallies continued to be held in the years after the riot. In fact, the town held a 1997 50th anniversary rally to commemorate the event.
     

    If you want to read about the media exaggerating the biker menace, I’d recommend Hunter Thompson’s book about the Hell’s Angels

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    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
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  197. res says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    You are completely wrong when the population is balanced. Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die. Your point only makes sense in an infinitely growing population.

    Example: I inherited my family home when my father died. There is minimum two-acre zoning there and has been since my parents built our house in 1972. There are also huge mountain parks owned by the people. The population there is stable, with young families moving in when older people like my father leave. What, exactly is wrong with that, and what is keeping each new generation from replacing the old? Nothing.

    Where I live now has minimum three-acre zoning. We have a thriving community where new families with young children buy homes and move in all the time, mixed in with retired people.

    Americans will either "zone" their country and limit growth, or their descendants will live in a place that resembles India.

    You are completely wrong when the population is balanced. Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die.

    One problem with your point is the disconnect between inter-generation housing need timelines and average lifetimes. That was a mouthful. Put more simply, people generally don’t inherit houses until after they are done raising their children, which is the period when having housing that is both spacious and has access to good schools is most important.

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable. Which I think is your primary point?

    It would be interesting to see numbers on how many older people in high real estate appreciation areas are cashing out and spending the money on themselves vs. leaving the properties to their children. Even with an inheritance there may be pricing issues with one sibling needing to effectively pay the price of the house to have it vs. the other assets.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable. Which I think is your primary point?
     
    Yes, that's my point. Inheritance is incidental.

    Inheritance in this case is between generations in a country, not specifically or necessarily inside particular families.

    As you say, the intergenerational timelines between parents and their children are too long for simple inheritance to function as the only cycle. That's not a problem, however, thanks to large numbers. There will always be supply from some families' parents matching demand from other families' children.

    This is, of course, simple common sense. It does not play out so neatly in local markets, but over a continent-wide country with hundreds of millions of Citizen-shareholders, it works mathematically.

    Part of my argument is that the United States has already passed its optimum population and needs to stop. This is obvious to those of us who have seen the quality of life drop and problems increase as we have gone from 200 million to 300 million and beyond. When we state it this way, we also happen to immunize ourselves against racial counterarguments.

    As someone pointed out, this is an aesthetic argument at its core. We have a country; what kind of country do we want it to be? Beautiful or crowded? It is our natural right to decide.

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  198. res says:
    @PiltdownMan
    Thank you.

    There are a few non-commercial video clips on YouTube from that time. It is striking, from the perspective of 2018, how spacious places in California were when the population was 10 million (1950) or 15 million (1960) rather than the 40 million it is today.

    For every four bodies walking around now, there was only one then, and it was almost definitely that of a Caucasian American.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hwh8WkfnDZA

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4RgY2rdrauM

    how spacious places in California were when the population was 10 million (1950) or 15 million (1960) rather than the 40 million it is today.

    One thing I think people in this thread are underestimating is how California of the time combined both a small population and extremely rapid growth. That is clearly an unsustainable combination (as we see now).

    Think about how much the economic boom generated by that extreme growth influenced the experience of California of the time as idyllic. I think one of the reasons there is resentment of the older generations is the way in which they were able to benefit from unsustainable situations. And the way in which the surrounding environment was rendered much less nice in the process.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    Think about how much the economic boom generated by that extreme growth influenced the experience of California of the time as idyllic. I think one of the reasons there is resentment of the older generations is the way in which they were able to benefit from unsustainable situations. And the way in which the surrounding environment was rendered much less nice in the process.

     

    cf. Joni Mitchell "They paved paradise" and put up a parkin' lot"

    ("You don't know what you've got 'til it's gone")

    Neil Young - "After the Goldrush"

    Eagels - "Hotel California"

    // (Frank Zappa - "We're Only in it For The Money" / "Weasels Rip My Flesh")

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  199. Sparkon says:
    @Old Palo Altan
    Absolutely right - thanks for reminding me.
    Frogs. And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.

    I was never a surfer,but my cousins on Beach Road in Capistrano Beach were obsessed, and one became a semi-professional.

    I'm sure they knew well the man called Bruce Brown you mention. It seems he died very recently, and is discussed on the site about the Dana Point statues I linked to earlier.

    And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.

    More likely, those were Anna’s hummingbirds (Calypte anna), the only year-round resident in California, although both Allen’s (Selasphorus sasin) and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus) hummingbirds migrate through the state.

    The Ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) is found primarily east of the Rocky Mountains, and its normal range does not include California. Anna’s is the only American hummingbird with an iridescent red crown, while in the RT, the iridescent red feathers are confined to the gorget, or throat area.

    In the CSN&Y classic “Suite Judy Blue Eyes,” Stephen Stills sang about the “chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow” but they don’t have those in California either, or anywhere else.

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    • Replies: @Old Palo Altan
    Happy to be corrected.

    Must have been the Rufous, because they were tiny and had a reddish throat.

    We all called them ruby-throated though, I suppose simply because ... well, they did have red throats.
    , @Buzz Mohawk

    Stephen Stills sang about the “chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow” but they don’t have those in California either, or anywhere else.
     
    You could probably see them in Laurel Canyon in the 1960s if you took just the right amount of LSD.
    , @PiltdownMan

    In the CSN&Y classic “Suite Judy Blue Eyes,” Stephen Stills sang about the “chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow”
     
    Yeah, that came to mind when Old Palo Altan used the adjective.

    Actually, Neil Young wasn't with them when they recorded that song in 1969, or on the Crosby, Stills & Nash album it was on, when it was released that year. The band was called Crosby, Stills and Nash at that point.

    Neil Young was on the next album and they became Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

    When they picked a name for the group, they deliberately used their last names, so that if one principal member left, the group couldn't continue with the same name. Crosby's experience with Jim/Roger McGuinn's band, The Byrds, which he left in acrimony, had something to do with the decision.
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  200. @res

    how spacious places in California were when the population was 10 million (1950) or 15 million (1960) rather than the 40 million it is today.
     
    One thing I think people in this thread are underestimating is how California of the time combined both a small population and extremely rapid growth. That is clearly an unsustainable combination (as we see now).

    Think about how much the economic boom generated by that extreme growth influenced the experience of California of the time as idyllic. I think one of the reasons there is resentment of the older generations is the way in which they were able to benefit from unsustainable situations. And the way in which the surrounding environment was rendered much less nice in the process.

    Think about how much the economic boom generated by that extreme growth influenced the experience of California of the time as idyllic. I think one of the reasons there is resentment of the older generations is the way in which they were able to benefit from unsustainable situations. And the way in which the surrounding environment was rendered much less nice in the process.

    cf. Joni Mitchell “They paved paradise” and put up a parkin’ lot”

    (“You don’t know what you’ve got ’til it’s gone”)

    Neil Young – “After the Goldrush”

    Eagels – “Hotel California”

    // (Frank Zappa – “We’re Only in it For The Money” / “Weasels Rip My Flesh”)

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  201. @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL about the toes - I guess the OB's aren't required to do anything but get an overall count. In my blog post I linked to above, I was mentioning how California was the place to go to get rid of your old life and start completely new, whether a new career, newly divorced, sick of life, whatever. Drugs didn't have to be a part of it. Sex with Joni Mitchell was probably a part of plan A for lots of guys, though. I'd settle for just a Jim Rockford single-wide, but up a few miles into a canyon, with any one of the "Ladies of the Canyon":

    "Don't it always seem to go,
    you don't know what you've got till it's gone."


    Perfect epitaph for the late great state of Californ-eye-ay:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZgMEPk6fvpg

    Ach Achmed – I had almost the same idea – about Joni Mitchell. Wild Things Run Fast” has some worthwhile stuff in it, too. And Hejira and Paprika Plains on “Don Juan’s Reckless Daughter”

    Very liberal on your side – almost a tad aristocratic in it’s liberty – -your remark, that “drugs didn’t have to be part of it.” That’s – this kind of tolerance and respect for the minorities – -is of real noblesse, I have to say!

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yeah, "liberal" in the old terminology. I would pass for no kind of Liberal in the modern sense, Dieter. This tune here is the one that is illustrates my point about Joni Mitchell having written her lyrics before her tunes. That's all cool, and I'm sure some songwriters (or teams thereof) do it that way. However, no matter how much the lyrics don't fit, Joni says "hell with that ... these are the lyrics and I'm stickin' to em!" It's still a good song - have a good night, Dieter.

    California from Blue:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Lm39YkGrHp8
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  202. SGOTI says:

    Interesting that I just rented “Big Wednesday” out of the blue the other week, not having seen it in over a decade, and killing time on a rainy weekend day with the kids/grommets.

    And lo and behold, shortly thereafter Hurricane Chris turned our normally placid and knee-high break into a frothing, mountainous, double overhea- well, chest-high break.

    “It’s gonna get bigger. . . “

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  203. Sparkon says:

    I didn’t grow up in California, but I would agree with iSteve’s thesis here, that the early Boomers, especially, grew up in a virtually different country compared to what we have now, so there was indeed some Boomer privilege, the actual nature of which escapes those whiners with Boomer Envy, who are constantly blaming Boomers for things and events that we had no hand in their creation, like Woodstock, Hippies, LSD, bad TV, even ruining the USA.

    Boomers were consumers, not creators of the so-called youth revolution, but it takes a least a little of the conspiratorial mindset for it all to come into focus, and I would recommend the late, great Dave McGowan’s “Weird Scenes in the Canyon” for admittedly somewhat disheartening re-orientation about that part of the matrix.

    https://www.amazon.com/Weird-Scenes-Inside-Canyon-Laurel/dp/1909394122

    I passed through Cal flying out and returning from two overseas tours in Japan, where I did some body surfing in the warm waters near Sendai, areas effected by the triple meltdown at Fukushima, not that the damage is confined to that area.

    I had gotten my first skateboard while a senior in HS in the Midwest — class of ’64 — but the fool thing had metal wheels and was dangerous, but could raise sparks in the dark. Later, while going to college at Indiana Univ. courtesy of Uncle Sam, I got a much better skateboard with composition wheels and a decent truck with rubber damping that allowed me to go around corners and change direction with some moxie if not elan. I was the only skateboarder on campus at that time, and was fixin’ to do myself some real damage with my idiotic stunts on that thing when fate intervened, and I bought a Honda CL72, which was not only much safer than the skateboard, but also had room for a female passenger.

    “And the name of the place is I like it like that. C’mon let me show you where it’s at…C’mon…”

    Prior to the Summer of Love, it was the Endless Summer — what a great promotional graphic that was, but the movie – meh. When I moved to California and went to the beach, it certainly wasn’t to watch the surfers. And anyway, much north of San Diego, the water off the Cal coast is far too cold for this guy to do much more than take a quick dip.

    I could cite many California siren songs, but let’s go with this classic from the Riverias in early ’64 to put a little rip current in your coffee:

    For anyone who thinks they he can carry my skateboard…

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  204. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Achmed, you may find this haunting song to be of interest:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPFNdaxraF8

    I Remember California — R.E.M.

    I remember redwood trees, bumper cars and wolverines

    The ocean’s Trident submarines

    Lemons, limes and tangerines

    I remember this

    More Military Keynesianism Now
    For California and the USA and how
    Print up the loot, pay for anything that shoots
    Pizza pie a hundred bucks, purchasing power sensitive out of luck

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  205. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    You are completely wrong when the population is balanced. Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die. Your point only makes sense in an infinitely growing population.

    Example: I inherited my family home when my father died. There is minimum two-acre zoning there and has been since my parents built our house in 1972. There are also huge mountain parks owned by the people. The population there is stable, with young families moving in when older people like my father leave. What, exactly is wrong with that, and what is keeping each new generation from replacing the old? Nothing.

    Where I live now has minimum three-acre zoning. We have a thriving community where new families with young children buy homes and move in all the time, mixed in with retired people.

    Americans will either "zone" their country and limit growth, or their descendants will live in a place that resembles India.

    No, that is indeed what happens. Unless old people were to have the habit of dropping dead once their children reached adulthood, or were forced to transfer their homes to their children and move to nursing homes or something upon their children reaching adulthood. In general, people tend to inherit property, if they do so at all, in late middle age and older.

    Those young families didn’t appear out of thin air when your father left. They had to have a place to form long before your father left.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    Note my reply to commenter res regarding this very thing:

    Inheritance in this case is between generations in a country, not specifically or necessarily inside particular families.

    As you say, the intergenerational timelines between parents and their children are too long for simple inheritance to function as the only cycle. That’s not a problem, however, thanks to large numbers. There will always be supply from some families’ parents matching demand from other families’ children.
     

    If I made it sound like there has to be some kind of direct inheritance of housing along family lines (absurd) I apologize.

    Note that in my previous reply to you, I stated:


    Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die.
     
    I am speaking of generations in general, "the young" and "the older," as well as "purchasing available property."
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    res explains it better than I. It really is the simple result of a steady-state population:

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable.
     
    It is not about direct inheritance. Sorry for the confusion.
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  206. boomstick says:

    There’s also a few things like Italian, Russian, and French surf music from the 60′s to now.

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  207. @res

    You are completely wrong when the population is balanced. Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die.
     
    One problem with your point is the disconnect between inter-generation housing need timelines and average lifetimes. That was a mouthful. Put more simply, people generally don't inherit houses until after they are done raising their children, which is the period when having housing that is both spacious and has access to good schools is most important.

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable. Which I think is your primary point?

    It would be interesting to see numbers on how many older people in high real estate appreciation areas are cashing out and spending the money on themselves vs. leaving the properties to their children. Even with an inheritance there may be pricing issues with one sibling needing to effectively pay the price of the house to have it vs. the other assets.

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable. Which I think is your primary point?

    Yes, that’s my point. Inheritance is incidental.

    Inheritance in this case is between generations in a country, not specifically or necessarily inside particular families.

    As you say, the intergenerational timelines between parents and their children are too long for simple inheritance to function as the only cycle. That’s not a problem, however, thanks to large numbers. There will always be supply from some families’ parents matching demand from other families’ children.

    This is, of course, simple common sense. It does not play out so neatly in local markets, but over a continent-wide country with hundreds of millions of Citizen-shareholders, it works mathematically.

    Part of my argument is that the United States has already passed its optimum population and needs to stop. This is obvious to those of us who have seen the quality of life drop and problems increase as we have gone from 200 million to 300 million and beyond. When we state it this way, we also happen to immunize ourselves against racial counterarguments.

    As someone pointed out, this is an aesthetic argument at its core. We have a country; what kind of country do we want it to be? Beautiful or crowded? It is our natural right to decide.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    As someone pointed out, this is an aesthetic argument at its core.
     
    Commenter Dieter Kief made this point, and it is a good one. I should have credited him specifically in my previous comment.
    , @Jim Don Bob

    This is obvious to those of us who have seen the quality of life drop and problems increase as we have gone from 200 million to 300 million and beyond.
     
    The quality of life would have dropped no matter who the people were who took us from 200 to 300 million, but it would have been far less bad had they been white people.

    I like Mexican food and Modelo, but I would gladly give them up forever if only all the "hispanics" would leave for good.

    The Home Depot here in the Peoples' Republic looked like the Third World at 7am today.
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  208. “Big Wednesday” was a decent portrayal of an aging surf rat (Jan Michael Vincent) still riding a longboard in California as Gerry Lopez (portraying himself) and the gun designs take over the surfing world from Hawaii. Presumably, Big Wednesday was where John Milius got it in his head that Gerry Lopez could act.

    Lopez is still around and doing great at age 70. What a fantastic individual. Can’t say the same for poor Jan Michael, who’s not doing so well after being drunk for 30 years.

    My memories of childhood are very clear. I remember Jan Michael Vincent in some late 60s TV schlock called Danger Island.

    Which led me to this guy, who’s also still around and running a stunt school with his family:

    http://nightflight.com/uh-oh-chongo-danger-island-and-the-daredevil-life-career-of-kim-kahana/

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  209. danand says:
    @Anon
    the “Tri Five Car Club,” featuring mostly 54, 55 and 56 chevys. Last show was two years ago, membership has declined, lots of widows with nice cars sitting in their garages. Not a lot of guys building hot rods any more.

    In the late '70s, I bought my first car at age 15, a year before I could get my license - a '69 Camaro for $300, and worked on it until it was ready for the streets. Nearly all my friends and peers did the same thing. We'd race our street-legal muscle cars at New England Dragway on Wednesday nights. I received some accolades by turning a 14:00 flat.

    In the late ’70s, I bought my first car at age 15, a year before I could get my license – a ’69 Camaro for $300, and worked on it until it was ready for the streets. Nearly all my friends and peers did the same thing. We’d race our street-legal muscle cars at New England Dragway on Wednesday nights. I received some accolades by turning a 14:00 flat.

    #349, Thanks for posting, brings back memories.

    Similar story, late ’70′s, up here in the SF Bay Area. But it was a $400 ’65 Mustang fastback (11 months to street ready), our Wednesday track was in Fremont over in the East Bay, and we were thrilled when the 1st of our group broke 13.9!

    My wife bought me a new Mustang in ’14. On a lark went up to Sonoma Raceway (now the Bay Area’s nearest): clicked of an easy 12.93, no wrenching, and no sense of accomplishment. But still a fun throwback outing.

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  210. Anonymous[242] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buzz Mohawk
    That's it, The Endless Summer. I posted my own reference to it before I saw yours.

    Now here's Dick Dale playing his song "Misirlou" on surf guitar, in case no one has already posted that too. The man invented the sound and the equipment that makes it:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTTmJKbAIsE

    Dick Dale invented the sound but Leo Fender masterminded the equipment. And a lot of key pieces were subcontracted: the D-130-F speakers and OEM Triad output transformers.

    But without Dick Dale’s field testing, Jimi Hendrix would have been SOL.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk
    I had read that Dick Dale participated in the development of the equipment, to get the sound he wanted. Typical for me, I oversimplified the situation. Thanks for clearing that up.
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  211. @Big Bill
    Remember?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZYi8jk6gPXk

    The 1963 album My Son the Surf Nut had a cover by teenaged surfer Rick Griffin:

    A few years later he drew the Aoxomoxoa album cover for the Grateful Dead:I’m pretty sure Rick came up with the Aoxomoxoa title. In his comics, the characters were liable to say things like

    WOW GOD DOG!
    MOM,

    or

    E Y E
    A M
    T H E
    I

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    • Replies: @the one they call Desanex
    I meant to mention that Rick Griffin loved palindromes, palindromic words, and bilateral symmetry in general.
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  212. @the one they call Desanex
    The 1963 album My Son the Surf Nut had a cover by teenaged surfer Rick Griffin:
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UyeI6T5Gg2k
    A few years later he drew the Aoxomoxoa album cover for the Grateful Dead:
    http://www.alexmathews.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/aoxomoxoab.jpg
    I’m pretty sure Rick came up with the Aoxomoxoa title. In his comics, the characters were liable to say things like

    WOW GOD DOG!
    MOM,

    or

    E Y E
    A M
    T H E
    I

    I meant to mention that Rick Griffin loved palindromes, palindromic words, and bilateral symmetry in general.

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  213. Twinkie says:
    @Neil Templeton
    Still, if forced to revisit any one of them, I would choose Big Wednesday.

    Still, if forced to revisit any one of them, I would choose Big Wednesday.

    I agree. It’s the least objectionable of the three, and I can nap through it more peacefully.

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  214. @Buzz Mohawk

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable. Which I think is your primary point?
     
    Yes, that's my point. Inheritance is incidental.

    Inheritance in this case is between generations in a country, not specifically or necessarily inside particular families.

    As you say, the intergenerational timelines between parents and their children are too long for simple inheritance to function as the only cycle. That's not a problem, however, thanks to large numbers. There will always be supply from some families' parents matching demand from other families' children.

    This is, of course, simple common sense. It does not play out so neatly in local markets, but over a continent-wide country with hundreds of millions of Citizen-shareholders, it works mathematically.

    Part of my argument is that the United States has already passed its optimum population and needs to stop. This is obvious to those of us who have seen the quality of life drop and problems increase as we have gone from 200 million to 300 million and beyond. When we state it this way, we also happen to immunize ourselves against racial counterarguments.

    As someone pointed out, this is an aesthetic argument at its core. We have a country; what kind of country do we want it to be? Beautiful or crowded? It is our natural right to decide.

    As someone pointed out, this is an aesthetic argument at its core.

    Commenter Dieter Kief made this point, and it is a good one. I should have credited him specifically in my previous comment.

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  215. @Buzz Mohawk

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable. Which I think is your primary point?
     
    Yes, that's my point. Inheritance is incidental.

    Inheritance in this case is between generations in a country, not specifically or necessarily inside particular families.

    As you say, the intergenerational timelines between parents and their children are too long for simple inheritance to function as the only cycle. That's not a problem, however, thanks to large numbers. There will always be supply from some families' parents matching demand from other families' children.

    This is, of course, simple common sense. It does not play out so neatly in local markets, but over a continent-wide country with hundreds of millions of Citizen-shareholders, it works mathematically.

    Part of my argument is that the United States has already passed its optimum population and needs to stop. This is obvious to those of us who have seen the quality of life drop and problems increase as we have gone from 200 million to 300 million and beyond. When we state it this way, we also happen to immunize ourselves against racial counterarguments.

    As someone pointed out, this is an aesthetic argument at its core. We have a country; what kind of country do we want it to be? Beautiful or crowded? It is our natural right to decide.

    This is obvious to those of us who have seen the quality of life drop and problems increase as we have gone from 200 million to 300 million and beyond.

    The quality of life would have dropped no matter who the people were who took us from 200 to 300 million, but it would have been far less bad had they been white people.

    I like Mexican food and Modelo, but I would gladly give them up forever if only all the “hispanics” would leave for good.

    The Home Depot here in the Peoples’ Republic looked like the Third World at 7am today.

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  216. @Anonymous
    Dick Dale invented the sound but Leo Fender masterminded the equipment. And a lot of key pieces were subcontracted: the D-130-F speakers and OEM Triad output transformers.

    But without Dick Dale’s field testing, Jimi Hendrix would have been SOL.

    I had read that Dick Dale participated in the development of the equipment, to get the sound he wanted. Typical for me, I oversimplified the situation. Thanks for clearing that up.

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  217. @Hapalong Cassidy
    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 - you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments. I think if you were born in 1953 though, and thus turning 20 in 1973, you were home free, since I think 1972 was the last year they called anyone up.

    One drawback of being born in 1946-1952 – you could have been drafted to fight in Vietnam. Especially when they went to the lottery system in 1969, which eliminated almost all education deferments.

    Oh man, does that bring back memories! I was born in 1949, and graduated college in 1970. One year earlier, and I could have gotten a deferment for graduate school, or a job with a defense contractor (my major was electrical engineering). One year later, and my lottery number would have been high enough to avoid being drafted. As it was, the only way I could avoid being drafted into the Army was to enlist in the Air Force.

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  218. @MEH 0910
    OT:

    https://twitter.com/MGM_Studios/status/1017093917932544000

    rehash, redo, remake……anything to keep the profits rolling in.

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  219. @Jack D
    What would California be like today if there was no '65 Immigration Act? Surely not as crowded as it is now, but not the same as it was in '65 in any case. People from other states would have kept coming for its paradisiacal qualities until the paradise was ruined. Whites would have had more children if conditions for doing so were better. Would the CA high tech economy be so high tech without fresh infusions of foreign tech talent? Maybe without cheap foreign labor (more of) agricultural production would have shifted to Mexico or you would have even more mechanized farming? It's impossible to know exactly what alternate history would be like but I'm not sure that "everything would be wonderful if only those immigrants hadn't come" is really a complete picture.

    What would California be like today if there was no ’65 Immigration Act? Surely not as crowded as it is now, but not the same as it was in ’65 in any case. People from other states would have kept coming for its paradisiacal qualities until the paradise was ruined. Whites would have had more children if conditions for doing so were better. Would the CA high tech economy be so high tech without fresh infusions of foreign tech talent? Maybe without cheap foreign labor (more of) agricultural production would have shifted to Mexico or you would have even more mechanized farming? It’s impossible to know exactly what alternate history would be like but I’m not sure that “everything would be wonderful if only those immigrants hadn’t come” is really a complete picture.

    Not a hard analysis. More people than 65, far fewer than today.

    Relative to ’65–more crowded and expensive but with clean air and the Internet.

    Relative to today–yes, a somewhat smaller, way more white, tech industry with higher wages. Somewhat smaller, more mechanized agriculture … with higher wages.

    Much much lower housing costs, less traffic, less congestion, more affordable-family-formation, more open space, better schools, lower taxes and a Republican electorate. Sounds hellish!

    “Everything would be wonderful if those immigrants hadn’t come?” … ok, i’ll grant you’d with all the white kids around, you’d have to wait longer for your turn to drop in at your favorite surf spot. Still sound pretty effing wonderful to me.

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  220. @Sparkon

    And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.
     
    More likely, those were Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna), the only year-round resident in California, although both Allen's (Selasphorus sasin) and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus) hummingbirds migrate through the state.

    The Ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) is found primarily east of the Rocky Mountains, and its normal range does not include California. Anna's is the only American hummingbird with an iridescent red crown, while in the RT, the iridescent red feathers are confined to the gorget, or throat area.

    In the CSN&Y classic "Suite Judy Blue Eyes," Stephen Stills sang about the "chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow" but they don't have those in California either, or anywhere else.

    Happy to be corrected.

    Must have been the Rufous, because they were tiny and had a reddish throat.

    We all called them ruby-throated though, I suppose simply because … well, they did have red throats.

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  221. @Dieter Kief
    Ach Achmed - I had almost the same idea - about Joni Mitchell. Wild Things Run Fast" has some worthwhile stuff in it, too. And Hejira and Paprika Plains on "Don Juan's Reckless Daughter"

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BgQNLEDAaWs

    Very liberal on your side - almost a tad aristocratic in it's liberty - -your remark, that "drugs didn't have to be part of it." That's - this kind of tolerance and respect for the minorities - -is of real noblesse, I have to say!

    Yeah, “liberal” in the old terminology. I would pass for no kind of Liberal in the modern sense, Dieter. This tune here is the one that is illustrates my point about Joni Mitchell having written her lyrics before her tunes. That’s all cool, and I’m sure some songwriters (or teams thereof) do it that way. However, no matter how much the lyrics don’t fit, Joni says “hell with that … these are the lyrics and I’m stickin’ to em!” It’s still a good song – have a good night, Dieter.

    California from Blue:

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  222. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Achmed, you may find this haunting song to be of interest:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xPFNdaxraF8

    I DO remember this song, Jenner. I have this album on vinyl.

    It’s got a bit of Michael Stipe whiny stuff, but Green still’s got mostly that great REM sound, as exemplified by my favorite Geography song:

    I mean, how many geography songs are there to begin with?

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  223. trelane says:
    @Jenner Ickham Errican

    And the correct followup [video] is:
     
    Ackshully, it’s this. I posted late, so you get a mulligan. :)

    Thanks, I think ur right

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  224. @boomstick
    The Mermen were the other band I was trying to recall. Not famous, but they had some nice CDs if you wanted to listen while coding.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1aNYf_kznDU

    … if you wanted to listen while coding.

    It’s literally like you read my mind. Surf guitar has a very tight sound to it — like baroque music — that makes it ideal as an accompaniment to coding or writing.

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  225. @Sparkon

    And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.
     
    More likely, those were Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna), the only year-round resident in California, although both Allen's (Selasphorus sasin) and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus) hummingbirds migrate through the state.

    The Ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) is found primarily east of the Rocky Mountains, and its normal range does not include California. Anna's is the only American hummingbird with an iridescent red crown, while in the RT, the iridescent red feathers are confined to the gorget, or throat area.

    In the CSN&Y classic "Suite Judy Blue Eyes," Stephen Stills sang about the "chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow" but they don't have those in California either, or anywhere else.

    Stephen Stills sang about the “chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow” but they don’t have those in California either, or anywhere else.

    You could probably see them in Laurel Canyon in the 1960s if you took just the right amount of LSD.

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  226. @Anonymous
    No, that is indeed what happens. Unless old people were to have the habit of dropping dead once their children reached adulthood, or were forced to transfer their homes to their children and move to nursing homes or something upon their children reaching adulthood. In general, people tend to inherit property, if they do so at all, in late middle age and older.

    Those young families didn't appear out of thin air when your father left. They had to have a place to form long before your father left.

    Note my reply to commenter res regarding this very thing:

    Inheritance in this case is between generations in a country, not specifically or necessarily inside particular families.

    As you say, the intergenerational timelines between parents and their children are too long for simple inheritance to function as the only cycle. That’s not a problem, however, thanks to large numbers. There will always be supply from some families’ parents matching demand from other families’ children.

    If I made it sound like there has to be some kind of direct inheritance of housing along family lines (absurd) I apologize.

    Note that in my previous reply to you, I stated:

    Your implied argument is that somehow limiting development forbids the young from inheriting the properties of the older generation, or from buying available property when older ones move or die.

    I am speaking of generations in general, “the young” and “the older,” as well as “purchasing available property.”

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  227. @Anonymous
    No, that is indeed what happens. Unless old people were to have the habit of dropping dead once their children reached adulthood, or were forced to transfer their homes to their children and move to nursing homes or something upon their children reaching adulthood. In general, people tend to inherit property, if they do so at all, in late middle age and older.

    Those young families didn't appear out of thin air when your father left. They had to have a place to form long before your father left.

    res explains it better than I. It really is the simple result of a steady-state population:

    The key aspect of a balanced population is it eliminates the upward pressure on housing prices resulting from a growing population without a similarly increasing housing stock. Making purchasing affordable.

    It is not about direct inheritance. Sorry for the confusion.

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  228. Anonymous[202] • Disclaimer says:

    Millennials still surf and enjoy the outdoors, contrary to the belief that all they do is scroll through their cell phones and play video games.

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  229. boomstick says:

    Bend in central Oregon has a river surfing area downtown.

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  230. Shaq says:

    Steve –

    Too many posts!

    Anyway, trying to tie together Ireland and surfing:

    http://tbaysurf.com/surfing/irish-surf-legends/

    Also, for the Bay Area, Santa Cruz (and the environs) are red hot. Great surfing and expensive 2nd homes.

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  231. Speaking about the deteriorating environment in California, I went to Muir Woods about three weeks ago. My sister-in-law was visiting from overseas and so I took the family. At any rate, you now have to park in Sausalito and take a shuttle bus which added a good hour to the trip. The permanent Democratic / liberal overlords who decide such things now have determined that it is better to shove more diversity at the expense of lessening the experience. With any luck, that is as far North as the silicon valley clique will venture leaving the remaining spaces up north relatively unspoiled.

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  232. @Sparkon

    And ruby-throated hummingbirds in every garden, flitting through the morning glories.
     
    More likely, those were Anna's hummingbirds (Calypte anna), the only year-round resident in California, although both Allen's (Selasphorus sasin) and Rufous (Selasphorus rufus) hummingbirds migrate through the state.

    The Ruby-throated hummingbird (Archilochus colubris) is found primarily east of the Rocky Mountains, and its normal range does not include California. Anna's is the only American hummingbird with an iridescent red crown, while in the RT, the iridescent red feathers are confined to the gorget, or throat area.

    In the CSN&Y classic "Suite Judy Blue Eyes," Stephen Stills sang about the "chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow" but they don't have those in California either, or anywhere else.

    In the CSN&Y classic “Suite Judy Blue Eyes,” Stephen Stills sang about the “chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow”

    Yeah, that came to mind when Old Palo Altan used the adjective.

    Actually, Neil Young wasn’t with them when they recorded that song in 1969, or on the Crosby, Stills & Nash album it was on, when it was released that year. The band was called Crosby, Stills and Nash at that point.

    Neil Young was on the next album and they became Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

    When they picked a name for the group, they deliberately used their last names, so that if one principal member left, the group couldn’t continue with the same name. Crosby’s experience with Jim/Roger McGuinn’s band, The Byrds, which he left in acrimony, had something to do with the decision.

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    Yes, you're right. Over time, depending on active members, the band has been known and/or referred to as CSN, CS&N, CSN&Y, and CSNY. Even then, pedants quibbled about the band's name, so I've heard this song before. And stay tuned:

    Young echoed these sentiments in a January 2017 interview: “I think CSNY has every chance of getting together again. I’m not against it.
     
    CSN had already recorded the eponymous album Crosby, Stills & Nash including "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes" before Young formally joined the band.

    With Young on board, the restructured group embarked on a four-leg, 39-date tour... Their first gig was on August 16, 1969, at the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, with Joni Mitchell as their opening act. They mentioned they were going to someplace called Woodstock the next day, but that they had no idea where that was.
     
    CSN&Y performed S:JBE after Young joined the band even while the song was still in the Top 40, and David Crosby still couldn't sing.

    On November 13th 1969, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young performed at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, California. They opened their thirteen song set with "Suite: Judy Blue Eyes." At the time the song was at #27 on Billboard's Hot Top 100 chart, ten days later on November 23rd, 1969 it would peak at #21 {for 2 weeks} and spent 12 weeks on the Top 100...

     

    In 1971, CSN&Y released Four Way Street, which included just 33 seconds of S:JBE, probably from the live tour. Later, Young left the band, which went back to being just CSN, at least for a while.

    As for the Byrds birds: the American goldfinch is sometimes known informally as a "wild canary," and the females are a quite drab yellow-brown color in winter, but only an imaginative songwriter seeking rhythmic lyrics would describe their winter coat as "chestnut brown." The House finch and Purple finch are somewhat sparrow-like in appearance, and both have a rosy, reddish breast in the breeding males, but "ruby-throated" is really pushing it, and neither bird is a sparrow.

    A classmate at Syracuse had talked me in to going to Woodstock in '69, but about halfway there we decided to turn back because of the massive traffic jams being reported on the radio.
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  233. @prosa123
    "Best year to be born 1937. Avoid all wars. Climb the corporate,college or government ladder easily."

    I remember hearing one of my great-grandfathers say that being born in 1900 served him very well in life. He just missed the World War I draft, climbed the corporate ladder in the Roaring Twenties (and was well enough established to make it through the Great Depression relatively unscathed), was over the age for the World War II draft, had a nice late stage career during the prosperous 1950's, and retired in the late 1960's when most corporations still had generous pensions. His only bit of hardship was in the last several years before he died in 1990, as by then his once-generous pension didn't amount to much and his Social Security wasn't too high because his lifetime earnings were modest by contemporary standards.

    Both of my Grandfathers were born in 1900 also; October and December so they missed ww1. One was waiting to graduate from high school before enlisting and the other was on a train coming back from college when the armistice was signed. My father was even luckier. He signed up for the USAAF when he graduated from high school in 1944. He was in training to be a tail gunner on a b-29 and was made active duty the day the surrender announced. That meant that he technically he was part of the greatest event of his generation, something that my uncle who was born two years later was not. My oldest brother was in the Vietnam draft in 1971-72 but missed getting his number called.

    The opposite of that was my great great grandfathers and their brothers / cousins / uncles on both sides of my family and the war who fertilized much of Pennsylvania and Virginia.

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  234. Sparkon says:
    @PiltdownMan

    In the CSN&Y classic “Suite Judy Blue Eyes,” Stephen Stills sang about the “chestnut-brown canary, ruby-throated sparrow”
     
    Yeah, that came to mind when Old Palo Altan used the adjective.

    Actually, Neil Young wasn't with them when they recorded that song in 1969, or on the Crosby, Stills & Nash album it was on, when it was released that year. The band was called Crosby, Stills and Nash at that point.

    Neil Young was on the next album and they became Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young.

    When they picked a name for the group, they deliberately used their last names, so that if one principal member left, the group couldn't continue with the same name. Crosby's experience with Jim/Roger McGuinn's band, The Byrds, which he left in acrimony, had something to do with the decision.

    Yes, you’re right. Over time, depending on active members, the band has been known and/or referred to as CSN, CS&N, CSN&Y, and CSNY. Even then, pedants quibbled about the band’s name, so I’ve heard this song before. And stay tuned:

    Young echoed these sentiments in a January 2017 interview: “I think CSNY has every chance of getting together again. I’m not against it.

    CSN had already recorded the eponymous album Crosby, Stills & Nash including “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes” before Young formally joined the band.

    With Young on board, the restructured group embarked on a four-leg, 39-date tour… Their first gig was on August 16, 1969, at the Auditorium Theatre in Chicago, with Joni Mitchell as their opening act. They mentioned they were going to someplace called Woodstock the next day, but that they had no idea where that was.

    CSN&Y performed S:JBE after Young joined the band even while the song was still in the Top 40, and David Crosby still couldn’t sing.

    On November 13th 1969, Crosby, Stills, Nash, and Young performed at the Winterland Ballroom in San Francisco, California. They opened their thirteen song set with “Suite: Judy Blue Eyes.” At the time the song was at #27 on Billboard’s Hot Top 100 chart, ten days later on November 23rd, 1969 it would peak at #21 {for 2 weeks} and spent 12 weeks on the Top 100…

    In 1971, CSN&Y released Four Way Street, which included just 33 seconds of S:JBE, probably from the live tour. Later, Young left the band, which went back to being just CSN, at least for a while.

    As for the Byrds birds: the American goldfinch is sometimes known informally as a “wild canary,” and the females are a quite drab yellow-brown color in winter, but only an imaginative songwriter seeking rhythmic lyrics would describe their winter coat as “chestnut brown.” The House finch and Purple finch are somewhat sparrow-like in appearance, and both have a rosy, reddish breast in the breeding males, but “ruby-throated” is really pushing it, and neither bird is a sparrow.

    A classmate at Syracuse had talked me in to going to Woodstock in ’69, but about halfway there we decided to turn back because of the massive traffic jams being reported on the radio.

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  235. @JMcG
    Joe,
    I spent some nights in the summer of ‘73 in a tiki bar in the (barely) west of Ireland. It was actually called the Kon-Tiki; that’s how tiki it was. The band played on a little raft in the middle of a tiny pond inside the pub itself.

    JMcG, My wife tells me that the name of the local Tiki bar was the Mauna Kai.

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  236. Highlander says: • Website
    @Charles Pewitt
    Young Americans of European Christian ancestry will retaliate against the treasonous nation-wrecking White scum born before 1965.

    Mass immigration is an inter-generational attack on young people of European Christian ancestry.

    The baby boomers and the generations before the baby boomers treasonously used mass immigration to attack the future ancestral core of the United States. This has happened in many European Christian nations. The United States, Germany, France, Australia, England, Canada, the Netherlands and other European Christian nations are all under attack from mass immigration and multicultural mayhem.

    Stupid young people will smarten up when they gain control of the central banks in all European Christian nations and then refuse to pay ALL of the government debt fraudulently stacked up by the evil nation-wreckers born before 1965.

    OK, now I'll read Sailer's bit. The surfer guy harassed by non-Europeans while he was younger has a tall wife with a magnificent can, that's my opinion, and I got lots of them.

    The ant-white Immigration and Nationality Act of 1965 that opened the borders was proposed by Rep. Imanuel Celler (born 1888) sponsored by Sen. Philip Hart (born 1912) land passed by a Congress largely made up of the WWII generation.

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  237. Highlander says: • Website
    @alaska3636
    The Superbank has some manmade qualities:
    https://www.surfertoday.com/surfing/11482-the-superbank-a-joint-venture-between-man-and-nature

    But ocean currents and sand build-up are super fickle, bro.

    Dumping an artificial reef somewhere would be cool but I'm not sure how easy it would be to predict the effects of undertaking such a project.

    Kelly Slater's Wave Ranch is the closest thing to creating super waves:
    http://www.kswaveco.com/

    Surfing is large industry in California. I have several friends making a career with varying degrees of success. This article estimates that riding waves is a $50 billion dollar industry worldwide:

    https://samuelwills.files.wordpress.com/2012/10/mcgregorwills2017.pdf

    I love surfing, but I would give it up in a minute or two for affordable houses.

    WannaSurf is for barneys and their “ratings” pimping is a joke.

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  238. Highlander says: • Website
    @Charles Pewitt
    1946

    David Lynch was born in 1946. George W Bush was too.

    Baby boomer David Lynch has the ultimate answer to baby boomer George W Bush's assertion that most baby boomers didn't protest against the Vietnam War or rebel against the ruling class.

    Unsaid by David Lynch, but the subtext of his movies, was that the baby boomers who didn't protest strongly against the Vietnam War or rebel against the ruling class of the American Empire were much worse nation-wreckers than the ones who did protest the war and the ruling class.

    The baby boomers are the human monsters who will destroy the United States and other European Christian nations. Bill Clinton and George W Bush are the evil baby boomer mutants who could be called Globalizerhead instead of Eraserhead.

    Baby boomer scum George W Bush and Bill Clinton did everything they could to erase the borders of the United States and the sovereignty of the United States. Bill Clinton and George W Bush pushed open borders mass immigration and multiculturalism.

    The baby boomer generation has willingly pushed for the erasure of European Christendom in many different European Christian nations.

    It was the money-grubbing, regular baby boomers who are responsible for the civilizational disaster that is destroying the United States.

    Solution?

    Yep.

    Raise the federal funds rate to 10 percent and implode the asset bubbles in bonds, stocks and real estate and deport 50 million or so of the foreigners who have invaded the United States.

    I’d be mad as hell and as envious as you are Charles if I too was blocked from promotion out of cubicle-land by boomers who refuse to retire. Hahahahaha!

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  239. Highlander says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    In the 50 years that Hollywood has been making surf films, audiences have never been as enthused as wave-crazed executives and filmmakers thought they would. Nobody learned that lesson harder than Steven Spielberg and George Lucas. Normally shrewd businessmen, they read John Milius’s script for Big Wednesday and got so swept up that they traded points on their own projects.

    “They gave John points in Close Encounters of the Third Kind and Star Wars for a piece of Big Wednesday,” said George, who got Spielberg to reminisce about the debacle. “Steven says, kind of sharply, `We only did that once, and it worked out better for some than others.’ Everyone assumed Big Wednesday was going to be a big summer blockbuster, and when Steven and George read the script, they thought this was a beach-bound American Graffiti, with Jaws mixed in. Big Wednesday was a disaster, and Close Encounters and Star Wars each grossed around $600 million.”

    https://deadline.com/2010/05/how-steven-spielberg-and-george-lucas-caught-surf-bug-and-waved-bye-to-points-on-close-encounters-and-star-wars-39792/

    It’s still a way better movie than Point Break despite the final totally hokey big wave scene where Malibu is filmed at Sunset.

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  240. MEH 0910 says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Tiki bars are back recently.

    My impression is that surf clothes brands like Hollister (named after a surf region out past Santa Barbara) were big about a decade ago, and Abercrombie and Fitch was heavily into surf styles back then. But not these days.

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