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Stoller: "The Hamilton Hustle"
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From The Baffler:

The Hamilton Hustle
Why liberals have embraced our most dangerously reactionary founder

Matt Stoller

… But if you want to understand the politics of authoritarianism in America, the place to start is not with Trump, but with the cool-kid Founding Father of the Obama era, Alexander Hamilton.

I’m not just talking about the actual founder, though we’ll come back to him. I’m talking about the personage at the center of the Broadway musical, Hamilton.
The show is a Tony Award–winning smash hit, propelling its writer, Lin-Manuel Miranda, to dizzying heights of fame and influence. It is America’s Les Misérables, an achingly beautiful and funny piece of theater about a most unlikely icon of democratic inclusiveness, Alexander Hamilton.

… Miranda’s play is one of the most brilliant propaganda pieces in theatrical history. And its construction and success tell us a lot about our current political moment. Before it was even written, the play was nurtured at the highest levels of the political establishment. While working through its material, Miranda road-tested song lyrics at the White House with President Obama. When it was performed, Obama, naturally, loved it. Hamilton, he said, “reminds us of the vital, crazy, kinetic energy that’s at the heart of America.” Michelle Obama pronounced it the best art she had ever seen. …

Conservative pop-historian Niall Ferguson opened up a book talk, according to one witness on Twitter, “with a rap set to music inspired by Hamilton.” Former secretaries of the treasury praised it, from Tim Geithner to Jack Lew to Hank Paulson. So did Dick Cheney, prompting Obama to note that the wonder of the play was perhaps the only thing the two men agreed on. … Hillary Clinton quoted the play in her speech accepting the Democratic nomination, and told a young voter, “I’ve seen the show three times and I’ve cried every time—and danced hard in my seat.” …

Oh, boy …

… But Alexander Hamilton simply didn’t believe in democracy, which he labeled an American “disease.” He fought—with military force—any model of organizing the American political economy that might promote egalitarian politics. He was an authoritarian, and proud of it. …

Indeed, most of Hamilton’s legacy is astonishingly counter-democratic. His central role in founding both the financial infrastructure of Wall Street and a nascent military establishment (which supplanted the colonial system of locally controlled democratic militias) was rooted in his self-appointed crusade to undermine the ability of ordinary Americans to govern themselves.

To the people paying four figures for a ticket, that’s a feature not a bug. Not too many Jeffersonian yeomen, much less Jacksonian backwoodsmen, can afford the highest-priced show in Broadway history, which would have made Hamilton happy.

… In the roaring 1920s, when Wall Street lorded it over all facets of our public life, treasury secretary Andrew Mellon put Hamilton’s face on the ten-dollar bill. …

During the next decade, as populists put constraints on big money, Hamilton fell into disrepute. … By 1947, a post-war congressional report titled “Fascism in Action” listed Hamilton as one intellectual inspiration for the Nazi regime.

Hamilton the play is not the real story of Alexander Hamilton; rather, as historian Nancy Isenberg has noted, it’s a revealing parable about the politics of the finance-friendly Obama era.

But Stoller won’t touch the core of how Hamilton reveals the essence of the Obama/Hillary Era: Identity Politics Pimping Plutocracy:

Hamilton, or shall I say Hamilton! (i.e., the character in the musical, not the historical A.H.), is an immigrant, a nonwhite, and, maybe, secretly Jewish. And, as the star of a Broadway musical, an honorary gay.

That makes him Good.

And all that plutocratic stuff makes him better.

 
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  1. OT:

    http://www.cnbc.com/2017/03/20/private-label-mortgage-bonds-are-rising-from-the-grave.html

    They aren’t even trying to hide it. Some great quotes in this one:

    “We’re verifying, and in the regulatory environment you have to. Investors who buy these loans demand it,” said Michael Fierman, co-founder and CEO of Angel Oak Capital Advisors. “So yes, some of these borrowers have had some credit dings or other issues that take them out of the box, but they’re not necessarily higher-risk borrowers, I would argue.”

    Reinflate that housing bubble!

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  2. Off topic. Is Trump in real danger of being toppled over these Russian allegations?

    The allegations seem idiotic to me and I have even heard people say Brexit only happened because of Russian hacking. That’s really dumb as British elections are counted by hand.

    PCers here believe Trump is on the verge of impeachment.

    Is that even plausible?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Guy de Champlagne
    He is very unpopular and while it will take more than what we've seen to lead to impeachment many of the allegations are not idiotic. Russian hacking may have swung the election and there isn't anything comparable that helped Clinton. Talking about media influence or the foreign leaders endorsing Clinton doesn't come close to establishing any kind of real equivalency. The question of how convincing the evidence is is beyond my pay grade. But it's silly to call all the allegations idiotic.

    https://www.good.is/articles/trump-low-approval-ratings

    , @whorefinder
    The Left and the Cucks are dangerously misreading the mood of the country, and their position.

    First, Trump has Congress in control of his party, so the unhinged wackos of the Left can't give him the full Stalinist show-trial treatment.

    Second, cucks like Lindsay Graham and John McCain wilt in the face of public disapproval.

    Third, Trump smartly filled his adminstration with generals, one major reason being he knows how polarizing he is, and wanted to have some backstop against a coup.

    Don't forget how the R's completely misread the country's mood when it came to Bill Clinton's impeachment. Clinton was proven outright to have lied under oath, which scnadalized him, but they should have left it at that. The impeachment caused the American people to rally around Bubba and get angry. The R's overreached and it saved his legacy.

    If the Left and the Cucks try some ham-fisted impeachment now, not only will there be riots in the streets and mass demonstrations, but the generals in his administration will be securing lower-ranked military officers to be ready to deploy if Trump is convicted, with the full-throated support of the people. And McCain and Graham and any cuck who supports them can kiss their seat in congress goodbye.

    But I don't think it will get to that point. Maddow's overreach on the 2005 taxes blew up in her face so bad that Stephen Colbert---yes, Stephen Colbert---mocked her nonsense in a skit. Trump just needs one more lefty overreach---perhaps through another leak----to get the left feeling too embarassed to consider impeachment. Trump's very deft at making the corporate media and angry Left look foolish and deranged, and it's a skill he'll bring to bear if he thinks he's in danger of impeachment.

    , @IHTG
    No, but let them continue believing that.
    , @eD
    (re OT comment on Trump impeachment)

    Pretty much the deal is that the GOP establishment, which controls Congress, is happy to have Trump to sell the GOP agenda of tax cuts and business deregulation, and more taxpayer money for the military industrial complex. They want their cheap labor and free trade, but are willing to give Trump token victories here as long as he does his job.

    There are two issues here. The first is whether Trump is happy to carry out the GOP agenda in return for the perks of being President of the US, staying within the pattern of past recent prezes, or if he will insist on the populist elements on his agenda. The second is whether Trump can really be a satisfactory frontman even if he wants to do this At some point it will have to involve selling his supporters down the river.

    Right now, we don't know. If Trump can't be a satisfactory front-man like Obama was, for whatever reason, the GOP leadership in Congress will be looking for an excuse for impeachment and removal. I don't think the Russian stuff will work, they will have to come up with something else. They also will need the co-operation of the Donks to get Pence in the White House, if the Donks don't demand something for this the party is useless even as an opposition, but that may well be the case.
  3. I’d still gladly graft Clinton’s banking policy onto Trump any day. How many Goldman Sachs alumnae does Trump have running around in high level positions in his administration?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Other than Goldman Sachs alumna Dina Powell, I think the other half dozen or so are alumni.
  4. @22pp22
    Off topic. Is Trump in real danger of being toppled over these Russian allegations?

    The allegations seem idiotic to me and I have even heard people say Brexit only happened because of Russian hacking. That's really dumb as British elections are counted by hand.

    PCers here believe Trump is on the verge of impeachment.

    Is that even plausible?

    He is very unpopular and while it will take more than what we’ve seen to lead to impeachment many of the allegations are not idiotic. Russian hacking may have swung the election and there isn’t anything comparable that helped Clinton. Talking about media influence or the foreign leaders endorsing Clinton doesn’t come close to establishing any kind of real equivalency. The question of how convincing the evidence is is beyond my pay grade. But it’s silly to call all the allegations idiotic.

    https://www.good.is/articles/trump-low-approval-ratings

    Read More
    • Troll: IHTG, Clyde, Forbes
    • Replies: @Emblematic
    If your claim that "Russian hacking may have swung the election..." is true then can we maybe see some evidence?
    Have we seen any real forensic evidence that the DNC and Podesta emails were 'hacked' by Russia?

    The whole Russia thing originally started off as a tactic for the Democrats to avoid talking about the embarrassing *content* of the emails, and only after Trump unexpectedly won did they begin using it to try and bring down the administration.

    Comey keeps saying he can't go into details becuse "ongoing". Quite a convenient way to keep the narrative going without actually producing anything.
    , @WJ
    "But it's silly to call all the allegation idiotic". Correct, it is not silly, it is insane. The idea that the Russians "hacked" or swayed the election is easily the equivalent of the "Obama was born in Kenya" theory. Modern day nuttery that if spewed by the other side would be rightly be condemned by our absurd and increasingly irrelevant media.

    Trump will still be the president on January 1, 2021. If HRC gets the nomination (and if he runs) he will be the president on January 1, 2025.
    , @LondonBob
    PPD, most accurate in 2016, alongside Trafalgar, has Trump's ratings as plus 7. Trafalgar also has some recent approval rating polling from SC and the peach state which are also pretty spiffy. These fake polls will prove as successful as the last time they were deployed. Sad!
    , @Oleaginous Outrager
    Yes, those wily and tech-savvy Rooskies hacked paper ballots. The allegations are less idiotic than your attempted "defense" of them.
  5. @22pp22
    Off topic. Is Trump in real danger of being toppled over these Russian allegations?

    The allegations seem idiotic to me and I have even heard people say Brexit only happened because of Russian hacking. That's really dumb as British elections are counted by hand.

    PCers here believe Trump is on the verge of impeachment.

    Is that even plausible?

    The Left and the Cucks are dangerously misreading the mood of the country, and their position.

    First, Trump has Congress in control of his party, so the unhinged wackos of the Left can’t give him the full Stalinist show-trial treatment.

    Second, cucks like Lindsay Graham and John McCain wilt in the face of public disapproval.

    Third, Trump smartly filled his adminstration with generals, one major reason being he knows how polarizing he is, and wanted to have some backstop against a coup.

    Don’t forget how the R’s completely misread the country’s mood when it came to Bill Clinton’s impeachment. Clinton was proven outright to have lied under oath, which scnadalized him, but they should have left it at that. The impeachment caused the American people to rally around Bubba and get angry. The R’s overreached and it saved his legacy.

    If the Left and the Cucks try some ham-fisted impeachment now, not only will there be riots in the streets and mass demonstrations, but the generals in his administration will be securing lower-ranked military officers to be ready to deploy if Trump is convicted, with the full-throated support of the people. And McCain and Graham and any cuck who supports them can kiss their seat in congress goodbye.

    But I don’t think it will get to that point. Maddow’s overreach on the 2005 taxes blew up in her face so bad that Stephen Colbert—yes, Stephen Colbert—mocked her nonsense in a skit. Trump just needs one more lefty overreach—perhaps through another leak—-to get the left feeling too embarassed to consider impeachment. Trump’s very deft at making the corporate media and angry Left look foolish and deranged, and it’s a skill he’ll bring to bear if he thinks he’s in danger of impeachment.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
    Here's something else to chew on:

    The largest uniformed law enforcement agency that carries guns is the US Border Patrol, to the tune of 19k uniformed agents.

    One of Trump's very first acts was to replace the FBI yes man who was the first Chief from outside the agency with the former acting Chief, and get very very cozy with the Patrol's union.

    Basically Trump has indeed, covered his counter coup bases. If the FBI leadership starts feeling its oats and tries something funny, I'd be very nervous as a regular FBI agent. The average FBI agent has been riding a desk and the agent corps is four figures. The average Patrol Agent has been engaging in low level counter insurgency ops along the SWB for at least two decades.

    If the two agencies clash, I know who I'm betting on.

  6. I think the best thing about Hamilton! is that it’s a great bellweather about whether someone is worth your time.

    If someone says, “I love Hamilton!” they are either stupid or slimy, but, in either case, you should avoid their company.

    Read More
  7. @22pp22
    Off topic. Is Trump in real danger of being toppled over these Russian allegations?

    The allegations seem idiotic to me and I have even heard people say Brexit only happened because of Russian hacking. That's really dumb as British elections are counted by hand.

    PCers here believe Trump is on the verge of impeachment.

    Is that even plausible?

    No, but let them continue believing that.

    Read More
  8. @Guy de Champlagne
    I'd still gladly graft Clinton's banking policy onto Trump any day. How many Goldman Sachs alumnae does Trump have running around in high level positions in his administration?

    Other than Goldman Sachs alumna Dina Powell, I think the other half dozen or so are alumni.

    Read More
  9. @Guy de Champlagne
    He is very unpopular and while it will take more than what we've seen to lead to impeachment many of the allegations are not idiotic. Russian hacking may have swung the election and there isn't anything comparable that helped Clinton. Talking about media influence or the foreign leaders endorsing Clinton doesn't come close to establishing any kind of real equivalency. The question of how convincing the evidence is is beyond my pay grade. But it's silly to call all the allegations idiotic.

    https://www.good.is/articles/trump-low-approval-ratings

    If your claim that “Russian hacking may have swung the election…” is true then can we maybe see some evidence?
    Have we seen any real forensic evidence that the DNC and Podesta emails were ‘hacked’ by Russia?

    The whole Russia thing originally started off as a tactic for the Democrats to avoid talking about the embarrassing *content* of the emails, and only after Trump unexpectedly won did they begin using it to try and bring down the administration.

    Comey keeps saying he can’t go into details becuse “ongoing”. Quite a convenient way to keep the narrative going without actually producing anything.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ragno

    The whole Russia thing originally started off as a tactic for the Democrats to avoid talking about the embarrassing *content* of the emails, and only after Trump unexpectedly won did they begin using it to try and bring down the administration.
     
    Thank you, thank you, THANK you!

    What, I can't help but wonder, will it take for sober-minded and trustworthy Americans to begin reading those e-mails and putting the breadcrumb trail of treasonous criminality together?

    Or is it that they simply don't want to acknowledge that Hillary's me-too desire to hang a Muslim pelt on her wall led to the Libyan debacle and the entire "refugee" nightmare of the past few years? Leftists will forgive "Her" anything....but can they really forgive her precipitating a catastrophic human-rights clusterf**k as a byproduct of her own ambition?

    We'll never find out so long as the story is The Hacking and not The Damn E-mails!!

  10. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    This musical makes people ‘cry’?

    What happens that is cry-worthy?

    Is it a tragedy?

    Terry Teachout of COMMENTARY said he cried too.

    What are these, babies?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    At those ticket prices, they ought to cry.

    Is there a Virtue Signaling Index, along the lines of the Forbes Magazine cost of living exceedingly well?
    Hillary voter - check
    Eats artisanal anything - check
    Private schools - check
    Vacationed on the Cape, or the Vineyard - check
    At least one relative owns a Prius - check
    No blue collar relatives for at least a generation, preferably two - check
    Never took a lit class in college - oh, wait
    , @James Kabala
    Actually, it kind of is. It ends with the violent death of the main character, obviously, and it features the violent death of his son before that, so it is a tragedy in the modern vernacular sense. Whether it is a tragedy in the Greek sense is more doubtful, but one could argue that both Hamilton and Burr have tragic flaws (principally ambition in both cases).
    , @vinteuil
    Terry Teachout, who I first met when I was playing 'cello and he was playing 'bass in the Kansas City Youth Symphony c. 1973, and who I kept up with from time to time for many years, used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs.

    Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich - eh. Not in the same class.

    Nowadays, he tears up at Hamilton.

    Hamilton

    Sad.
  11. Re: Hamilton’s purported Jewishness, it has been a source of some dismay to learn that my ancestor, Robert Morris, Hamilton’s predecessor, from whom he borrowed much of the financial architecture of the fledging country, has had his actual accomplishments misattributed for many years. There now stand three separate monuments to Haym Salomon, an agent of Financier Morris. Additionally, during the Bicentennial, Salomon was commemorated with a dual-sided stamp by the USPS, a first for that organization. Morris’ very real contributions to our nation’s founding have for too long been overshadowed by his now more famous successor Hamilton, and by his underling Salomon’s heirs’ efforts on their ancestor’s behalf.

    http://personal.stevens.edu/~llevine/haym_salomon_part_27.pdf

    Read More
  12. Re: Hamilton’s purported Jewishness, it has been a source of some dismay to learn that my ancestor, Robert Morris, Hamilton’s predecessor, from whom he borrowed much of the financial architecture of the fledging country, has had his actual accomplishments misattributed for many years. There now stand three separate monuments to Hyam Salomon, an agent of Financier Morris. Additionally, during the Bicentennial, Salomon was commemorated with a dual-sided stamp by the USPS. Morris’ very real contributions to our nation’s founding have for too long been overshadowed by his now more famous successor Hamilton, and by his underling Salomon’s heirs’ efforts on their ancestor’s behalf.

    http://personal.stevens.edu/~llevine/haym_salomon_part_27.pdf

    Read More
  13. @Anon
    This musical makes people 'cry'?

    What happens that is cry-worthy?

    Is it a tragedy?

    Terry Teachout of COMMENTARY said he cried too.

    What are these, babies?

    At those ticket prices, they ought to cry.

    Is there a Virtue Signaling Index, along the lines of the Forbes Magazine cost of living exceedingly well?
    Hillary voter – check
    Eats artisanal anything – check
    Private schools – check
    Vacationed on the Cape, or the Vineyard – check
    At least one relative owns a Prius – check
    No blue collar relatives for at least a generation, preferably two – check
    Never took a lit class in college – oh, wait

    Read More
  14. Before this absurd musical came to be, Hamilton was most memorable to me as the guy who instigated and became strangely involved in the Whiskey Rebellion, the first conflict to arise out of overreach by the US government. The weird part about it was that Hamilton wanted to be a military leader. From http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/biographies/alexander-hamilton/the-whiskey-rebellion—august-1794.php :

    Upon his return, Hamilton was castigated by the press. His actions provided undeniable proof to Republicans that Hamilton was a monster who would stop at nothing to defend his corrupt policies, a budding Caesar bent on establishing a monarchy. For his part, Hamilton dismissed the criticism: “It is long since I have learnt to hold popular opinion of no value . . .”

    But what was at the root of Hamilton’s extreme reaction to the Whiskey Rebellion? Hamilton was, after all, much too astute politically to believe his official reasoning that his involvement would have a positive effect. Nothing was more basic to Hamilton’s personality than a love of military command and all the danger and glory it afforded; and the opportunity to once again ride out in uniform with Washington must have been irresistible to him.

    Burr was even weirder than Hamilton, but I still say the best guy won that duel. And the government never really put down the Whiskey Rebellion – the Scotch Irish of the Appalachians were moonshiners for a couple of hundred years afterwards.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It was the Revolutionary / Napoleonic Era, after all. That's how Hamilton got himself killed in his duel with Aaron Burr: he was worried that if he laughed off Burr, he wouldn't be taken seriously as the North American Bonaparte when the time came. Burr felt much the same.
  15. @J1234
    Before this absurd musical came to be, Hamilton was most memorable to me as the guy who instigated and became strangely involved in the Whiskey Rebellion, the first conflict to arise out of overreach by the US government. The weird part about it was that Hamilton wanted to be a military leader. From http://www.let.rug.nl/usa/biographies/alexander-hamilton/the-whiskey-rebellion---august-1794.php :

    Upon his return, Hamilton was castigated by the press. His actions provided undeniable proof to Republicans that Hamilton was a monster who would stop at nothing to defend his corrupt policies, a budding Caesar bent on establishing a monarchy. For his part, Hamilton dismissed the criticism: "It is long since I have learnt to hold popular opinion of no value . . ."

    But what was at the root of Hamilton's extreme reaction to the Whiskey Rebellion? Hamilton was, after all, much too astute politically to believe his official reasoning that his involvement would have a positive effect. Nothing was more basic to Hamilton's personality than a love of military command and all the danger and glory it afforded; and the opportunity to once again ride out in uniform with Washington must have been irresistible to him.
     

    Burr was even weirder than Hamilton, but I still say the best guy won that duel. And the government never really put down the Whiskey Rebellion - the Scotch Irish of the Appalachians were moonshiners for a couple of hundred years afterwards.

    It was the Revolutionary / Napoleonic Era, after all. That’s how Hamilton got himself killed in his duel with Aaron Burr: he was worried that if he laughed off Burr, he wouldn’t be taken seriously as the North American Bonaparte when the time came. Burr felt much the same.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    he was worried that if he laughed off Burr, he wouldn’t be taken seriously as the North American Bonaparte when the time came. Burr felt much the same.
     
    It's not just Napoleonic.

    Look what happened to W after he didn't take seriously blatant offenses to his honor during his administration. Dueling isn't the only answer, but you can't just sit there.
  16. The “party of Jefferson and Jackson” has now embraced Jefferson’s arch-enemy, the oligarchical Federalist Hamilton, wants Jackson off the twenty dollar bill, and are embarrassed about calling their annual powwows “Jefferson-Jackson Day dinners.”

    And, the Donald has visited the Hermitage and declared himself the true heir of Old Hickory.

    Personally, I always wanted to be a member of a party that could embrace the author of the Declaration of Independence and the scourge of the Second Bank.

    This political realignment is working out okay.

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Read More
  17. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    “Honorary gay” ? Hardly. How little “conservatives” know of actual history.

    Washington’s letters state that he was less than thrilled with marital life (“not much fire between the sheets”) and preferred the company of men — particularly the young Alexander Hamilton, whom he made his personal secretary — to that of women. His concern for his male colleagues clearly extended to their personal lives. This was especially true of Hamilton, whom he brought with him to Valley Forge, giving Hamilton a cabin to share with his then-lover, John Laurens, to whom Hamilton had written passionate love letters that are still extant.

    http://gayhistoryproject.epgn.com/historical-profiles/george-washington-gay-friendly-father-of-our-country/

    Read More
    • Replies: @5371
    Your moldy old lies have been in the bathhouse too long.
  18. The “Hamilton was Jewish” meme doesn’t really work despite the efforts of the professor, since there’s no question that Hamilton was not ethnically Jewish and there’s no question he ever practiced Judaism. Whether his mother was for some time Jewish is sort of like saying Madonna is Jewish.

    Read More
    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Sounds like the purported Jewishness of all Trump's grandchildren, fictional.
  19. In case anybody’s curious, Hamilton may be heard, complete, on YouTube, with synchronized text, here:

    The word “kitschy” does not even begin to do justice to the full dreckiness of it all.

    I mean, commercial pleasantry is what Broadway, past, present & future, is all about. But add hip-hop to the mix & you descend into aesthetic depths that make Hello Dolly look like a work of eternal genius.

    Read More
  20. @Anon
    This musical makes people 'cry'?

    What happens that is cry-worthy?

    Is it a tragedy?

    Terry Teachout of COMMENTARY said he cried too.

    What are these, babies?

    Actually, it kind of is. It ends with the violent death of the main character, obviously, and it features the violent death of his son before that, so it is a tragedy in the modern vernacular sense. Whether it is a tragedy in the Greek sense is more doubtful, but one could argue that both Hamilton and Burr have tragic flaws (principally ambition in both cases).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Does it make sense to grieve for a fool who'd been rappin' and yappin' nonsense for 2 or 3 hrs?

    I'd think when the fool finally dies, RUN-DMC should come out and say 'You talked too much, and now you shut up.'
  21. @Anon
    This musical makes people 'cry'?

    What happens that is cry-worthy?

    Is it a tragedy?

    Terry Teachout of COMMENTARY said he cried too.

    What are these, babies?

    Terry Teachout, who I first met when I was playing ‘cello and he was playing ‘bass in the Kansas City Youth Symphony c. 1973, and who I kept up with from time to time for many years, used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs.

    Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich – eh. Not in the same class.

    Nowadays, he tears up at Hamilton.

    Hamilton

    Sad.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    "...used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs. Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich – eh. Not in the same class."

    He was more a musical blob than a snob. I mean anyone with sense knows Sibelius was the greatest of all time. Sym 4, 5, and 7 have never been topped.

    But snob or blob, he was never just a classical music guy. For a long time, he was a fan of Jazz, arguing against the 'creation myth' that Negroes alone created Jazz. And he wrote about musicals. And he likes the Beatles too. So, even if he has certain elitists tastes in music, his taste was comprehensive.

    Now, if some people had a fun time at HAMILTON, I can understand. Maybe it's lively and have some funny parts.

    But CRY at a rap musical? I mean GROW UP!!

    I generally don't think the musical format makes for good tragedy. WEST SIDE STORY has some fantastic numbers, but when the Puerto kid shot the Polish guy, I wished he'd shot the girl too. I mean Natalie Wood's sermon at the end is excruciating.

    One of the darkest musicals is OKLAHOMA, but I don't recall seeing the whole thing. It begins with Oh What a Beautiful Morning, then it gets really boring for a while, and then the ending is pretty disturbing.

    , @Desiderius
    The Holy Grail for goodwhites is to (re-)create nonwhites in their image.

    That's why Hamilton is so emotional for them.
  22. @whorefinder
    The Left and the Cucks are dangerously misreading the mood of the country, and their position.

    First, Trump has Congress in control of his party, so the unhinged wackos of the Left can't give him the full Stalinist show-trial treatment.

    Second, cucks like Lindsay Graham and John McCain wilt in the face of public disapproval.

    Third, Trump smartly filled his adminstration with generals, one major reason being he knows how polarizing he is, and wanted to have some backstop against a coup.

    Don't forget how the R's completely misread the country's mood when it came to Bill Clinton's impeachment. Clinton was proven outright to have lied under oath, which scnadalized him, but they should have left it at that. The impeachment caused the American people to rally around Bubba and get angry. The R's overreached and it saved his legacy.

    If the Left and the Cucks try some ham-fisted impeachment now, not only will there be riots in the streets and mass demonstrations, but the generals in his administration will be securing lower-ranked military officers to be ready to deploy if Trump is convicted, with the full-throated support of the people. And McCain and Graham and any cuck who supports them can kiss their seat in congress goodbye.

    But I don't think it will get to that point. Maddow's overreach on the 2005 taxes blew up in her face so bad that Stephen Colbert---yes, Stephen Colbert---mocked her nonsense in a skit. Trump just needs one more lefty overreach---perhaps through another leak----to get the left feeling too embarassed to consider impeachment. Trump's very deft at making the corporate media and angry Left look foolish and deranged, and it's a skill he'll bring to bear if he thinks he's in danger of impeachment.

    Here’s something else to chew on:

    The largest uniformed law enforcement agency that carries guns is the US Border Patrol, to the tune of 19k uniformed agents.

    One of Trump’s very first acts was to replace the FBI yes man who was the first Chief from outside the agency with the former acting Chief, and get very very cozy with the Patrol’s union.

    Basically Trump has indeed, covered his counter coup bases. If the FBI leadership starts feeling its oats and tries something funny, I’d be very nervous as a regular FBI agent. The average FBI agent has been riding a desk and the agent corps is four figures. The average Patrol Agent has been engaging in low level counter insurgency ops along the SWB for at least two decades.

    If the two agencies clash, I know who I’m betting on.

    Read More
  23. I’ve said it before: the play reminds me of cargo cultists fashioning airplanes out of straw and waiting for real ones to show up, in how it’s been rapturously received–what they’re looking to the skies for is anything beyond a superficial understanding and respect for our democratic traditions in American non-whites.
    But I find their oblivion hilarious: it’s precisely the language, attitudes and crotch-grabbing postures of hip hop that are–not just signs of, but anathema to democracy and order.

    Read More
  24. @22pp22
    Off topic. Is Trump in real danger of being toppled over these Russian allegations?

    The allegations seem idiotic to me and I have even heard people say Brexit only happened because of Russian hacking. That's really dumb as British elections are counted by hand.

    PCers here believe Trump is on the verge of impeachment.

    Is that even plausible?

    (re OT comment on Trump impeachment)

    Pretty much the deal is that the GOP establishment, which controls Congress, is happy to have Trump to sell the GOP agenda of tax cuts and business deregulation, and more taxpayer money for the military industrial complex. They want their cheap labor and free trade, but are willing to give Trump token victories here as long as he does his job.

    There are two issues here. The first is whether Trump is happy to carry out the GOP agenda in return for the perks of being President of the US, staying within the pattern of past recent prezes, or if he will insist on the populist elements on his agenda. The second is whether Trump can really be a satisfactory frontman even if he wants to do this At some point it will have to involve selling his supporters down the river.

    Right now, we don’t know. If Trump can’t be a satisfactory front-man like Obama was, for whatever reason, the GOP leadership in Congress will be looking for an excuse for impeachment and removal. I don’t think the Russian stuff will work, they will have to come up with something else. They also will need the co-operation of the Donks to get Pence in the White House, if the Donks don’t demand something for this the party is useless even as an opposition, but that may well be the case.

    Read More
  25. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @James Kabala
    Actually, it kind of is. It ends with the violent death of the main character, obviously, and it features the violent death of his son before that, so it is a tragedy in the modern vernacular sense. Whether it is a tragedy in the Greek sense is more doubtful, but one could argue that both Hamilton and Burr have tragic flaws (principally ambition in both cases).

    Does it make sense to grieve for a fool who’d been rappin’ and yappin’ nonsense for 2 or 3 hrs?

    I’d think when the fool finally dies, RUN-DMC should come out and say ‘You talked too much, and now you shut up.’

    Read More
  26. @Steve Sailer
    It was the Revolutionary / Napoleonic Era, after all. That's how Hamilton got himself killed in his duel with Aaron Burr: he was worried that if he laughed off Burr, he wouldn't be taken seriously as the North American Bonaparte when the time came. Burr felt much the same.

    he was worried that if he laughed off Burr, he wouldn’t be taken seriously as the North American Bonaparte when the time came. Burr felt much the same.

    It’s not just Napoleonic.

    Look what happened to W after he didn’t take seriously blatant offenses to his honor during his administration. Dueling isn’t the only answer, but you can’t just sit there.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Agree. By turning the other cheek, W let his enemies define him. He should have let Cheney loose; that's what VPs are for. Plus the Left already hated Cheney's guts so he had nothing to lose, and he's never cared what the Left thinks.
  27. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @vinteuil
    Terry Teachout, who I first met when I was playing 'cello and he was playing 'bass in the Kansas City Youth Symphony c. 1973, and who I kept up with from time to time for many years, used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs.

    Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich - eh. Not in the same class.

    Nowadays, he tears up at Hamilton.

    Hamilton

    Sad.

    “…used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs. Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich – eh. Not in the same class.”

    He was more a musical blob than a snob. I mean anyone with sense knows Sibelius was the greatest of all time. Sym 4, 5, and 7 have never been topped.

    But snob or blob, he was never just a classical music guy. For a long time, he was a fan of Jazz, arguing against the ‘creation myth’ that Negroes alone created Jazz. And he wrote about musicals. And he likes the Beatles too. So, even if he has certain elitists tastes in music, his taste was comprehensive.

    Now, if some people had a fun time at HAMILTON, I can understand. Maybe it’s lively and have some funny parts.

    But CRY at a rap musical? I mean GROW UP!!

    I generally don’t think the musical format makes for good tragedy. WEST SIDE STORY has some fantastic numbers, but when the Puerto kid shot the Polish guy, I wished he’d shot the girl too. I mean Natalie Wood’s sermon at the end is excruciating.

    One of the darkest musicals is OKLAHOMA, but I don’t recall seeing the whole thing. It begins with Oh What a Beautiful Morning, then it gets really boring for a while, and then the ending is pretty disturbing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Father O'Hara
    Thought for as long time that the secret message of WSS is that women are monsters who bring suffering with their self centered ways.
    But why would a bunch of homosexuals have animus toward women?
    , @vinteuil
    "...anyone with sense knows Sibelius was the greatest of all time. Sym 4, 5, and 7 have never been topped..."

    Hey, anon - what've you got against that tall, cool glass of ice water, the 6th?
  28. @vinteuil
    Terry Teachout, who I first met when I was playing 'cello and he was playing 'bass in the Kansas City Youth Symphony c. 1973, and who I kept up with from time to time for many years, used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs.

    Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich - eh. Not in the same class.

    Nowadays, he tears up at Hamilton.

    Hamilton

    Sad.

    The Holy Grail for goodwhites is to (re-)create nonwhites in their image.

    That’s why Hamilton is so emotional for them.

    Read More
  29. Yet as recently as 2008 HBO’s “John Adams” featured a Hamilton hellbent on warmongering and proposing strong centralized government above all of the states. He was in this telling the black hat of the Washington Administration. The immigrant narrative trumps the facts. When the legend becomes fact, print the legend.

    Read More
  30. Hamilton wasn’t a wannabee soldier, he was a real deal soldier during the Revolution. He was a military leader, even if he was not a general, he did personally lead the last attack on the British position at Yorktown before Cornwallis surrendered.

    Per Hamilton being a plutocrat, he couldn’t be one. Washington was the richest man in the US and if one has been to Mount Vernon, if you took it and put it on the grounds of Blenheim Palace, it would be the servants’ bunkhouse. In the US of Hamilton’s time, there weren’t any plutocrats since there weren’t any rich Americans per the standards of the time. There also weren’t any poor people compared to what poor meant in Europe.

    Hamilton wasn’t a Jacksonian democrat, but neither was TJ, his adversary. They didn’t exist yet.

    Per him being a secret Bonaparte wannabee, aw c’mon.

    I think Hamilton is a bit lessened given how he’s become some sort of mascot, but they’re being unfair to him.

    Read More
  31. @Emblematic
    If your claim that "Russian hacking may have swung the election..." is true then can we maybe see some evidence?
    Have we seen any real forensic evidence that the DNC and Podesta emails were 'hacked' by Russia?

    The whole Russia thing originally started off as a tactic for the Democrats to avoid talking about the embarrassing *content* of the emails, and only after Trump unexpectedly won did they begin using it to try and bring down the administration.

    Comey keeps saying he can't go into details becuse "ongoing". Quite a convenient way to keep the narrative going without actually producing anything.

    The whole Russia thing originally started off as a tactic for the Democrats to avoid talking about the embarrassing *content* of the emails, and only after Trump unexpectedly won did they begin using it to try and bring down the administration.

    Thank you, thank you, THANK you!

    What, I can’t help but wonder, will it take for sober-minded and trustworthy Americans to begin reading those e-mails and putting the breadcrumb trail of treasonous criminality together?

    Or is it that they simply don’t want to acknowledge that Hillary’s me-too desire to hang a Muslim pelt on her wall led to the Libyan debacle and the entire “refugee” nightmare of the past few years? Leftists will forgive “Her” anything….but can they really forgive her precipitating a catastrophic human-rights clusterf**k as a byproduct of her own ambition?

    We’ll never find out so long as the story is The Hacking and not The Damn E-mails!!

    Read More
  32. @Anon
    "...used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs. Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich – eh. Not in the same class."

    He was more a musical blob than a snob. I mean anyone with sense knows Sibelius was the greatest of all time. Sym 4, 5, and 7 have never been topped.

    But snob or blob, he was never just a classical music guy. For a long time, he was a fan of Jazz, arguing against the 'creation myth' that Negroes alone created Jazz. And he wrote about musicals. And he likes the Beatles too. So, even if he has certain elitists tastes in music, his taste was comprehensive.

    Now, if some people had a fun time at HAMILTON, I can understand. Maybe it's lively and have some funny parts.

    But CRY at a rap musical? I mean GROW UP!!

    I generally don't think the musical format makes for good tragedy. WEST SIDE STORY has some fantastic numbers, but when the Puerto kid shot the Polish guy, I wished he'd shot the girl too. I mean Natalie Wood's sermon at the end is excruciating.

    One of the darkest musicals is OKLAHOMA, but I don't recall seeing the whole thing. It begins with Oh What a Beautiful Morning, then it gets really boring for a while, and then the ending is pretty disturbing.

    Thought for as long time that the secret message of WSS is that women are monsters who bring suffering with their self centered ways.
    But why would a bunch of homosexuals have animus toward women?

    Read More
  33. Yeah, thanks to j mct for sticking up for Hamilton. The article is just flatly wrong about him.

    “any model of organizing the American political economy that might promote egalitarian politics.”

    That would be Jefferson’s egalitarian politics. Jefferson. The slaveholder who sold people so he could buy some books. Right.

    “His central role in founding both the financial infrastructure of Wall Street and a nascent military establishment (which supplanted the colonial system of locally controlled democratic militias) was rooted in his self-appointed crusade to undermine the ability of ordinary Americans to govern themselves.”

    hahaha. Yes. Yes. We should have state militias instead of an army. What a GREAT idea. And god forbid we should have had a bank to stabilize the economy. Hamilton should have done what Jackson did–kill the bank, and have nearly 100 years of “panics” every 20 years that wiped everyone out. Sure. Totally egalitarian.

    Matt Stoller’s a moron. And I am totally uninterested in the play Hamilton.

    Hamilton was the only founding father who started from far less than nothing. He made it ahead on his own merit. And to this day,w e don’t have a “pure” democracy in no small part because of people who, like him, were worried about straight up democracy. He wasn’t perfect, but he wasn’t the guy in that profile, either.

    Read More
    • Agree: Federalist, Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @5371
    I would say the US economy did pretty well between Jackson's breaking of the Bank and the founding of the Fed, but then I'm not an "education realist" who thinks "sold people so he could buy some books" is a devastating zinger.
    , @Oleaginous Outrager

    kill the bank, and have nearly 100 years of “panics” every 20 years that wiped everyone out
     
    Thank God the Federal Reserve has prevented any financial disaster from happening ever again! The finest wine and stock options for everyone!
  34. @Anon
    "...used to be the musical snob to end all musical snobs. Stravinsky & Bartok, he insisted, exhausted the list of great 20th century composers. Sibelius, Nielsen, Prokofiev, even Shostakovich – eh. Not in the same class."

    He was more a musical blob than a snob. I mean anyone with sense knows Sibelius was the greatest of all time. Sym 4, 5, and 7 have never been topped.

    But snob or blob, he was never just a classical music guy. For a long time, he was a fan of Jazz, arguing against the 'creation myth' that Negroes alone created Jazz. And he wrote about musicals. And he likes the Beatles too. So, even if he has certain elitists tastes in music, his taste was comprehensive.

    Now, if some people had a fun time at HAMILTON, I can understand. Maybe it's lively and have some funny parts.

    But CRY at a rap musical? I mean GROW UP!!

    I generally don't think the musical format makes for good tragedy. WEST SIDE STORY has some fantastic numbers, but when the Puerto kid shot the Polish guy, I wished he'd shot the girl too. I mean Natalie Wood's sermon at the end is excruciating.

    One of the darkest musicals is OKLAHOMA, but I don't recall seeing the whole thing. It begins with Oh What a Beautiful Morning, then it gets really boring for a while, and then the ending is pretty disturbing.

    “…anyone with sense knows Sibelius was the greatest of all time. Sym 4, 5, and 7 have never been topped…”

    Hey, anon – what’ve you got against that tall, cool glass of ice water, the 6th?

    Read More
  35. @j mct
    Hamilton wasn't a wannabee soldier, he was a real deal soldier during the Revolution. He was a military leader, even if he was not a general, he did personally lead the last attack on the British position at Yorktown before Cornwallis surrendered.

    Per Hamilton being a plutocrat, he couldn't be one. Washington was the richest man in the US and if one has been to Mount Vernon, if you took it and put it on the grounds of Blenheim Palace, it would be the servants' bunkhouse. In the US of Hamilton's time, there weren't any plutocrats since there weren't any rich Americans per the standards of the time. There also weren't any poor people compared to what poor meant in Europe.

    Hamilton wasn't a Jacksonian democrat, but neither was TJ, his adversary. They didn't exist yet.

    Per him being a secret Bonaparte wannabee, aw c'mon.

    I think Hamilton is a bit lessened given how he's become some sort of mascot, but they're being unfair to him.

    Chernow’s book is in fact a good read.

    Read More
    • Agree: res
    • Replies: @res
    Though he does have a few nods to SJWism that are irksome. IIRC it was mostly in the preface where I guess he was establishing his "cred."
  36. @Desiderius

    he was worried that if he laughed off Burr, he wouldn’t be taken seriously as the North American Bonaparte when the time came. Burr felt much the same.
     
    It's not just Napoleonic.

    Look what happened to W after he didn't take seriously blatant offenses to his honor during his administration. Dueling isn't the only answer, but you can't just sit there.

    Agree. By turning the other cheek, W let his enemies define him. He should have let Cheney loose; that’s what VPs are for. Plus the Left already hated Cheney’s guts so he had nothing to lose, and he’s never cared what the Left thinks.

    Read More
  37. @education realist
    Yeah, thanks to j mct for sticking up for Hamilton. The article is just flatly wrong about him.

    "any model of organizing the American political economy that might promote egalitarian politics."

    That would be Jefferson's egalitarian politics. Jefferson. The slaveholder who sold people so he could buy some books. Right.

    "His central role in founding both the financial infrastructure of Wall Street and a nascent military establishment (which supplanted the colonial system of locally controlled democratic militias) was rooted in his self-appointed crusade to undermine the ability of ordinary Americans to govern themselves."

    hahaha. Yes. Yes. We should have state militias instead of an army. What a GREAT idea. And god forbid we should have had a bank to stabilize the economy. Hamilton should have done what Jackson did--kill the bank, and have nearly 100 years of "panics" every 20 years that wiped everyone out. Sure. Totally egalitarian.

    Matt Stoller's a moron. And I am totally uninterested in the play Hamilton.

    Hamilton was the only founding father who started from far less than nothing. He made it ahead on his own merit. And to this day,w e don't have a "pure" democracy in no small part because of people who, like him, were worried about straight up democracy. He wasn't perfect, but he wasn't the guy in that profile, either.

    I would say the US economy did pretty well between Jackson’s breaking of the Bank and the founding of the Fed, but then I’m not an “education realist” who thinks “sold people so he could buy some books” is a devastating zinger.

    Read More
  38. @Anon
    "Honorary gay" ? Hardly. How little "conservatives" know of actual history.

    Washington’s letters state that he was less than thrilled with marital life (“not much fire between the sheets”) and preferred the company of men — particularly the young Alexander Hamilton, whom he made his personal secretary — to that of women. His concern for his male colleagues clearly extended to their personal lives. This was especially true of Hamilton, whom he brought with him to Valley Forge, giving Hamilton a cabin to share with his then-lover, John Laurens, to whom Hamilton had written passionate love letters that are still extant.

    http://gayhistoryproject.epgn.com/historical-profiles/george-washington-gay-friendly-father-of-our-country/

    Your moldy old lies have been in the bathhouse too long.

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  39. Ugh, The Baffler. Haven’t seen it in a long time though subbed in its earliest years.

    Is the writer above this Matt Stoller (formerly with Yves Smith’s site)?

    http://mattstoller.com/

    “Hillary Clinton crying and dancing hard in her seat” is one of the most vomitous images this side of actually hurling explosively.

    Consider that we came very close to having, as POTUS, a dumpy malevolent female who brags about acting at a four-figure-ticket Broadway play like a toddler with pinworms.

    Read More
    • Replies: @black sea
    “I’ve seen the show three times and I’ve cried every time—and danced hard in my seat.” …

    Poor Hillary, endlessly engaged in her quest to convince the world that she's got soul . . . or at least, a soul.
  40. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    The real Hamilton was an Anglophile who from the very beginning was totally down on mass immigration. Wonder how he would respond to this Miranda person having appropriated his name and legacy.

    Read More
  41. @Guy de Champlagne
    He is very unpopular and while it will take more than what we've seen to lead to impeachment many of the allegations are not idiotic. Russian hacking may have swung the election and there isn't anything comparable that helped Clinton. Talking about media influence or the foreign leaders endorsing Clinton doesn't come close to establishing any kind of real equivalency. The question of how convincing the evidence is is beyond my pay grade. But it's silly to call all the allegations idiotic.

    https://www.good.is/articles/trump-low-approval-ratings

    “But it’s silly to call all the allegation idiotic”. Correct, it is not silly, it is insane. The idea that the Russians “hacked” or swayed the election is easily the equivalent of the “Obama was born in Kenya” theory. Modern day nuttery that if spewed by the other side would be rightly be condemned by our absurd and increasingly irrelevant media.

    Trump will still be the president on January 1, 2021. If HRC gets the nomination (and if he runs) he will be the president on January 1, 2025.

    Read More
  42. @Desiderius
    Chernow's book is in fact a good read.

    Though he does have a few nods to SJWism that are irksome. IIRC it was mostly in the preface where I guess he was establishing his “cred.”

    Read More
  43. @Guy de Champlagne
    He is very unpopular and while it will take more than what we've seen to lead to impeachment many of the allegations are not idiotic. Russian hacking may have swung the election and there isn't anything comparable that helped Clinton. Talking about media influence or the foreign leaders endorsing Clinton doesn't come close to establishing any kind of real equivalency. The question of how convincing the evidence is is beyond my pay grade. But it's silly to call all the allegations idiotic.

    https://www.good.is/articles/trump-low-approval-ratings

    PPD, most accurate in 2016, alongside Trafalgar, has Trump’s ratings as plus 7. Trafalgar also has some recent approval rating polling from SC and the peach state which are also pretty spiffy. These fake polls will prove as successful as the last time they were deployed. Sad!

    Read More
  44. @SPMoore8
    The "Hamilton was Jewish" meme doesn't really work despite the efforts of the professor, since there's no question that Hamilton was not ethnically Jewish and there's no question he ever practiced Judaism. Whether his mother was for some time Jewish is sort of like saying Madonna is Jewish.

    Sounds like the purported Jewishness of all Trump’s grandchildren, fictional.

    Read More
  45. @Guy de Champlagne
    He is very unpopular and while it will take more than what we've seen to lead to impeachment many of the allegations are not idiotic. Russian hacking may have swung the election and there isn't anything comparable that helped Clinton. Talking about media influence or the foreign leaders endorsing Clinton doesn't come close to establishing any kind of real equivalency. The question of how convincing the evidence is is beyond my pay grade. But it's silly to call all the allegations idiotic.

    https://www.good.is/articles/trump-low-approval-ratings

    Yes, those wily and tech-savvy Rooskies hacked paper ballots. The allegations are less idiotic than your attempted “defense” of them.

    Read More
  46. @education realist
    Yeah, thanks to j mct for sticking up for Hamilton. The article is just flatly wrong about him.

    "any model of organizing the American political economy that might promote egalitarian politics."

    That would be Jefferson's egalitarian politics. Jefferson. The slaveholder who sold people so he could buy some books. Right.

    "His central role in founding both the financial infrastructure of Wall Street and a nascent military establishment (which supplanted the colonial system of locally controlled democratic militias) was rooted in his self-appointed crusade to undermine the ability of ordinary Americans to govern themselves."

    hahaha. Yes. Yes. We should have state militias instead of an army. What a GREAT idea. And god forbid we should have had a bank to stabilize the economy. Hamilton should have done what Jackson did--kill the bank, and have nearly 100 years of "panics" every 20 years that wiped everyone out. Sure. Totally egalitarian.

    Matt Stoller's a moron. And I am totally uninterested in the play Hamilton.

    Hamilton was the only founding father who started from far less than nothing. He made it ahead on his own merit. And to this day,w e don't have a "pure" democracy in no small part because of people who, like him, were worried about straight up democracy. He wasn't perfect, but he wasn't the guy in that profile, either.

    kill the bank, and have nearly 100 years of “panics” every 20 years that wiped everyone out

    Thank God the Federal Reserve has prevented any financial disaster from happening ever again! The finest wine and stock options for everyone!

    Read More
  47. I am one who more often than not notes how those who bash Jews first as THE cause of our many problems are off base. That Hamilton may have been Jewish makes that even harder. Hamilton was the worst of the group we usually label Founding Fathers.

    Read More
  48. Mao’s cultural revolution coming to a town near you. Preempt the mobs by burning all books written before 1965 (except those on the approved reading list)

    Read More
  49. “Hamilton, or shall I say Hamilton! (i.e., the character in the musical, not the historical A.H.), is an immigrant, a nonwhite, and, maybe, secretly Jewish.

    Oh dear lord. Hamilton was secretly Jewish, Columbus was secretly Jewish, and Shakespeare was actually a Jewish woman. When all is said and done, some Jews will be laying claim to every single gentile of note. (Yes, there really are people who believe that the works of Shakespeare were written by a Jewish woman.)

    Hamilton wasn’t Jewish. His DNA has been tested. His y chromosome (Haplogroup I-M253) is quite common in Scotland and Scandinavia. Nearly a third of Scandinavian men belong to it. The number of Jews who belong to that haplogroup is probably somewhere close to nil.

    Read More
  50. @Olorin
    Ugh, The Baffler. Haven't seen it in a long time though subbed in its earliest years.

    Is the writer above this Matt Stoller (formerly with Yves Smith's site)?

    http://mattstoller.com/


    "Hillary Clinton crying and dancing hard in her seat" is one of the most vomitous images this side of actually hurling explosively.

    Consider that we came very close to having, as POTUS, a dumpy malevolent female who brags about acting at a four-figure-ticket Broadway play like a toddler with pinworms.

    “I’ve seen the show three times and I’ve cried every time—and danced hard in my seat.” …

    Poor Hillary, endlessly engaged in her quest to convince the world that she’s got soul . . . or at least, a soul.

    Read More

Comments are closed.

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