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Stephen Hawking, RIP
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One of the great personalities of the age.

 
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  1. I agree. I honestly came here just looking to see if there was a post on this. I might not agree with his views on every topic, but he fought a good fight.

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  2. Did he set a completely new record for someone surviving with his condition? I never understood how everyone, and I mean everyone, else with this disease died in a few years but he had lived for at least, what, forty years with it??

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    He was 76. He was always most grateful to the British National Health Service for keeping him alive so long!

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/18/nhs-scientist-stephen-hawking
    , @BenKenobi
    When the Illuminati send their celebrity clones, they aren't sending their best.
    , @Dave Pinsen
    More than 50 years.
    , @Anonymous
    Retard strength?
    , @flyingtiger
    Hawkings contacted the illness when he was young. That helped him to survive. Also, he was able to stay active and survived. He could contribute to the field of Physics in his wheelchair. Staying active helps to keep a positive attitude to fight the disease.
    Being on Star Trek and the big bang theroy also helped.
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  3. One of the smartest retards of all time.

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    • Replies: @Santoculto
    = average sensibility levels among unz readers...
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  4. Steve, any thoughts on the Heimbach situation?

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    • LOL: IHTG
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Yeah: who is Heimbach?
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  5. @Anonymous
    Steve, any thoughts on the Heimbach situation?

    Yeah: who is Heimbach?

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    • Replies: @the Supreme Gentleman
    Matt Heimbach is (or was?) the head of the Traditionalist Worker Party, which was sort of attempting to do right-wing (like, National Socialism right-wing) community organizing in proletarian white areas. He was just in a domestic imbroglio that was so convoluted (involving affairs, step-parents, domestic abuse, et cetera) that I suspect fans of Latin American daytime television would have angrily rejected it as requiring impossible suspension of disbelief, if it had been the plot of an episode of a soap opera.
    , @Anonymous
    One of the leaders of the alt-right and founder and chairman of the Traditionalist Workers Party
    , @bored identity
    Good one, Uncle Sailer;

    Feigning utter ignorance with your spongy-noticing mammillary nuclei is not an easy task.

    bored identity believes that Mr. Heimbach is/was just another mediocre White Asset whose political staging and maneuvering lands him somewhere between rigor mortised S.Hawking and alive and kickin' T. Hawk :


    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/14/article-0-0CC19B52000005DC-846_634x542.jpg

    Classic Heimbach Maneuver :

    http://img1.joyreactor.com/pics/post/gif-wheelchair-stunt-890645.gif
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  6. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah: who is Heimbach?

    Matt Heimbach is (or was?) the head of the Traditionalist Worker Party, which was sort of attempting to do right-wing (like, National Socialism right-wing) community organizing in proletarian white areas. He was just in a domestic imbroglio that was so convoluted (involving affairs, step-parents, domestic abuse, et cetera) that I suspect fans of Latin American daytime television would have angrily rejected it as requiring impossible suspension of disbelief, if it had been the plot of an episode of a soap opera.

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    • Replies: @MarcB.
    "I suspect fans of Latin American daytime television would have angrily rejected it as requiring impossible suspension of disbelief, if it had been the plot of an episode of a soap opera".

    It's a case of an Alt Right activist family taking the CBS soap opera "The Bold and the Beautiful" a little too seriously. Hopefully they will find a way to sort this tragedy out in private while getting their lives back on track.
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  7. So disabled, yet so accomplished; perhaps he was able to focus more while a more able body would have been distracted.

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  8. @Anonymous
    Did he set a completely new record for someone surviving with his condition? I never understood how everyone, and I mean everyone, else with this disease died in a few years but he had lived for at least, what, forty years with it??

    He was 76. He was always most grateful to the British National Health Service for keeping him alive so long!

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/18/nhs-scientist-stephen-hawking

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    • Replies: @Lagertha
    let's hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.
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  9. @Anonymous
    Did he set a completely new record for someone surviving with his condition? I never understood how everyone, and I mean everyone, else with this disease died in a few years but he had lived for at least, what, forty years with it??

    When the Illuminati send their celebrity clones, they aren’t sending their best.

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  10. @Anonymous
    Did he set a completely new record for someone surviving with his condition? I never understood how everyone, and I mean everyone, else with this disease died in a few years but he had lived for at least, what, forty years with it??

    More than 50 years.

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  11. @Jonathan Mason
    He was 76. He was always most grateful to the British National Health Service for keeping him alive so long!

    https://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2017/aug/18/nhs-scientist-stephen-hawking

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

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    • Replies: @Clyde

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.
     
    The same type Dr Feelgood injections The Monsters of DC get monthly at Walter Reed. That have kept McCain, Pelosi, Di Feinstein etc plunging onward. Arlen Spector, Henry Kissinger got them too. Ho-shou-wu is in it. https://tinyurl.com/y84u9h3g
    , @Sam Malone
    Not a charitable comment so soon. Give the man his due, yes he talked too much in these last years about whatever subject came to his head probably just to get attention, which he always got too much of too easily because of who he was, but still there's no need to get snarky about his personal medical situation.
    , @Jonathan Mason

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.
     
    You sound like you know, so why don't you tell us?
    , @Jack D
    I don't think there was any special secret, aside from the fact that he received excellent (though standard) care and round the clock nursing to keep his airways clear and his respirator on (this has to be done 100% of the time, not 99% of the time). If you are some average zhlub in the nursing home, your hose slips out and by the time the nurse's aide who has been out back smoking a cigarette notices it, you are gone.

    For some unknown reason, the natural course of his disease was much slower than it usually is.
    , @gunner29

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long
     
    A perpetual hard on.....he had 3 kids!
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  12. Don’t care about this dude; will refrain from speaking ill of the dead to avoid bad juju.

    OT – Steve What do you make of the Tillerson firing?

    Maybe Mr T just found Tillerson called him a “f*cking moron” 6 months ago?
    Never liked the guy, seemed like a corporate empty suit. Never could understand why Trump choose him over true believers. When the Dems are in power they put their top cadres in that seat.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    Not Steve but very briefly Russia has been in fake trouble, one way or another, for years (The only athletes who dope! This redhead is a spy because we say so! That business needs to be banned, while the Saudis do whatever they want!), and the business in Britain is clearly the latest installment of that, and Tillerson shot his mouth off without thinking on that issue. We must signal to Russia that we see how silly this is, without saying that outright where Britain can hear us. Right now Russia is moving S400s into Syria. Not a time for a secretary of State to speak without thinking.
    If you've fallen for this painfully silly episode, consider that:
    >Russia has lots of ways to kill people that cannot be immediately traced directly back to Russia.
    >A country cannot "own" a chemical.
    >Russia developed this nerve agent, then numerous Russian scientists defected or emigrated.
    >The place where this happened just happens to be the UK's chemical weapons centre. It's like if a "Russian" artillery round went off at Aberdeen, Texas.
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  13. Requiescat in pace, Mr. Hawking. How many other scientists of note are household names these days?

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    • Replies: @prosa123
    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.
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  14. @Anonymous
    Did he set a completely new record for someone surviving with his condition? I never understood how everyone, and I mean everyone, else with this disease died in a few years but he had lived for at least, what, forty years with it??

    Retard strength?

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  15. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah: who is Heimbach?

    One of the leaders of the alt-right and founder and chairman of the Traditionalist Workers Party

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    "Leader of the alt-right" is the new ATF agent in a twenty-dollar fake Nazi jacket who wants to know if you'd be interested in unlicensed firearm modifications.
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  16. @the Supreme Gentleman
    Requiescat in pace, Mr. Hawking. How many other scientists of note are household names these days?

    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.

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    • Replies: @Pericles

    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.
     
    Don't forget Richard Dawkins.
    , @dearieme
    Jim Watson?
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  17. All we have to do is keep talking. RIP

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    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I suspect this is a visceral truth that Mr. Hawking learned the hard way. In recent times, the value of "discourse" and "communication" has been a theme mostly appropriated by the institutional left, but they are right, and when they try to "de-platform" people they know they are striking with the best blow they've got. Let's keep talking.
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  18. You. Rêad. This. In. His. Voice.

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  19. @Anonymous
    One of the leaders of the alt-right and founder and chairman of the Traditionalist Workers Party

    “Leader of the alt-right” is the new ATF agent in a twenty-dollar fake Nazi jacket who wants to know if you’d be interested in unlicensed firearm modifications.

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  20. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonym
    https://youtu.be/tS-qsh6eTik

    All we have to do is keep talking. RIP

    I suspect this is a visceral truth that Mr. Hawking learned the hard way. In recent times, the value of “discourse” and “communication” has been a theme mostly appropriated by the institutional left, but they are right, and when they try to “de-platform” people they know they are striking with the best blow they’ve got. Let’s keep talking.

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  21. @jesse helms think-alike
    Don't care about this dude; will refrain from speaking ill of the dead to avoid bad juju.

    OT - Steve What do you make of the Tillerson firing?

    Maybe Mr T just found Tillerson called him a "f*cking moron" 6 months ago?
    Never liked the guy, seemed like a corporate empty suit. Never could understand why Trump choose him over true believers. When the Dems are in power they put their top cadres in that seat.

    Not Steve but very briefly Russia has been in fake trouble, one way or another, for years (The only athletes who dope! This redhead is a spy because we say so! That business needs to be banned, while the Saudis do whatever they want!), and the business in Britain is clearly the latest installment of that, and Tillerson shot his mouth off without thinking on that issue. We must signal to Russia that we see how silly this is, without saying that outright where Britain can hear us. Right now Russia is moving S400s into Syria. Not a time for a secretary of State to speak without thinking.
    If you’ve fallen for this painfully silly episode, consider that:
    >Russia has lots of ways to kill people that cannot be immediately traced directly back to Russia.
    >A country cannot “own” a chemical.
    >Russia developed this nerve agent, then numerous Russian scientists defected or emigrated.
    >The place where this happened just happens to be the UK’s chemical weapons centre. It’s like if a “Russian” artillery round went off at Aberdeen, Texas.

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    • Replies: @Harry Baldwin
    I think you meant Aberdeen, Maryland, home of the US Army Proving Ground. There's an Abilene, Texas, but no Aberdeen.
    , @Inquiring Mind
    Oh . . . come . . . on!

    Mr. Putin saying with one breath "I didn't do it" and with the other breath "We deal harshly with traitors" is on the level of a certain football star who claimed "I didn't do it" followed by "The b**ch deserved to die."

    It is one thing for these "substances" to be blowing around Syria and be excused as "false flag" operations by the terrorist factions the U.S. and Saudi are supporting.

    It is quite another thing to conduct a chemical WMD strike in the heartland of our U.K. ally. Both Secretary Tillerson's and PM May's remarks were way too mild. They should have been pounding the lectern and speaking in "the broad Russian language" complete with the S-word and the F-bomb like in the movie trailer iSteve linked on another posting. The President Trump is trying to smooth this over proves that he has been chasing women of low moral station long enough that he has turned into one of them.
    , @Jack D
    You are right that if the Russians wanted to do away with this guy quietly they could have. He would have had "a heart attack" or "committed suicide" or "been killed in a robbery gone wrong" like so many of Putin's other enemies. The choice of a nerve agent that is available only to state actors was consciously intended to send an unmistakable message. If you believe the Russian denials, I have a bridge that I would like to sell you.
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  22. @Lagertha
    let's hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

    The same type Dr Feelgood injections The Monsters of DC get monthly at Walter Reed. That have kept McCain, Pelosi, Di Feinstein etc plunging onward. Arlen Spector, Henry Kissinger got them too. Ho-shou-wu is in it. https://tinyurl.com/y84u9h3g

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    The same type Dr Feelgood injections The Monsters of DC get monthly at Walter Reed. That have kept McCain
     
    McCain died in the Vietnam War. The Viet Cong sent us a tinman clone. It is the clone getting the injections.

    McCain is a machine, not a human being. And his Barbie-doll trophy wife shows what Frankenstein can do with injection molding, genetic engineering and electricity. Never underestimate the skill, nor the diabolical nature, of a deranged scientist.

    But hey, they fit in well with Democrats and stabber Republicans.
    , @Lagertha
    I thought you were gonna reveal a whole lotta more scarrier stuff than vitamins! Haha, I have been poisoned by male teenagers who think everyone in DC is eating fetuses or something....yeah, I know, yuch...but kids these days, do think Planned Parenthood is like a drive thru like Kentucky Fried Chicken. Kid you not.
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  23. Read More
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  24. OT claims of Zimbabwe style informal land seizure happening now in South Africa

    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/163880222

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    • Replies: @Rod1963
    That's our fate in 6 to 8 years when the Democrats take over. It's not 1985 like a lot of alt-right types think.

    Because the Left isn't going to stop at just demonizing us whiteys. All the nasty shit that has festered in our universities is now leaking into the mainstream and it's not good. It never stops at demonization. Demonization is the step to reduce your opponents to sub-human status so it makes it easier to commit violence against them when the time comes.

    We already see bits and pieces of it where the Left is removing pieces of history from public grounds. changing names of schools, schools supporting radical agendas by busing students to protests, teachers brainwashing students into SJW thinking, enforced campus speech codes, open discrimination against whites, etc.

    The last thing they need is to control the presidency and congress which will allow them to really drop the hammer on us.
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  25. @Lagertha
    let's hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

    Not a charitable comment so soon. Give the man his due, yes he talked too much in these last years about whatever subject came to his head probably just to get attention, which he always got too much of too easily because of who he was, but still there’s no need to get snarky about his personal medical situation.

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    • Disagree: Highlander
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Well put. Hawking was fine so long as he stuck to cosmology which is a tad more speculation than hard science but...that's another story. Eventually though even guys like Hawking wind up staring at their reflection in the pool a bit too long, after which they (and the public who, for the most part, don't know any better) start taking themselves a wee bit too seriously.
    , @Je Suis Omar Mateen
    "Give the man his due, yes he talked too much in these last years about whatever subject came to his head probably just to get attention,"

    Yes, latter day Stephen Hawking is a case study in Dunning-Kruger syndrome: his immense knowledge of one subject convinced him he was an expert in everything. Pace Laura Ingram: shut up and maths!
    , @Lagertha
    sheesh - all of you guys misunderestimated me: I simply wondered what kept him alive? - because I want to ingest THAT, or give it to compromised-immune system folks that are my friends.

    My father was crippled with Post-Polio Complex...died early, in severe pain at 60, now my mother is dying to issues that are so complex, but it is, also, death by starvation. And, it is so hard to see your conscious parent being embarrassed to wear those adult diapers shown in all those commercials on TV for years.

    Sometimes, some of you guys, need to STFU and be good to your women, family, friends...buy some flowers, be romantic, take a small road trip, be nice, be sexy..tick, tock, tick, tock.

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  26. he was a freak in the bed. that is how he shall be remembered. he probably got more pussy than you. don’t be jealous!

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  27. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    OT:-but similar:

    https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/27116-nokie-edwards-19352018

    Although he would become most associated with the Mosrites that the Ventures made famous, Edwards’ first guitar with the band was a Telecaster. In later years, he would design his own custom HitchHiker guitar, which he’s playing in this photo from the 2005 Ponderosa Stomp in New Orleans.
    Photo by Joseph A. Rosen

    Guitarist Nokie Edwards passed away on March 12 from complications after hip surgery. He was 82. Best known for his groundbreaking work with the Ventures, Edwards was not a household name—but he should be. His impact upon the electric guitar scene is felt in every type of music.

    Born in 1935 in Lahoma, Oklahoma, Nole “Nokie” Edwards began playing at an early age, encouraged by his musical family. By his mid 20s, Edwards had relocated to Washington State, where he performed in a succession of country acts, including one with a young Buck Owens. It was a chance meeting with guitarists Bob Bogle and Don Wilson that led to the formation of a new group more focused on instrumental rock and popular music. With Edwards on bass, the group began their journey as the Ventures in 1959.

    Their first album was recorded that year in a home studio and released on Dolton Records in 1960 with such low expectations that the band wasn’t even shown on the cover. Surprisingly, it yielded a million-selling single: a cover of Johnny Smith’s “Walk Don’t Run.” The Ventures’ version became the de facto electric guitar jam for thousands of garage bands that followed in their wake. By the time their second album arrived, Edwards had switched to guitar—first a Telecaster and then a Mosrite—and a series of 12 top-selling albums followed, until 1968. Although the 1970s proved tough, the Ventures remained popular overseas—particularly in Japan—and have persevered (with personnel changes) until the present.

    Although musicologists might argue that Edwards’ country-fueled and steel-guitar influenced licks owed more to country than pop or rock, there is no denying that Edwards’ twangy tone, wang-bar glides, and staccato riffing paved the way for the California surf bands of the 1960s. The Beach Boys often cited the Ventures as an influence.
    It was the power and tone of Edwards’ guitar, slightly distorted and dripping with lush reverb, that gave the band its signature sound and driving appeal.

    The Ventures made a career by performing and recording instrumental versions of the pop songs of the day, but it was the power and tone of Edwards’ guitar, slightly distorted and dripping with lush reverb, that gave the band its signature sound and driving appeal. Although the Ventures were chameleons who could tackle upbeat rockers, classic melodies, and melancholy ballads, it remained up to Edwards to create the chord-melody and single-note lines that stayed faithful to the song while still displaying enough guitar gymnastics to stamp the band’s identity on anything they played. If you want a clear example of this, compare the Ventures Live in Japan ’65 version of “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue” to the original ballet score by Richard Rodgers. Edwards reasoned that a good song should be simple enough to hum along to—a philosophy he employed on hits like “Perfidia,” “Telstar,” and “Red River Rock.” It made the Ventures international stars—and so big in Japan that they outsold the Beatles there during their early heyday.

    Jol Dantzig is a noted designer, builder, and player who co-founded Hamer Guitars, one of the first boutique guitar brands, in 1973. Today, as the director of Dantzig Guitar Design, he continues to help define the art of custom guitar. To learn more, visit guitardesigner.com.

    ” The Ventures members’ names are not household names. Everyone knows John Paul George Ringo, they know Mick and Keith, they know the Brothers Gibb and the Davies and perhaps the Gallagher brothers. But everyone has heard The Ventures’ music, “Walk Don’t Run”, the Hawaii Five-O theme, and probably several more. And in Japan, there names are as household as the Beatles’ are. Because there music has no lyrics-they are purely an instrumental group-it has no national boundaries, and they are hugely popular in places where English is unknown, or where it is disdained. It is as hard to imagine a musical landscape without them as it is to imagine one without the Beatles. ”

    Carl Ottomeyer, Midwest Rock and Gossip, 1995

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    • Replies: @Pat Kittle
    It's not true that the Ventures' "music has no lyrics-they are purely an instrumental group."

    Here are the lyrics to their song "Tequila!":

    "TEQUILA!"
    "TEQUILA!"
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  28. @prosa123
    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.

    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.

    Don’t forget Richard Dawkins.

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    • Replies: @jim jones
    Another English genius
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  29. If nothing else, I enjoyed a collection of his papers on the properties of black holes. Very well written and elegant, if memory serves; at least even a fool like me could make some sense of them and improve his understanding.

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  30. @Pericles

    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.
     
    Don't forget Richard Dawkins.

    Another English genius

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  31. Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.

    Don’t forget Richard Dawkins.

    I’d wager not many people know who Jane Goodall is, nowadays. But she was certainly a household name for a couple of decades until the ’90s or so. And I’d bet also that a lot of people would be surprised to learn that Richard Dawkins is a scientist.

    The most famous scientists in the world are Neil deGrasse Tyson and that Hidden Figures woman.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    The most famous scientists in the world are Neil deGrasse Tyson and that Hidden Figures woman.
     
    Don't forget Bill Nye.
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  32. @J.Ross
    OT claims of Zimbabwe style informal land seizure happening now in South Africa
    http://boards.4chan.org/pol/thread/163880222

    https://twitter.com/willempet/status/972932440124686337

    https://twitter.com/RationalGent/status/972920304329809920

    That’s our fate in 6 to 8 years when the Democrats take over. It’s not 1985 like a lot of alt-right types think.

    Because the Left isn’t going to stop at just demonizing us whiteys. All the nasty shit that has festered in our universities is now leaking into the mainstream and it’s not good. It never stops at demonization. Demonization is the step to reduce your opponents to sub-human status so it makes it easier to commit violence against them when the time comes.

    We already see bits and pieces of it where the Left is removing pieces of history from public grounds. changing names of schools, schools supporting radical agendas by busing students to protests, teachers brainwashing students into SJW thinking, enforced campus speech codes, open discrimination against whites, etc.

    The last thing they need is to control the presidency and congress which will allow them to really drop the hammer on us.

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    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    Then America is rent asunder.

    "Oh? And when the last law was down, and the [White] Devil turned round on you — where would you hide, the laws all being flat? This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast — man's laws, not God's — and if you cut them down — and you're just the man to do it — d'you really think you could stand upright in the winds that would blow then? Yes, I'd give the [White] Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake."
    - A Man For All Seasons
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  33. I met Hawking back in the winter of 1975-’76: I was taking a course from Hawking’s friend Kip Thorne, and Kip arranged for a seminar with Steve that a dozen or so of us attended. Hawking did not have his voice synthesizer back then, and I had enough sense to keep my mouth shut and just listen.

    There is going to be a lot of nonsense in the next few days along the lines that Hawking was our generation’s Einstein. There are in fact very few Einsteins: perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein.

    On the other hand, while Hawking was no Einstein, he was indeed one of the world’s top experts on general relativity, and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public’s instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.

    By the way, on one scientific issue –information loss in black holes — I, along with a number of other physicists, turned out to be right and Hawking turned out to be wrong. Or, more accurately, Hawking changed his mind and admitted that all of us had been right all along, although I’m still a bit nervous on the matter — maybe Hawking was right in his initial opinion and we were indeed all wrong. It is a sucker’s bet to bet against Steve Hawking.

    A brilliant physicist and a great man. (And, while he said a couple of foolish things outside his area of expertise in his last few years… well, has anyone here never said anything foolish?).

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Read More
    • Replies: @MG
    In his 1975 lecture at the University of Chicago titled “Shakespeare, Beethoven, Newton” (available on the web) the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.
    , @SimpleSong
    Agree with your comment; would like to add that Einstein, while great, was not even in the ballpark of Newton. Ranking physicists I would say he places a close third after Maxwell. Einstein was both an incredibly great physicist and an incredibly overrated physicist since he's considered head and shoulders above everyone else in the popular imagination, to the point that his name is synonymous with genius.

    Then again, apparently my kid had a playground argument last week about whether Einstein or Newton was smarter, and the 3rd graders' final consensus was that Newton was greater. Upon hearing this I realized there is hope for the future, and also that I live in a really good school district.

    Most underrated physicist? My vote would be J.W. Gibbs or Boltzmann.

    , @dearieme
    "perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein." Maxwell, yes. Newton was in a league all of his own. Who else has been top theoretical physicist, a top experimental physicist, and a top grade mathematician too?
    , @Reverend Spooner
    I have never understood why he was so famous. His theory that black holes emit some kind of radiation hasn't been proven and may never be. Could it be because of his crippling condition?
    , @englishmike

    ...and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public’s instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.
     
    On a BBC Radio news programme this morning, a fellow scientist recalled his first meeting with Hawking. Initially he wondered why Hawking seemed to be constantly winking at him, until he realised that this was the only physical means by which he could control the device which gave him his "voice".

    I'm not qualified to judge his standing as a scientist. But what a man!
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  34. @Anonymous
    OT:-but similar:

    https://www.premierguitar.com/articles/27116-nokie-edwards-19352018

    Although he would become most associated with the Mosrites that the Ventures made famous, Edwards’ first guitar with the band was a Telecaster. In later years, he would design his own custom HitchHiker guitar, which he’s playing in this photo from the 2005 Ponderosa Stomp in New Orleans.
    Photo by Joseph A. Rosen

    https://www.premierguitar.com/ext/resources/images/content/2018_03/FEATs/Nokie-OBIT-WEB.jpg


    Guitarist Nokie Edwards passed away on March 12 from complications after hip surgery. He was 82. Best known for his groundbreaking work with the Ventures, Edwards was not a household name—but he should be. His impact upon the electric guitar scene is felt in every type of music.

    Born in 1935 in Lahoma, Oklahoma, Nole “Nokie” Edwards began playing at an early age, encouraged by his musical family. By his mid 20s, Edwards had relocated to Washington State, where he performed in a succession of country acts, including one with a young Buck Owens. It was a chance meeting with guitarists Bob Bogle and Don Wilson that led to the formation of a new group more focused on instrumental rock and popular music. With Edwards on bass, the group began their journey as the Ventures in 1959.

    Their first album was recorded that year in a home studio and released on Dolton Records in 1960 with such low expectations that the band wasn’t even shown on the cover. Surprisingly, it yielded a million-selling single: a cover of Johnny Smith’s “Walk Don’t Run.” The Ventures’ version became the de facto electric guitar jam for thousands of garage bands that followed in their wake. By the time their second album arrived, Edwards had switched to guitar—first a Telecaster and then a Mosrite—and a series of 12 top-selling albums followed, until 1968. Although the 1970s proved tough, the Ventures remained popular overseas—particularly in Japan—and have persevered (with personnel changes) until the present.

    Although musicologists might argue that Edwards’ country-fueled and steel-guitar influenced licks owed more to country than pop or rock, there is no denying that Edwards’ twangy tone, wang-bar glides, and staccato riffing paved the way for the California surf bands of the 1960s. The Beach Boys often cited the Ventures as an influence.
    It was the power and tone of Edwards’ guitar, slightly distorted and dripping with lush reverb, that gave the band its signature sound and driving appeal.

    The Ventures made a career by performing and recording instrumental versions of the pop songs of the day, but it was the power and tone of Edwards’ guitar, slightly distorted and dripping with lush reverb, that gave the band its signature sound and driving appeal. Although the Ventures were chameleons who could tackle upbeat rockers, classic melodies, and melancholy ballads, it remained up to Edwards to create the chord-melody and single-note lines that stayed faithful to the song while still displaying enough guitar gymnastics to stamp the band’s identity on anything they played. If you want a clear example of this, compare the Ventures Live in Japan ’65 version of “Slaughter on Tenth Avenue” to the original ballet score by Richard Rodgers. Edwards reasoned that a good song should be simple enough to hum along to—a philosophy he employed on hits like “Perfidia,” “Telstar,” and “Red River Rock.” It made the Ventures international stars—and so big in Japan that they outsold the Beatles there during their early heyday.
     
    Jol Dantzig is a noted designer, builder, and player who co-founded Hamer Guitars, one of the first boutique guitar brands, in 1973. Today, as the director of Dantzig Guitar Design, he continues to help define the art of custom guitar. To learn more, visit guitardesigner.com.

    " The Ventures members' names are not household names. Everyone knows John Paul George Ringo, they know Mick and Keith, they know the Brothers Gibb and the Davies and perhaps the Gallagher brothers. But everyone has heard The Ventures' music, "Walk Don't Run", the Hawaii Five-O theme, and probably several more. And in Japan, there names are as household as the Beatles' are. Because there music has no lyrics-they are purely an instrumental group-it has no national boundaries, and they are hugely popular in places where English is unknown, or where it is disdained. It is as hard to imagine a musical landscape without them as it is to imagine one without the Beatles. "

    Carl Ottomeyer, Midwest Rock and Gossip, 1995

    It’s not true that the Ventures’ “music has no lyrics-they are purely an instrumental group.”

    Here are the lyrics to their song “Tequila!”:

    “TEQUILA!”
    “TEQUILA!”

    Read More
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  35. I was fortunate to have attended a public lecture by Hawking around
    1981, when he was still able to speak, although with difficulty and with
    some help from an interpreter. His 1974 paper, published in the journal
    Nature, which announced the existence of Hawking radiation, was
    described as one of the most beautiful papers ever published in
    physics. The claim that black holes could emit energy came as a
    complete surprise. Physics was still exciting in the 1970s. It seemed
    like every month there was a new discovery, whether of new subatomic
    particles or new insights into GUTs (Grand Unified Theories) or
    claims that we are getting close to TOE (Theory of Everything).
    In practically every issue of Scientific American there were
    fascinating articles about Quantum Chromodynamics, Cosmic Inflation,
    plans to build a giant Supercollider in Texas, etc. And then by 1981
    or so the Standard Model of Particle Physics was completed, and
    fundamental physics suddenly hit a brick wall. String theories turned
    out to be a big disappointment. Physicists are stuck, unable to go beyond
    the Standard Model. Of course, applied physics which focuses on optics,
    condensed matter physics, quantum computers, etc is still making
    progress. But the progress is glacial, nothing like a hundred years ago.
    In this sense physics today has become like chemistry – slow painstaking
    progress, with few exciting discoveries.

    By the way, Gregory Benford, physicist, science fiction writer, and
    a friend of Stephen Hawking’s, commented today that Hawking had
    to keep writing books (starting with his bestselling “A Brief History of
    Time (1988)). By the 1980s he had 2-3 full-time nurses, and this can
    quickly get very expensive.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Pericles

    By the 1980s he had 2-3 full-time nurses, and this can quickly get very expensive.

     

    What now, the NHS was not enough for him?
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  36. @PhysicistDave
    I met Hawking back in the winter of 1975-'76: I was taking a course from Hawking's friend Kip Thorne, and Kip arranged for a seminar with Steve that a dozen or so of us attended. Hawking did not have his voice synthesizer back then, and I had enough sense to keep my mouth shut and just listen.

    There is going to be a lot of nonsense in the next few days along the lines that Hawking was our generation's Einstein. There are in fact very few Einsteins: perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein.

    On the other hand, while Hawking was no Einstein, he was indeed one of the world's top experts on general relativity, and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public's instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.

    By the way, on one scientific issue --information loss in black holes -- I, along with a number of other physicists, turned out to be right and Hawking turned out to be wrong. Or, more accurately, Hawking changed his mind and admitted that all of us had been right all along, although I'm still a bit nervous on the matter -- maybe Hawking was right in his initial opinion and we were indeed all wrong. It is a sucker's bet to bet against Steve Hawking.

    A brilliant physicist and a great man. (And, while he said a couple of foolish things outside his area of expertise in his last few years... well, has anyone here never said anything foolish?).

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    In his 1975 lecture at the University of Chicago titled “Shakespeare, Beethoven, Newton” (available on the web) the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks. Do you have a link to the whole speech?
    , @PhysicistDave
    MG wrote:

    S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.
     
    Well... is Everest or K2 really higher?

    Newton is the beginning of it all -- with honorable mention to Galileo. Personally, I think of Maxwell as the "physicist's physicist," who saw deeply into electromagnetism, statistical mechanics, etc. And, Einstein deeply shocked us all by showing that the elementary categories of space and time were not what we think they are.

    They are each sui generis.

    Perhaps the sad thing is that more people can tell who was in the Beatles or the Beach Boys than who James Clerk Maxwell was!

    I'm all in favor of honoring Beethoven and Bach and, for that matter, the Beatles and the Beach Boys. But, if someone cannot write a paragraph briefly describing why Newton or Maxwell or Einstein mattered, maybe that person should not be considered educated.
    , @Karl
    34 MG > Newton was head and shoulders above them all


    the closer you you read the history of calculus and the history of gravitational physics, the more convinced you become that Newton was the world's most famous summarizer of previously-extant knowledge.

    I seem to recall that Newton wrote on other, unrelated physics - I am not commenting on that here.
    , @NickG

    the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.
     
    I am not in a position to judge, but I have heard this from a number sources who may be.
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  37. @MG
    In his 1975 lecture at the University of Chicago titled “Shakespeare, Beethoven, Newton” (available on the web) the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.

    Thanks. Do you have a link to the whole speech?

    Read More
    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven/
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven-page2/
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven-page3/
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  38. @Steve Sailer
    Thanks. Do you have a link to the whole speech?
    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Thanks.
    , @JerseyJeffersonian
    MEH 0910,

    Thanks for the link; this is good stuff.
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  39. @MEH 0910
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven/
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven-page2/
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven-page3/

    Thanks.

    Read More
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  40. Anonymous • Disclaimer says:

    Newton was quite the troll:

    To avoid being baited by little smatterers in mathematics, I designedly made the Principia abstruse; but yet so as to be understood by able mathematicians who, I imagine, by comprehending my demonstrations would concur with my theory.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Newton was right. Some incredibly small fraction of Europe could read his Principia, but they were all immediately convinced he was right.
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  41. @Anonymous
    Newton was quite the troll:

    To avoid being baited by little smatterers in mathematics, I designedly made the Principia abstruse; but yet so as to be understood by able mathematicians who, I imagine, by comprehending my demonstrations would concur with my theory.
     

    Newton was right. Some incredibly small fraction of Europe could read his Principia, but they were all immediately convinced he was right.

    Read More
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  42. It’s interesting that in the last 10 years or so Hawking
    has published at least 5 children’s books co-authored
    with his daughter Lucy Hawking who is now 47. The
    slim volumes have whimsical titles like “George and
    the Blue Moon.” I wasn’t aware of this side of his
    creativity. Parents of small children may want to look
    them up – they may be suitable as gifts. It’s astonishing that
    until last year, that is until he was 75, he was still publishing
    complex papers in physics. He had the reputation of being able
    to solve complicated differential equations in his head.

    A couple of years ago Hawking also published a short 100-page
    autobiography. This seems to be a trend among (famous)
    physicists. Joseph Polchinski, a famous string theorist (but not
    as famous as Hawking), who knew he was dying wrote a short
    account of his life and published it last fall. He died a few weeks
    ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    Anon 2 wrote:

    Joseph Polchinski, a famous string theorist (but not as famous as Hawking), who knew he was dying wrote a short account of his life and published it last fall. He died a few weeks ago.
     
    Here is Joe's autobiography.

    Even physicists would be pressed to read in detail all the parts of Joe's memoirs dealing with his physics research, but the sections on his childhood and on Caltech are quite readable.

    Joe and I were in the same dorm at Caltech (Joe was just a few months older than I, but he was a year ahead since he entered college early), and I remember well the incidents he relates. He did make some of those incidents sound a bit less, let's say, conflictual than they really were, and Caltech was (and still is) much, much weirder than you might think from his memoirs!

    When I visited the old dorm a couple years ago, the students seemed not to know that former resident Professor Polchinski was a famous string theorist, but they did all know about Joe Polchinski's so-called "Millikan-door" adventure, the key passage being:

    There was a ventilation shaft nearby, opening on each floor and then out on the roof. The frame could be unscrewed, so all that was needed was someone with no common sense to climb the shaft from the top floor to the roof. Having a particular talent in this area, late one night I found myself wriggling up the last twelve feet of the shaft, with 9 stories beneath me and tethered by a climbing robe that I had never tried.
     
    Joe could have fallen a hundred feet to his death. Fortunately, he was good at what Techers called "wall-walking."

    Alas, the last six weeks have not been good for physics.
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  43. @MG
    In his 1975 lecture at the University of Chicago titled “Shakespeare, Beethoven, Newton” (available on the web) the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.

    MG wrote:

    S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.

    Well… is Everest or K2 really higher?

    Newton is the beginning of it all — with honorable mention to Galileo. Personally, I think of Maxwell as the “physicist’s physicist,” who saw deeply into electromagnetism, statistical mechanics, etc. And, Einstein deeply shocked us all by showing that the elementary categories of space and time were not what we think they are.

    They are each sui generis.

    Perhaps the sad thing is that more people can tell who was in the Beatles or the Beach Boys than who James Clerk Maxwell was!

    I’m all in favor of honoring Beethoven and Bach and, for that matter, the Beatles and the Beach Boys. But, if someone cannot write a paragraph briefly describing why Newton or Maxwell or Einstein mattered, maybe that person should not be considered educated.

    Read More
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  44. There was a good article about ALS and life expectancy on lesswrong a few years back, published by a community member who had been diagnosed with the disease. Apparently they can keep you alive for quite a long time if you agree in advance to let them do a tracheotomy and attach you to a machine to keep you breathing once your abdominal muscles fail; most people don’t take this option which is why they die much sooner rather than later.

    https://lesswrong.com/lw/1ab/dying_outside/

    Read More
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  45. @Anon 2
    I was fortunate to have attended a public lecture by Hawking around
    1981, when he was still able to speak, although with difficulty and with
    some help from an interpreter. His 1974 paper, published in the journal
    Nature, which announced the existence of Hawking radiation, was
    described as one of the most beautiful papers ever published in
    physics. The claim that black holes could emit energy came as a
    complete surprise. Physics was still exciting in the 1970s. It seemed
    like every month there was a new discovery, whether of new subatomic
    particles or new insights into GUTs (Grand Unified Theories) or
    claims that we are getting close to TOE (Theory of Everything).
    In practically every issue of Scientific American there were
    fascinating articles about Quantum Chromodynamics, Cosmic Inflation,
    plans to build a giant Supercollider in Texas, etc. And then by 1981
    or so the Standard Model of Particle Physics was completed, and
    fundamental physics suddenly hit a brick wall. String theories turned
    out to be a big disappointment. Physicists are stuck, unable to go beyond
    the Standard Model. Of course, applied physics which focuses on optics,
    condensed matter physics, quantum computers, etc is still making
    progress. But the progress is glacial, nothing like a hundred years ago.
    In this sense physics today has become like chemistry - slow painstaking
    progress, with few exciting discoveries.

    By the way, Gregory Benford, physicist, science fiction writer, and
    a friend of Stephen Hawking's, commented today that Hawking had
    to keep writing books (starting with his bestselling "A Brief History of
    Time (1988)). By the 1980s he had 2-3 full-time nurses, and this can
    quickly get very expensive.

    By the 1980s he had 2-3 full-time nurses, and this can quickly get very expensive.

    What now, the NHS was not enough for him?

    Read More
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  46. Ironically, Stephen Hawking died on Einstein’s birthday, March 14
    (or the pi date 3/14, at least in the United States)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon 2
    To add one more coincidence, Stephen Hawking was born
    on the 300th anniversary of Galileo's death, January 8, 1642
    , @Authenticjazzman
    Jermome Kern, the marvelous American composer, was born on Jan 27 : Mozart's birthday.

    Authenticjazzman "Mensa" qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro jazz musician.

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  47. Stevie “book” Hawking was the smartest vegetable on PBS. Living far past the possibility of his disease, he was propped up in a wheelchair and using a magic voice box was able to speak better than any digital reader could ever do, while typing the words without using his hands.
    “I cannot believe people are this dumb and gullible!” said the puppeteers. “These Grubers will believe anything.” The many atheist diatribes written by a quadriplegic in a wheelchair, surpassed the readership of Carl Sagan, the PBS maven who seemed to believe the number system began and ended with Billions.
    “We will miss the ratings this vegetable got for us!” said an unnamed PBS producer. “What kind of vegetable could have such a following? Not even Asparagus can do this. Even Evil Asparagus cannot get these kind of ratings!” said a Vegan Fanatic.
    Stevie Hawking leaves behind a trail of followers, idiots, socialists, atheists, and of course people who cannot actually read. Its like Prison without the human rights complaints and sexual abuse.

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  48. Although 7 billion are we,
    True sui generis was he.
    Twisted flesh was no prison
    For Hawking’s far vision,
    From matter now finally free.

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  49. He made a Simpsons appearance, unfortunately Homer thought he was Larry Flynt.

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  50. RIP. If Hawking were physically normal he probably could have been as smart as Neil Degrasse Tyson!

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  51. @Anon 2
    Ironically, Stephen Hawking died on Einstein's birthday, March 14
    (or the pi date 3/14, at least in the United States)

    To add one more coincidence, Stephen Hawking was born
    on the 300th anniversary of Galileo’s death, January 8, 1642

    Read More
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  52. @MG
    In his 1975 lecture at the University of Chicago titled “Shakespeare, Beethoven, Newton” (available on the web) the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.

    34 MG > Newton was head and shoulders above them all

    the closer you you read the history of calculus and the history of gravitational physics, the more convinced you become that Newton was the world’s most famous summarizer of previously-extant knowledge.

    I seem to recall that Newton wrote on other, unrelated physics – I am not commenting on that here.

    Read More
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  53. @J.Ross
    Not Steve but very briefly Russia has been in fake trouble, one way or another, for years (The only athletes who dope! This redhead is a spy because we say so! That business needs to be banned, while the Saudis do whatever they want!), and the business in Britain is clearly the latest installment of that, and Tillerson shot his mouth off without thinking on that issue. We must signal to Russia that we see how silly this is, without saying that outright where Britain can hear us. Right now Russia is moving S400s into Syria. Not a time for a secretary of State to speak without thinking.
    If you've fallen for this painfully silly episode, consider that:
    >Russia has lots of ways to kill people that cannot be immediately traced directly back to Russia.
    >A country cannot "own" a chemical.
    >Russia developed this nerve agent, then numerous Russian scientists defected or emigrated.
    >The place where this happened just happens to be the UK's chemical weapons centre. It's like if a "Russian" artillery round went off at Aberdeen, Texas.

    I think you meant Aberdeen, Maryland, home of the US Army Proving Ground. There’s an Abilene, Texas, but no Aberdeen.

    Read More
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    I am delighted to be corrected. The rest of the country is a haze when you never go out.
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  54. @Lagertha
    let's hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

    You sound like you know, so why don’t you tell us?

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  55. @Rod1963
    That's our fate in 6 to 8 years when the Democrats take over. It's not 1985 like a lot of alt-right types think.

    Because the Left isn't going to stop at just demonizing us whiteys. All the nasty shit that has festered in our universities is now leaking into the mainstream and it's not good. It never stops at demonization. Demonization is the step to reduce your opponents to sub-human status so it makes it easier to commit violence against them when the time comes.

    We already see bits and pieces of it where the Left is removing pieces of history from public grounds. changing names of schools, schools supporting radical agendas by busing students to protests, teachers brainwashing students into SJW thinking, enforced campus speech codes, open discrimination against whites, etc.

    The last thing they need is to control the presidency and congress which will allow them to really drop the hammer on us.

    Then America is rent asunder.

    “Oh? And when the last law was down, and the [White] Devil turned round on you — where would you hide, the laws all being flat? This country’s planted thick with laws from coast to coast — man’s laws, not God’s — and if you cut them down — and you’re just the man to do it — d’you really think you could stand upright in the winds that would blow then? Yes, I’d give the [White] Devil benefit of law, for my own safety’s sake.”
    - A Man For All Seasons

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    That is an appeal to principle. That doesn't work on nonwhites, and once diversity has tribalized whites, it won't work on whites either.
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  56. Tribute to Stephen Hawking:

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  57. @MG
    In his 1975 lecture at the University of Chicago titled “Shakespeare, Beethoven, Newton” (available on the web) the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.

    the Indian astrophysicist S. Chandrasekhar says that comparisons with Newton are not fair to the other scientists, that Newton was head and shoulders above them all.

    I am not in a position to judge, but I have heard this from a number sources who may be.

    Read More
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  58. No scientist, I.

    But he will be missed, by me.

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  59. @PiltdownMan


    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.
     
    Don’t forget Richard Dawkins.

     

    I'd wager not many people know who Jane Goodall is, nowadays. But she was certainly a household name for a couple of decades until the '90s or so. And I'd bet also that a lot of people would be surprised to learn that Richard Dawkins is a scientist.

    The most famous scientists in the world are Neil deGrasse Tyson and that Hidden Figures woman.

    The most famous scientists in the world are Neil deGrasse Tyson and that Hidden Figures woman.

    Don’t forget Bill Nye.

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  60. Another leftist BS artist having propagated rediculous notions of the nature of reality for decades, commencing with his TIME-BASED version of the universe which is wrong from every aspect beginning with the FACT that “time” per se’ is nothing more than an AGREEMENT amongst humanity and not an actual “real” property of this dimension.
    Einstein also having been a shit-talker non-plus-ultra who came up with the most absurd concepts which then were accepted by the (ha ha ha ha) “science community” and written into “law”, such as his devine axiom claiming that nothing can move faster than light : Therefore he being the all-knowing visionary who “declares” certain opinions to be fact and presto, since he is/was all-knowing , they are : fact.
    Obviously the “genius” AE had never contemplated the phenomena of : Telepathy, which occurs : instantaneously and without a lapse or movement of : “time” : thought being transfered from the sender to the receiver in the same moment, which then dispells and obliterates his notion of the speed of light, and renders it as null.
    This subject and the the observation of these phoney icons being almost endless.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained Us Army vet, and pro jazz musician ( last gig yesterday evening)

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  61. @Steve Sailer
    Yeah: who is Heimbach?

    Good one, Uncle Sailer;

    Feigning utter ignorance with your spongy-noticing mammillary nuclei is not an easy task.

    bored identity believes that Mr. Heimbach is/was just another mediocre White Asset whose political staging and maneuvering lands him somewhere between rigor mortised S.Hawking and alive and kickin’ T. Hawk :

    Classic Heimbach Maneuver :

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Once again, why is this Heimbach person newsworthy?
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  62. @Anon 2
    Ironically, Stephen Hawking died on Einstein's birthday, March 14
    (or the pi date 3/14, at least in the United States)

    Jermome Kern, the marvelous American composer, was born on Jan 27 : Mozart’s birthday.

    Authenticjazzman “Mensa” qualified since 1973, airborne trained US Army vet, and pro jazz musician.

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  63. He was a very twisted little man with no spiritual abilities to speak of . I can smell his warped little frame burning .

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  64. No Nobel in Physics. Why?

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    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    No black holes conveniently nearby to observe and confirm Hawking radiation.
    , @War for Blair Mountain
    Because Hawking’s most important contribution was about rigorously-mathematically clarifying the concept of mass in General Relativity with Roger Penrose...

    His work on applying Quantum Mechanics to Black Holes...could turn out to be hocus pocus nonphysics....Same thing for his wave function of the Universe...
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  65. @Anonymous
    One of the smartest retards of all time.

    = average sensibility levels among unz readers…

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  66. @PhysicistDave
    I met Hawking back in the winter of 1975-'76: I was taking a course from Hawking's friend Kip Thorne, and Kip arranged for a seminar with Steve that a dozen or so of us attended. Hawking did not have his voice synthesizer back then, and I had enough sense to keep my mouth shut and just listen.

    There is going to be a lot of nonsense in the next few days along the lines that Hawking was our generation's Einstein. There are in fact very few Einsteins: perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein.

    On the other hand, while Hawking was no Einstein, he was indeed one of the world's top experts on general relativity, and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public's instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.

    By the way, on one scientific issue --information loss in black holes -- I, along with a number of other physicists, turned out to be right and Hawking turned out to be wrong. Or, more accurately, Hawking changed his mind and admitted that all of us had been right all along, although I'm still a bit nervous on the matter -- maybe Hawking was right in his initial opinion and we were indeed all wrong. It is a sucker's bet to bet against Steve Hawking.

    A brilliant physicist and a great man. (And, while he said a couple of foolish things outside his area of expertise in his last few years... well, has anyone here never said anything foolish?).

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    Agree with your comment; would like to add that Einstein, while great, was not even in the ballpark of Newton. Ranking physicists I would say he places a close third after Maxwell. Einstein was both an incredibly great physicist and an incredibly overrated physicist since he’s considered head and shoulders above everyone else in the popular imagination, to the point that his name is synonymous with genius.

    Then again, apparently my kid had a playground argument last week about whether Einstein or Newton was smarter, and the 3rd graders’ final consensus was that Newton was greater. Upon hearing this I realized there is hope for the future, and also that I live in a really good school district.

    Most underrated physicist? My vote would be J.W. Gibbs or Boltzmann.

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    • Replies: @PhysicistDave
    SimpleSong wrote:

    Einstein was both an incredibly great physicist and an incredibly overrated physicist since he’s considered head and shoulders above everyone else in the popular imagination, to the point that his name is synonymous with genius.
     
    Yes, you're right. In developing General Relativity, Einstein made several serious wrong turns: indeed, I am proud to say that, in trying to learn GR, I made some of the same mistakes he did! I'm as dumb as Einstein.

    Of course, the difference is that Einstein fixed his errors himself, whereas I fixed my errors because I assumed that Einstein was right and that I was wrong and that I needed to find out why he was right and I was wrong.

    That does, though,, point to the fact that his "genius" was largely the dogged determination to just not give up. Genius consists largely of the willingness to work very, very hard, as Edison indicated in his famous "99 percent perspiration" quip.

    SimpleSong also wrote:

    Most underrated physicist? My vote would be J.W. Gibbs or Boltzmann.
     
    I vote for Gibbs: hardly anyone knows who he was (outside of STEM majors, of course), but his work was seminal in statistical mechanics, not to mention vector analysis and the Gibbs phenomenon in Fourier analysis.
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  67. I’ve been skeptical of Hawking for quite some time. I’m sure he was a very bright guy and did produce original work back in the day, buuuuuut…..

    I think any pronouncement that has supposedly come from him in the last 20 years
    or so has been largely the work of his “handlers”. He always seemed to be at the cutting edge of most every cause championed by Lefty and was quick with a timely profundity of moral gravitas. An amazing feat by a spergie theoretical physicist. Where’d he find the time?

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  68. @Anonymous
    Did he set a completely new record for someone surviving with his condition? I never understood how everyone, and I mean everyone, else with this disease died in a few years but he had lived for at least, what, forty years with it??

    Hawkings contacted the illness when he was young. That helped him to survive. Also, he was able to stay active and survived. He could contribute to the field of Physics in his wheelchair. Staying active helps to keep a positive attitude to fight the disease.
    Being on Star Trek and the big bang theroy also helped.

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  69. anonymous • Disclaimer says:
    @Sam Malone
    Not a charitable comment so soon. Give the man his due, yes he talked too much in these last years about whatever subject came to his head probably just to get attention, which he always got too much of too easily because of who he was, but still there's no need to get snarky about his personal medical situation.

    Well put. Hawking was fine so long as he stuck to cosmology which is a tad more speculation than hard science but…that’s another story. Eventually though even guys like Hawking wind up staring at their reflection in the pool a bit too long, after which they (and the public who, for the most part, don’t know any better) start taking themselves a wee bit too seriously.

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  70. @prosa123
    Not too many scientists are household names these days. Jane Goodall is about the only one I can think of.

    Jim Watson?

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  71. @PhysicistDave
    I met Hawking back in the winter of 1975-'76: I was taking a course from Hawking's friend Kip Thorne, and Kip arranged for a seminar with Steve that a dozen or so of us attended. Hawking did not have his voice synthesizer back then, and I had enough sense to keep my mouth shut and just listen.

    There is going to be a lot of nonsense in the next few days along the lines that Hawking was our generation's Einstein. There are in fact very few Einsteins: perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein.

    On the other hand, while Hawking was no Einstein, he was indeed one of the world's top experts on general relativity, and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public's instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.

    By the way, on one scientific issue --information loss in black holes -- I, along with a number of other physicists, turned out to be right and Hawking turned out to be wrong. Or, more accurately, Hawking changed his mind and admitted that all of us had been right all along, although I'm still a bit nervous on the matter -- maybe Hawking was right in his initial opinion and we were indeed all wrong. It is a sucker's bet to bet against Steve Hawking.

    A brilliant physicist and a great man. (And, while he said a couple of foolish things outside his area of expertise in his last few years... well, has anyone here never said anything foolish?).

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    “perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein.” Maxwell, yes. Newton was in a league all of his own. Who else has been top theoretical physicist, a top experimental physicist, and a top grade mathematician too?

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  72. @J.Ross
    Not Steve but very briefly Russia has been in fake trouble, one way or another, for years (The only athletes who dope! This redhead is a spy because we say so! That business needs to be banned, while the Saudis do whatever they want!), and the business in Britain is clearly the latest installment of that, and Tillerson shot his mouth off without thinking on that issue. We must signal to Russia that we see how silly this is, without saying that outright where Britain can hear us. Right now Russia is moving S400s into Syria. Not a time for a secretary of State to speak without thinking.
    If you've fallen for this painfully silly episode, consider that:
    >Russia has lots of ways to kill people that cannot be immediately traced directly back to Russia.
    >A country cannot "own" a chemical.
    >Russia developed this nerve agent, then numerous Russian scientists defected or emigrated.
    >The place where this happened just happens to be the UK's chemical weapons centre. It's like if a "Russian" artillery round went off at Aberdeen, Texas.

    Oh . . . come . . . on!

    Mr. Putin saying with one breath “I didn’t do it” and with the other breath “We deal harshly with traitors” is on the level of a certain football star who claimed “I didn’t do it” followed by “The b**ch deserved to die.”

    It is one thing for these “substances” to be blowing around Syria and be excused as “false flag” operations by the terrorist factions the U.S. and Saudi are supporting.

    It is quite another thing to conduct a chemical WMD strike in the heartland of our U.K. ally. Both Secretary Tillerson’s and PM May’s remarks were way too mild. They should have been pounding the lectern and speaking in “the broad Russian language” complete with the S-word and the F-bomb like in the movie trailer iSteve linked on another posting. The President Trump is trying to smooth this over proves that he has been chasing women of low moral station long enough that he has turned into one of them.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross

    It is one thing for these “substances” to be blowing around Syria and be excused as “false flag” operations by the terrorist factions the U.S. and Saudi are supporting.

     

    No, it is not "one thing." That would be a causus belli. It's been attempted several times by the same faction now accusing Putin of being a sloppy idiot with no head for security. There are two reasons these multiple attempts to start a war with false flagged chemical weapons attacks got no traction. One is the ineptitude of the terrorists, who in one case are on video mishandling the goods and dying. The other is the threat of widespread public disfavor as seen in the Facebook Mutiny, when Obama attempted to start a war in Syria.
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  73. @anony-mouse
    No Nobel in Physics. Why?

    No black holes conveniently nearby to observe and confirm Hawking radiation.

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  74. It’s very hard to take someone seriously who tells the world we are going to all die due to global warming. The comments that he has said a few silly things outside his area of expertise don’t make sense to me because if you have no respect for foundational principles of science and math your higher level work is also very suspect.
    Good on him for being famous with a serious illness and seeming to enjoy his life but professionally he seems like just another hustler.

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  75. I didn’t even know he was sick

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  76. @PhysicistDave
    I met Hawking back in the winter of 1975-'76: I was taking a course from Hawking's friend Kip Thorne, and Kip arranged for a seminar with Steve that a dozen or so of us attended. Hawking did not have his voice synthesizer back then, and I had enough sense to keep my mouth shut and just listen.

    There is going to be a lot of nonsense in the next few days along the lines that Hawking was our generation's Einstein. There are in fact very few Einsteins: perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein.

    On the other hand, while Hawking was no Einstein, he was indeed one of the world's top experts on general relativity, and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public's instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.

    By the way, on one scientific issue --information loss in black holes -- I, along with a number of other physicists, turned out to be right and Hawking turned out to be wrong. Or, more accurately, Hawking changed his mind and admitted that all of us had been right all along, although I'm still a bit nervous on the matter -- maybe Hawking was right in his initial opinion and we were indeed all wrong. It is a sucker's bet to bet against Steve Hawking.

    A brilliant physicist and a great man. (And, while he said a couple of foolish things outside his area of expertise in his last few years... well, has anyone here never said anything foolish?).

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    I have never understood why he was so famous. His theory that black holes emit some kind of radiation hasn’t been proven and may never be. Could it be because of his crippling condition?

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    • Replies: @MEH 0910
    I don't think Hawking's ALS alone is sufficient to account for his fame. I think the ingenious solution of how a black hole, that shouldn't radiate, nevertheless could radiate, captured the imagination of the portion of the public that loves scientific puzzle-solving.
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  77. I am a former CALS…

    I think of all the trillions spent on Gulf War 1…Gulf War 2…ongoing occupation of the Middle East….

    Nearly all of the research that has ever been done on ALS…not worth the paper it was published on….

    The whole ALS bucket challenge….totally disgusts me….

    Stephen….RIP….

    ALS…epidemic among Gulf War 1 Vets…..ROT IN HELL CONGRESSMAN STEVEN SOLARZS…It was your War….

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  78. @anony-mouse
    No Nobel in Physics. Why?

    Because Hawking’s most important contribution was about rigorously-mathematically clarifying the concept of mass in General Relativity with Roger Penrose…

    His work on applying Quantum Mechanics to Black Holes…could turn out to be hocus pocus nonphysics….Same thing for his wave function of the Universe…

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    Penrose, by the by, has gotten relatively little publicity over the years though I've heard and read that he was every bit Hawking's equal in terms of intellectual candlepower.
    , @PhysicistDave
    War for Blair Mountain wrote:

    Because Hawking’s most important contribution was about rigorously-mathematically clarifying the concept of mass in General Relativity with Roger Penrose…
     
    Hmmm... I would have said his most important work, with Penrose, was proving that actual physical singularities must occur under some fairly natural conditions in classical General Relativity (i.e., ignoring quantum effects).

    WfBM also wrote:

    His work on applying Quantum Mechanics to Black Holes…could turn out to be hocus pocus nonphysics...
     
    Well, conceivably. Almost all physicists who have looked at it carefully are convinced he is right. I will admit, though, that while I find it plausible, I myself have never been able to completely understand it.

    I actually heard one of the first talks Hawking gave in the States (at Caltech) on his ideas about quantum effects causing black holes to evaporate, back in the early '70s. I kept the copy of the paper handed out to all the members of the audience and pulled it out recently: I find that I still cannot really understand it.

    So, if you're right that it is really "hocus pocus," then I'm not so dumb after all!

    WfBM also wrote:

    Same thing for his wave function of the Universe…
     
    Let's just be charitable and call that an interesting speculation. As Feynman pointed out, nobody really understands quantum mechanics.
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  79. @War for Blair Mountain
    Because Hawking’s most important contribution was about rigorously-mathematically clarifying the concept of mass in General Relativity with Roger Penrose...

    His work on applying Quantum Mechanics to Black Holes...could turn out to be hocus pocus nonphysics....Same thing for his wave function of the Universe...

    Penrose, by the by, has gotten relatively little publicity over the years though I’ve heard and read that he was every bit Hawking’s equal in terms of intellectual candlepower.

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    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    Roger Penrose has made great mathematical contributions...Here are two of them:1)Penrose inverses...2)twistor theory...a mathematical construction that has very real applications to physics...specifically to calculating scattering amplitudes in quantum chromodynamics....Ed Witten figured out that QCD calculations....Feynman diagram calculations...could be greater simplified in a twistor theory framework....trying to think of a third...3)not totally sure...twistors are part of the framework for understanding the inverse scattering transform method in the theory of exactly solvable nonlinear wave equations....

    On YouTube....you can listen to Roger Penrose give a very clever argument against the Weak Anthropic Principle...a principle much beloved by Steven Hawking....
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  80. @J.Ross
    Not Steve but very briefly Russia has been in fake trouble, one way or another, for years (The only athletes who dope! This redhead is a spy because we say so! That business needs to be banned, while the Saudis do whatever they want!), and the business in Britain is clearly the latest installment of that, and Tillerson shot his mouth off without thinking on that issue. We must signal to Russia that we see how silly this is, without saying that outright where Britain can hear us. Right now Russia is moving S400s into Syria. Not a time for a secretary of State to speak without thinking.
    If you've fallen for this painfully silly episode, consider that:
    >Russia has lots of ways to kill people that cannot be immediately traced directly back to Russia.
    >A country cannot "own" a chemical.
    >Russia developed this nerve agent, then numerous Russian scientists defected or emigrated.
    >The place where this happened just happens to be the UK's chemical weapons centre. It's like if a "Russian" artillery round went off at Aberdeen, Texas.

    You are right that if the Russians wanted to do away with this guy quietly they could have. He would have had “a heart attack” or “committed suicide” or “been killed in a robbery gone wrong” like so many of Putin’s other enemies. The choice of a nerve agent that is available only to state actors was consciously intended to send an unmistakable message. If you believe the Russian denials, I have a bridge that I would like to sell you.

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    • Replies: @J.Ross
    >believe the Russian denials
    I have not heard any. I am merely demonstrating an aversion to sexed-up intel from Limey warmongers.
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  81. @Harry Baldwin
    I think you meant Aberdeen, Maryland, home of the US Army Proving Ground. There's an Abilene, Texas, but no Aberdeen.

    I am delighted to be corrected. The rest of the country is a haze when you never go out.

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  82. @Jack D
    You are right that if the Russians wanted to do away with this guy quietly they could have. He would have had "a heart attack" or "committed suicide" or "been killed in a robbery gone wrong" like so many of Putin's other enemies. The choice of a nerve agent that is available only to state actors was consciously intended to send an unmistakable message. If you believe the Russian denials, I have a bridge that I would like to sell you.

    >believe the Russian denials
    I have not heard any. I am merely demonstrating an aversion to sexed-up intel from Limey warmongers.

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  83. @Lagertha
    let's hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

    I don’t think there was any special secret, aside from the fact that he received excellent (though standard) care and round the clock nursing to keep his airways clear and his respirator on (this has to be done 100% of the time, not 99% of the time). If you are some average zhlub in the nursing home, your hose slips out and by the time the nurse’s aide who has been out back smoking a cigarette notices it, you are gone.

    For some unknown reason, the natural course of his disease was much slower than it usually is.

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    • Replies: @Buzz Mohawk

    For some unknown reason, the natural course of his disease was much slower than it usually is.
     
    Time dilation. Hawking's work often took him to the vicinity of black holes. He has finally passed through the event horizon. May he rest in peace on the other side.
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  84. @Inquiring Mind
    Oh . . . come . . . on!

    Mr. Putin saying with one breath "I didn't do it" and with the other breath "We deal harshly with traitors" is on the level of a certain football star who claimed "I didn't do it" followed by "The b**ch deserved to die."

    It is one thing for these "substances" to be blowing around Syria and be excused as "false flag" operations by the terrorist factions the U.S. and Saudi are supporting.

    It is quite another thing to conduct a chemical WMD strike in the heartland of our U.K. ally. Both Secretary Tillerson's and PM May's remarks were way too mild. They should have been pounding the lectern and speaking in "the broad Russian language" complete with the S-word and the F-bomb like in the movie trailer iSteve linked on another posting. The President Trump is trying to smooth this over proves that he has been chasing women of low moral station long enough that he has turned into one of them.

    It is one thing for these “substances” to be blowing around Syria and be excused as “false flag” operations by the terrorist factions the U.S. and Saudi are supporting.

    No, it is not “one thing.” That would be a causus belli. It’s been attempted several times by the same faction now accusing Putin of being a sloppy idiot with no head for security. There are two reasons these multiple attempts to start a war with false flagged chemical weapons attacks got no traction. One is the ineptitude of the terrorists, who in one case are on video mishandling the goods and dying. The other is the threat of widespread public disfavor as seen in the Facebook Mutiny, when Obama attempted to start a war in Syria.

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  85. @BenKenobi
    Then America is rent asunder.

    "Oh? And when the last law was down, and the [White] Devil turned round on you — where would you hide, the laws all being flat? This country's planted thick with laws from coast to coast — man's laws, not God's — and if you cut them down — and you're just the man to do it — d'you really think you could stand upright in the winds that would blow then? Yes, I'd give the [White] Devil benefit of law, for my own safety's sake."
    - A Man For All Seasons

    That is an appeal to principle. That doesn’t work on nonwhites, and once diversity has tribalized whites, it won’t work on whites either.

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  86. @anonymous
    Penrose, by the by, has gotten relatively little publicity over the years though I've heard and read that he was every bit Hawking's equal in terms of intellectual candlepower.

    Roger Penrose has made great mathematical contributions…Here are two of them:1)Penrose inverses…2)twistor theory…a mathematical construction that has very real applications to physics…specifically to calculating scattering amplitudes in quantum chromodynamics….Ed Witten figured out that QCD calculations….Feynman diagram calculations…could be greater simplified in a twistor theory framework….trying to think of a third…3)not totally sure…twistors are part of the framework for understanding the inverse scattering transform method in the theory of exactly solvable nonlinear wave equations….

    On YouTube….you can listen to Roger Penrose give a very clever argument against the Weak Anthropic Principle…a principle much beloved by Steven Hawking….

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  87. @Jack D
    I don't think there was any special secret, aside from the fact that he received excellent (though standard) care and round the clock nursing to keep his airways clear and his respirator on (this has to be done 100% of the time, not 99% of the time). If you are some average zhlub in the nursing home, your hose slips out and by the time the nurse's aide who has been out back smoking a cigarette notices it, you are gone.

    For some unknown reason, the natural course of his disease was much slower than it usually is.

    For some unknown reason, the natural course of his disease was much slower than it usually is.

    Time dilation. Hawking’s work often took him to the vicinity of black holes. He has finally passed through the event horizon. May he rest in peace on the other side.

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    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    ALS has many many mysteries surrounding it.....seriously... there isn’t a hell of lot of usefull scientific insight concerning ALS......ALS is a small market disease...

    The epidemelogical statistics are interesting though:ALS is increasing among young women....


    Steven Hawking had a massive support network.....he wasn’t locked in his body completely...and this combined with his massive support network no doubt prolonged his life....
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  88. Ironic that the string theorist Joseph Polchinski, who died just a month before Hawking, was also known for work on a paradox of black hole evaporation (though he will be best remembered for bringing branes to the center stage of string theory).

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  89. @Buzz Mohawk

    For some unknown reason, the natural course of his disease was much slower than it usually is.
     
    Time dilation. Hawking's work often took him to the vicinity of black holes. He has finally passed through the event horizon. May he rest in peace on the other side.

    ALS has many many mysteries surrounding it…..seriously… there isn’t a hell of lot of usefull scientific insight concerning ALS……ALS is a small market disease…

    The epidemelogical statistics are interesting though:ALS is increasing among young women….

    Steven Hawking had a massive support network…..he wasn’t locked in his body completely…and this combined with his massive support network no doubt prolonged his life….

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  90. European Soccer Leagues…ALS epidemic….

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  91. RIP

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  92. The choice of a nerve agent that is available only to state actors was consciously intended to send an unmistakable message. If you believe the Russian denials, I have a bridge that I would like to sell you.

    You describe one plausible scenario, but the certainty is unwarranted.

    I didn’t even know he was sick

    ISWYDT.

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  93. @bored identity
    Good one, Uncle Sailer;

    Feigning utter ignorance with your spongy-noticing mammillary nuclei is not an easy task.

    bored identity believes that Mr. Heimbach is/was just another mediocre White Asset whose political staging and maneuvering lands him somewhere between rigor mortised S.Hawking and alive and kickin' T. Hawk :


    http://i.dailymail.co.uk/i/pix/2011/01/14/article-0-0CC19B52000005DC-846_634x542.jpg

    Classic Heimbach Maneuver :

    http://img1.joyreactor.com/pics/post/gif-wheelchair-stunt-890645.gif

    Once again, why is this Heimbach person newsworthy?

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    • Replies: @bored identity
    Uncle Sailer already knows the answer;

    Because normies have to be reminded on a daily basis of a spectre that is haunting US—the spectre of Huwhite Power.

    Because that Slander Properly Low Center's bank account in the Cayman Islands won't bloat to ten digit number by itself.


    Ergo, Paltry Heimbach and his two dozen of minions are meant to be on the front pages as long as Trump occupies the White House....and beyond.


    https://www.counter-currents.com/2018/03/in-bed-with-the-press/#comment-1401096
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  94. @Sam Malone
    Not a charitable comment so soon. Give the man his due, yes he talked too much in these last years about whatever subject came to his head probably just to get attention, which he always got too much of too easily because of who he was, but still there's no need to get snarky about his personal medical situation.

    “Give the man his due, yes he talked too much in these last years about whatever subject came to his head probably just to get attention,”

    Yes, latter day Stephen Hawking is a case study in Dunning-Kruger syndrome: his immense knowledge of one subject convinced him he was an expert in everything. Pace Laura Ingram: shut up and maths!

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  95. @Lagertha
    let's hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long

    A perpetual hard on…..he had 3 kids!

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  96. And on Pi day too. What timing.

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  97. Read More
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  98. @MEH 0910
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven/
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven-page2/
    http://www.parrikar.org/essays/shakespeare-newton-beethoven-page3/

    MEH 0910,

    Thanks for the link; this is good stuff.

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  99. @PhysicistDave
    I met Hawking back in the winter of 1975-'76: I was taking a course from Hawking's friend Kip Thorne, and Kip arranged for a seminar with Steve that a dozen or so of us attended. Hawking did not have his voice synthesizer back then, and I had enough sense to keep my mouth shut and just listen.

    There is going to be a lot of nonsense in the next few days along the lines that Hawking was our generation's Einstein. There are in fact very few Einsteins: perhaps only Newton and Maxwell were in the same league as Einstein.

    On the other hand, while Hawking was no Einstein, he was indeed one of the world's top experts on general relativity, and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public's instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.

    By the way, on one scientific issue --information loss in black holes -- I, along with a number of other physicists, turned out to be right and Hawking turned out to be wrong. Or, more accurately, Hawking changed his mind and admitted that all of us had been right all along, although I'm still a bit nervous on the matter -- maybe Hawking was right in his initial opinion and we were indeed all wrong. It is a sucker's bet to bet against Steve Hawking.

    A brilliant physicist and a great man. (And, while he said a couple of foolish things outside his area of expertise in his last few years... well, has anyone here never said anything foolish?).

    Dave Miller in Sacramento

    …and, of course, he amazingly achieved this while suffering from a monstrously crippling illness. That truly is heroic, and the general public’s instinct to honor a man who so courageously dealt with adversity speaks well of the public: perhaps all is not lost.

    On a BBC Radio news programme this morning, a fellow scientist recalled his first meeting with Hawking. Initially he wondered why Hawking seemed to be constantly winking at him, until he realised that this was the only physical means by which he could control the device which gave him his “voice”.

    I’m not qualified to judge his standing as a scientist. But what a man!

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  100. @Steve Sailer
    Once again, why is this Heimbach person newsworthy?

    Uncle Sailer already knows the answer;

    Because normies have to be reminded on a daily basis of a spectre that is haunting US—the spectre of Huwhite Power.

    Because that Slander Properly Low Center’s bank account in the Cayman Islands won’t bloat to ten digit number by itself.

    Ergo, Paltry Heimbach and his two dozen of minions are meant to be on the front pages as long as Trump occupies the White House….and beyond.

    https://www.counter-currents.com/2018/03/in-bed-with-the-press/#comment-1401096

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    • Replies: @Tyrion 2
    You would do well to recognise just quite how self-defeating pathological paranoia is for any organisation. The comment you linked to off-site is a particularly bizarre example of it. You are really crazy. You should certainly seek help.
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  101. Stephen Hawking in his A Brief History of Time succinctly described how Newton operated as the quintessential proverbial amoral operator in his underhanded actions against John Flamsteed (the Astronomer Royal) and Gottfried Leibniz (along with Newton the co-inventor of calculus).

    Hawking noted that Newton was very active in anti-Catholic politics while at Cambridge and at Parliament. While Warden of the Royal Mint he was personally responsible for the hanging of several counterfeiters.

    All in all, quite a guy.

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  102. @Clyde

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.
     
    The same type Dr Feelgood injections The Monsters of DC get monthly at Walter Reed. That have kept McCain, Pelosi, Di Feinstein etc plunging onward. Arlen Spector, Henry Kissinger got them too. Ho-shou-wu is in it. https://tinyurl.com/y84u9h3g

    The same type Dr Feelgood injections The Monsters of DC get monthly at Walter Reed. That have kept McCain

    McCain died in the Vietnam War. The Viet Cong sent us a tinman clone. It is the clone getting the injections.

    McCain is a machine, not a human being. And his Barbie-doll trophy wife shows what Frankenstein can do with injection molding, genetic engineering and electricity. Never underestimate the skill, nor the diabolical nature, of a deranged scientist.

    But hey, they fit in well with Democrats and stabber Republicans.

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  103. @Sam Malone
    Not a charitable comment so soon. Give the man his due, yes he talked too much in these last years about whatever subject came to his head probably just to get attention, which he always got too much of too easily because of who he was, but still there's no need to get snarky about his personal medical situation.

    sheesh – all of you guys misunderestimated me: I simply wondered what kept him alive? – because I want to ingest THAT, or give it to compromised-immune system folks that are my friends.

    My father was crippled with Post-Polio Complex…died early, in severe pain at 60, now my mother is dying to issues that are so complex, but it is, also, death by starvation. And, it is so hard to see your conscious parent being embarrassed to wear those adult diapers shown in all those commercials on TV for years.

    Sometimes, some of you guys, need to STFU and be good to your women, family, friends…buy some flowers, be romantic, take a small road trip, be nice, be sexy..tick, tock, tick, tock.

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    • Replies: @Thrasymachus
    Well- as others have said, he had a lot more reason to live than the typical ALS sufferer.

    My father passed away recently, and while he was definitely going to die soon anyway, the loss of his independence, which he treasured, cut several months off his life.
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  104. @Clyde

    let’s hope his family reveals what kept him alive, for so long.
     
    The same type Dr Feelgood injections The Monsters of DC get monthly at Walter Reed. That have kept McCain, Pelosi, Di Feinstein etc plunging onward. Arlen Spector, Henry Kissinger got them too. Ho-shou-wu is in it. https://tinyurl.com/y84u9h3g

    I thought you were gonna reveal a whole lotta more scarrier stuff than vitamins! Haha, I have been poisoned by male teenagers who think everyone in DC is eating fetuses or something….yeah, I know, yuch…but kids these days, do think Planned Parenthood is like a drive thru like Kentucky Fried Chicken. Kid you not.

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  105. @Anon 2
    It's interesting that in the last 10 years or so Hawking
    has published at least 5 children's books co-authored
    with his daughter Lucy Hawking who is now 47. The
    slim volumes have whimsical titles like "George and
    the Blue Moon." I wasn't aware of this side of his
    creativity. Parents of small children may want to look
    them up - they may be suitable as gifts. It's astonishing that
    until last year, that is until he was 75, he was still publishing
    complex papers in physics. He had the reputation of being able
    to solve complicated differential equations in his head.

    A couple of years ago Hawking also published a short 100-page
    autobiography. This seems to be a trend among (famous)
    physicists. Joseph Polchinski, a famous string theorist (but not
    as famous as Hawking), who knew he was dying wrote a short
    account of his life and published it last fall. He died a few weeks
    ago.

    Anon 2 wrote:

    Joseph Polchinski, a famous string theorist (but not as famous as Hawking), who knew he was dying wrote a short account of his life and published it last fall. He died a few weeks ago.

    Here is Joe’s autobiography.

    Even physicists would be pressed to read in detail all the parts of Joe’s memoirs dealing with his physics research, but the sections on his childhood and on Caltech are quite readable.

    Joe and I were in the same dorm at Caltech (Joe was just a few months older than I, but he was a year ahead since he entered college early), and I remember well the incidents he relates. He did make some of those incidents sound a bit less, let’s say, conflictual than they really were, and Caltech was (and still is) much, much weirder than you might think from his memoirs!

    When I visited the old dorm a couple years ago, the students seemed not to know that former resident Professor Polchinski was a famous string theorist, but they did all know about Joe Polchinski’s so-called “Millikan-door” adventure, the key passage being:

    There was a ventilation shaft nearby, opening on each floor and then out on the roof. The frame could be unscrewed, so all that was needed was someone with no common sense to climb the shaft from the top floor to the roof. Having a particular talent in this area, late one night I found myself wriggling up the last twelve feet of the shaft, with 9 stories beneath me and tethered by a climbing robe that I had never tried.

    Joe could have fallen a hundred feet to his death. Fortunately, he was good at what Techers called “wall-walking.”

    Alas, the last six weeks have not been good for physics.

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  106. @War for Blair Mountain
    Because Hawking’s most important contribution was about rigorously-mathematically clarifying the concept of mass in General Relativity with Roger Penrose...

    His work on applying Quantum Mechanics to Black Holes...could turn out to be hocus pocus nonphysics....Same thing for his wave function of the Universe...

    War for Blair Mountain wrote:

    Because Hawking’s most important contribution was about rigorously-mathematically clarifying the concept of mass in General Relativity with Roger Penrose…

    Hmmm… I would have said his most important work, with Penrose, was proving that actual physical singularities must occur under some fairly natural conditions in classical General Relativity (i.e., ignoring quantum effects).

    WfBM also wrote:

    His work on applying Quantum Mechanics to Black Holes…could turn out to be hocus pocus nonphysics…

    Well, conceivably. Almost all physicists who have looked at it carefully are convinced he is right. I will admit, though, that while I find it plausible, I myself have never been able to completely understand it.

    I actually heard one of the first talks Hawking gave in the States (at Caltech) on his ideas about quantum effects causing black holes to evaporate, back in the early ’70s. I kept the copy of the paper handed out to all the members of the audience and pulled it out recently: I find that I still cannot really understand it.

    So, if you’re right that it is really “hocus pocus,” then I’m not so dumb after all!

    WfBM also wrote:

    Same thing for his wave function of the Universe…

    Let’s just be charitable and call that an interesting speculation. As Feynman pointed out, nobody really understands quantum mechanics.

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  107. @SimpleSong
    Agree with your comment; would like to add that Einstein, while great, was not even in the ballpark of Newton. Ranking physicists I would say he places a close third after Maxwell. Einstein was both an incredibly great physicist and an incredibly overrated physicist since he's considered head and shoulders above everyone else in the popular imagination, to the point that his name is synonymous with genius.

    Then again, apparently my kid had a playground argument last week about whether Einstein or Newton was smarter, and the 3rd graders' final consensus was that Newton was greater. Upon hearing this I realized there is hope for the future, and also that I live in a really good school district.

    Most underrated physicist? My vote would be J.W. Gibbs or Boltzmann.

    SimpleSong wrote:

    Einstein was both an incredibly great physicist and an incredibly overrated physicist since he’s considered head and shoulders above everyone else in the popular imagination, to the point that his name is synonymous with genius.

    Yes, you’re right. In developing General Relativity, Einstein made several serious wrong turns: indeed, I am proud to say that, in trying to learn GR, I made some of the same mistakes he did! I’m as dumb as Einstein.

    Of course, the difference is that Einstein fixed his errors himself, whereas I fixed my errors because I assumed that Einstein was right and that I was wrong and that I needed to find out why he was right and I was wrong.

    That does, though,, point to the fact that his “genius” was largely the dogged determination to just not give up. Genius consists largely of the willingness to work very, very hard, as Edison indicated in his famous “99 percent perspiration” quip.

    SimpleSong also wrote:

    Most underrated physicist? My vote would be J.W. Gibbs or Boltzmann.

    I vote for Gibbs: hardly anyone knows who he was (outside of STEM majors, of course), but his work was seminal in statistical mechanics, not to mention vector analysis and the Gibbs phenomenon in Fourier analysis.

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    • Replies: @MG
    Abraham Pais’ scientific biography of Einstein “Subtle is the Lord” has a great account of Einstein’s struggle in developing the General Theory, the many blind alleys he encountered, and so on. There are equations but the gist is accessible to the lay person without knowledge of tensor calculus.

    Another physicist who made important contributions but is completely outside the popular imagination was Stueckelberg. Especially given that he had worked out some of things Feynman is known for.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Stueckelberg
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  108. MG says:
    @PhysicistDave
    SimpleSong wrote:

    Einstein was both an incredibly great physicist and an incredibly overrated physicist since he’s considered head and shoulders above everyone else in the popular imagination, to the point that his name is synonymous with genius.
     
    Yes, you're right. In developing General Relativity, Einstein made several serious wrong turns: indeed, I am proud to say that, in trying to learn GR, I made some of the same mistakes he did! I'm as dumb as Einstein.

    Of course, the difference is that Einstein fixed his errors himself, whereas I fixed my errors because I assumed that Einstein was right and that I was wrong and that I needed to find out why he was right and I was wrong.

    That does, though,, point to the fact that his "genius" was largely the dogged determination to just not give up. Genius consists largely of the willingness to work very, very hard, as Edison indicated in his famous "99 percent perspiration" quip.

    SimpleSong also wrote:

    Most underrated physicist? My vote would be J.W. Gibbs or Boltzmann.
     
    I vote for Gibbs: hardly anyone knows who he was (outside of STEM majors, of course), but his work was seminal in statistical mechanics, not to mention vector analysis and the Gibbs phenomenon in Fourier analysis.

    Abraham Pais’ scientific biography of Einstein “Subtle is the Lord” has a great account of Einstein’s struggle in developing the General Theory, the many blind alleys he encountered, and so on. There are equations but the gist is accessible to the lay person without knowledge of tensor calculus.

    Another physicist who made important contributions but is completely outside the popular imagination was Stueckelberg. Especially given that he had worked out some of things Feynman is known for.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ernst_Stueckelberg

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  109. H&I, a TV network that shows five hours of Star Trek reruns six nights a week, will honor Stephen Hawking by playing the TNG episode (“Descent”) where he did a cameo at 6 p.m. (Eastern) on Friday.

    On the day he filmed his scene (alongside actors playing Einstein and Newton), Hawking took a tour of the TNG sets. When he looked up at the warp core, he said, “I’m working on that.”

    Spergy stuff:

    Why “Descent” is airing at that time, in a slot normally devoted to Hercules, I don’t know. Ironically, “Descent” aired only a few days ago as part of the normal TNG rotation.

    Every night, H&I shows the five live-action Trek series in chronological order (TOS at 8 p.m., TNG at 9 p.m., and so on), with the episodes airing in the order they were originally broadcast. TNG, DS9, and Voyager are all in their seventh seasons.

    In fact, the very last episode of Voyager airs (in two parts) tonight and tomorrow. It was originally broadcast as a two-hour movie on May 23, 2001.

    I remember watching that show when it first aired. It was shortly before I graduated from high school, so it was a memorable time in my life.

    (My peak Trekkie/Trekker/whatever days were during my last year of middle school and my first year of high school. I tuned out of Trek for most of the rest of high school, then started watching Voyager again shortly before it ended.)

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  110. @Lagertha
    sheesh - all of you guys misunderestimated me: I simply wondered what kept him alive? - because I want to ingest THAT, or give it to compromised-immune system folks that are my friends.

    My father was crippled with Post-Polio Complex...died early, in severe pain at 60, now my mother is dying to issues that are so complex, but it is, also, death by starvation. And, it is so hard to see your conscious parent being embarrassed to wear those adult diapers shown in all those commercials on TV for years.

    Sometimes, some of you guys, need to STFU and be good to your women, family, friends...buy some flowers, be romantic, take a small road trip, be nice, be sexy..tick, tock, tick, tock.

    Well- as others have said, he had a lot more reason to live than the typical ALS sufferer.

    My father passed away recently, and while he was definitely going to die soon anyway, the loss of his independence, which he treasured, cut several months off his life.

    Read More
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  111. @bored identity
    Uncle Sailer already knows the answer;

    Because normies have to be reminded on a daily basis of a spectre that is haunting US—the spectre of Huwhite Power.

    Because that Slander Properly Low Center's bank account in the Cayman Islands won't bloat to ten digit number by itself.


    Ergo, Paltry Heimbach and his two dozen of minions are meant to be on the front pages as long as Trump occupies the White House....and beyond.


    https://www.counter-currents.com/2018/03/in-bed-with-the-press/#comment-1401096

    You would do well to recognise just quite how self-defeating pathological paranoia is for any organisation. The comment you linked to off-site is a particularly bizarre example of it. You are really crazy. You should certainly seek help.

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  112. @Reverend Spooner
    I have never understood why he was so famous. His theory that black holes emit some kind of radiation hasn't been proven and may never be. Could it be because of his crippling condition?

    I don’t think Hawking’s ALS alone is sufficient to account for his fame. I think the ingenious solution of how a black hole, that shouldn’t radiate, nevertheless could radiate, captured the imagination of the portion of the public that loves scientific puzzle-solving.

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  113. @the Supreme Gentleman
    Matt Heimbach is (or was?) the head of the Traditionalist Worker Party, which was sort of attempting to do right-wing (like, National Socialism right-wing) community organizing in proletarian white areas. He was just in a domestic imbroglio that was so convoluted (involving affairs, step-parents, domestic abuse, et cetera) that I suspect fans of Latin American daytime television would have angrily rejected it as requiring impossible suspension of disbelief, if it had been the plot of an episode of a soap opera.

    “I suspect fans of Latin American daytime television would have angrily rejected it as requiring impossible suspension of disbelief, if it had been the plot of an episode of a soap opera”.

    It’s a case of an Alt Right activist family taking the CBS soap opera “The Bold and the Beautiful” a little too seriously. Hopefully they will find a way to sort this tragedy out in private while getting their lives back on track.

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