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Starch and Sugar Often Worse for Your Weight Than Fat
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Here’s a new study that vindicates what entrepreneurial actress Suzanne Somers was saying in her diet books in the 1990s: that starch and sugar are worse than fat. From the NYT:

How a Low-Carb Diet Might Help You Maintain a Healthy Weight

Adults who cut carbohydrates from their diets and replaced them with fat sharply increased their metabolisms.

By Anahad O’Connor, Nov. 14, 2018

It has been a fundamental tenet of nutrition: When it comes to weight loss, all calories are created equal. Regardless of what you eat, the key is to track your calories and burn more than you consume.

But a large new study published on Wednesday in the journal BMJ challenges the conventional wisdom. It found that overweight adults who cut carbohydrates from their diets and replaced them with fat sharply increased their metabolisms. After five months on the diet, their bodies burned roughly 250 calories more per day than people who ate a high-carb, low-fat diet, suggesting that restricting carb intake could help people maintain their weight loss more easily.

The new research is unlikely to end the decades-long debate over the best diet for weight loss. But it provides strong new evidence that all calories are not metabolically alike to the body. And it suggests that the popular advice on weight loss promoted by health authorities — count calories, reduce portion sizes and lower your fat intake — might be outdated.

“This study confirms that, remarkably, diets higher in starch and sugar change the body’s burn rate after weight loss, lowering metabolism,” said Dr. Dariush Mozaffarian, the dean of the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts University, who was not involved in the research. “The observed metabolic difference was large, more than enough to explain the yo-yo effect so often experienced by people trying to lose weight.” …

Dr. Mozaffarian called the findings “profound” and said they contradicted the conventional wisdom on calorie counting. “It’s time to shift guidelines, government policy and industry priorities away from calories and low-fat and toward better diet quality.” …

But experts like Dr. Ludwig argue that the obesity epidemic is driven by refined carbohydrates such as sugar, juices, bagels, white bread, pasta and heavily processed cereals. These foods tend to spike blood sugar and insulin, a hormone that promotes fat storage, and they can increase appetite.

One bowl of Cheerios always made me hungrier for a second bowl, which made me hungrier for a third bowl.

Let me emphasize, however, that people are different, so don’t weight my experiences for more than they are worth. Human biodiversity is real. This is a problem for diet research, which is constantly looking for the One True Diet.

The subjects on the low-carb diet also had the sharpest declines in a hormone called ghrelin, which is produced in the stomach. Ghrelin promotes hunger and body fat, and it lowers energy expenditure. Suppressing ghrelin may be one reason the low-carb diet increased metabolism, the authors noted.

Dr. Ludwig emphasized that the results need to be replicated by other investigators and he stressed that the findings do not impugn whole fruits, beans and other unprocessed carbohydrates. Rather, he said, the study suggests that reducing foods with added sugar, flour and other refined carbohydrates could help people maintain weight loss by increasing their metabolisms at a lower body weight.

If I recall my Suzanne Somers biochemical theory correctly, while vegetables are carbohydrates, they take longer to digest than Cheerios, so they don’t make you instantly hungry for a couple more servings of vegetables.

Anyway, never trust me for diet advice.

Trust Suzanne Somers.

 
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  1. She’s right.
    Do we get to vote for which actresses will rule us?
    I can provide or conceal documents as necessary.

  2. Trevor H. says:

    Gentle reader, I know little of your life and doings, yet I can still guess that reading the bitchiest theatrical notice of our era may well lighten the mood of your entire day. And it’s not off-topic. No not even a little :)

    https://www.nytimes.com/2005/07/18/theater/reviews/selfhelp-expert-gets-back-her-own.html

    2005 New York Times. “Self-help expert gets back her own”

  3. johnd says:

    the tenor of this article?
    “all calories are created equal”
    even calories can be racist huh.

  4. Does Suzanne Somers get paid to be a celebrity spokesperson or does she get a crush on each new health expert who seems to offer her eternal youth?

    Beware the low carb diet. It works for awhile then leaves you bereft of both metabolism and energy. Honestly I believe nature intended it as pre-hibernation fare to be followed by a pizza binge the next spring so you can catch fish, vie for dominance, etc.

    • Agree: Trevor H., fish
    • Disagree: Chrisnonymous
  5. Dude, go to YouTube and search on Keto or Ketogenic and Intermittent Fasting.

    She of the ThighMaster must be obeyed.

  6. anon[321] • Disclaimer says:

    Drinking man’s diet. FWIW.

    “Did you ever hear of a diet which was fun to follow? A diet which would let you have two martinis before lunch, and a thick steak generously spread with Sauce Béarnaise, so that you could make your sale in a relaxed atmosphere and go back to the office without worrying about having gained so much as an ounce? A diet which allows you to take out your favorite girl for a dinner of squab and broccoli with hollandaise sauce and Chateau Lafitte, to be followed by an evening of rapture and champagne?”

    So starts a jaunty little pamphlet titled The Drinking Man’s Diet that first appeared in 1964. It was published by an equally jaunty San Francisco bon vivant, Robert Cameron, who priced it at $1. (Cameron used noms de plume–first Gardner Jameson and Elliott Williams, later Jeffrey W. Roberts.) In two years, he sold 2.4 million copies in 13 languages. Now Cameron, 93, still jaunty, still a bon vivant and still admirably trim from following his own diet, is reissuing this classic. It can be bought for $4.95 through Amazon.com or through Cameron’s own Web site (www.abovebooks.com).

  7. tyrone says:

    Bacon!……..nature’s most perfect food………the pig, man’s new best friend.

    • Replies: @another fred
    , @Buffalo Joe
  8. Hodag says:

    Did the ThighMaster create Summers or did Summers create ThighMaster?

    Is crafting/creation one in the same?

    Jack LaLanne advocated no sugar, no processed carbs. Was he the demiurge which then sprang forth Summers?

  9. You can also eat more carbs if you physically work for a living. If you’re walking behind a horse all day, spending 10 hours a day in a factory using a lot of muscle power, or manually (womanually?) running a household, you don’t get fat. If you ride a tractor, sit behind a desk, and household chores are largely automated, you tend to get fat.
    But remember the wisdom of Spinal Tap:”The bigger the cushion, the sweeter the pushin’”.

  10. @Trevor H.

    Whaddya wanna bet that the NYT reviewer, Charles Sherwood, never got near a blonde like Suzanne Somers back when he was in high school?

    (And was still simmering over it decades later?)

  11. Altai says:

    OT:
    Two more examples of the silent oppression of non-blondes by blondes.

    In Denmark, Ms Priyanka Kalra is disappointed that she has gone from being considered fair and lovely by Indian standards to having to compete with Danish women. (I feel for her, that is some drastic whiplash and Danish guys are quite attractive too, the Torment of Tantalus but by the same token, nobody asked her to go live in Denmark.) The correct answer is that the Danes are wrong for simply wanting to be left alone, they are infact racist for having not done anything at all. Are there really Danes going up and down the isles of Netto at darker girls and going ‘you’re ugly!’?

    https://friktionmagasin.dk/the-ugly-refugee-brown-skin-and-white-beauty-standards-38d0246ec2bd

    Western beauty standards carry with them an inherent racism — rooted in the white West’s colonization of the rest of the world. Living within these standards as a woman of colour, never “beautiful enough”, provokes feelings of insecurity and inferiority.


    Suddenly, the reason for my Kenyan friend in Aarhus not talking to the guy at the bar because she doesn’t think that she is “beautiful here” meant so much more than mere lack of confidence, and now my Nigerian friend’s experience of being called an “ugly refugee” while shopping at Netto was not just a racist incident any more.


    These differences are highlighted even further when you are surrounded by women who effortlessly and naturally fit the standards. “My body hair is more prominent in Denmark,” said a Pakistani friend while laughing. Being aware of my own hair removal regime, I couldn’t join her in the hysteria. The idea of beauty doesn’t just play on the self-esteem but also causes psychological distress that disrupts day-to-day life. These subconsciously imposed notions from generations of social conditioning threaten the physical and mental health of every individual. Yet, every time I have had this conversation, the awkward silence at the table is only broken by a “everyone has their insecurities, this has nothing to do with race”.

    “my Nigerian friend’s experience of being called an “ugly refugee” while shopping at Netto was not just a racist incident any more.” It was worse than racism, he called her ugly!

    This is from the SBS which is basically an entire channel run by the ABC in Australia, originally for some programming exploring and showcasing non-Anglo-Celtic Australia but is now a functionally anti-white heterosexual channel. (So much so that they run Australia’s entry to the Eurovision and haven’t once sent a white person to the contest.) Being run and staffed by ethnocentric and aggrieved Australian-born children of recent immigrants.

    https://www.sbs.com.au/topics/life/culture/article/2018/06/05/i-went-bed-every-night-wishing-i-could-just-wake-white

    A few years ago, I was on a date. It was 11pm; we were in the city and walking back to his place. My date, who later became my boyfriend, is a charming and intelligent African Australian, deeply attuned to his own racial identity – as you would have to be growing up brown in Australia. I am an Asian-Australian woman.

    It was our third date. We were on Lonsdale Street when a group of loud, drunk white men stumbled in front of us. One of them turned to my partner and whisper-shouted, “Congratulations man, you got an Asian girl! How did you get an Asian girl? You’re Black.”


    By the time I was fifteen, I wanted nothing to do with my race. I went to bed every night wishing I could just wake up white. I hated my parents because my life would have been so much easier if they weren’t Chinese – if I hadn’t been born Chinese. I stopped speaking my language. I had heard too many ching chong chang’s when I walked down the street, courted too many catcalls, encountered countless white men who would leer as they passed me and shouted “ni hao” at the same time.

    It’s weird how all these racial incidents keep happening to people who’ve been obsessed with their race their whole life. Lots of people are embarassed by their parents but don’t go around demanding the ethnic cleansing of the people she wished her parents were like. What is the issue here for her? She seems to have wanted to be Anglo-Celtic Australian, clearly diversity isn’t strength, but I suspect she is for open borders for Australia.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Clyde
    , @Spangel
  12. Bill B. says:

    What I like about low-carb is that it reduces hunger pangs so that one can engage in ascetic eating, you know, like James Bond. Steak with wine.

    But also one can go without eating for 10 or 18 hours without discomfort which may be of the very few genuinely effective ways to extend your life. A ‘fast’ of 14-20 hours causes the body to repair itself in a way that nothing else (extreme diet restriction aside) does.

    The go-to site is Mangan’s but there are others.

    http://roguehealthandfitness.com

    Modern food is designed by engineers who know how to manipulate our appetites in ways that nature never intended. It seems sensible and natural that the key to good health is to get away from constant eating.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    , @Henry's Cat
  13. LondonBob says:

    They do something to the food, when I moved to Russia I lost a stone within a month or two despite no change in diet or lifestyle. The food manufacturers need to be looked in to.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  14. You still have to count calories IMHO with no-carb but you can eat a lot of vegetables/beans/meat/fish.

    No bread or potatoes in the house because the flesh is weak. Once a week we go out eating and forget the diet. We’ve lost a stone each. Now if only we could stop drinking wine…

    (Anyone got ideas on improving the various beans/pulses (blackeye, cannelini, kidney, butter, broad, pinto, green lentils)? I tend to do them with passata/fried onion/chorizo/mushroom as a sauce, but it gets a bit samey)

  15. @miss marple

    You’ve probably come upon the best diet idea without even knowing it, Miss Marple, and you’re not even on Three’s Company: Hibernation, that’s the ticket. I think we should all hibernate on different schedules – and I mean real 1 breath/min respiration with NO INTERNET!

  16. One bowl of Cheerios always made me hungrier for a second bowl, which made me hungrier for a third bowl.

    That wasn’t my experience at all, Stever. Unless I had 4 teaspoons of sugar mixed in, Cheerios just made me hungrier for some REAL cereal, such as Apple Jacks, Lucky Charms, or Count Chocula.

    • LOL: Kylie
  17. @Trevor H.

    What is it with gorgeous women in showbiz having so few kids?

    “When Suzanne Somers found out she was pregnant with Alan’s child she had an abortion because she wasn’t ready to take care of a second child.”

    Is it “muh career”, is it marrying Jewish guys (see Dawn Wells aka Mary Ann), or is it something in the water?

    I’m trying to think of a beautiful star with three or more children, but the only one I can think of is comely but not beautiful.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    , @The Alarmist
  18. jim jones says:

    The main problem with Black girls is not skin colour but obesity.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    , @Marty
  19. As a kid I knew Dr. Blake Donaldson the author of “Strong Medicine”
    (1962). Dr. Donaldson is considered one of the early founders of the low carb diet. His book is an interesting read.

    • Replies: @res
  20. miss Marple and Redneck Farmer make the good and true points that a low-carb diet works if you live a fairly sedentary lifestyle, but (from my experience) comes up short if you’re an aerobic athlete or simply work at a physically demanding job.

    I stumbled on the paleo, then called low-carb, diet about twenty years ago in the writings of Barry Groves, who was an advocate. He had many interesting insights about diabetes and metabolism. Here’s a link to his website. Much of this became mainstream as the paleo craze took hold. I notice that Barry Groves just passed away at the age of 77.

    Check it out. He looks at the long term follow ups to e.g. the Framington Heart Study and notes that high cholesterol is not linked to heart disease in a direct simple fashion. Also, he claims that longitudinal studies showed that once a person is over 60 or so, there is no or even an inverse correlation between cholesterol and heart disease.

    He may not have gotten every thing right, but one thing Grove’s research did highlight was the glycemic index of a food, what Steve alluded to, how fast something is metabolized, the calories liberated by digestion and made available to the body. The fat-consumer advocates pointed to fat’s long term burn time vs. carbo’s instant sugar high, insulin spike yo-yoing.

    There’s something to this, but as I say, in my personal experience, and for what it’s worth, I found that I needed carbs to put out a lot of work for a sustained period of time.

    http://www.second-opinions.co.uk

  21. Chriscom says:

    I’m a little less dogmatic about the benefits of a low carb diet than I used to be because as Steve-o notes human biodiversity is real. But I’ve been doing it for what, 15 years, whenever that Gary Taubes book expanding on his NYT magazine piece came out. I get regular physicals so this is not just in my head – – I’m healthy and active and can regulate my weight +/- 2 pounds pretty much at will based on my carb intake. (Along with adjustments for physical activity, if I’m biking a ton I can have a few more cookies).

  22. @tyrone

    Bacon may be “nature’s”, but Irish coffee is best. All four of the essential foods; alcohol, caffeine, sugar, and fat, right there in one mug.

    • Agree: Coemgen
    • LOL: Mr. Rational
  23. Anonymous[295] • Disclaimer says:
    @Altai

    “… while a Chinese friend recounts unhealthy eating practices on the expectations of women being ultra thin.”

    Man! How did they ever survive foot-binding?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Foot_binding

  24. Oh, and I forgot. Barry Groves was the first dietician I ran into who condemned Soy. So he got that right. Unfermented soy is useful as a source of oil for plastics, but as a food, not so much.

    “Henry Ford did indeed experiment with soybean production in the mid to late thirties. He was fascinated by the possibilities of the soybean and built a plant to produce soybean products, plastics being one the products. Henry exhibited his “Soybean Car”

    Here’s Groves’ take on soy.

    http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/no-joy.html#.W-7C5y-ZMWo

    His articles are well referenced to seemingly respectable journals. Whether he was entirely objective in selecting his evidence from these, I’m not qualified to say.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  25. Who’s the author of the study? Captain Obvious?

  26. Rosie says:

    Let me emphasize, however, that people are different, so don’t weight my experiences for more than they are worth. Human biodiversity is real. This is a problem for diet research, which is constantly looking for the One True Diet.

    This!

    Another factor is whether you can actually stick to it. Extreme low-carb diets are fine for crash diets, in preparation for a wedding or something, but they’re too restrictive for the long-term.

    I try to go by the rules on plate arrangement. Use a luncheon size plate, cover half of it with vegetables, and don’t have seconds.

    Other tips:

    Divide brownies into three baking pans. That way you have dessert for three nights with everyone getting a small portion.

    Eat early on weekends. I follow a modified hobbit schedule when I’m not limited by Mr. Rosie’s work schedule:

    Breakfast (quick meal to give me the energy to make…
    Second breakfast (a decadent affair usually involving pancakes, French toast or biscuits-n-gravy)
    Dinner (a feast around 2 or 3 o’clock in the pm, mashed potatoes, dinner rolls, the whole works)
    Dessert (7 or 8, no sharing, everyone gets a full helping all to themselves).

  27. Bitfu says:

    Go back 10-20 years…and the cutting-edge experts were touting ‘complex carbs’, and the notion of grazing throughout the day on 6-8 meals. [They touted grazing because it would speed up the metabolism.]

    Now the cutting edge guys are all about the notion that insulin is deadly. As such, we all need low-carb keto/paleo and intermittent fasting.

    Go forward 10-20 years and I suspect the cutting edge experts will then be touting the dangers of cortisol. Cortisol at elevated levels will decrease immunity, libido, and leads to slower metabolism and fatty deposits in neck and face. And what kind of diet elevates cortisol? Keto/Paleo.

  28. Bill P says:

    The carb thing is obvious to anyone who pays attention to their weight and is not in denial.

    When I turned 21 and was allowed to regularly indulge in beer, which contains about 12 grams of carbs per serving, I put on about 20 pounds in short order. One night out with the guys will result in an extra 60-80 grams of carbs (two to three ounces) from beer alone, plus whatever amount of pizza, pretzels or chips go along with it. Do that a couple times a week and it adds up fast.

    In my case, all I have to do to return to a reasonable weight is eliminate beer, but a lot of people crave sugar a lot more than I do, and that’s probably even worse as only one serving of pop contains 40 grams of carbs, and most people who drink pop consume other forms of sugar throughout the day as well.

    If you don’t want to eat a lot of meat, substitute legumes for your regular carb fixes. Legumes have carbs but a lot of it is fiber that does not affect insulin. They also slow down digestion and support beneficial gut bacteria, and have a fair amount of protein as well.

    Some examples of healthy, filling legume dishes include hummus (eaten with vegetables rather than bread), refried beans (yes, with lard), cannellini soup, various lentil concoctions, split pea soup and bean chili. Legumes are the one food shown to increase lifespan across all cultures and ethnicites studied.

    I’m convinced that the reason old Mexicans are doing better than old Anglos of similar socioeconomic status is the diet. The Mexicans are the original domesticators of the common bean (Phaseolus vulgaris), and they eat a great quantity of beans to this day, hence the “beaner” ethnonym. This should fill Mexicans with pride, as they have made a great contribution to global cuisine not only through the introduction of the common bean and all its glorious offspring, but corn, chili peppers and the domestic turkey, among others.

    • Replies: @Clyde
  29. The low carb (aka keto or paleo or Atkins or carnivore) diet is vastly healthier on every level. The science has been pretty conclusive since the early 2000s.

    It’s very easy to follow if you like to eat meat and salads (as I do). However, it does seem to work much better for men than women.

    The key is the suppression of insulin.

    Due to the American Heart Association’s baseless demonizing of dietary fat as the cause of heart disease, Americans have been following disastrous low-fat, high sugar diets for 40 years.

    As a result, they have been bathing their systems with insulin to the point where almost everyone is now an obese diabetic by their 40s.

    If you’ve ever seen one of those juxtaposed crowd pictures comparing the 70′s and now, the difference in the average body type is absolutely jarring.

    • Replies: @Simply Simon
  30. Anonymous[426] • Disclaimer says:

    they take longer to digest than Cheerios, so they don’t make you instantly hungry for a couple more servings of vegetables.

    How does that follow, Steve?

  31. Clyde says:
    @Altai

    I live in USA and was born here. Reading your post, what the hell are these racially oriented misfits doing in Denmark and Australia? They complain and complain and complain (racism) but none of them are fleeing back to India or similar cesspits. They cannot go home because they are defacto anchor babies and the family back home in third worldsville pressures them, sees them as their foot in the door.

    • Replies: @notanon
  32. Anonymous[426] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill B.

    A ‘fast’ of 14-20 hours causes the body to repair itself in a way that nothing else (extreme diet restriction aside) does.

    Citation needed.

    • Replies: @notanon
    , @Bill B.
  33. Clyde says:
    @Bill P

    You want the ultimate bean? It is the chickpea. #2 People put down soy and soy boy stuff but tofu is quick to deal w in cooking and is not that tasteless and is the protein of the soybean. Extracted though it is not pure protein, there is still lots of carbohydrates in it.

    Summary – think chickpeas. WIKI>>> Chickpea seeds are high in protein. It is one of the earliest cultivated legumes and 7500-year-old remains have been found in the Middle East.[6][7]

  34. pyrrhus says:
    @miss marple

    No, the low carb diet has been known to be better for a long time…But you have to experiment to find out how low you can go….And avoid factory food with all the additives.

  35. Steve, look up ketosis and its benefits.

    To people who are interested in this stuff, that starch and sugars are the real culprits in many health issues has been known for quite a long time. The food pyramid is junk science. Read Gary Taubes’ book “Good Calories, Bad Calories”.

  36. Jason Liu says:

    I’m in good shape and breakfast cereal is the only food that makes my blood sugar spike then crash a few hours later. Like shaking with cold sweat. It’s all carbs, no fat or protein to slow down absorption. Avoid like the plague.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  37. @Redneck farmer

    Yes, carbs are the best for growth and sustaining massive expenditures of energy. Powerlifters and bodybuilders and offensive lineman typically use high carb diets (6000-10,000 calories a day) to maintain their muscle mass and overall size.

    for John Q normie, the fewer carbs the better.

  38. Giuseppe says:

    The human body can use either glucose or fat as an energy source. The low-carb diets switch you from your usual glucose to fat energy, which saves your pancreas and has other benefits.

  39. Nathan says:

    The truth about carbs has been known for a long time, and has been covered up so that the “scientists” behind the old, bad dieting advice could save face. Back in my physiology and nutrition class in college, ketogenic diets were covered for medical reasons, but “there were no long term studies” to prove they were safe.

    Never mind that there aren’t that many long term diet studies to begin with.

  40. Here’s another weight management program: Get up at 5 AM and clear the snow off your driveway. That’s what we do here on days like today.

    • Replies: @Flip
  41. More and more research keeps confirming that eating more fats and less carbs is better for our health.

  42. carol says:

    We knew about the carb problem a long time ago. No bread, potatoes, sugar, rice. Every young woman knew! Steak and salad, baby! But carbs are much easier to find and prepare. Is there anything easier than toast or cereal?

    Low carb is hard.

    • Replies: @notanon
    , @Dave Pinsen
    , @Bill
  43. KunioKun says:

    Here’s a selection of photos of different families around the world and their groceries for the week:

    https://fstoppers.com/food/what-week-groceries-looks-around-world-3251

    I have found the best way for me to lose weight is to catch a cold.

    • Replies: @Bill
    , @Desiderius
  44. Don’t believe the otherwise lovely Suzanne Somers. The low carb diets in their various guises – Paleo, Carnivore, Atkins, Ketogenic, Banting – all work the same way.

    They get the body to ramp up stress hormones and start to catabolize itself. This initially feels great — but cannot be sustained indefinitely. And I should add: is unhealthy.

    Read Ray Peat and one of his populizer’s, Danny Roddy on this.

  45. Of course, there is a racial component as well. Rice is nothing but carbs, and East Asians can eat it like it’s going out of style without any impact on their weight or health.

  46. @Redneck farmer

    You can also eat more carbs if you physically work for a living. If you’re walking behind a horse all day, spending 10 hours a day in a factory using a lot of muscle power, or manually (womanually?) running a household, you don’t get fat. If you ride a tractor, sit behind a desk, and household chores are largely automated, you tend to get fat.

    Exactly. If you want to eat carbs you need to actually burn the carbs. Work like your grandparents (or great-grandparents) did and ok, carb away.

    But if you carb up in the morning with your cereal or bagel, then your blood sugar spikes, and your insulin metabolism is kicked into gear. If you aren’t burning the carbs off, then the insulin will turn them into … weight for it … fat! And your blood sugar slumps and viola, you’re hungry again.

    Simple carbs were rare in the ancestral enviroment–fruit tree in season–and a fine “pick me up”. They became much less rare with the neolithic. But tractable if you follow that pancake breakfast by working in the fields for four hours. Sitting on your ass in the office doesn’t cut it.

    The plain reality here: we’ve changed a lot since the neolithic–gotten much smarter (some “population groups more than otheres”), more cooperative, conscientious. However in this 10,000 year explosion we haven’t engineered a whole new carbohydrate metabolism. No need to. It works. But it’s designed to take unused high blood sugar and … turn it into fat.

    So don’t give your metabolism unused high blood sugar.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  47. Svigor says:

    And it suggests that the popular advice on weight loss promoted by health authorities — count calories, reduce portion sizes and lower your fat intake — might be outdated.

    No, it doesn’t. It suggests that adding low carb high everything else to your list will improve your results. All of that other stuff works, too (well, the “lower your fat intake” bit gets half an asterisk).

    Does the article mention the fact the body burns a lot more calories digesting protein (like 40% more, or something, IIRC)? That’s a big reason why type of calories matters; cost of uptake.

    If I recall my Suzanne Somers biochemical theory correctly, while vegetables are carbohydrates, they take longer to digest than Cheerios, so they don’t make you instantly hungry for a couple more servings of vegetables.

    A lot of vegetables are basically calorically non-existent. Leafy green stuff has pretty much 0 calories. It’s there to taste good, make you feel full, and give you nutrients.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  48. I like the French diet: cigarettes and coffee. Food really isn’t necessary for modern life.

    Then there’s the homeless diet: booze and drugs and cigarettes. A variant of the French diet.

    The punk-ass diet: drugs and steroids and Monster Energy.

    The old 70′s rural diet: chew gum and spit.

    The champagne diet: yeah, you just drink champagne. A friend and I tried this one and we didn’t last very long. And we didn’t lose any weight. But I still recommend you give it a shot.

    • Replies: @Bill
  49. @AnotherDad

    Let me simplify this for you.

    Don’t eat junk food!

    I think I just summarized all successful dietary schemes.

  50. Dietary restrictions are all very well and good. But another very effective trick to keep your weight down involves constant intense worrying. Like worrying about climate change, for example. Combined with frequent public outrage over social injustice, you got a surefire calorie incinerator there!

    Just look at how svelte the SJWs are. Look at Tiny Duck’s trim Toby McGuire physique.

  51. Spangel says:
    @Altai

    There’s the narrative and there’s what that article really said. The narrative is that there is this white beauty standard, an environmentally created facet of white male hegemonic patriarchy, which causes all non white women to feel lesser.

    Then there is what that article said which is that black women feel like ugly refugees, the Pakistani girl is hairy but she’s laughing at it and the Chinese girl is in demand.

    Last I was in Europe, most black women were at least somewhat ugly given that they are completely black West Africans. The exception were street walkers, who were surprisingly good looking. If not for being there, I would have thought “refugee” prostitutes were merely women who took a boat to Europe and had no other prospects. Not so. A lot of the street walkers were clearly chosen and shipped over to appeal to a European audience. The human traffickers picked out some very good looking west African girls and sent them over for this purpose.

    The Pakistani girl has got a problem, the hairiness, but that’s not hard to remove. Her bigger problem is probably what her uncles would do to her if they found out she was dating a danish dude.

    And the Chinese girl has got no problems but the narrative just has to pretend that all women of color face similar challenges when reality is that no one is more different to an African woman than an East Asian woman.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  52. Spangel says:

    I ate on a low carb high protein diet for decades now my cholesterol was 290. Granted you don’t have to get protein from red meat like I did. Scaled the red meat back this year and gained about 10% of my weight. I’d like a solution to this.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  53. Forbes says:

    Even the early USDA (bad) advice for high carb/low fat diet stressed complex carbs over simple carbs. But most people don’t understand the distinction. What they should’ve emphasized was the avoidance of refined or processed foods. Though the packaged foods companies would’ve snuffed out that recommendation.

    If most people just ate one-third less (smaller portions) than they currently do, they’d get their weight under control. It’s a bit challenging at first–but far easier than attempting to follow a rule book that has you jumping through hoops counting/tracking myriad food items.

    My rules: no fast food, no junk food, no snack food, no deserts/sweets, no fruit juice, no soft drinks, no bread, no processed foods, and preferably cook what you eat. Eat more protein. Buy nothing labeled “low fat”–fat is flavor, chemical substitutes (worth avoiding) are added to enhance flavor.

    My exceptions: fast food allowed when in car on a road trip; deserts allowed for a birthday/anniversary or similar occasional celebration.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Henry's Cat
  54. anonymous[333] • Disclaimer says:

    Pretty much conforms to personal experience rather than sounding like a good theory amongst competing diet theories. I’ve found a low sugar and carb diet leans me down. With s+c energy goes up and down whereas with a mostly protein and fat diet energy is pretty steady throughout and hunger pangs are few. There seems to be a transition period between sugar/carb reduction and going on to a primarily protein/fat intake lasting maybe four-five days where one has sugar cravings. Once you’re over the hump it goes away. Once you’re no longer a sugar junkie sugary foods taste like garbage. I wouldn’t say that calories don’t count but that it’s best to get them mostly from protein sources rather than carbs and sugar. It’s not that you’ll never eat carbs or sugary things but that your tastes shift and you’ll end up limiting your intake of them simply because they no longer are as appealing as they once were. Trading notes with others who’ve dieted confirms this general experience even though some of them have gone in for more extreme forms of dieting such as keto, caveman, fasting, etc. They have gotten results that I could see up close as well being able to gauge it personally.

  55. … weight for it …

    Haha, homonym mistake there, or good pun?

  56. For the past two years, I’ve basically banned starches–the white foods–from my day to day eating. My very favorite foods, mind you: potatoes, pasta, rice, and bread. Also corn, although I’ve never loved it as much as flour.

    I didn’t ban all carbs–I don’t eat a lot of sugar, and I don’t buy icecream, but I’ll eat peanut butter (from the jar, no bread!) as a treat. I drink beer, but I’ve cut most of the darks and ambers and drink really good pilsners–and I cut back. I drink wine, too. I eat rice when eating sushi, but that’s it. I skip hamburgers unless they are good enough to eat in a lettuce wrap, and few do. God, I miss french fries.

    But it’s not religiously anti-carbs, just ruthless banning of my favorite foods. Instead, I eat a lot more steak, bacon, and eggs than I used to. The only low carb food that causes me damage is cheese. I rarely keep it in the house, and if I use it in meals it’s mozzarella or goatcheese or a reduced fat cheese I don’t object to. I can’t eat enough steak to do damage. Cheese, I can wipe out a thousand calories worth without blinking and ask for more. When I mention losing focus (below), it’s always cheese that starts the slide.

    If I monitor calories as well and regularly walk 5-6 miles a week, I lose weight at 2-3 pounds a month. But the past year plus has been busy, and if I’m working hard I can’t focus on monitoring calories and exercise–and I start buying cheese every night, rather than as a 3 or 4 times a month treat.

    However, for this period of two years, sliding off weight loss or not,I have stayed the same weight. This last summer, I went on a 2-week business trip with an expense account, went to Louisiana with my brother and dad and went nuts on fried chicken, crab, and shrimp, and ended the summer at the same weight I started.

    I haven’t been dieting, haven’t avoided thinking about the scale. That’s a switch. Normally, I’m either dieting or avoiding thinking about weight (and thus gaining).

    I have never been able to do full bore low-carb, but this is working for me. I am not feeling deprived, and not worrying about weight. Next goal is to lose some consistently, but this is a really nice stall until then.If I can consistently limit cheese and stop snacking after dinner, I’ll get there. But work tends to get in the way.

  57. Pat Boyle says:

    I have a bowl of cereal every morning except I skip the cereal part and leave the milk – whole milk. Actually this is the easiest carbohydrate to cut. If I make myself a hamburger I find it hard to skip the bun. I know I should but toasting the bun is part of the hamburger ritual.

    When I stopped going to mass I felt the need for ritual in my daily life. One of my greatest and most fulfilling rituals is making the morning Cappuccino. Lots of little steps followed in a specific order. When the earthquake hits and my Cappuccino has no electricity I can still make coffee of some kind but the ancillary machines like the grinder and the frother will also be out,.

    I also make a ritualistic hamburger. Actually a cheeseburger, with a large thin slice of Bermuda onion cut on my mandolin. Surprisingly the meat hardly matters but it must have a bun no matter what the carbohydrate penalty.

    I grill the meat patty in the microwave. If this shocks you – you’ve been sleeping.

    • Replies: @Hockamaw
    , @Jack D
  58. And yet the authorities (sic) and their credentialcrat progeny are not only still pushing the same old ADM nonsense, they’re still blackballing those who dissent from it.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  59. Low carb and no carb are two different animals.

    Low carb/modest portions is just good practice for everyone. No carb (keto) is much higher risk/reward.

  60. @YetAnotherAnon

    All good information, but what’s with you Englishmen and your stones? What is that, like the same as a metric shit-ton? Either go full SI and use kilos, or stick with lb-mass, one. I haven’t heard your term in, like a fortnight or a furlong or something …

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  61. @another fred

    Hah! I almost resemble that remark. On a 10-day trip in Ireland, I ate just the four basic food groups of: Cheddar cheese (in blocks), baguettes of bread, Guiness Beer, and Cadbury’s chocolate bars.

    I was younger then – if I did that today, I’d be dead within a fortnight. If you want to know more about the basic food groups, then subsribe to my every-fortnightly newsletter. It also has after-the-fact stock price tip explanations.

  62. cthulhu says:

    If you want all of the nitty-gritty details, read Gary Taubes’ opus Good Calories, Bad Calories. His Why We Get Fat, published a few years after GCBC, is more accessible but not as detailed. Nina Teicholz’s The Big Fat Surprise goes into all of the political games that were played and why Ancel Keys should go down in history as the primary perpetrator of the crime against humanity known as the low fat diet craze. And while you’re at it, go to https://peterattiamd.com and read his magnum opus on cholesterol to understand why dietary cholesterol isn’t a problem and why the typical LDL / HDL blood test report is meaningless.

    And then be prepared to experiment and tweak to find exactly what works for you. There’s enough variation in human metabolism so that some element of trial-and-error is still necessary.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
  63. @another fred

    Which reminds me, it’s been a couple of weeks since I’ve made Irish coffee.

  64. @Jason Liu

    I don’t know, judging by your Oriental-sounding last name, I think you are just Fruit-Loops-Intolerant, Jason. It happens, but I hope you are more tolerant in the other areas of your life, like with the trannies, grandes and grannies.

    OK, in seriousness here, I wanted to ask you if you know about the pretty large incidence of diabetes in China. This goes back to what 3-Cranes above wrote. There aren’t many obese people in China, but plenty who are 10-25 lb. overweight (whatever that is in stones, I don’t freakin’ know!) My wife was looking into all the nutrition stuff some years ago, and white rice has a really high GI (Glycemic Index), even higher than pototoes. They just can’t do without rice over there, as without rice, I quote “it’s not a meal”. For me it’s “without some red meat, it’s not a meal.”

    Anyway, the potato thing makes me wonder about the Irish (the ones that don’t exist on Guiness, cheese, bread, and Cadbury bars, that is). Potatoes were such a large part of their diet going back 2 centuries, but I guess it was the fact that most physically worked their asses off (relative to today) that kept away the health problems from that starch-heavy diet.

    • Replies: @Jason Liu
    , @Kratoklastes
  65. Fat also creates a sense of fullness, so while you’ve just taken in a lot of calories, you’re unlikely to want more.

    Have some chorizo and eggs for breakfast. You’ll be fine until dinner. Compare and contrast with the effects of having a bowl of cereal.

    There’s even the argument that your body wants you to eat a certain amount of fat — and salt. Reduce the quantity of those in your diet, and your body will simply urge you to eat more so that you meet its preferences for fat and salt intake. You’ll actually be adding calories from all the additional carbohydrates and protein you’ll wind up taking in.

    So eat your morning bacon. It’s good for you.

  66. My problem is the near total lack of a metabolism. What I eat doesn’t matter as long as it’s healthy and not too much of any one thing or eating frequently. I’m near comatose without caffeine, but not energized with it. I tried the green tea weight loss supplements which wrecked my gut bacteria without helping me lose weight. Even heart rate counters on exercise equipment register the problem; I’m either working out below target heart rate or it jumps into the danger zone. Why not in between where the metabolism boost burns the calories?

    • Replies: @notanon
  67. Flip says:
    @Buzz Mohawk

    I’ve known two guys who died of heart attacks from shoveling snow.

  68. sturbain says:
    @Rosie

    “Extreme low-carb diets are fine for crash diets, in preparation for a wedding or something, but they’re too restrictive for the long-term.”

    Respectfully disagree. I’ve been almost zero carb for two years. Never felt better, no cravings. Benefits include:
    -lost 40 pounds – stayed off
    - joint pain gone
    -bowel issues – gone
    - lazy eye – less lazy
    -fewer colds
    - dramatic mental improvement, better moods
    - no tiredness in afternoon, much more energy overall
    -no longer need blood pressure pills – blood pressure down to teenage levels

    It’s purely anecdotal, but with these benefits I’m committed to a lifetime of near zero carb. Animal products and greens. That’s it. There is very interesting research being done on auto-immune disorders and carbs, BTW.

    We have been lied to for a generation. Fat is good. Protein is good. Grain is bad. Sugar is poison.

    The one reason so many people fail on low carb is the “Atkins flu” that one gets for the first week after giving up carbs. Carbs are a powerful addiction. The first week is rough.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Rosie
  69. @Svigor

    I never ate a vegetable that tasted good, Svigor. Maybe OK, but not good, like a piece of fresh bread or a bite of steak. I eat lots of veggies because I need to. If you like them, than I don’t see how you could have any weight problems at all. We also go hog-wild* for fruit in my family – that’s some good stuff there.

    * and maybe the occasional wild hog (OK, we really just had it once, but we’d like to eat much more of it.)

    • Replies: @Anon
  70. NYMOM says:

    “Let me emphasize, however, that people are different, so don’t weight my experiences for more than they are worth. Human biodiversity is real. This is a problem for diet research, which is constantly looking for the One True Diet.”

    Yes and no…all human evolved I believe to be meat and fish eaters (with a bit of veggies and fruit thrown in seasonally)…

    Probably the introduction of farming is what is doing us in calorically. It supported larger groups of people remaining in one place; but, the end result is the over weight and diabetes which is now rampant in Western societies. Also I might mention the Chinese are now experiencing a big increase in diabetes (over 30 million diabetes in China) from eating so much rice…

    Good article Steve….

  71. @YetAnotherAnon

    I’m trying to think of a beautiful star with three or more children, but the only one I can think of is comely but not beautiful.

    Would that be mother-of-five Mare Winningham? Some called her “brood Mare”.

    She’s almost sixty, though. Anyone younger?

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  72. @YetAnotherAnon

    “I’m trying to think of a beautiful star with three or more children, but the only one I can think of is comely but not beautiful.”

    1) Shirley Jones
    2) Elizabeth Montgomery
    3) Florence Henderson
    4) Goldie Hawn

    But to your point, they don’t make them like that anymore, though there are

    4) Julie Bowen
    5) Kate Hudson

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  73. Hockamaw says:
    @Pat Boyle

    When I stopped going to mass I felt the need for ritual in my daily life. One of my greatest and most fulfilling rituals is making the morning Cappuccino. Lots of little steps followed in a specific order. When the earthquake hits and my Cappuccino has no electricity I can still make coffee of some kind but the ancillary machines like the grinder and the frother will also be out,.

    You should return to the Church. God bless you.

    • Agree: Bill
  74. Avoid industrial foods and prepare 90% of your meals from good fresh ingredients at home. No need to worry about carb or fat ratios, the problems will take care of themselves.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @ThreeCranes
  75. anon[166] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    >Use a luncheon size plate, cover half of it with vegetables, and don’t have seconds.

    A female approach (not that it’s bad or wrong). My mother and sister-in-law advocate same.

    Most guys just do not want all this rabbit food– I’d rather skip a meal than eat all that kale and arugula.

    • Replies: @Anon
  76. Jack D says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Exactly. People in E. Europe lived on a high carb diet – lots of bread and potatoes and cabbage and beans, etc. . Meat was mainly as a flavoring – you’d make a big pot of soup for the whole family which you would eat with plenty of bread and there would be 1 little piece of meat on the bone (more bone than meat) in there to give it a little flavor and maybe you’d get a little taste of meat in each serving. If you were poor, none at all. People couldn’t afford to eat big hunks of meat. But people worked outside all day in the cold so they didn’t get fat. Also very little sugar in the diet.

    I think the key to not getting fat (aside from vigorous exercise) is some kind of limited diet. People eat more when there is a large variety of foods to choose from. If you arbitrarily cut out entire categories (no carbs or no meat or no sugar – it doesn’t really matter which as long as you cut out a big enough category) then you are going to eat less overall. Bread will make you fat if you eat a whole bunch of it and then go on and have a full meal but if bread IS the meal then there’s a limit to how much of it you feel like eating. If you are disciplined you could eat a little bit of everything and be fine (French meals feature many courses but the portions for each course are small by American standards) but most people don’t know when to stop so cutting out a whole category makes it simpler.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  77. Jack D says:
    @Paleo Retiree

    Mostly you should work the outer perimeter of the supermarket (where all the fresh food is) and rarely venture into the aisles in the middle unless you need toilet paper or dog food.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  78. Wilkey says:

    But the science was settled….

  79. Jack D says:
    @Pat Boyle

    When the earthquake hits and my Cappuccino has no electricity I can still make coffee of some kind but the ancillary machines like the grinder and the frother will also be out,.

    Grinder – get a hand cranked grinder.

    Frother – if you can heat the milk over a flame (my stove is electric induction but I have a butane burner for outages – they sell them (along with cans of butane) cheap in Asian supermarkets) then they have little battery powered whisks that make fake foam. You can even buy a stovetop frother – it looks like a moka pot (stovetop espresso) but with a steam wand. “Bellman” is the last surviving one in production but old ones come up on ebay under different names (Vesubio, Vesuviana, etc.). You can also sometimes find little alcohol stoves that go along with these things.

    • Replies: @Anon
  80. @tyrone

    tyrone, I have a tee shirt from NY’s Pork Producers, a sponsor of a BBQ festival I help set up…”Pigs, the inventors of bacon.” My friend used to say, “Bacon makes butter better.”

  81. @Reg Cæsar

    Meryl Streep has four. A handsome woman but the stained glass windows in her neighbourhood are pretty safe.

    No real beauties* though, perhaps they are all trying to preserve their looks as much as possible – to what avail I know not. Do they think more money and more fame is better than children ?

    *Ashley Judd – “it’s unconscionable to breed with the number of children who are starving to death in impoverished countries” – her former husband, racing driver Dario Franchitti, remarried and immediately started a family.

  82. @jim jones

    jim, but someone is poking those big fat black women.

  83. @The Alarmist

    I’m very pleased to hear the lovely Samantha had three. It should IMHO be a criminal offence to look like that and not have babies.

  84. @Rosie

    Rosie, when not wishing that I was wealthy, I often wished I could have a weekly guilt free day to binge eat. A pig out with no health or weight consequences. A milkshake to go with a stack of pancakes and bacon, with home fries just to start the day. A Rueben with fries, smothered in gravy for lunch, with a slice of banana crème pie. A two inch thick slice of standing rib, asparagus with hollandaise sauce and potatoes au gratin for dinner. A banana split for dessert and butter popcorn while watching a movie before bed. Is there a heaven?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  85. Marty says:
    @jim jones

    The main problem is language.

  86. @Hypnotoad666

    A cultural anthropologist could have a field day comparing crowd pictures of the 1930s and now. Take for instance scenes at the nation’s capital and Arlington Cemetery. With few exceptions the men wore coats and ties and the women dresses and hats. Today’s attire and conduct at these two places can only be described as an abomination. Nothing more gross than a fat woman in hot pants. Not long ago the sergeant in command of the changing of the guard at Arlington stopped the ceremony because of an unruly crowd. I call this era “The Age of No Class”.

  87. Jack D says:
    @Spangel

    One of the worst things that you can eat is beef even though it is delicious. Especially well marbled beef or ground beef with a lot of fat in it. Maybe if you are a gaucho and chase cattle all day and eat nothing but beef it’s OK, but for everyone else beef should be a rare treat or something consumed in very small portions. You can still eat beef, just not every day. If you have it once in a while as a special treat you’ll enjoy it even more. Think of it as something like lobster that you eat only on special occasions. Instead of a hamburger every day, have a wagyu steak on your birthday. Fortunately there are other proteins – fish, poultry, buffalo, etc. Grass-fed beef is better than feedlot beef but it has to be cooked rare or it will be dry.

    • Replies: @Spangel
    , @Anon
    , @Jim Don Bob
  88. Jason Liu says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s not just rice, Chinese cooking is generally centered around lots of carbs. If it’s not rice it’ll be noodles and dumplings and pastries, leading to blood sugar issues. Meat is more common now, but traditions die hard. Potatoes are actually a bit better because it’s got more fiber.

  89. Jack D says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    There are diets that are based on that exact premise. Six days a week you have to eat very carefully and one night a week you have “off” from your diet.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  90. Marty says:
    @Rosie

    Gary Player disagrees.

    ”Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”

    • Replies: @Rosie
  91. Rosie says:
    @Forbes

    If most people just ate one-third less (smaller portions) than they currently do, they’d get their weight under control. It’s a bit challenging at first–but far easier than attempting to follow a rule book that has you jumping through hoops counting/tracking myriad food items.

    Yes, portion control is the key IMO. I love your rule on junk food for road trips! If you carve out exceptions, then you’re less likely to feel like a failure on those occasions when junk food is just too convenient to resist!

    OTOH, your rule on dessert is a bit restrictive don’t you think? Again, portion control! My kids have always had to choose seconds or dessert.

    • Replies: @Forbes
  92. Rosie says:
    @sturbain

    The one reason so many people fail on low carb is the “Atkins flu” that one gets for the first week after giving up carbs. Carbs are a powerful addiction. The first week is rough.

    Well that and the fact that I’m convinced I cannot live without chocolate.

  93. Spangel says:
    @Jack D

    Yes, I learned the hard way. I ate beef at least once a day for 20+ years and now in middle age, I have major cholesterol issues.

    But it worked for the weight and body fat problems though. I was lean and mean despite my growing cardiovascular problems.

  94. Jason Liu says:
    @Rosie

    I have gone many years without chocolate.

    • Replies: @Rosie
  95. Rosie says:
    @sturbain

    It’s purely anecdotal, but with these benefits I’m committed to a lifetime of near zero carb.

    I have a question. Anywhere near zero carb is totally unacceptable to me. Does that mean I can’t use low-carb dieting principles at all? Many low-carb enthusiasts seem to take a very extreme all-or-nothing approach, based on this idea that sugar is literally addictive and you have to go cold turkey.

    But isn’t it still better to go lower carb? It seems to me that a smaller smoothie with whole milk is better for you than a larger one with all fructose.

    Seriously. I’m asking.

  96. Anon[627] • Disclaimer says:

    PC is a lot of empty calories. Sugar for the self-righteous. They got have another bowl and then another then another. Bad for national health but so-feely-good to one’s virtue-vanity.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
  97. Rosie says:
    @Jason Liu

    I have gone many years without chocolate.

    Like I always say, it’s probably genetics. Sooner or later, we’ll find the genes responsible for the ability to live without chocolate.

    • Replies: @Anon
  98. notanon says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    my fave non-keto-day thing now is hummus (chickpeas with olive oil) mashed up into burgers with spinach and fatty fish and then fried

    vitamin bomb

  99. Rosie says:
    @Marty

    ”Eat breakfast like a king, lunch like a prince, and dinner like a pauper.”

    A large breakfast first thing in the morning seems like a bad idea to me. You get an adrenaline rush in the morning, and if you eat a big breakfast, you’ll waste all that energy digesting your food.

    Though here again, I think these things are all very idiosyncratic. My mom swears by a large breakfast, but then she doesn’t really have much energy in the morning anyway.

    Rosie at 9:00 am: Mom, let’s go shopping.
    Rosie’s Mom: No, I’m not awake yet.
    Rosie’s Mom at 2:00 pm: Let’s go shopping.
    Rosie: No, it’s time for my nap.

    • Replies: @notanon
  100. @Jack D

    Jack, “Off” a little, or off the rails that I crave.

    • Replies: @Anon
  101. notanon says:
    @Clyde

    the media promote “racism” stories to instill guilt in that section of the white population who are susceptible to that kind of emotional manipulation to keep white people divided over immigration control.

  102. notanon says:
    @carol

    butter, cheese, double cream

    i often have a small carton of double cream for breakfast

  103. notanon says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    people who have been grain farming the longest (like most east asians) are probably better adapted to carbs

    the northern european staple was weighted more towards dairy farming or pigs until they got the heavy plow c. 1000 years ago so lots of butter, cheese, cream, fatty meat etc

    • Replies: @Johann Ricke
  104. @cthulhu

    There’s enough variation in human metabolism so that some element of trial-and-error is still necessary.

    Man, do we ever need the genome studies so we can just take a sample and KNOW what is going to work.  (Maybe combined with samples of gut flora.)

  105. @Bill B.

    I remember Mangan when he was alt-lite, but now he’s become a fitness grinch.

    • Replies: @Bill B.
  106. notanon says:
    @miss marple

    My problem is the near total lack of a metabolism.

    might be a specific micro-nutrient deficiency: b-vitamins, electrolytes, sunlight?

    some people have genetic issues where they don’t absorb some particular thing very well.

  107. @notanon

    Hummus is just edible wallpaper paste; now, heated falafel in a bun with coleslaw, tomato, thousand island dressing….bit windy, though.

    • Replies: @notanon
  108. @notanon

    Sounds tasty!  What do you put on it?  What kind of fish do you use, purchased in what form?

    • Replies: @notanon
  109. Anon[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    have a wagyu steak on your birthday.

    Or just have a really good steak, because, unless you’re very selective, that “wagyu” is probably a scam.

    buffalo

    Would this actually be better than beef? I suppose, all things considered, it’s probably less fatty.

  110. @Forbes

    These rules are much easier if you live alone and do your own food shopping. I can resist temptation in a supermarket much easier than in my home.

    For those addicted to coffee, I recommend trying it with hazlenut milk. It has a woody type flavour that means you don’t miss the sugar, and so you can afford to add a dash of cream or a square of dark chocolate for indulgence.

  111. Anon[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Rosie

    … and ruthlessly breed them out of the race.

    Right?
    /s

    • LOL: Rosie
  112. @Spangel

    Yes, I learned the hard way. I ate beef at least once a day for 20+ years and now in middle age, I have major cholesterol issues.

    But it worked for the weight and body fat problems though. I was lean and mean despite my growing cardiovascular problems.

    If I might ask, where are you on the BMI (body mass index) range? Above, at the upper border, in the middle, at the lower border, or below?

    • Replies: @Spangel
  113. @notanon

    the northern european staple was weighted more towards dairy farming or pigs until they got the heavy plow c. 1000 years ago so lots of butter, cheese, cream, fatty meat etc

    The average northern European did not have enough resources for lots of meat or dairy. The 16th century French ruler, Henry IV, once said “If God keeps me, I will make sure that no peasant in my realm will lack the means to have a chicken in the pot on Sunday!”

    • Replies: @notanon
  114. Anon[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buffalo Joe

    This is not a good source, but Sergey Brin offers and I paste: https://www.today.com/health/diet-break-t116476

    In college (not that long ago) I used to eat relatively sparingly for most of the week and relatively more heavily (at a restaurant, usually a very good buffet nearby) on Sundays, more for economic than health reasons.

  115. notanon says:
    @Rosie

    yes lower carb, higher fat is better as a general principle if you don’t want to get too deep into it

    it’s not so much sugar/carbs are bad per se; what causes the harm is spiking your blood sugar above the body’s preferred limit but as we have so many foods now that do that then “less carbs, more fat” is a good quick shorthand imo.

    (although if someone is already diabetic then going zero carb might be the way)

    if you want to go into it in more detail then carbs with a lower glycemic index are better than those that don’t or eating something sugary after a work out is less bad (not bad at all?) cos it will partly go to restocking your glycogen stores or although the actual food part of vegetables is generally all carbs they’re also mostly water so the actual amount of carbs in vegetables is often tiny e.g. cabbage is something like 6g of carbs per 100g (and half of that is fiber) so you can eat a ton of green vegetables and still be low carb etc.

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  116. notanon says:
    @Rosie

    A large breakfast first thing in the morning seems like a bad idea to me.

    i think it might have been okay back when people did heavy manual work as it would have burned off faster but not for people doing sedentary jobs – although i sometimes have a big breakfast (e.g. a big mound of bacon and eggs) and then not eat till the evening.

  117. I thought it was the digestion of protein rather than fat which caused an increase in metabolic rate.

    • Replies: @CJ
  118. @YetAnotherAnon

    Now if only we could stop drinking wine

    Preach it. What’s worse is the ‘collateral damage’: if I have a glass (a proper 250-300ml glass, not a bloody restaurant 140ml sip), I tend to have another two glasses and then go looking for chips, or crackers & cheese, or anything carby.

    Anyone got ideas on improving the various beans/pulses (blackeye, cannelini, kidney, butter, broad, pinto, green lentils)

    I dunno whether you like stuff with a Middle Eastern vibe, but ‘my’ Spicy Green Lentil Stew with harissa gets rave reviews. (I say ‘my’ because I found the recipe online).

    Basic outline:

    • Heat oil in a pan;
    • add red chili flakes and ground cumin;
    • tip in a mirepoix (i.e., equal quantities of diced onion, celery and carrot, and 3 or 4 cloves of garlic);
    • fry off until the onions take some colour and celery and carrot start to soften;
    • add green (or brown, or even Puy) lentils and stir until lentils are ‘coated’ (they just look shiny);
    • add a litre of vegetarian stock (reconstituted Vegeta powdered stock is fine);
    • add harissa paste, tomato paste, and a tin of crushed tomatoes;
    • chuck in some shredded cabbage (or don’t);
    • simmer (lid on) until the lentils are tender.

    Serve on a small pan-warmed flatbread; put a schmeer of hummus on the flatbread before you dump the lentils on, and then a tiny dollop of sour cream and maybe a little squeeze of lemon.

    I batch-prep this in almost-bulk (~2kg cooked) and freeze it in single serves (150g-ish).

    I also batch-prep

    ‘basic’ black beans (these go into huevos racheros, so don’t want them too dominant);
    spicy pinto beans (I drop the bacon – we’re veggie);
    chickpea masala; and
    spicy coconut red lentil dal (use 2 green chillies, and replace the tinned tomatoes with mini-Roma or cœur de pigeon tomatoes).

    Cannelini beans:
    • in a hot frypan: fry a tin of drained cannelini beans in butter until the beans start to get caramelised; set them aside in a bowl;
    • turn the heat down to moderate;
    • fry off some onions and red chilli until the onions start to colour;
    • add a finely chopped leek and continue gently frying until it’s soft;
    • add some halved mini-Roma or cœur de pigeon tomatoes;
    • once the tomatoes soften, add a knob of butter and half a glass of white wine.

    That’s more of a side dish, and it doesn’t freeze well…

    So yeah… nobody in our house is ever constipated, and between the two of us we probably produce more methane than the average feedlot.

  119. Calories out greater than calories in. That’s how you lose weight.

    But eating a loaf of bread a day is stupid, which was govt advice for a while.

  120. Forbes says:
    @Rosie

    Kids are YOUR responsibility. My rules work for me. But once you get the discipline down, it becomes self-fulfilling because you know you are in charge of your impulse control–and that is very satisfying.

    Creating good habits is hard work, and they can slip away without reinforcement. But they have to work–they can’t be an impossible task.

  121. NYMOM says:

    “the northern european staple was weighted more towards dairy farming or pigs until they got the heavy plow c. 1000 years ago so lots of butter, cheese, cream, fatty meat etc”

    Yes, I had read that northern Europeans were the last of the major groups to leave herding behind and settle down as farmers…probably explains our obsession with dogs and horses to this day, which are a complete nuisance in urban living but very necessary for herders….

  122. Anon[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    You can raise a nice head of foam the Indian way, though it’s not quite the same thing.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VoM8XMhh0j4

    (skip to the last minute)

  123. NYMOM says:

    Not saying I don’t love dogs and horses…I do…

  124. @Achmed E. Newman

    GL (glycemic load) is more important than GI.

    GI indexes the blood-glucose response from a fixed 50g-of-carbs quantity of the food, to the response from 50g of pure glucose.

    GL is the same thing, but takes into account the carb density of a standard portion of the food.

    White rice has a very high GI, but the relatively low level of available carbohydrate (typically 20% of a 100g serve) means that its glycemic load is about 20 – lower than a ‘low GI’ corn tortilla.

    Of even more importance if the insulin response: there are foods with a high GI (and GL) that don’t elicit a large spike in insulin. So there’s a thing call “Insulin Index“, but it’s only available for a fairly narrow range of foods.

    Also, bear in mind that GI, GL and II are all based on eating the food by itself.

    If you add other foods, everything changes.

    Akilen et al (2016) showed that when kids were permitted unlimited mashed potato or french fries as part of a meal with meatballs, their insulin response didn’t get above 40μL/ml (in context: that’s 1/5th the insulin response from potato eaten by itself).

    A useful quote from that study’s review of prior literature:

    For example, the GI of potatoes was significantly reduced from 93 to 39 when boiled Estima potatoes were served with 62 g of cheddar cheese and from 108 to 54 when mashed potatoes were served with oil, chicken breast and salad in amounts that represent a meal. Similarly, the GI of rice-based meals is markedly reduced through addition of other meal components such as tofu, eggs and vegetable

    Nutrition is a fascinating subject, and the vast bulk of what you read on the internet is broscience – because the vast bulk of ‘nutritionists’ have the same cognitive apparatus as journalists (and gym-bros): they can’t read or interpret (let alone understand) journal articles.

    I’m not obese, nor am I diabetic… but I fast a day a week and do 18-6 intermittent fasting (except for one ‘cheat day’).

    I’m ideally suited to fasting because I have never really gotten hunger signals: the first time I can recall being hungry, was the second day of my first 2-day fast. It lasted 25 minutes and I understand why people don’t like it.

    The downside to that, is that I also don’t get satiety signals.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  125. @Kratoklastes

    Oops… you’e gonna need to add back the cannelini beans…

  126. @notanon

    If hummus can’t be fit into a keto framework, then keto is objectively pure evil and its continued existence cannot be tolerated. I kinda suspected as much, but if it’s confirmed we can commence the pogrom right away.

    Crudités with proper home-made hummus (with cumin, olive oil, tahini and unholy amounts of lemon juice) is my favourite way to break a 24-hour fast.

    However… not so fast. I accidentally took 100mg modafinil today, even though it’s the weekend.

    So let’s get OCD on this motherfucker: to the Bat-journals!

    OK… Figure 2 in this paper (Augustin et al 2016) shows the insulin response from ‘store bought’ hummus; even eating half a pound of the stuff gives an insulin response less than one slice of white bread. (One slice of white bread is likely to break ketosis – but half a pound of hummus is plenty hummus!)

    The insulin index of hummus (52±13) is roughly the same as the insulin index for beef (51±16 – see table).

    So if hummus could kick someone out of ketosis, then so could an equal-calorie serving of beef.

    (Insulin Index is derived from the area under the curve (AUC) for blood insulin over 2 hours, for a serve with an energy content of 1000kJ).

    Hummus and beef might generate two quite different paths that have about the same AUC; one might have a significant ‘spike’ and then drop to baseline quickly; the other might rise less, but persist slightly longer.

    If hummus had the ‘spike’ it would be more likely to stop ketosis.

    However Figure 2 of the paper linked above shows that the curve for a 110g (roughly 1000kJ) peaks at a little over 10μU/ml at the 45-minute mark; that’s a tiny rise.

    By contrast, the insulin curve for a 1000kJ piece of beef hits 50μU/ml at 30 minutes, and peaks at about 55μU/ml at the one-hour mark (that’s Figure 2 in Tinder et al 2016 – reproduced below).

    TL;DR: If 110g of hummus will stop of ketosis, then so will 150g of steak. 150g is a pretty small steak. I don’t have steak very often (I try to be veggie), but when I do it’s a shitload more than 150g.

    The whole insulin-response stuff should make ‘paleo’ and ‘keto’ folks’ heads spin.

    Some interesting things:
    • cheese has a high insulin index than white pasta;
    • fish has a higher insulin index than popcorn;
    • steak (as we have just shown) has a higher acute impact on insulin, than hummus.

    HUMMUS PWNZ STEAKZ.

    HAIL KEK!

    • Replies: @notanon
    , @Dave Pinsen
  127. Meneldil says:
    @Rosie

    Most of the websites and youtubers I know that advocate for a keto diet tell you to limit the carb intake per day either to less than 20 (that’s very hard for me) some tells you that up to 50 is fine (that’s a lot more manageable already). Most don’t like milk (lactose is a form of sugar after all, and there’s some potential problem with milk and calcium absorption by adult it would seem, I don’t really know) but praise good quality cheese and cream.

    They also say that if you really can’t go full keto lower carb is still far better than the standard very high carb and sugar diet, zero-carbers seem to be rare, it’s apparently good for people who have massive digestive issues but even though I like meat and animal products, I couldn’t go on living eating just that. Most keto and low-carb health “gurus” actually want you to eat a lot of vegetables as long as they are low in carb life leafy greens and cruciferous.

    Here’s a few videos of channels I’m subscribed to, they have products to sell for sure but they seem to give genuinely good advice and not only in it for the money :

  128. @Rosie

    You’re better off giving up on the whole smoothie idea entirely. Just have mushrooms and garlic fried with diced bacon for lunch. You can buy diced bacon, smash the garlic cloves instead of slicing. It’s easy and fast as a smoothie.

    Your way of thinking about food, as revealed by your posts above–”I can’t live without chocolate! how do I make smoothie on this diet? “– is a product of Carb Culture. You’re in the food equivalent of GOPe “I’m really not a racist” land. Wrong set of rules. Ditch the whole thing.

  129. dvorak says:

    Cheerios are whole grain with only 1g of sugar per serving. But the bowl of milk is high in sugar.

    If iSteve poured unsweetened almond milk on his Cheerios, he would likely stop with one bowl.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Anonymous
    , @Jack D
  130. Rosie says:
    @dvorak

    Cheerios are whole grain with only 1g of sugar per serving. But the bowl of milk is high in sugar.

    See that’s what I’m trying to understand. Doesn’t the fat in the milk sow the absorption of the carbs and make the cereal “stick to your ribs”?

    My own experience tells me so, but then maybe I’m just imagining it.

  131. Yarro says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Rice in Asia is for children. In the Chinese families I know in Hong Kong, none of the adults touch it.

    • Replies: @Flip
  132. @Kratoklastes

    Thank you Kratoklastes. Nutrition is indeed an interesting subject. My wife worries about diabetes a lot, but I don’t think any of us in my family have any of the major risk factors.

    I’m in absolute agreement about the journalists, and that goes for ANY subject. Just read or listen to them “report” on some subject that you happen to be an expert on. It’ll make you cringe. Way back, when I used to watch national TV news, I would see 2 guys report on science for NBC. The younger guy knew his shit, but he older guy was full of the same.

  133. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    It’s “stone”, never “stones”. The stone is fourteen pounds.
    Used almost exclusively for the weight of people today.

    Much as horse heights are measured in hands, and nautical and aeronautical speeds and distances are in nautical miles and knots (nm/hr).

  134. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @dvorak

    In a recent video Little LMM admits that non-dairy milk is “disgusting”. She is right about that.

    I also take part of this missive as a blast of the trumpet against fathers who “ignore” their children and don’t send Christmas cards, et al. I’m guessing maybe she is speaking from personal experience. Perhaps Sir Ray was deterred from doing so or maybe he did and Big LMM shitcanned them? Who knows.

  135. notanon says:
    @Kratoklastes

    If hummus can’t be fit into a keto framework

    people have different definitions of what counts as keto – some say less than 10g of carbs which is why i said the hummous burger thing was “non-keto-day” – i meant in that strict <10g sense (which i think might be best for people who already have diabetes).

    personally i go by trying to keep the ratio of fat to protein+carb around 2:1 to 3:1 and that works for me.

    So if hummus could kick someone out of ketosis, then so could an equal-calorie serving of beef.

    yes – i had to keep protein low when i first started.

  136. Bigjohn33 says:

    Hogwash. Yes keto, atkins, whatever can help you lose weight but you drastically increase the risk of all kinds of cardiovascular problems, cancer, etc. Especially long-term. You’d probably be better off starting smoking than cutting carbs. You need carbs. That’s what your body uses for energy. Even if you’re an eskimo you’d probably be better off not eating animal products and processed foods. It isn’t even about the morality of it. I wear leather and kill stuff just for fun.

    But I only eat plants. Veggies, fruits, potatoes, corn, grain, rice, beans, etc.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
  137. Anon[340] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    I never ate a vegetable that tasted good

    Y

    ou will find me drinking rum,
    Like a sailor in a slum,
    You will find me drinking beer like a Bavarian
    You will find me drinking gin
    In the lowest kind of inn
    Because I am a rigid Vegetarian.

    OK, I’ll stop now. Chesterton is probably not the best source of dietary advice anyway.

  138. cthulhu says:
    @Bigjohn33

    You need carbs…Even if you’re an eskimo you’d probably be better off not eating animal products and processed foods.

    Bzzzzt! There ain’t no such thing as an essential carbohydrate:

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vilhjalmur_Stefansson#Advocacy_of_an_exclusively_meat_diet

    • Replies: @Bigjohn33
  139. @Paleo Retiree

    Agree.

    My wife works in social service with poor people, many of whom are single moms. Very few of them even know how to cook anymore. It’s not uncommon for the whole family to load up in the car and head out to a fast food franchise for dinner.

    They don’t teach Home Ec (or Shop) in our grade schools anymore–the equipment and insurance are too expensive. Once again, the lawyers shape our society for the worse. Girls aren’t taught how to sew or cook and they certainly don’t know the science of nutrition.

    With no training and education they make poor homemakers. But feminism has taught them that that’s a desirable end, that they’re better off as ignorant, low paid, tatted-up, single mothers.

    Ironically, much of their meager wages is spent on childcare. A stranger raising their kids while they slave away to earn the money to pay her to do so. This is a cruel joke.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @education realist
  140. Bill B. says:

    More support for our host’s “When the revolution comes I will look hotter” theory of female journalism – albeit here an academic. From Steve’s favorite classics journal.

    There is yet to be a scientific study of the damage caused by doctors’ prescribing diets, shaming of fat patients, misdiagnosing them because they don’t look beyond their own assumptions about fat (this has happened to me), and denying them equality of care. When it comes to fat people the medical profession fails repeatedly to honor the Hippocratic Oath

    This might have been an interesting article on whether Hippocrates really advocating a low-carb diet and thin body shape but she turns it into the usual dreary rant.

    https://eidolon.pub/fat-classics-76db5d5578f4

  141. EH says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    The lowest glycemic index (longest-digesting, lowest blood-sugar spike) food is the Indian or Desi chickpea, a.k.a. chana dal. It is best cooked in a pressure cooker then pureed with olive oil or butter and the indian spice mix garam masala (cumin, coriander, cardamom, pepper, cinnamon, cloves, and nutmeg) plus optional chili, tumeric, extra coriander, onion etc.

    Other chickpeas are close in glycemic index, store-bought hummus is a lot easier, though pita bread is not low-glycemic. $4/lb at Aldi.

    Also I find canned black beans with spices (e.g. pepper and chipotle or smoked paprika), heated, with olive oil and grated white cheddar to be easy and tasty.

  142. Bill B. says:
    @Anonymous

    Autophagy; cell repair.

    Mangan looks at this but note that he fine-tunes his views as his knowledge expands with the incoming research (which is why I find his site useful). The length time needed to induce autophagy may be a bit longer than in the below. Search his site; he links to scientific papers.

    http://roguehealthandfitness.com/how-to-increase-autophagy-for-lifespan-extension/

  143. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:

    They don’t teach Home Ec (or Shop) in our grade schools anymore–the equipment and insurance are too expensive. Once again, the lawyers shape our society for the worse. Girls aren’t taught how to sew or cook and they certainly don’t know the science of nutrition.

    Wichita Disease-Pwoduct Wiability! Pwoduct Wiability! Help us!!!!!!-if they wanted to run home ec they’d run home ec. Consider football: millions of dollars, no, billions, against football progams and football helmet makers because of paralyzed high schoolers, but football hasn’t suffered a bit, especially in the South, which runs on football and religion and during playoffs, even ministers admit football IS the religion. Liability is the Convenient Excuse.

    I bet if, as I had hoped, the Payne Stewart family had whacked a ten figure judgment against Learjet and made them actually pay it (they’d have wound up owning the plant on Harry Street and the lawyers would have shit their expensive pants) all of a sudden Cessna would be back in the 150 and 172 business overnight, at 1972 prices adjusted for inflation. They simply would have judgmentproofed the company and quit buying PL coverage and made enough airplanes that they could pay lawyers to drag out any cases until they’d made enough money to cash out and file Chapter 7.

  144. @ThreeCranes

    Complete nonsense that eating fresh food prepared at home avoids weight loss.

    “My wife works in social service with poor people, many of whom are single moms. Very few of them even know how to cook anymore. It’s not uncommon for the whole family to load up in the car and head out to a fast food franchise for dinner.

    They don’t teach Home Ec (or Shop) in our grade schools anymore–the equipment and insurance are too expensive. Once again, the lawyers shape our society for the worse. Girls aren’t taught how to sew or cook and they certainly don’t know the science of nutrition.”

    So let me see if I get this straight. Poor girls aren’t learning math, English, or how to avoid getting pregnant, but by golly if we had Home Ec they’d learn how to cook and eat properly?

    Insurance has nothing to do with why they aren’t teaching Home Ec and shop. Cost of equipment is some of it. But it’s much more complex than anything you’re saying: https://educationrealist.wordpress.com/2016/05/31/vocational-ed-and-the-elephant/

    Also, at no point in US history has there ever been a golden era of Shop and Home Ec, where boys learned cars and girls learned cooking. Food both at home and in restaurants is far superior to most of what was produced back in the 50s.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
    , @Jack D
  145. Bill B. says:
    @Henry's Cat

    Mangan pulls short of hectoring and seems fairly sensible. I like it that in his vitamin/supplement recommendations he admits that some are of dubious efficacy but he takes them anyway because they are cheap.

    There are worse people around.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  146. @Bill B.

    I met Mangan a number of years ago, and, yeah, he looks great.

  147. @Spangel

    your blood cholesterol is not related to your food…and your atherosclerosis is not related to your blood cholesterol …it’s all basically genetics

  148. If I recall my Suzanne Somers biochemical theory correctly, while vegetables are carbohydrates, they take longer to digest than Cheerios, so they don’t make you instantly hungry for a couple more servings of vegetables.

    There is a difference between chemical carbohydrates and dietary carbohydrates. “Fiber”, from a chemical structure perspective, is absolutely a carbohydrate molecule, but humans don’t digest it, it has zero calories, and from a nutrition and diet perspective, it’s not considered a carb.

    Celery or lettuce has lots of fiber, but near zero calories. Broccoli has both fiber and some digestible starch, but it’s a modest amount of starch. Most low-carb diets support eating broccoli.

    Some vegetables like potatoes have lots of starch, and usually low-carb diets steer you away from those.

    Suzanne Somer’s diet: meat, fish, allows potatoes, white rice, but no starchy carbs, no breads/pastas, no dairy, no nuts.

    Paleo diet: Lots of meat, fish, eggs. They highly recommend eating liver. No carbs, no nuts, no beans,

    Forks Over Knives Diet. Or similar Engine 2 Diet: Vegan. Lots of whole plant, beans, nuts. No meat, no fish, no dairy. No processed carbs.

  149. Anon[143] • Disclaimer says:

    It didn’t take long after your review of Plomin for you to completely forget everything he wrote about weight.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  150. @Hapalong Cassidy

    “I like rice, it is great when you are hungry and want 2000 of something.” Mitch Hedberg

  151. @education realist

    Your first sentence is totally backwards; not “avoids”, “aids”.

    Second, yes, you got it straight. Many “poor girls” need to be taught life skills and that includes cooking, learning to clean a house and trying to balance a check book or read a credit card statement. Establishing a budget is way beyond their capacity. That’s not an unfair description, it’s just the way it is.

    “Also, at no point etc.” You’re simply full of horsepuckey. I lived during that era. Are you now trying to undermine my mooring in reality by denying the truth of my memories? Shop and Home Ec were taught in every American grade school. Not high school you idiot; the article you provided a link to discusses vocational education in high schools, as a career option. That’s not at all what I’m talking about and the fact that you conflate the two shows just how unaware you are of what I am talking about.

    Shop and Home Ec were part of the standard curriculum in the seventh and eighth grade. I was the son of a PhD chemist and I took shop. So did the son’s of the MDs in town. Every boy and girl spent forty minutes of the day studying–or rather doing–one or the other–and yes, it was divided by sex.

    “Food both at home and in restaurants is far superior etc”. Are you kidding me? Family restaurants then baked real turkeys in their ovens and served that up with real mashed potatoes for the daily lunch or dinner special. Or meat loaf or roast beef and so on.

    You’re wrong on virtually every point. You scored a perfect zero. You must be a teacher.

    • Replies: @education realist
  152. Bigjohn33 says:
    @cthulhu

    You don’t need carbs in the same way your car doesn’t need an oil change.

    • Replies: @cthulhu
  153. notanon says:
    @Mr. Rational

    tin of chickpeas mashed with olive oil

    (a lot of store bought hummus is made with canola type oils – bad)

    half a tin of chopped spinach (fresh is too much of a pain to mix in)

    tin of mackerel (any fish tastes nice but i usually go for oily fish for the omega 3s and mackerel for phosphorus – for bones)

    big handful of mixed herbs (big as in BIG)

    fired as burgers with a stir-fried veggies

    nom, nom, nom

    (i’m mostly keto but once a week i have a cheat day of massive amounts of high nutrient veggies)

  154. notanon says:
    @Henry's Cat

    Hummus is just edible wallpaper paste

    on its own yeah – i have the chickpeas just for the magnesium and potassium – the fish/spinach/herbs provide the taste

    making myself hungry thinking about it

  155. Jack D says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    Anyone got ideas on improving the various beans/pulses

    Yes, do as our forefathers did and cook them with a little bit of (smoked) meat.

  156. J1234 says:

    One bowl of Cheerios always made me hungrier for a second bowl, which made me hungrier for a third bowl.

    Did you put sugar on your Cheerios? I always did, and everyone else did when I was growing up. I started eating Cheerios again about five years ago – this time without sugar – and it was a very strange experience at first. I thought I’d never get used to the unnatural flavor of Cheerios without sugar, but now I can’t imagine having sugar on them.

    It’s my impression that Cheerios really does improve my cholesterol to a degree, as does red wine. I now limit my red wine (and other alcohol) to two three drinks once every three days, but I eat Cheerios every day. My cholesterol’s not great, but not real bad, either. My overall cholesterol is almost always within normal limits.

    As far as sugar spiking, I abandoned all actual sweet sweets (cake, candy, etc.) for two or three years, and my fasting blood sugar kind of healed – from 108 down to usually around 100 or below – but I still ate pasta, bread, etc. For the past couple of years, I’ve started eating a moderate amount of sweets with no big effect on my fasting blood sugar. Eating nuts with sweets helps a lot on sugar spikes. None of the things I mentioned do anything to help reduce my weight.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  157. notanon says:
    @Johann Ricke

    milk, butter, cheese, cream

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_cheese#Post-Roman_Europe

    28 The stratification of medieval food is discussed in Stephen Mennell, All Manners of Food: Eating and Taste in England and France from the Middle Ages to the Present, 1996: “Eating in the Middle Ages: the social distribution of food”, pp 41ff; Mennell observes, “Dairy produce very much remained identified with the lower orders and disdained by the grand”, adding “one of the few ways in which peasants in the mountains of Provence had a dietary advantage over the archbishop [of Arles] was in their high consumption of cheese.”

    peasant food

  158. Jack D says:
    @education realist

    Girls are supposed to learn how to cook from their mothers, not in a classroom. This is how it was done for the last 50,000 years.

    The 1950′s were perhaps a low point where our food supply had become highly industrialized and mass media promoted recipes that consisted of various combinations of canned food. The connection to local farms and traditional preservation methods had been broken but we didn’t have the technology/infrastructure to bring in fresh grapes from Chile in the middle of the winter so people ate things like canned grapes packed in sugar syrup (key ingredient in “fruit cocktail”).

    The biggest driver in the degradation of home cooking has been food stamps. In the past, the poor were forced to be ingenious and construct a diet made up of healthy basic ingredients such as collard greens and corn meal. Now they load up their carts with junk food filled with high fructose corn syrup. The US government might as well just wire the money directly into ADM’s account.

    As for “Golden Era”, yes racial minorities have always had below average intelligence but we used to have less of them.

  159. @Kratoklastes

    Thank you, and also EH (more chickpeas!) and JackD (smoked meat!) – I’ll give that a try, although I may skip Satan’s Vegetable (celery) – don’t know why but I can’t stand them.

    I find fried leeks and fried onions to be a useful “base” for most stews/casseroles.

  160. @notanon

    IOW, don’t eat junk food. Why is this so complicated?

    Eating 100g of cabbage will have some serious consequences. Bonus points if you have onions and peppers sauteed along with it. Very delicious, but only if you don’t live with anyone.

    After a workout, don’t go for a dessert or a beer, go for a good carb/protein mixture, like pasta with ground pork. mmmmmm…….oink, oink, oink.

    • Replies: @notanon
  161. Jack D says:
    @dvorak

    Almond “milk” is disgusting and bears no resemblance to actual milk which is an animal product by definition. They really need to outlaw the labeling of watery nut smoothies as “milk”.

    I recommend “Fairlife” milk, especially (but not only) if you are lactose intolerant. Rather than converting all the lactose in milk to simple sugars with lactase enzyme, they use “ultrafiltration” to actually remove the sugar from the milk. The milk ends up with a lot more protein (relative to volume) and a lot less sugar even though they don’t add any anything to the milk. They add a little lactase enzyme to clean up the residual sugars but the milk doesn’t taste sweet like regular Lactaid milk.

    The ironic thing is that in order to legally call the stuff milk you are not allowed to add any water. At one point in the ultra filtration process, they have separated the milk solids from the liquid, which is a solution of water with dissolved sugar. They then filter the sugar from the sugar water, leaving just water, which they add back to the solids and make milk again. It would taste exactly the same (and be a lot cheaper ) if they just added tap water at that point instead of making very expensive water out of the filtrate but then they could not legally call it milk. Ultrafiltration is a cold process and nothing like old school methods for removing water from milk by evaporation.

    • Replies: @Anon
  162. @Kratoklastes

    people produce sulfur compounds, not methane, but I get the whiff, I mean drift, of what you’re saying.

    Wasn’t it Bill Clinton who said he subsisted mostly on beans? I wonder if he’s still on that diet. I think I’d rather just die sooner than give up meat and dairy and bread.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  163. notanon says:
    @stillCARealist

    IOW, don’t eat junk food. Why is this so complicated?

    i agree it doesn’t have to be – part of the reason for the complication is curiosity as a lot of people involved in this stuff are experimenting on themselves for fun.

    (for example even though i’m happy with my relaxed keto one of these days i’m going to try full carnivore just to compare the results)

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  164. Anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    Almond milk and coconut milk are not fit for drinking, but, boy, are they great for cooking. And if you have the ingredients in each case you can make your own.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  165. @Jack D

    Girls learned how to cook from their mothers and we ended up with millions of shit cooks.

    “The biggest driver in the degradation of home cooking has been food stamps. ”

    Oh, my lord, how pathetic. What, is there a Big Book teaching you how to be a racist and stupid with it? The driver in the degradation of home cooking was more and more restaurants. McDonalds and Burger King had far more to do with ending home cooking.

    You, er, do realize that at least food stamps expected the recipients to make meals at home?

    I’m no fan of food stamps, but I’m even less a fan of jackwits who have one limited nail. Clearly, you had a terrible shop teacher.

    “As for “Golden Era”, yes racial minorities have always had below average intelligence but we used to have less of them.”

    Any idiot who goes around linking everything to IQ is, regardless of his own IQ, not using the brains he was given.

    And in this case, irrelevant. There is no Golden Era of vocational tech. Has nothing to do with race.There wasn’t some wonderful time in the class where the cute blond boys and girls of your dreams learned how to cook and fix cars.

  166. Spangel says:
    @Johann Ricke

    Throughout my early adulthood, I was on the leaner side of normal. Now I am still within the healthy normal range but a shade over the middle of normal. But it’s only been one year since I all but gave up read meat, and I fear I may continue to gain if I continue eating the way I am. I try to eat a lot of fish but I just get sick of it. I never tired of a burger.

  167. Liza says:
    @miss marple

    ALL highly restrictive diets work great for awhile, you lose your excess fat and think you’re in heaven – and then you crash one way or another. People are so damn stupid – they can’t see the difference between a temporary diet and a long term way of eating. The only people who do well on low-carb are some aboriginals.

    Us folks who have civilization (agriculture) in our backgrounds have adapted to carbs, fats and protein. People such as Jordan Peterson and his daughter, who can eat nothing but meat day & night just to be able to function, likely have severe digestive weakness and that is why they apparently can’t tolerate so much as a bit of an apple or a grain of rice. That the numbers of people with such advanced pathology appear to be on the increase is ominous, indeed. Eating healthy-type carbs is not the cause; there’s a lot more going on than diet.

    I’ve never heard of anyone who could stick with all raw-vegan or nearly all fat ‘n’ meat diet or low-fat, high starch for long. But they’ll rarely own up to it. These folks probably have orthorexia (obsession with eating an odd diet as being the cure to everything that ails humanity).

    • Replies: @baythoven
  168. Jack D says:
    @notanon

    Canned (tinned) spinach is disgusting. At least buy the frozen.

  169. cthulhu says:
    @Bigjohn33

    You don’t need carbs in the same way your car doesn’t need an oil change.

    And obviously you don’t need any facts in your life; I guess they would just contradict your prejudices. *plonk*

  170. Anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @Jack D

    The Southern poor who ate collard greens and cornmeal had problems with pellagra. Not that I disagree with your basic premise, I’m just not sure that’s a great example.

    But your basic premise of peasant cooking being pretty good is a sound one. Here’s an example:

    (Obviously this woman is no longer in peasant circumstances.) But for some reason Irish cooks have a reputation for being unskilled, and I think the same is true of English.

  171. @notanon

    Thanks, I’ll have to try that sometime (foodie that I am).

  172. @J1234

    I’m not sure what it does for cholesterol (the various good and bad types), but celery lowers my blood pressure by >20 psi. It’s amazing, but I’ve got to do more experimenting to see how long the effect is. Just as Mr. Sailer says, though, there is this HBD thing,

    Speaking of celery, that’s a perfect example of vegetables not tasting good, or not tasting like anything, for that matter. Well, sure, if you dip it in peanut butter or spray cheeze whiz on it, that’s different. Eating celery is like just chewing on your cud, chew, chew, chew, and then you can finally swallow the fiber. I’ve heard it takes more energy to eat it than you get out of it, but that’s not why you’re eating if, of course.

    I don’t think humans were created to eat celery, but I highly recommend it for you if your blood pressure is elevated.

    • Replies: @Mr. Rational
    , @J1234
    , @Anon
  173. @stillCARealist

    Wasn’t it Bill Clinton who said he subsisted mostly on beans?

    Aha! That explains why the Hildabeast didn’t get along with him. Oh, plus the cheating with the interns and all that …

  174. @Anon

    Whose review of Plomin?

    • Replies: @Anon
  175. baythoven says:
    @Liza

    Finally, at last, some counterpoint in defense of carbs. I enjoy all kinds of them, especially cereal. There are plenty of tasty, healthier-type breakfast cereals, and you can make a good balanced breakfast with them if you add nuts, use plenty of milk, and add some fresh fruit. Or for a change of pace, oatmeal with yoghurt, nuts, and fruit. These days I even eat cereal in the middle of the night, as I’m prone to insomnia and it helps get me to sleep. Not so great for my teeth, maybe, as I only rinse, don’t brush again. But for my weight? That’s never a problem. I’m the same waist size at 60 as at 20.

    • Replies: @Anon
    , @Liza
  176. @Jack D

    Instead of the food pyramid, it’s the food trapezoid. Fresh vegetables in the front corner, meat and dairy on the back wall, wine and beer in the opposite front corner.

  177. @Jack D

    “Girls are supposed to learn how to cook from their mothers, not in a classroom. This is how it was done for the last 50,000 years.”

    Yes. In a perfect world this would be so. My initial comment spoke about poor, single mothers who were on some form of relief.

    They themselves often come from dysfunctional families; their moms were drunks or addicts and the women themselves were one of a herd of chilluns who sprang from a multitude of Dads, none of whom pay child support. And so it continues onto the next generation. When I say that these women have very poorly developed coping skills I’m not being racist or sexist; I’m being a realist.

    They can’t manage their time, their money, the rats that infest their living quarters because they don’t wash the dishes between meals, their cars, their kids or their boyfriends. No one taught them much of anything and if they can get to work on time and get their kids to daycare on time, then that’s “getting er done” for them.

    They don’t live easy lives. They generally must use public transport both to ferry their kids to daycare and then to get to work. This is hellish as it means sometimes leaving home two hours before they need to report to work to make all the connections. They have a hard time finding jobs because they must schedule their working hours around daycare. Etc. etc.

    Of course they would never be caught dead riding a bike to work or taking the kid to childcare in a bike trailer. Many poor people seem to have such a misplaced sense of vanity. The decisions they make are part of their own problems.

    • Agree: Mr. Rational
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  178. Anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @baythoven

    As people above have mentioned, a carb-heavy diet is great for certain people, or if you are going to work like a horse. Adam Smith commented on the generally robust appearance of the Irish in a day when they lived on potatoes and whatever little else they could get.

    (And, obviously, amount is rather important.)

  179. @ThreeCranes

    or taking the kid to childcare in a bike trailer

    When I’m driving, bike trailers with toddlers in them on the street give me the heebie-jeebies. Are they really a good idea?

  180. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I’ve wondered the same. Even on bike trails without cars around they seem unsafe. They’re often going pretty fast. A lot of the dads hauling those things aren’t leisurely bike riders but serious cyclists trying to get a workout in.

  181. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @miss marple

    The low-energy feeling is usually just an early phase of being on a low carb diet, maybe a side effect of low electrolytes. The first couple of weeks on low carb, I couldn’t finish my usual gym workout; now, I drink a glass of water with electrolytes, then have a coffee with butter & MCT oil in it before workouts and I’m fine.

    Losing weight is still a challenge though. I lost about 10 or 11 pounds in the first month and just another 2 or 3 the second month.

  182. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @ThreeCranes

    Michael Milken put out a book about 20 years ago advocating eating tons of soy. Supposedly, it helped keep his cancer in remission. He hired a CIA-trained chef, IIRC, who did stuff like swapping soft tofu for ricotta in lasagna.

  183. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @carol

    It’s pretty easy to order a burger without the bun at a fast food restaurant.

  184. @Steve Sailer

    AGREED!, any you all know how I feel about biking*. The things I do on a bike are not things I would do with a kid in the back, yet that’s all I know. Let them learn to ride later on.

    * f__k the cars!

  185. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Rosie

    You can eat some chocolate on low carb if you limit yourself to chocolate with high cocoa levels and low sugar.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  186. @Achmed E. Newman

    Celery raw, develops the jaw
    But celery stewed, is more quietly chewed.

    — Ogden Nash

  187. Bill says:
    @carol

    Boiling eggs is not that hard. Cutting a piece of cheese is not that hard.

  188. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Kratoklastes

    Hummus fits in for me. I have it on a gyro platter at the local Muslim place without rice or bread.

    Also, high enough levels of protein can keep you out of ketosis.

  189. Bill says:
    @KunioKun

    That’s cool. I especially like the obese Mexicans and their 10,000 liters of coke. Also, Poland looks delicious.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  190. Bill says:
    @stillCARealist

    The old 70′s rural diet: chew gum and spit.

    That brown, leafy, carcinogenic stuff is not called “gum.”

  191. Liza says:
    @baythoven

    Carbs are GREAT! I lost weight years ago on lots of healthy-type carbs – cereals, vegetables, legumes, whole fruit, etc. No sweets or desserts at all. However, after 10 years of starchy food, when I got pregnant, the Baby spoke, and I had to increase fats and protein, craved mightily in the form of pizza and cheese ‘n’ tomato sandwiches and…chocolate, God help me. The baby turned out okay. LOL.

    Nothing, not even diet, is forever. And when you have children, you have to be more flexible. They are not going to want to eat the way the adults do. As I am sure you know.

    Congrats, baythoven, on keeping your weight stable and your waist skinny.

    • Replies: @Anon
  192. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dave Pinsen

    He hired a CIA-trained chef

    I take it you are talking about “that other CIA”, the Culinary Institute of America? Or does Langley have a special chef program too?

    The movie “Heavy” deals with the school as I recall. I also recall Steve never reviewed it. It was really a pretty good movie. A bit art housey.

    I once had an employee who was a CIA graduate. We had a Christmas party and were going to have a turkey, but he suggested a goose instead, so I agreed to that. He roasted the goose and we had all the froufrou trimmings. Goose is really tasty-when cooked by an expert. Otherwise, it’s a greasy, gamy, nasty bird.

  193. J1234 says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Thanks very much for passing that along, Achmed. I do have hypertension, and have been on meds for 20 years (I’m 60 now), so I’ll give it a try. I’ve long suspected that my Guinea pigs eat healthier than I do.

    • Replies: @res
  194. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Bill

    Steezers are often fat and unsightly, but give them respect where it’s due: they won’t drink American Coke with high fructose corn syrup. Around here, Wal-mart Neighborhood Markets and most of the convenience stores besides Quik-Trip carry Mexican Coke and Sprite in the “Medio Litro” 500ml bottles. I won’t drink any other Coke any more.

  195. @Steve Sailer

    I agree too. What was I thinking? Even I wouldn’t do that.

    But for us, we wouldn’t do it because it’s crazy. For these single moms, they wouldn’t do it because they wouldn’t be caught dead on a bicycle.

  196. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    I make a dynamite cashew cream in the blender using raw cashews and hot water. You can use it pretty much the same as heavy cream. Great for cream soups.

  197. @notanon

    I’ve gone pretty nuts with the olives and olive oil over the last couple years. Wish I’d known about them before I washed and dried all my hair out by 40.

    • Replies: @notanon
  198. @Dave Pinsen

    Soy in baby formula and the effect estrogen-related compounds have upon humans. Many sources cited.

    http://www.second-opinions.co.uk/soy-online-service/04babyhealth.htm#.W_DTmi-ZO8o

  199. Anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @Liza

    I wonder if protein-heavy and carbohydrate-light diets are generally more suitable for men than women? Just judging by this thread, that’s the idea I seem to form.

    With the caveat: if you are going to physically work hard regularly, you seem to need carbohydrates. Maybe in our coddled age housewives work harder than working men? :)

    I really have no idea, but this seems an interesting topic. Lots of clashing dogmas.

    • Replies: @Liza
  200. Anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Are you Scottish? Perhaps you have a phobia of kale from a mythologized race-memory of the trauma suffered by Cuddie Headrigg when Jenny Dennison emptied the pot of kail-brose over his head.

    • LOL: Liza
    • Replies: @Anon
  201. @ThreeCranes

    “Are you now trying to undermine my mooring in reality by denying the truth of my memories? ”

    God forbid your memories should be polluted with actual data.

    And that’s assuming they are correct memories. In truth, most people are wrong about what they remember, and anyone as hysterical as you probably can’t remember properly.

    But when you talk about public education, you have to talk about all Americans, not just your own particularly slice of life.

    Now, stop fulminating.

    • Replies: @ThreeCranes
  202. Liza says:
    @Anon

    I am not sure it’s a male VS female thing when it comes to diets, but one’s basic constitution, ie, metabolic type, plus of course level of physical effort is also equally important.

    Sure have to snort at all those borderline effete men of today who eat paleo & Atkins style, both of these regimens being highly restricted. Somebody tell them about the tough Russian and German soldiers of WW II. All that rye bread and potatoes in addition to fat and meat. What you say about housewives working harder than men, that sure is the case in our household. If I didn’t have a good sized serving of carb at every meal to provide energy and feed the brain (such as it is), I would be banging my head against the wall.

    Dogmas, you mention: yes, that’s all it is. Our bodies know better.

  203. res says:
    @Rohirrimborn

    Thanks for the book recommendation. It is interesting to look for that book using Worldcat. Few of the major universities have it. Mostly a scattering of small and obscure universities as far as I see.

    A quick search turns up a PDF of a Google scan from the University of Michigan.

  204. One fact needs to be noted when talking about resurrecting the diet of our stone-age ancestors and that is this: wild game has much less fat content than does the modern beef that we buy from the grocery store.

    The meat from wild game is not marbled with fat. Wild animals don’t have the luxury of standing around munching down all day and chewing their cud like their domesticated cousins do.

    The kid who died up in the Alaska School bus may have died of malnourishment due to what used to be called “protein poisoning”. He shot and ate hundreds of squirrels. This was a common disease among the early mountain men and trappers of the American West. Of course Indians got their vitamins by eating the contents of a deer’s intestines and relished the liver.

    So the Paleo man of today is probably eating far more animal fat than his role model did. I’ve seen stuff recently that claimed to have shown, through analysis of tooth wear and tooth composition, that stone-age humans may have eaten more carbohydrates than current paleos give them credit for.

    Just saying.

    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
  205. res says:
    @J1234

    I do have hypertension

    I highly recommend reading https://www.amazon.com/Salt-Solution-Herb-Boynton/dp/1583330852
    Has a good appendix (targeted at MDs) giving a cell membrane transport level explanation of why.

    TLDR: Consume more potassium.

    P.S. I did much more than that in dietary changes which altogether dropped my BP about 25 points.

    • Replies: @J1234
  206. @education realist

    From “What were U.S. schools like in the 1960′s”

    “I took metal shop, wood shop, and mechanical drawing, courses that every kid should take that are not available now. I could arc weld, braze, and spot weld by the time I finished 7th grade. Kids simply do not learn this level of skill today.”

    and this:

    “Wood shop in seventh grade, if you are a boy. Home Economics I if you are a girl.
    Metal shop in eighth grade, if you are a boy. Home Economics II, if you are a girl.”

    and this:

    “I took it in middle school in the late 80s. We took cooking and sewing in both 6th and 7th grade, and “home ec” was in 8th grade, IIRC… that class was more about personal hygiene, balancing a checkbook and things like that. Those types of classes were electives in high school, and I didn’t take them.”

    and this:

    “We were forced to in 7th and 8th grade. It was all kinds of hell and I never took it again after that.”

    and this:

    “I took it for three years in junior high. Boys took shop, girls took home ec. I think that technically we were allowed to cross the gender divide, but no one ever did. I don’t remember if it was offered in high school, but I know I didn’t take it.”

    and this:

    “We took shop in 6th, 7th and 8th grades. Mandatory. It was one of a four-part rotation of shop, art, home ec and “life skills.”

    Everyone took all of them.”

    and this:

    “Our “package” was Shop, Home Ec and Art and it wasn’t elective.Same here, plus music. One quarter each for 6th, 7th, and 8th.”

    All from different sources and I could go on forever.

    Quite simply, you don’t know what you’re talking about.

    • Agree: Desiderius
  207. Anon[178] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Whose review of Plomin?

    The one by you that I definitely remember reading.

    This is the year 2Q18, isn’t it?

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  208. @Anon

    I haven’t read Plomin’s book.

    • Replies: @Anon
  209. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @ThreeCranes

    Ronald Hamilton figured out that lathrysm killed Chris McCandless. Jon Krakauer wrote about it 5 years ago. https://www.newyorker.com/books/page-turner/how-chris-mccandless-died

  210. Anon[372] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Repasting image:

  211. Anon[231] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    I haven’t read Plomin’s book.

    I guess to avoid the race taboo, he chooses weight and education level (which sounds more polite than IQ) as the examples he most expounds on. So a large part of the book is effectively a diet book. A really depressing diet book: For adults, GWAS analysis of your genome can predict 80 percent of your weight. The meaning of “80 percent” is of course a very complicated statistics subject — it doesn’t mean that you cannot lose more than 20 percent of your excess fat. But it’s still pretty depressing. Of course, you will lose weight if you eat less. But the ability to get yourself to eat less is part of those genes that the weight analysis is looking at. This is all environmentally dependent of course, which is why we were all thinner in 1980. But unless you have a time machine, environment also turns out to be genetic: Your parents design your environment, you seek out and construct your environment, etc.

  212. Anon[231] • Disclaimer says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Celery is relatively high in sodium, 50 mg for a stalk. Your DRI is 2,400 a day, so from that perspective it’s not that high, but someone with hypertension will be aiming at a much lower DRI.

  213. notanon says:
    @Desiderius

    yeah i used to think people going on about health food was all a bit hippyish and ignored it but now i see it as engineering.

  214. Liza says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Well, as long as you are biking nice ‘n’ slow, stick to the curb, don’t make left turns (make the turn in two goes instead), do hand signals and never use the bike trailer in high traffic areas, I think they are a good idea. I followed these rules and never had any accidents or close calls.

    Kids just love being pulled along in these nifty things. Can be lots of work for Ma, though, at times, if she’s not an athlete. :)

  215. notanon says:
    @Rosie

    I’m convinced I cannot live without chocolate.

    fat bombs ftw

    https://divascancook.com/chocolate-peanut-butter-fat-bombs-keto-diet-recipe/

    • Replies: @3g4me
  216. A B says:
    @Spangel

    @Spangel, it’s possible to have a pushing 300 total cholesterol but still be totally clear re. plaques in vessels. Wife is one of those. She had the heart scan that came back totally clean.

  217. @Dave Pinsen

    In Groves’ opinion fermenting mitigates most of the harmful effects of soy. So Tofu would be okay.

  218. 3g4me says:
    @notanon

    @220 notanon: Chocolate peanut butter fat bombs

    I’ll have to try those. I, like Rosie, am a chocoholic but have not traditionally been a fan of dark chocolate. Lately, however, JoJo’s peanut butter delights (moderately dark (70 %) chocolate bars with peanuts – I buy them by the bag at Sprouts) have done the trick. One 1.2 oz bar is 160 cals, 12 g fat, 4 g fiber, 6 g protein, 6 g sugar, total 10 g carbs.

    Note, however, that I do not follow a true keto diet. I aim for a mix of moderate (20-50 grams) or medium (50-100 grams) carb days in a week. That, plus intermittent fasting (eat from 1 PM to 9 PM only) plus 4 days a week at the gym (mix of cardio and heavy lifting (for a 60 year old woman) has helped me drop about 20 pounds in the last few months.

    • Replies: @notanon
  219. @Jack D

    One of the worst things that you can eat is beef even though it is delicious.

    Why?

    • Replies: @Desiderius
  220. @Jim Don Bob

    He’s thirty years behind the science.

  221. notanon says:
    @3g4me

    fat bombs were great for me when i first started cos i couldn’t see how i could possibly eat as much fat as required – and fat bombs was how – since then my addiction to butter has meant i don’t need them any more but i make some occasionally just cos they taste great.

    your regime is pretty close to mine – i was strict ketogenic (<10g) to get adapted but then gradually added more green veggies so i eat about a pound of green veg a day (which although that is c. 500g by weight there's only c. 50g of actual carbs as green veg is mostly water).

    I do not follow a true keto diet

    yeah there’s an issue here with what to call all the various diets which come from the science behind the ketogenic diet (i.e. fat vs carbs, primacy of controlling insulin etc) and the literal ketogenic diet which was developed for the specific purpose of managing epilepsy in kids.

    these keto-lite variations on the ketogenic theme need a collective name.

  222. Anon87 says:

    With everyone sending vials of spit in for DNA analysis, hoping to find lost relatives or susceptibly to disease, does anyone know if a company reports a diet best for you? I agree with Steve that there isn’t a one size fits all diet, but it would be nice if it could report some basic guidelines. Do they report lactose intolerance or alcohol sensitivity now? That seems like step one.

    I’m not exactly anti-carb, since a few billion Asians eat it all the time and Europeans still love bread, and on the whole aren’t riding rascal scooters to shop for groceries. Calories down, exercise up. Easy to say, hard to do.

    I also hate to think how much smoking might have kept waistlines down as affluence increased?

  223. @notanon

    I had a good friend growing up (gosh, the early 80′s now) who was all into organic, natural, unprocessed, etc. He said this was to compensate for his inveterate pot-smoking. I appreciate that sor t of honesty.

  224. J1234 says:
    @res

    Thank you for the link. I’ll check it out.

  225. CJ says:
    @Henry's Cat

    I thought it was the digestion of protein rather than fat which caused an increase in metabolic rate.

    Not sure what you mean by metabolic rate, but there is some research indicating that eating the protein part of a meal first, and the carbs (if there are any) last will cause blood sugar levels to rise less steeply.

    Eat Carbs Last to Reduce After-Meal Blood Sugar Spikes? YES

    After learning about this research, which seemed more serious than a lot of nutrition junk science, I have been doing this consistently and it seems to work. I no longer get tired half an hour after lunch (my big meal of the day) when blood sugar would crash. Most of my lunches consist of meat/fish/chicken and two or three courses of cooked vegetables. I rarely eat starchy carbs like potatoes or especially rice because meat and vegetables already have some carbs.

    What I really like about recommending this is that there’s no sacrifice — you’re eating exactly the same food, you just always eat the protein course first. Surprised nobody in this thread has already mentioned this approach.

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