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"Sovereignty" Is Next to be Demonized
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  1. How dare he respect the right of all nations to chart their own path! Doesn’t he know that the United States should chart it for them instead?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Also, how dare he presume to chart the path of his own country! Doesn't he know that the New World Order should chart our fate for us?
    , @pyrrhus
    McMuffin wants the US to be a home for all potential Mormons, even the intergalactic ones...
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  2. McMullin is good for a laugh, but is there any evidence anyone takes this cartoon character seriously? I have read comments from several people who voted for him that say they regret it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Blank
    I'm beginning to wonder if this guy is a sockpuppet for Vox Day. Seriously, if Vox Day were to invent his own phony cuckservative nemesis as a joke, it would be hard to tell the difference.
  3. What is “despotic soverignity” supposed to mean anyway?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    He's referring to Russia, I think. By "value-driven leadership" he means not respecting the sovereignty of a nation if it has "leadership we don't like", i.e., "despotism". I take the "for" in his sentence to be poor writing. Otherwise, he's crazy

    I henceforth demand the right to engage in "value-driven investing".

    "Value-driven bla blah blah": another example of the way in which "business English" represents a kind of Orwellian manipulation of the language.

    , @guest
    It's new by me, but my guess is it means grabbing enough power to malevolently attempt to monopolize enjoyment of the territory of the United States for U.S. citizens and those legally allowed to be here, rather than the entire world.
    , @Olorin
    Egg is dogwhistling an r/The_Donald (subreddit) anagram:

    it's groovy, centipedes!

  4. I’ve said it before. I would actually prefer to be governed by Jeb Bush over Evan McMullin.

    McMullin seems to have taken True Conservatism to an autistic level. He is insane.

    By the way, Mark Steyn had his show cancelled by CRTV. He is suing them. Wonder what happened? Hopefully it wasn’t because he mentioned your name on his show? ;)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    If only NASA still had the ability to put a man in space we could deport McMuffin back to Kolob.
    , @Thea
    It's really hard to take McMullin seriously. He is straight out of central casting.

    He is either ethnic Scottish or Irish? What has happened to my Celts?
  5. Evan McMullin, Isn’t he the same patsy the neocon’s hired to run in Utah and ruin the electoral vote and assure Hillary the win?

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    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Evan McMullin, Isn’t he the same patsy the neocon’s hired to run in Utah and ruin the electoral vote and assure Hillary the win?"

    Utah is the only majority Mormon state on the planet and Evan McMullin still lost Utah to the Non Mormon Donald J. Trump. Evan McMullin is a pathetic loser.
  6. I read that Evan McMullin is a closet Homosexual who was raised by 2 Dyke mothers. That certainly would explain why he is extremely hostile towards the idea of America remaining a majority White
    Heterosexual nation, because most Homos lean politically to the Left.

    Read More
    • Replies: @SteveRogers42
    "Confirmed bachelor". "Just hasn't met the right girl yet."
  7. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I read that three times – was there something even mildly sinister in that Trump quote?

    Wow…I’m really falling out of touch with the times.

    Read More
  8. Steve, you should change the name of your blog to “Despotic Sovereignty.”

    Read More
  9. Gosh, and here I thought that Trump was just sounding like John Quincy Adams. You know, the guy who is commonly regarded as out greatest Secretary of State:

    Wherever the standard of freedom and independence has been or shall be unfurled, there will her [America's] heart, her benedictions and her prayers be. But she goes not abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to the freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own. She will recommend the general cause, by the countenance of her voice, and the benignant sympathy of her example.

    Read More
  10. Can we agree this creature is as relevant to intelligent discourse about the fate of nations as his eponymous breakfast-sandwich?

    I’m not mocking you or belittling your choice to highlight this putz, but I ask generally and genuinely. Does anyone know what Walter Mondale, Bob Dole, or Ross Perot thinks of Mr. Trump? Is anyone asking? Why not? Aren’t they all correct not to? What did our parents advise us all about those who annoyed us just to get attention?

    “Just ignore him, dear; he’ll go away.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Does anyone know what Walter Mondale,"

    Walter Mondale is still alive? He must be 200 years old by now, after all he already had a shit load of gray hair all the way back in 1984 and that was a whopping 33 years ago.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I understand that you lumped Mr. Perot in that crowd because they were all on the losing side of presidential elections, Mr. Authchthon, but I really wish we could hear from Ross Perot, and especially about Trump.

    Ross Perot was a real patriot and it was a shame that he was coerced, blackmailed, who-knows into dropping out of the race in 1992. He got back in and got a significant portion of the vote, ushering in the Clinton dynasty, if you recall this history. However, the drop-out/re-up thing seemed flaky behavior at the time to us voters. Ross Perot was a earlier and better version of Donald Trump in my opinion.

    How come you don't hear anything like a comparison between these 2 guys? Oh, I understand the LP would want no part of it, but how about some bloggers? I think it would be very interesting.
  11. ??¿¿ From the Mitt Romney wing of Mormonism. This clown came out of nowhere to be a top political commentator. How did this happen? Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife. Mormons were reliable conservatives 30 years. Today they are a nullticulti mess.

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    • Replies: @Crawfurdmuir

    Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife.
     
    You'll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin's wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay.
    , @Jefferson
    "Does he make guacamole at home with his wife"

    Evan McMullin will give you the same answer Liberace gave Ed Sullivan regarding his romantic life, "I Just Haven't Found The Right Woman Yet, But I Hope She Is Out There Somewhere".
    , @Kyle a
    He's a lifelong bachelor with two mommies. Not very Mormon like.
  12. America does not go abroad in search of monsters to destroy. She is the well-wisher to freedom and independence of all. She is the champion and vindicator only of her own.

    John Quincy Adams

    But then again Adams was the first US Minister to Russia, so obviously he’s just another one of Putin’s stooges.

    Read More
  13. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    One good thing about this is there can’t be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke.

    I guess no one told him what happened in Russia in the 90s as the result of globalist ‘value-driven leadership’.

    http://nypost.com/2001/02/15/how-marc-helped-plunder-russia/

    Libya sure got more from US than from Russia. Russia said, “you decide your national interest”.
    US said, “we decide your national interest.” And that is why Libya is now such a success, as well as a wonderful bridge between Africa and Europe.

    We should just make Victoria Nuland the empress of the world. We need such value-driven leadership.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "One good thing about this is there can’t be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke."

    Comparing Evan McMullin to Dan Aykroyd is an extreme insult to Dan Aykroyd.
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    One good thing about this is there can’t be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke.
     
    That there's your problem. He's from France.
  14. “value-driven leadership”

    Which means?

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    • Replies: @bomag
    "Value-driven leadership"? Sounds like a phrase the people pushing soylent green would use.
    , @AndrewR
    The CIA installing governments friendly to globalist interests.
  15. Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America’s “missionary exceptionalism”, the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn’t proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn’t incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China’s affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I’ve been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    Read More
    • Agree: Randal
    • Disagree: Melendwyr
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.
    , @ben tillman

    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America’s “missionary exceptionalism”, the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural.
     
    Henotheism (Greek ἑνας θεός henas theos "one god") is the worship of a single god while not denying the existence or possible existence of other deities. Henotheism -- not polytheism -- is what monotheism should be contrasted with. Henotheism is tolerant; monotheism is not. McMullin, like the Neocons, has the intolerance of a monotheist.
    , @Chrisnonymous

    Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit.
     
    Yes, of course this is tautological because China defines itself by what it can dominate and how. Interfere in North Korean (or Lu Chu-an) affairs? Why no! They're independent! Interfere in Tibetan (or Mongolian) affairs? Why no! They're Chinese!
    , @Zachary Latif
    Interesting comment about how China leads the way. Paradoxically the best way for America to lead in "value led leadership" is by limiting emigration of the developing world.

    Another point though that immigration weakens source countries too. The brain drain and social pressures ameliorated by emigration doesn't do the developing world any favours.

    Skilled labour that migrate to the West drain their home countries of valuable cultural, economic and social input (literally the educated classes as in the case of IndoPak where most graduates just try to go abroad as soon as possible).

    If unskilled labour emigrates, it release the pressure valve on their home countries and prevent the emergence of social pressure and reform. The Arab Spring (whatever its merits/demerits) was a pressure cooker precisely because there was an angry and restive youth population. Once they disappear/emigrate so does the will for political reformation.

    One of the biggest takeaways I took last year from my trips to Iran was simply how open to reform and transformation the society actually was to what we read about. The isolation of the last 4 decades since the Iranian Revolution had actually made the Islamic government far more "sovereign" and conscious of the Iranian people's wishes than the Shah did.

    I am all for "eventual" open borders but it has to be done in a graduated and eventual fashion (Japan & the West can have open borders as an example but would be a good idea to wait for the Rest maybe until Asia & Africa get a whole lot richer).

    As this tweet shows ( https://twitter.com/hankgreelylsju/status/836989643589468160 ) there are 3 different Europes. The European Union was humming along just fine when it was a Western European construct, slight grumbling when it expanded to Central Europe but is now at breaking point when it has extended all the way to Eastern Europe (and Eastern European immigrants are a big source of tension in Britain since they compete with the skilled labour classes like electricians, plumbers and contractors; they've killed the market essentially).

    Or as my Swedish friend liked to put it; he likes to see the EU as the recreation of the Hanseatic League. Except in this iteration it marched down South far too soon and morphed into more dysfunction version of the Roman Empire!

    , @Johann Ricke

    For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit.
     
    Actually, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of having other countries conduct their internal affairs as China sees fit. Pretty much as soon as the party seized power, it spent a far bigger chunk of its GDP than the US training, funding and supplying guerrilla movements in countries as diverse as Rhodesia and the Philippines. That's not even counting its support for North Korea's and North Vietnam's attacks on South Korea and South Vietnam which, between them, killed over 2m Koreans and Vietnamese.

    The reason nobody criticizes the Chinese is because much of this historical memory emanates from governments and/or media that control the flow of information to the average man on the street. Foreign governments don't tell the truth about China because China retaliates against those of their sectors that do business in the Chinese market. The media doesn't want to get in China's bad books because the Chinese buy advertising space, and significant criticism would result in a boycott. That's not even taking into consideration the media companies want to sell content to the Chinese market, access to which has to be approved by a Chinese government ministry armed with a fixed dollar quota for all imports, permits for which are decided on a case-by-case basis.

    In material terms, China was the Khmer Rouge's principal foreign supporter. The Khmer Rouge went on to exterminate 1/4 of Cambodia's population. No one really gives the Chinese any guff about it, because you can't guilt them into anything. For that, the Chinese would have to have a conscience.

    It's not just the party. China's got a long history of territorial conquest. http://www.timemaps.com/history/china-1500bc/ It stopped for a time only because the West, Russia and Japan grew stronger, and expanded into areas (i.e. Chinese vassal states like what are now Okinawa, Korea, Burma, Vietnam, Malaysia) that might traditionally have been classified as future Chinese provinces. Now that China has almost reached economic parity with the US, its neighbors are about to rediscover what China was like before its military power and territorial ambitions were hemmed in by the West and Japan.
    , @guest
    China pursues a policy of non-intervention? Is this a joke? I'd assume anyone who put forward that thesis was woefully ignorant or had just lost their minds. But we're talking about Kissinger here, and duplicity is like breathing to him.

    A guy who was National Security Advisor and Secretary of State during the Vietnam War isn't aware of Chinese interventionism? Yeah, right.

    Not that I'm surprised he can get away with it. What percentage of the U.S. public, would you say, is unaware that we fought a major war against China in the 20th Century? Could be a majority.

    , @Father O'Hara
    Why do we need Confucius? Don't we have a tolerably fair political philosopher of our own,by the name of George Washington?
    , @Jason Liu
    Ironically, Chinese values are much more in line with humanity as a whole. Western liberal democracy, Enlightenment values, and even universalism itself is largely the product of the Western European mind. Maybe we should be proselytizing.
    , @Randal
    This broad truth that you have referenced here interacts with another, which is that Chinese thinking in the mid-C20th was to some extent corrupted by the aggressively universalist ideology of that time, which was revolutionary communism.

    But today, Chinese elites seem to have largely reverted to type and mostly don't appear to be prey to any universalist ideology, much as with the Russian elites, whereas US elites are now largely prisoners of the aggressively universalist and destabilising ideology of modern times, which is perhaps best termed globalist democratism and is founded upon the dogmas of the modern US left - social liberalism, activism and interventionism, and internationalist anti-nationalism.

    This is why in the mid-late C20th I supported the US and my country's alliance with it, whereas today I regard the US as the primary menace to humanity and my country's alliance with it as a serious problem.

    Whether Trump will succeed in making any substantive changes to that situation remains to be seen. I suspect he lacks the power to do so.
  16. McMullin is a strange guy, like he was created in some lab to be the perfect globalist. A “conservative” that manages never to say a single thing that angers the left. 40 year old Mormon that’s never been married, indicating he’s a virgin. Actually quite strange, as Mormons are encouraged to marry young and are able to do so if they’re decent providers. So what’s his deal? Conveniently popped up out of nowhere, agreeing with the deep state on every single issue, right when they were hoping that someone could come along, split the conservative vote and keep Trump from winning.

    Something strange is going on here. Surprising that no internet sleuths have looked into this.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    Any Mormon man not married by 30 is either dysfunctional or gay. In Cuck McMuffin's case I'd grant him a few extra years due to serving overseas, but he should have gotten hitched to his baby factory by now.
    , @Jefferson
    "A “conservative” that manages never to say a single thing that angers the left. 40 year old Mormon that’s never been married, indicating he’s a virgin."

    Evan McMullin is not a virgin, Evan McMullin is a

    https://youtu.be/Zgu7djuloZs
    , @guest
    I think most people assume he's a homo, not a virgin. I suppose he could be a virgin homo, but that's a strange combination these days.
    , @el topo
    McMullin claims his mother's family fled Poland to escape the Nazis.
    Thus I suspect that McMullin is Irish in the way that Country Joe McDonald (of Country Joe and the Fish) was: Jewish (and Leftist) on his mother's side. That would explain a lot.
  17. You’d think the billionaires and Conservative Inc. guys who dug this guy up would have put him back in his hole now. As much as the GOP Inc. sucks eighty percent of the GOP caucus would reject this kind of sentiment. Not sure how representative he is of even establishment republicans.

    Read More
  18. His use of “value-driven leadership” is confusing.

    “Values-driven leadership” was a 1996 book about how leaders should be virtuous, using higher values (honesty, courage, etc) to guide them.

    But take the “s” off “values” like McMullin did, and you have a completely meaningless term that sounds like something MBA students say to sound smart.

    Another round of “typo or just dumb?”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    MBA quantification of everything has spread from the business world to domestic government and now international relations.
  19. @Stealth
    "value-driven leadership"

    Which means?

    “Value-driven leadership”? Sounds like a phrase the people pushing soylent green would use.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    It more or less means rendering unto Caesar that which belongs to God.
    , @Mr. Anon
    "“Value-driven leadership”? Sounds like a phrase the people pushing soylent green would use."

    Indeed. Wringing the maximum value out of the United States for the benefit of his oligarch overlords.
  20. Evan McMullin is basically a walking parody of the Deep State.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    Evan McMullin is basically a walking parody of the Deep State.
     
    Somehow this reminds me of Python's "Upper Class Twit of the Year".
    , @guest
    I'd tend to think of the quintessential Deep Stater as being a WASP. Can a Mormon be a WASP? They've historically been treated more like Scientologists than just another sort of protestant.

    Then again, I'm out of touch. I've heard lately of intelligence being jam-packed with Mormons, but I can't think their roots are that deep.
  21. @Jeremy Cooper
    McMullin is a strange guy, like he was created in some lab to be the perfect globalist. A "conservative" that manages never to say a single thing that angers the left. 40 year old Mormon that's never been married, indicating he's a virgin. Actually quite strange, as Mormons are encouraged to marry young and are able to do so if they're decent providers. So what's his deal? Conveniently popped up out of nowhere, agreeing with the deep state on every single issue, right when they were hoping that someone could come along, split the conservative vote and keep Trump from winning.

    Something strange is going on here. Surprising that no internet sleuths have looked into this.

    Any Mormon man not married by 30 is either dysfunctional or gay. In Cuck McMuffin’s case I’d grant him a few extra years due to serving overseas, but he should have gotten hitched to his baby factory by now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kyle a
    No vagina outside the continental United States?
  22. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Name Withheld
    Steve:

    If you go into a bookstore in the USA and find the religion section, there will be no books on Confucianism. Many on Islam, Buddhism, Hindu, Judaism, and several others.

    Ask an Western liberal this question: What is the largest religion in China and also one of the five major religions in the world? They will be hopeless with the answer.
    , @The True and Original David
    Agreed. The only ones I can think of are 70+ years old. There's Pound, who is unreadable. There's "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture" by Ruth Benedict, which doesn't fit the bill much (and she was working for the McMuffins of her day). Schopenhauer tried to tie Buddhism into his philosophical system.

    I'm sure there is a ton of hippie/New Age paperbacks, which are worthless.

    The trouble is, there's no money, power, or sex in doing a serious comparative study. Although some of our more creative minds might find ways to break through.

    , @Bill P
    Confucius's singular achievement was a successful apologia for Bronze Age society.
    , @Amasius
    Jason Jorjani is trying to create a greater Aryan consciousness, from Europe to Zoroaster and Buddha, extending indirectly through China and Japan with Chan/Zen Buddhism. This chat about Iranian history is a good place to start:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XkQfp2GmZH4&t=1s

    , @Daniel Chieh
    The Confucian Cycle by William A. Taylor and Kenneth R. Taylor is fairly decent. I think it'll be an interesting challenge to express it in its full form to the West given the focus on individualism and novelty in the West.
    , @StAugustine
    Spandrell is the one for that. Right after his ancient Chinese history book.
    , @Autochthon
    When I was in high school (1991 – 1995), in Georgia, the curriculum in social studies called for all students to study:

    Ninth Grade: World History
    Tenth Grade: European History
    Eleventh Grade: Econonomics & Comparative Government (One Semester Each)
    Twelfth Grade: American (U.S.A.) History

    I distinctly recall that as part of world history we learned of the world's major religions, extant and extinct (e.g., a bit about Greek, Roman, & Egyptian practices). We learned the basic history and fundamental precepts of these extant religions: Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Shinto, Hindusism, Confucianism, Sikhism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, and Judaism.

    (We did not study Jainism, and we – I think rightly, given its miniscule following – studied Judaism primarily as a means to understanding the two popular Abrahamic religions.)

    Sikhism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, and Shinto got relatively short shrift (rightly, proportionate to their popularity).

    The others were studied quite thoroughly, under the circumstances (a survey of world history). To this day I recall reading of the Analects and the Five Constants. The similarities (and the differences) among the major religions were made clear. Confucius was big on filial responsibility, up to the point of ancestor-worship, obligations to the state (tying in with China's ages old civil services and the esteem of mandarins), etc. It was much more materialistic than some other religions: wordly success came of right behaviour and so was to be honoured and strived for. Hierarchies, collectivism, and protocol were paramount.

    I'm writing this stuff from memory. I expect it's a shallow, but I hope still fair and accurate, understanding of Confucianism. I also expect none of this stuff is taught these days to young people, crippling their ability to understand others in the world.

    (Today I expect religion has no place in school, or time is spent learning about superficial stuff like holiday traditions and traditional costumes and foods rather than the meaningful aspects of the religion, warts and all – this last seems the trend with so called multiculturalism.)
  23. @Nopez
    His use of "value-driven leadership" is confusing.

    "Values-driven leadership" was a 1996 book about how leaders should be virtuous, using higher values (honesty, courage, etc) to guide them.

    But take the "s" off "values" like McMullin did, and you have a completely meaningless term that sounds like something MBA students say to sound smart.

    Another round of "typo or just dumb?"

    MBA quantification of everything has spread from the business world to domestic government and now international relations.

    Read More
  24. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    If anyone is, in equal parts, admirable and despicable, it is Chris Hedges.

    He has genuine moral courage(and physical courage), but he is such a moral-supremacist a**hole who is addicted to feeling holier than thou. A virtue nazi to the max.

    Read More
  25. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America’s “missionary exceptionalism”, the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural.

    Henotheism (Greek ἑνας θεός henas theos “one god”) is the worship of a single god while not denying the existence or possible existence of other deities. Henotheism — not polytheism — is what monotheism should be contrasted with. Henotheism is tolerant; monotheism is not. McMullin, like the Neocons, has the intolerance of a monotheist.

    Read More
  26. @JohnnyD
    Evan McMullin is basically a walking parody of the Deep State.

    Evan McMullin is basically a walking parody of the Deep State.

    Somehow this reminds me of Python’s “Upper Class Twit of the Year”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @War for Blair Mountain
    Ben Tillman

    Don't quote the Python's anymore. Eric Idle and Terry Gilliam want war with Christian Russia. Graham Chapman was a known pedophile.

    I think I am only among a dozen or so people on the Planet to hear Terry Jones give a lecture....front row seat actually...on "Who murdered Chaucer"
  27. @Clyde
    ??¿¿ From the Mitt Romney wing of Mormonism. This clown came out of nowhere to be a top political commentator. How did this happen? Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife. Mormons were reliable conservatives 30 years. Today they are a nullticulti mess.

    Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife.

    You’ll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin’s wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "You’ll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin’s wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay."

    Evan McMullin is in denial about his sexual orientation while Milo Yiannopoulos is not.
    , @Mr. Anon

    You’ll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin’s wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay.
     
    Also, his mother is an out and gay-married lesbian. Is this some new kind of Mormonism? The Church of LDSGBT or something?
  28. @George Taylor
    Evan McMullin, Isn't he the same patsy the neocon's hired to run in Utah and ruin the electoral vote and assure Hillary the win?

    “Evan McMullin, Isn’t he the same patsy the neocon’s hired to run in Utah and ruin the electoral vote and assure Hillary the win?”

    Utah is the only majority Mormon state on the planet and Evan McMullin still lost Utah to the Non Mormon Donald J. Trump. Evan McMullin is a pathetic loser.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    Utah is the only majority Mormon state on the planet and Evan McMullin still lost Utah to the Non Mormon Donald J. Trump. Evan McMullin is a pathetic loser.

    Trump is more authentically Mormon than Power Bottom Egg McMuffin. He has more wives and children, that's for sure.

    I would not be surprised if McMuffin had some personal, sexual reason for wanting to keep up the flow of migrants.
  29. OT: Bad news; CNN reporting “federal investigators” (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he “failed to disclose” ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Except Trump likes Sessions way more than Flynn.

    Plus the CNN claim is, as usual, a bald-faced lie.
    , @JohnnyD
    @snorlax,
    Sessions said that he didn't meet with the Russians to discuss the campaign. Unless the Democrats (and Lindsay Graham) can prove that Sessions was talking with the Russians specifically about the campaign, it's not technically perjury.
    , @bored identity
    I agree.

    Scrutinizing of Putinizing was supposed to be nipped in the bud.

    Now just wait for the deep-shit-state-niners to start "unearthing more proofs"- such as these :

    * http://www.unz.com/isteve/american-interest-how-the-golden-state-became-the-intellectual-capital-of-trumps-gop/#comment-1610642

    (*scroll down a half way the comment for the part alluding that The National Interest is being run by Russians & Sessions)
    , @bored identity
    I agree.

    Scrutinizing of Putinizing was supposed to be nipped in the bud.

    Now just wait for the deep-shit-state-niners to start "unearthing more proofs"- such as these :

    * http://www.unz.com/isteve/american-interest-how-the-golden-state-became-the-intellectual-capital-of-trumps-gop/#comment-1610642

    (*scroll down a half way the comment for the part alluding that The National Interest is being run by Russians & Sessions)
    , @reiner Tor
    Yes, as I wrote elsewhere, a strong leader usually defends his stupid subordinate, and then gets rid of him later, after the storm has passed. That way he can show he's such a strong leader that he can afford to protect the most inept (corrupt, etc.) of his subordinates, while not actually retaining them for long. It also shows him to be loyal to his followers, however stupid they might be. By protecting a stupid subordinate the leader signals that his first instinct is to stand by his subordinates no matter what (and yell at them only behind closed doors), which in turn will make his followers more loyal.

    He could've (and probably should've) fired Flynn a few months later, long after the controversy has died down. This would also have been important, to signal to the same subordinates that being stupid is not advisable. (I'm assuming Flynn really was stupid, as seemed to be the case. I'm not totally sure, though.)
    , @midtown
    I think Trump had a number of grievances with Flynn, and this was just the last straw. I believe Trump felt he was misled by Flynn on various things, such as the elevation of Bannon to the NSC. He is much more in tune with Sessions. This is just another kerfuffle caused by the media. In the end, I think a lot of Trump's enemies will be in court.
    , @snorlax
    And now Sessions says he'll recuse himself from the Russia witch hunt.

    I have to say the Trump admin seems really amateur/naive on this stuff. They don't realize that they're pouring tanker trucks of gasoline on the fire.
  30. @Autochthon
    Can we agree this creature is as relevant to intelligent discourse about the fate of nations as his eponymous breakfast-sandwich?

    I'm not mocking you or belittling your choice to highlight this putz, but I ask generally and genuinely. Does anyone know what Walter Mondale, Bob Dole, or Ross Perot thinks of Mr. Trump? Is anyone asking? Why not? Aren't they all correct not to? What did our parents advise us all about those who annoyed us just to get attention?

    "Just ignore him, dear; he'll go away."

    “Does anyone know what Walter Mondale,”

    Walter Mondale is still alive? He must be 200 years old by now, after all he already had a shit load of gray hair all the way back in 1984 and that was a whopping 33 years ago.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Well Jimmy Carter and his wife are still alive, so why not?

    Mondale is 89, but his daughter died at 51
  31. If anyone is, in equal parts, admirable and despicable, it is Chris Hedges.

    It’s the devout Christian background. He gets really annoying when he starts riffing on St. Paul.

    Read More
  32. Hehe. I double-checked after writing that, the same thoughts having occurred to me. He’s eighty-nine.

    Read More
  33. @Anon
    One good thing about this is there can't be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke.

    I guess no one told him what happened in Russia in the 90s as the result of globalist 'value-driven leadership'.

    http://nypost.com/2001/02/15/how-marc-helped-plunder-russia/

    Libya sure got more from US than from Russia. Russia said, "you decide your national interest".
    US said, "we decide your national interest." And that is why Libya is now such a success, as well as a wonderful bridge between Africa and Europe.

    We should just make Victoria Nuland the empress of the world. We need such value-driven leadership.

    “One good thing about this is there can’t be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke.”

    Comparing Evan McMullin to Dan Aykroyd is an extreme insult to Dan Aykroyd.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Back when Evan McMullin was running for President, or rather I should say, back when he was running to get Hillary Clinton elected President, the best comment I saw about him was someone on some blog somewhere who said he looks like a penis wearing a suit.
  34. I’m used to elite-speak, neo-con-speak, and political folderol, but McMuffin lost me. That’s happening with greater frequency lately. The likes of David Brooks, Bill Kristol, etc. are going in for what I’ve characterized as Symbolist poetry. But what is this? What is he even saying? Let’s parse.

    Putinspeak. I’ll let them have their evil talisman. What is it Trump said that resembles things Putin has said? Nevermind. So long as what Trump said was bad, it’s putinesque, because Putin stands for everything bad in the world.

    So what did Trump say? Well, whatever it is, it’s not driven by “values,” and has something to do with “despotic sovereignty.” Is it despotic because it’s not driven by “values?” Or is there something inherently despotic about sovereignty itself? Are Americans in good standing allowed to question sovereignty these days?

    Go ahead and take it for granted that Trump is a despot: possessed of great power which he misuses for malign purposes. How is his despotism manifesting itself here, specifically? Apart from not being driven by values and having something to do with sovereignty. Well, Trump wants to represent the U.S., not the world. That’s it. Such is what set Egg McMuffin off about Putin and despotism.

    Which is odd for Trump to say, admittedly, given he’s the recently elected Emperor of the World. Wait a sec…there’s no such thing as world emperor, is there? That’s right, my mistake. Trump was elected president of a particular nation, coincidentally the nation he said he wanted to represent. Don’t that just scream “despot?”

    By the way, what values are supposed to be driving Trump, presumably in the opposite direction from solely representing the country of which he is president? Those enumerated in the Zeroth Amendment, perhaps? Invade the World/Invite the World?

    It actually does sound as if Egg McMuffin doesn’t believe in sovereignty. Or maybe he just disbelieves in any sovereignty but that of a One World State.

    The mask is off. Can you even imagine people supposedly on the right openly talking like this before the Trump campaign got off the ground, let alone, say. 10 years ago?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    The lynchpin of American Empire is the belief among its advocates (and beneficiaries, but I repeat myself) that they constitute an elect uniquely suited to rule, and that the world would tumble into chaos and war without them in charge.

    What makes them uniquely suited? Their values. Which values? Principally nonjudgmentalism (stop laughing) and deracination.
  35. @Jokah Macpherson
    How dare he respect the right of all nations to chart their own path! Doesn't he know that the United States should chart it for them instead?

    Also, how dare he presume to chart the path of his own country! Doesn’t he know that the New World Order should chart our fate for us?

    Read More
  36. @Kev
    What is "despotic soverignity" supposed to mean anyway?

    He’s referring to Russia, I think. By “value-driven leadership” he means not respecting the sovereignty of a nation if it has “leadership we don’t like”, i.e., “despotism”. I take the “for” in his sentence to be poor writing. Otherwise, he’s crazy

    I henceforth demand the right to engage in “value-driven investing”.

    “Value-driven bla blah blah”: another example of the way in which “business English” represents a kind of Orwellian manipulation of the language.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kev
    I prefer vacuous gas-baggery, but I think you're spot-on!
  37. @snorlax
    OT: Bad news; CNN reporting "federal investigators" (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he "failed to disclose" ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    Except Trump likes Sessions way more than Flynn.

    Plus the CNN claim is, as usual, a bald-faced lie.

    Read More
  38. @Kev
    What is "despotic soverignity" supposed to mean anyway?

    It’s new by me, but my guess is it means grabbing enough power to malevolently attempt to monopolize enjoyment of the territory of the United States for U.S. citizens and those legally allowed to be here, rather than the entire world.

    Read More
  39. @bomag
    "Value-driven leadership"? Sounds like a phrase the people pushing soylent green would use.

    It more or less means rendering unto Caesar that which belongs to God.

    Read More
  40. If he ever won elective office, the footers on TV news shows would have to display his name as:

    Evan McMullin (CIA) Utah

    Read More
  41. @Jeremy Cooper
    McMullin is a strange guy, like he was created in some lab to be the perfect globalist. A "conservative" that manages never to say a single thing that angers the left. 40 year old Mormon that's never been married, indicating he's a virgin. Actually quite strange, as Mormons are encouraged to marry young and are able to do so if they're decent providers. So what's his deal? Conveniently popped up out of nowhere, agreeing with the deep state on every single issue, right when they were hoping that someone could come along, split the conservative vote and keep Trump from winning.

    Something strange is going on here. Surprising that no internet sleuths have looked into this.

    “A “conservative” that manages never to say a single thing that angers the left. 40 year old Mormon that’s never been married, indicating he’s a virgin.”

    Evan McMullin is not a virgin, Evan McMullin is a

    Read More
  42. @Autochthon
    Can we agree this creature is as relevant to intelligent discourse about the fate of nations as his eponymous breakfast-sandwich?

    I'm not mocking you or belittling your choice to highlight this putz, but I ask generally and genuinely. Does anyone know what Walter Mondale, Bob Dole, or Ross Perot thinks of Mr. Trump? Is anyone asking? Why not? Aren't they all correct not to? What did our parents advise us all about those who annoyed us just to get attention?

    "Just ignore him, dear; he'll go away."

    I understand that you lumped Mr. Perot in that crowd because they were all on the losing side of presidential elections, Mr. Authchthon, but I really wish we could hear from Ross Perot, and especially about Trump.

    Ross Perot was a real patriot and it was a shame that he was coerced, blackmailed, who-knows into dropping out of the race in 1992. He got back in and got a significant portion of the vote, ushering in the Clinton dynasty, if you recall this history. However, the drop-out/re-up thing seemed flaky behavior at the time to us voters. Ross Perot was a earlier and better version of Donald Trump in my opinion.

    How come you don’t hear anything like a comparison between these 2 guys? Oh, I understand the LP would want no part of it, but how about some bloggers? I think it would be very interesting.

    Read More
    • Agree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Kyle McKenna
    You raise some excellent points here. I supported Perot in 1992 but I haven't really thought too much (until now) about how the world might be different had he not been in the race. Sad to say, our two-party monster relegates any and all third-party efforts to the status of spoilers, at best.
    , @SteveRogers42
    Perot laid the groundwork for Trump, just as Goldwater did for Reagan. They tapped into the same vein of support, with many of the same causes, with Trump's campaign "benefitting" from the fact that the USA was 25 years further down the drain and the RealAmericans were 25 years more woke. Perot lacked The Don's media savvy, personal appearance/magnetism, and NYC big brass ones, but he showed in 1992 how a Nationalist-Populist could attract a multitude of voters.

    I found it strange that no one interviewed Perot for his comments on the Trump phenomenon during the 2016 campaign. Perhaps his age was a factor?
  43. @Jeremy Cooper
    McMullin is a strange guy, like he was created in some lab to be the perfect globalist. A "conservative" that manages never to say a single thing that angers the left. 40 year old Mormon that's never been married, indicating he's a virgin. Actually quite strange, as Mormons are encouraged to marry young and are able to do so if they're decent providers. So what's his deal? Conveniently popped up out of nowhere, agreeing with the deep state on every single issue, right when they were hoping that someone could come along, split the conservative vote and keep Trump from winning.

    Something strange is going on here. Surprising that no internet sleuths have looked into this.

    I think most people assume he’s a homo, not a virgin. I suppose he could be a virgin homo, but that’s a strange combination these days.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    These Late Days Mormosexuals are hand-picked for being ideology -fluid and co-patriotic oriented creatures.

    And then, there is Lindsey too.
  44. @Jefferson
    "One good thing about this is there can’t be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke."

    Comparing Evan McMullin to Dan Aykroyd is an extreme insult to Dan Aykroyd.

    Back when Evan McMullin was running for President, or rather I should say, back when he was running to get Hillary Clinton elected President, the best comment I saw about him was someone on some blog somewhere who said he looks like a penis wearing a suit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JeremiahJohnbalaya
    somewhere who said he looks like a penis wearing a suit.

    Hey, buddy, you look like a dick wearing that suit. And i don't mean a dick like an asshole. I mean, a dick like a penis.
  45. @Crawfurdmuir

    Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife.
     
    You'll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin's wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay.

    “You’ll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin’s wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay.”

    Evan McMullin is in denial about his sexual orientation while Milo Yiannopoulos is not.

    Read More
  46. @Crawfurdmuir

    Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife.
     
    You'll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin's wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay.

    You’ll wait until the Greek kalends to see a picture of McMullin’s wife. He is over 40, and never married. Odd for a Mormon, given the Mormon emphasis on marriage and family. He is widely rumored to be gay.

    Also, his mother is an out and gay-married lesbian. Is this some new kind of Mormonism? The Church of LDSGBT or something?

    Read More
  47. @bomag
    "Value-driven leadership"? Sounds like a phrase the people pushing soylent green would use.

    ““Value-driven leadership”? Sounds like a phrase the people pushing soylent green would use.”

    Indeed. Wringing the maximum value out of the United States for the benefit of his oligarch overlords.

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  48. @JohnnyD
    Evan McMullin is basically a walking parody of the Deep State.

    I’d tend to think of the quintessential Deep Stater as being a WASP. Can a Mormon be a WASP? They’ve historically been treated more like Scientologists than just another sort of protestant.

    Then again, I’m out of touch. I’ve heard lately of intelligence being jam-packed with Mormons, but I can’t think their roots are that deep.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Here's one:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brent_Scowcroft

    , @Thomas

    Then again, I’m out of touch. I’ve heard lately of intelligence being jam-packed with Mormons, but I can’t think their roots are that deep.
     
    The missions they go on tend to foster language skills. Their religion also prioritizes education and promotes clean living (i.e., no drugs, alcohol, or extra-marital sex). That leaves fewer issues to come up for security clearances. The FBI for years has been a "Mormon mafia" (supposedly something like one-fifth of FBI hires are Mormons).
  49. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit.

    Yes, of course this is tautological because China defines itself by what it can dominate and how. Interfere in North Korean (or Lu Chu-an) affairs? Why no! They’re independent! Interfere in Tibetan (or Mongolian) affairs? Why no! They’re Chinese!

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  50. @Clyde
    ??¿¿ From the Mitt Romney wing of Mormonism. This clown came out of nowhere to be a top political commentator. How did this happen? Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife. Mormons were reliable conservatives 30 years. Today they are a nullticulti mess.

    “Does he make guacamole at home with his wife”

    Evan McMullin will give you the same answer Liberace gave Ed Sullivan regarding his romantic life, “I Just Haven’t Found The Right Woman Yet, But I Hope She Is Out There Somewhere”.

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  51. @Anon
    One good thing about this is there can't be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke.

    I guess no one told him what happened in Russia in the 90s as the result of globalist 'value-driven leadership'.

    http://nypost.com/2001/02/15/how-marc-helped-plunder-russia/

    Libya sure got more from US than from Russia. Russia said, "you decide your national interest".
    US said, "we decide your national interest." And that is why Libya is now such a success, as well as a wonderful bridge between Africa and Europe.

    We should just make Victoria Nuland the empress of the world. We need such value-driven leadership.

    One good thing about this is there can’t be a worse salesman against Sovereignty than Evan CuckMullin. The conehead boy is a total joke.

    That there’s your problem. He’s from France.

    Read More
  52. @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    Steve:

    If you go into a bookstore in the USA and find the religion section, there will be no books on Confucianism. Many on Islam, Buddhism, Hindu, Judaism, and several others.

    Ask an Western liberal this question: What is the largest religion in China and also one of the five major religions in the world? They will be hopeless with the answer.

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  53. @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    Agreed. The only ones I can think of are 70+ years old. There’s Pound, who is unreadable. There’s “The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture” by Ruth Benedict, which doesn’t fit the bill much (and she was working for the McMuffins of her day). Schopenhauer tried to tie Buddhism into his philosophical system.

    I’m sure there is a ton of hippie/New Age paperbacks, which are worthless.

    The trouble is, there’s no money, power, or sex in doing a serious comparative study. Although some of our more creative minds might find ways to break through.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I read a book called China in World History by a New Zealand historian that was very interesting. Jesuit Matteo Ricci was his hero.
    , @Steve Sailer
    I read a book called China in World History by a New Zealand historian that was very interesting. Jesuit Matteo Ricci was his hero.
    , @guest
    The subject was China and Confucianism, not Japan or Buddhism.

    There are about a billion books on Confucius for Westerners, but I'm not aware of any recent pop-y ones specifically about the overlap between Confucius's thought and European thought.
  54. @Jefferson
    "Evan McMullin, Isn’t he the same patsy the neocon’s hired to run in Utah and ruin the electoral vote and assure Hillary the win?"

    Utah is the only majority Mormon state on the planet and Evan McMullin still lost Utah to the Non Mormon Donald J. Trump. Evan McMullin is a pathetic loser.

    Utah is the only majority Mormon state on the planet and Evan McMullin still lost Utah to the Non Mormon Donald J. Trump. Evan McMullin is a pathetic loser.

    Trump is more authentically Mormon than Power Bottom Egg McMuffin. He has more wives and children, that’s for sure.

    I would not be surprised if McMuffin had some personal, sexual reason for wanting to keep up the flow of migrants.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kyle McKenna

    Trump is more authentically Mormon than Power Bottom Egg McMuffin.
     
    Okay, now there's a phrase I never thought I'd read, much less at the UR. Salut
  55. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    Interesting comment about how China leads the way. Paradoxically the best way for America to lead in “value led leadership” is by limiting emigration of the developing world.

    Another point though that immigration weakens source countries too. The brain drain and social pressures ameliorated by emigration doesn’t do the developing world any favours.

    Skilled labour that migrate to the West drain their home countries of valuable cultural, economic and social input (literally the educated classes as in the case of IndoPak where most graduates just try to go abroad as soon as possible).

    If unskilled labour emigrates, it release the pressure valve on their home countries and prevent the emergence of social pressure and reform. The Arab Spring (whatever its merits/demerits) was a pressure cooker precisely because there was an angry and restive youth population. Once they disappear/emigrate so does the will for political reformation.

    One of the biggest takeaways I took last year from my trips to Iran was simply how open to reform and transformation the society actually was to what we read about. The isolation of the last 4 decades since the Iranian Revolution had actually made the Islamic government far more “sovereign” and conscious of the Iranian people’s wishes than the Shah did.

    I am all for “eventual” open borders but it has to be done in a graduated and eventual fashion (Japan & the West can have open borders as an example but would be a good idea to wait for the Rest maybe until Asia & Africa get a whole lot richer).

    As this tweet shows ( https://twitter.com/hankgreelylsju/status/836989643589468160 ) there are 3 different Europes. The European Union was humming along just fine when it was a Western European construct, slight grumbling when it expanded to Central Europe but is now at breaking point when it has extended all the way to Eastern Europe (and Eastern European immigrants are a big source of tension in Britain since they compete with the skilled labour classes like electricians, plumbers and contractors; they’ve killed the market essentially).

    Or as my Swedish friend liked to put it; he likes to see the EU as the recreation of the Hanseatic League. Except in this iteration it marched down South far too soon and morphed into more dysfunction version of the Roman Empire!

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  56. @snorlax
    OT: Bad news; CNN reporting "federal investigators" (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he "failed to disclose" ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    ,
    Sessions said that he didn’t meet with the Russians to discuss the campaign. Unless the Democrats (and Lindsay Graham) can prove that Sessions was talking with the Russians specifically about the campaign, it’s not technically perjury.

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  57. @Clyde
    ??¿¿ From the Mitt Romney wing of Mormonism. This clown came out of nowhere to be a top political commentator. How did this happen? Does he make guacamole at home with his wife with an authentic Mexican ¡Jeb guac bowl? I want to see a photo of his wife. Mormons were reliable conservatives 30 years. Today they are a nullticulti mess.

    He’s a lifelong bachelor with two mommies. Not very Mormon like.

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  58. @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    Confucius’s singular achievement was a successful apologia for Bronze Age society.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jason Liu
    Hierarchical bronze age social structures, despite any excesses, are generally better than what the modern west has conceived.
  59. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit.

    Actually, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of having other countries conduct their internal affairs as China sees fit. Pretty much as soon as the party seized power, it spent a far bigger chunk of its GDP than the US training, funding and supplying guerrilla movements in countries as diverse as Rhodesia and the Philippines. That’s not even counting its support for North Korea’s and North Vietnam’s attacks on South Korea and South Vietnam which, between them, killed over 2m Koreans and Vietnamese.

    The reason nobody criticizes the Chinese is because much of this historical memory emanates from governments and/or media that control the flow of information to the average man on the street. Foreign governments don’t tell the truth about China because China retaliates against those of their sectors that do business in the Chinese market. The media doesn’t want to get in China’s bad books because the Chinese buy advertising space, and significant criticism would result in a boycott. That’s not even taking into consideration the media companies want to sell content to the Chinese market, access to which has to be approved by a Chinese government ministry armed with a fixed dollar quota for all imports, permits for which are decided on a case-by-case basis.

    In material terms, China was the Khmer Rouge’s principal foreign supporter. The Khmer Rouge went on to exterminate 1/4 of Cambodia’s population. No one really gives the Chinese any guff about it, because you can’t guilt them into anything. For that, the Chinese would have to have a conscience.

    It’s not just the party. China’s got a long history of territorial conquest. http://www.timemaps.com/history/china-1500bc/ It stopped for a time only because the West, Russia and Japan grew stronger, and expanded into areas (i.e. Chinese vassal states like what are now Okinawa, Korea, Burma, Vietnam, Malaysia) that might traditionally have been classified as future Chinese provinces. Now that China has almost reached economic parity with the US, its neighbors are about to rediscover what China was like before its military power and territorial ambitions were hemmed in by the West and Japan.

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  60. @Lugash
    Any Mormon man not married by 30 is either dysfunctional or gay. In Cuck McMuffin's case I'd grant him a few extra years due to serving overseas, but he should have gotten hitched to his baby factory by now.

    No vagina outside the continental United States?

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    • Replies: @Rob McX
    I'm sure there's some kind of network for expatriate Mormons seeking spouses.
    , @Lugash
    If course, but observant Mormon men don't partake. It's hard to understand in modern America, but Mormons take their values seriously.
  61. @The True and Original David
    Agreed. The only ones I can think of are 70+ years old. There's Pound, who is unreadable. There's "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture" by Ruth Benedict, which doesn't fit the bill much (and she was working for the McMuffins of her day). Schopenhauer tried to tie Buddhism into his philosophical system.

    I'm sure there is a ton of hippie/New Age paperbacks, which are worthless.

    The trouble is, there's no money, power, or sex in doing a serious comparative study. Although some of our more creative minds might find ways to break through.

    I read a book called China in World History by a New Zealand historian that was very interesting. Jesuit Matteo Ricci was his hero.

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  62. @The True and Original David
    Agreed. The only ones I can think of are 70+ years old. There's Pound, who is unreadable. There's "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture" by Ruth Benedict, which doesn't fit the bill much (and she was working for the McMuffins of her day). Schopenhauer tried to tie Buddhism into his philosophical system.

    I'm sure there is a ton of hippie/New Age paperbacks, which are worthless.

    The trouble is, there's no money, power, or sex in doing a serious comparative study. Although some of our more creative minds might find ways to break through.

    I read a book called China in World History by a New Zealand historian that was very interesting. Jesuit Matteo Ricci was his hero.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Melendwyr
    And was the second stage of my learning about Memory Palaces. I suggest you look up the subject, Mr. Sailer, it's quite interesting and surprisingly useful.
  63. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    China pursues a policy of non-intervention? Is this a joke? I’d assume anyone who put forward that thesis was woefully ignorant or had just lost their minds. But we’re talking about Kissinger here, and duplicity is like breathing to him.

    A guy who was National Security Advisor and Secretary of State during the Vietnam War isn’t aware of Chinese interventionism? Yeah, right.

    Not that I’m surprised he can get away with it. What percentage of the U.S. public, would you say, is unaware that we fought a major war against China in the 20th Century? Could be a majority.

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  64. @guest
    I'd tend to think of the quintessential Deep Stater as being a WASP. Can a Mormon be a WASP? They've historically been treated more like Scientologists than just another sort of protestant.

    Then again, I'm out of touch. I've heard lately of intelligence being jam-packed with Mormons, but I can't think their roots are that deep.
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  65. @snorlax
    OT: Bad news; CNN reporting "federal investigators" (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he "failed to disclose" ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    I agree.

    Scrutinizing of Putinizing was supposed to be nipped in the bud.

    Now just wait for the deep-shit-state-niners to start “unearthing more proofs”- such as these :

    * http://www.unz.com/isteve/american-interest-how-the-golden-state-became-the-intellectual-capital-of-trumps-gop/#comment-1610642

    (*scroll down a half way the comment for the part alluding that The National Interest is being run by Russians & Sessions)

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  66. @snorlax
    OT: Bad news; CNN reporting "federal investigators" (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he "failed to disclose" ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    I agree.

    Scrutinizing of Putinizing was supposed to be nipped in the bud.

    Now just wait for the deep-shit-state-niners to start “unearthing more proofs”- such as these :

    * http://www.unz.com/isteve/american-interest-how-the-golden-state-became-the-intellectual-capital-of-trumps-gop/#comment-1610642

    (*scroll down a half way the comment for the part alluding that The National Interest is being run by Russians & Sessions)

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  67. @The True and Original David
    Agreed. The only ones I can think of are 70+ years old. There's Pound, who is unreadable. There's "The Chrysanthemum and the Sword: Patterns of Japanese Culture" by Ruth Benedict, which doesn't fit the bill much (and she was working for the McMuffins of her day). Schopenhauer tried to tie Buddhism into his philosophical system.

    I'm sure there is a ton of hippie/New Age paperbacks, which are worthless.

    The trouble is, there's no money, power, or sex in doing a serious comparative study. Although some of our more creative minds might find ways to break through.

    The subject was China and Confucianism, not Japan or Buddhism.

    There are about a billion books on Confucius for Westerners, but I’m not aware of any recent pop-y ones specifically about the overlap between Confucius’s thought and European thought.

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  68. @JerseyGuy
    I've said it before. I would actually prefer to be governed by Jeb Bush over Evan McMullin.

    McMullin seems to have taken True Conservatism to an autistic level. He is insane.

    By the way, Mark Steyn had his show cancelled by CRTV. He is suing them. Wonder what happened? Hopefully it wasn't because he mentioned your name on his show? ;)

    If only NASA still had the ability to put a man in space we could deport McMuffin back to Kolob.

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  69. @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    Jason Jorjani is trying to create a greater Aryan consciousness, from Europe to Zoroaster and Buddha, extending indirectly through China and Japan with Chan/Zen Buddhism. This chat about Iranian history is a good place to start:

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  70. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    Why do we need Confucius? Don’t we have a tolerably fair political philosopher of our own,by the name of George Washington?

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  71. @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    The Confucian Cycle by William A. Taylor and Kenneth R. Taylor is fairly decent. I think it’ll be an interesting challenge to express it in its full form to the West given the focus on individualism and novelty in the West.

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  72. I think a Sailer/ Zizek Campus Tour would be quite the hit.

    Admittedly, I may be an outlier.

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  73. @Mr. Anon
    Back when Evan McMullin was running for President, or rather I should say, back when he was running to get Hillary Clinton elected President, the best comment I saw about him was someone on some blog somewhere who said he looks like a penis wearing a suit.

    somewhere who said he looks like a penis wearing a suit.

    Hey, buddy, you look like a dick wearing that suit. And i don’t mean a dick like an asshole. I mean, a dick like a penis.

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  74. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    We must get back to basics and define what the word ‘sovereignty’ in the diplomatic sense, at least, means.
    Basically it means the right of a nation state to be the highest power running the said nation state. That is no foreign power, ie a ruler of a state which is separate to and distinct from the nation state in all political considerations, does not have the right or ability to override the ruler ship of the said nation state in matters of the internal political governance ofbthevsaid nation state.
    In a word, it means ‘independence’.
    Or what the States fought for back in 1776.

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  75. @ben tillman

    Evan McMullin is basically a walking parody of the Deep State.
     
    Somehow this reminds me of Python's "Upper Class Twit of the Year".

    Ben Tillman

    Don’t quote the Python’s anymore. Eric Idle and Terry Gilliam want war with Christian Russia. Graham Chapman was a known pedophile.

    I think I am only among a dozen or so people on the Planet to hear Terry Jones give a lecture….front row seat actually…on “Who murdered Chaucer”

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    The Pythons (why the apostrophe? is there a rule? I don't know, but I think it's unneeded) were a subversive element that helped subvert the old order in all white countries. But now we have a new orthodoxy, and why not use the selfsame subversive elements to subvert this new order? Especially since we grew up with both the Pythons and the new orthodoxy. Quoting them comes naturally to me and I'd guess to many other people.
    , @Kyle McKenna
    The Pythons have had to do a lot of backing-and-filling, given that Flying Circus was probably the most 'incorrect' show ever to air.

    Eric Idle and Terry Gilliam were always the dumbest Pythons, so what they say isn't so important. Your slur against Graham Chapman remains--shall we say--unproven, though I wouldn't stake big money on it either way.

    Suffice to say, we'll continue quoting them so long as they continue to be genius, which will be roughly forever. Now make yourself useful and remove the laugh tracks from those old shows. They're very irritating.

  76. European Union legislators have “overwhelmingly” voted to lift the EU parliamentary immunity of French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen for tweeting pictures of Isis violence.

    Ms Le Pen, a member of the European parliament, is under investigation in France for posting three graphic images of Isis executions on Twitter in 2015, including the beheading of the United States journalist James Foley.

    Responding to a request from the French judiciary, the EU MEPs in the legal affairs committee voted to lift her immunity, EU officials said. The committee’s decision will have to be backed by the whole parliament in a second vote, possibly this week.
    Ms Le Pen’s immunity shields her from prosecution and lifting it would permit legal action against her. The offence being considered is “publishing violent images,” which under certain circumstances can carry a penalty of three years in prison and a fine of €75,000 (£64,000).

    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/european-union-vote-lift-marine-le-pen-immunity-tweet-isis-violence-a7604506.html

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    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    Of course, the idea of immunity was conceived in the first place to protect members of legislative bodies against exactly such prosecutions.
    , @Veritatis
    French politics are the most evolved. In other democracies, the best candidate is supposed to win. In France, the one not formally charged is the winner.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/03/01/french-presidential-candidate-francois-fillon-wont-surrender-despite-pending-charges/98571932/
  77. @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    Spandrell is the one for that. Right after his ancient Chinese history book.

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  78. @snorlax
    OT: Bad news; CNN reporting "federal investigators" (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he "failed to disclose" ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    Yes, as I wrote elsewhere, a strong leader usually defends his stupid subordinate, and then gets rid of him later, after the storm has passed. That way he can show he’s such a strong leader that he can afford to protect the most inept (corrupt, etc.) of his subordinates, while not actually retaining them for long. It also shows him to be loyal to his followers, however stupid they might be. By protecting a stupid subordinate the leader signals that his first instinct is to stand by his subordinates no matter what (and yell at them only behind closed doors), which in turn will make his followers more loyal.

    He could’ve (and probably should’ve) fired Flynn a few months later, long after the controversy has died down. This would also have been important, to signal to the same subordinates that being stupid is not advisable. (I’m assuming Flynn really was stupid, as seemed to be the case. I’m not totally sure, though.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    And now Sessions is reclusing himself from the investigations. Trump is looking weaker and weaker. What will happen if they find something? They haven't found anything so far, but it's almost as if two members of his administration have already been found guilty. Do they really need a crime for an impeachment (which both parties crave)?
  79. @syonredux

    European Union legislators have “overwhelmingly” voted to lift the EU parliamentary immunity of French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen for tweeting pictures of Isis violence.

    Ms Le Pen, a member of the European parliament, is under investigation in France for posting three graphic images of Isis executions on Twitter in 2015, including the beheading of the United States journalist James Foley.

    Responding to a request from the French judiciary, the EU MEPs in the legal affairs committee voted to lift her immunity, EU officials said. The committee's decision will have to be backed by the whole parliament in a second vote, possibly this week.
    Ms Le Pen's immunity shields her from prosecution and lifting it would permit legal action against her. The offence being considered is “publishing violent images,” which under certain circumstances can carry a penalty of three years in prison and a fine of €75,000 (£64,000).
     
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/european-union-vote-lift-marine-le-pen-immunity-tweet-isis-violence-a7604506.html

    Of course, the idea of immunity was conceived in the first place to protect members of legislative bodies against exactly such prosecutions.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    "from exactly such prosecutions"

    What sort of prosecutions do you mean?
  80. @War for Blair Mountain
    Ben Tillman

    Don't quote the Python's anymore. Eric Idle and Terry Gilliam want war with Christian Russia. Graham Chapman was a known pedophile.

    I think I am only among a dozen or so people on the Planet to hear Terry Jones give a lecture....front row seat actually...on "Who murdered Chaucer"

    The Pythons (why the apostrophe? is there a rule? I don’t know, but I think it’s unneeded) were a subversive element that helped subvert the old order in all white countries. But now we have a new orthodoxy, and why not use the selfsame subversive elements to subvert this new order? Especially since we grew up with both the Pythons and the new orthodoxy. Quoting them comes naturally to me and I’d guess to many other people.

    Read More
  81. @reiner Tor
    Of course, the idea of immunity was conceived in the first place to protect members of legislative bodies against exactly such prosecutions.

    “from exactly such prosecutions”

    What sort of prosecutions do you mean?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I expect he means prosecutions meant to stifle political discourse, debate, dissent, and opposition. The same racket was done againat Wilders in the Netherlands. Every modern nation save America now criminlises saying Mean Things and objecting to being genocidally disposessed. It's one Hell of a coup toward taking over the government to formalise the invaders' rule.
  82. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    Ironically, Chinese values are much more in line with humanity as a whole. Western liberal democracy, Enlightenment values, and even universalism itself is largely the product of the Western European mind. Maybe we should be proselytizing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator

    in line with humanity as a whole
     
    What does this mean?
  83. @Bill P
    Confucius's singular achievement was a successful apologia for Bronze Age society.

    Hierarchical bronze age social structures, despite any excesses, are generally better than what the modern west has conceived.

    Read More
  84. @Kev
    What is "despotic soverignity" supposed to mean anyway?

    Egg is dogwhistling an r/The_Donald (subreddit) anagram:

    it’s groovy, centipedes!

    Read More
    • Replies: @slumber_j

    Egg is dogwhistling an r/The_Donald (subreddit) anagram:

    it’s groovy, centipedes!
     
    You blew my mind there.
  85. @Barnard
    McMullin is good for a laugh, but is there any evidence anyone takes this cartoon character seriously? I have read comments from several people who voted for him that say they regret it.

    I’m beginning to wonder if this guy is a sockpuppet for Vox Day. Seriously, if Vox Day were to invent his own phony cuckservative nemesis as a joke, it would be hard to tell the difference.

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  86. @Jason Liu
    Ironically, Chinese values are much more in line with humanity as a whole. Western liberal democracy, Enlightenment values, and even universalism itself is largely the product of the Western European mind. Maybe we should be proselytizing.

    in line with humanity as a whole

    What does this mean?

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    • Replies: @Jason Liu
    That most people around the world live in societies which favor nationalism and hierarchy more than western values of equality, freedom, etc. In that sense Chinese values are really more like human values.
  87. @Steve Sailer
    It might be time for a popular book on Confucian thought for Westerners, pointing out how there was a lot of overlap between Chinese and European thought.

    When I was in high school (1991 – 1995), in Georgia, the curriculum in social studies called for all students to study:

    Ninth Grade: World History
    Tenth Grade: European History
    Eleventh Grade: Econonomics & Comparative Government (One Semester Each)
    Twelfth Grade: American (U.S.A.) History

    I distinctly recall that as part of world history we learned of the world’s major religions, extant and extinct (e.g., a bit about Greek, Roman, & Egyptian practices). We learned the basic history and fundamental precepts of these extant religions: Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Shinto, Hindusism, Confucianism, Sikhism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, and Judaism.

    (We did not study Jainism, and we – I think rightly, given its miniscule following – studied Judaism primarily as a means to understanding the two popular Abrahamic religions.)

    Sikhism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, and Shinto got relatively short shrift (rightly, proportionate to their popularity).

    The others were studied quite thoroughly, under the circumstances (a survey of world history). To this day I recall reading of the Analects and the Five Constants. The similarities (and the differences) among the major religions were made clear. Confucius was big on filial responsibility, up to the point of ancestor-worship, obligations to the state (tying in with China’s ages old civil services and the esteem of mandarins), etc. It was much more materialistic than some other religions: wordly success came of right behaviour and so was to be honoured and strived for. Hierarchies, collectivism, and protocol were paramount.

    I’m writing this stuff from memory. I expect it’s a shallow, but I hope still fair and accurate, understanding of Confucianism. I also expect none of this stuff is taught these days to young people, crippling their ability to understand others in the world.

    (Today I expect religion has no place in school, or time is spent learning about superficial stuff like holiday traditions and traditional costumes and foods rather than the meaningful aspects of the religion, warts and all – this last seems the trend with so called multiculturalism.)

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    One question is whether Confucianism is more of a religion or a political ideology. Confucius seems more like Aristotle on politics than like, say, the Buddha.
  88. @Yan Shen
    Henry Kissinger in his book On China contrasted America's "missionary exceptionalism", the belief in the universality of its own values, with that of Chinese exceptionalism, which he describe as being cultural. Therefore, China didn't proselytize and made no claims about the relevancy of its institutions outside of China. For the most part, Chinese foreign policy is governed by the principle of non-interference. It respects the right of other sovereign nations to conduct their internal affairs how they see fit. And largely by staying out of the affairs of other nations, it hasn't incurred the same kind of hatred that the Americans have incurred by engaging in what Steve describes as a policy of invading the world. For instance, China's affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    On the key issues of immigration and foreign policy, Trump seems to be remarkably East Asian in his way of thinking. I've been arguing now that if ever the current winds of liberal PC insanity were to dissipate in the West, it would be largely motivated by the East Asian example. I suspect that this will become increasingly true over the coming decades, as America arrives at the precipice in terms of its future evolution. Can it remain a prosperous first world nation or will the currents of liberalism and multiculturalism reduce it to becoming the next Brazil?

    This broad truth that you have referenced here interacts with another, which is that Chinese thinking in the mid-C20th was to some extent corrupted by the aggressively universalist ideology of that time, which was revolutionary communism.

    But today, Chinese elites seem to have largely reverted to type and mostly don’t appear to be prey to any universalist ideology, much as with the Russian elites, whereas US elites are now largely prisoners of the aggressively universalist and destabilising ideology of modern times, which is perhaps best termed globalist democratism and is founded upon the dogmas of the modern US left – social liberalism, activism and interventionism, and internationalist anti-nationalism.

    This is why in the mid-late C20th I supported the US and my country’s alliance with it, whereas today I regard the US as the primary menace to humanity and my country’s alliance with it as a serious problem.

    Whether Trump will succeed in making any substantive changes to that situation remains to be seen. I suspect he lacks the power to do so.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    much as with the Russian elites

    Russian elites, and even the masses, tended to be super-philosophical. See Stoppard's "Coast of Utopia" for the Russian tendency to philosophize everything.

    I noticed the same thing when I visited Russia in the early 2000s. I needed to place a phone call home, and every time some Russian's suggestion for how I could do it failed, they never came up with a Plan B. Instead, they found the failure of their plans to be a welcome opportunity to philosophize about how human plans so often come to naught in this vail of tears, my friend.

    I finally explained my problem to a visiting Dutchman. He handed me his cell phone and then I sent him a check for the cost of the call.

    , @Jason Liu
    That is a good stance to take. The new battlelines are now drawn between the postmodern left, and the rest of humanity, and these factions extend beyond borders.

    Too many nationalists are still fighting with nationalists from next door over yesterday's grudges.

    , @Desiderius

    Whether Trump will succeed in making any substantive changes to that situation remains to be seen. I suspect he lacks the power to do so.
     
    That's the nut. It's why many Western world leaders "seem to" despise Trump. They're waiting to see whether the coast is clear - i.e. whether he's really in charge or whether the deep state that's also kept them under the boot is.
  89. borrowed Putinspeak: the idea that America should abandon value-driven leadership for despotic sovereignty

    Not the least advantage of Trump’s candidacy and election victory has been the way it has forced views like this from supposed “conservatives” out into the open.

    Read More
  90. @Autochthon
    When I was in high school (1991 – 1995), in Georgia, the curriculum in social studies called for all students to study:

    Ninth Grade: World History
    Tenth Grade: European History
    Eleventh Grade: Econonomics & Comparative Government (One Semester Each)
    Twelfth Grade: American (U.S.A.) History

    I distinctly recall that as part of world history we learned of the world's major religions, extant and extinct (e.g., a bit about Greek, Roman, & Egyptian practices). We learned the basic history and fundamental precepts of these extant religions: Islam, Christianity, Buddhism, Shinto, Hindusism, Confucianism, Sikhism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, and Judaism.

    (We did not study Jainism, and we – I think rightly, given its miniscule following – studied Judaism primarily as a means to understanding the two popular Abrahamic religions.)

    Sikhism, Zoroastrianism, Taoism, and Shinto got relatively short shrift (rightly, proportionate to their popularity).

    The others were studied quite thoroughly, under the circumstances (a survey of world history). To this day I recall reading of the Analects and the Five Constants. The similarities (and the differences) among the major religions were made clear. Confucius was big on filial responsibility, up to the point of ancestor-worship, obligations to the state (tying in with China's ages old civil services and the esteem of mandarins), etc. It was much more materialistic than some other religions: wordly success came of right behaviour and so was to be honoured and strived for. Hierarchies, collectivism, and protocol were paramount.

    I'm writing this stuff from memory. I expect it's a shallow, but I hope still fair and accurate, understanding of Confucianism. I also expect none of this stuff is taught these days to young people, crippling their ability to understand others in the world.

    (Today I expect religion has no place in school, or time is spent learning about superficial stuff like holiday traditions and traditional costumes and foods rather than the meaningful aspects of the religion, warts and all – this last seems the trend with so called multiculturalism.)

    One question is whether Confucianism is more of a religion or a political ideology. Confucius seems more like Aristotle on politics than like, say, the Buddha.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Right. Properly understood, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism are philosophical schools of thought more so than religions, in my opinion. (They do not focus on theology.) Shinto is in an even more nebulous area....

    Perhaps readers who are actual practicioners can share expertise. Surely Mr. Derbyshire has thoughts on Confucianism and how the Chinese approach it in daily life.
    , @Veritatis
    Well, maybe we have to define "religion" first. From the Latin "re-ligare" religion is held to be the beliefs and practices related to transcendence and humanity that "hold together" a community.

    However, there is another definition which is useful. Religion are those organizing systems of belief that require "faith" in some of its ideas. That is, ideas that cannot be proven in the reality around us. In Catholicism for example, those articles of faith include the Trinity or the Inmaculate Conception, or the Real Presence.

    In Buddhism, there are plenty of articles of faith: that the soul exists, that it transmigrates, that Nirvana exists and that "illumination" is possible. So yes, Buddhism is a religion, which in fact was originally aimed at monastic orders, had a founding text (the Pali canon), councils that deliberated said text and a Constantine-like ruler that institutionalized its practice around 250 b.C. Buddha simply did not have the inclination/talent to answer the question of whether a God/gods existed, or why there is something instead of nothing. That is why people say it is an atheistic belief system.

    Under this definition, other organizing systems of belief such as Communism could be considered "religious" for they too require the individual to act on articles of faith: that private property can be abolished, that the engine of history is class struggle, etc.

    Confucianism was born in times of much internal strife, and I believe was more concerned with how to order society in a positive way, how to foster better individual conduct for better results, as well as some conceptions about the State . It lacks the transcendent or non immediate focus of religions, and does not propose articles of faith. It would thus have more in common with an ethics system.
    , @Bill P
    Confucius would see that question as a false dichotomy. Divination and ritual are both integral parts of the ideal Confucian state. The ruler is not only the temporal leader, but also the high priest. Conducting the rites and interceding on behalf of his people is his most important job, hence the Chinese concept of "mandate of heaven."

    This is why the Jesuits ultimately failed in China. For an emperor to accept the pope's authority in these matters he would have to cede his position as high priest, which by Chinese custom would effectively delegitimize his rule, and naturally emperors were unwilling to do so. It is also why rebellions - like the Taiping - that claim heaven's mandate are so dangerous and taken very seriously.

    The old temples still stand in Beijing. The Temple of Heaven is my favorite. I used to go there during Chinese festivals when all the Chinese were home with family. The huge bronze cauldrons and braziers in which the sacrifices were burnt allow one to imagine what a spectacle the rituals must have been.

    I expect that in the not too distant future the Chinese will again commence the old rituals, offer sacrifices and reestablish the traditional state religion, or some version of it. There will be a global religious revival if, as appears likely, we run into diminishing returns from science and secular philosophy, and I think that will be the Chinese response.
  91. @Randal
    This broad truth that you have referenced here interacts with another, which is that Chinese thinking in the mid-C20th was to some extent corrupted by the aggressively universalist ideology of that time, which was revolutionary communism.

    But today, Chinese elites seem to have largely reverted to type and mostly don't appear to be prey to any universalist ideology, much as with the Russian elites, whereas US elites are now largely prisoners of the aggressively universalist and destabilising ideology of modern times, which is perhaps best termed globalist democratism and is founded upon the dogmas of the modern US left - social liberalism, activism and interventionism, and internationalist anti-nationalism.

    This is why in the mid-late C20th I supported the US and my country's alliance with it, whereas today I regard the US as the primary menace to humanity and my country's alliance with it as a serious problem.

    Whether Trump will succeed in making any substantive changes to that situation remains to be seen. I suspect he lacks the power to do so.

    much as with the Russian elites

    Russian elites, and even the masses, tended to be super-philosophical. See Stoppard’s “Coast of Utopia” for the Russian tendency to philosophize everything.

    I noticed the same thing when I visited Russia in the early 2000s. I needed to place a phone call home, and every time some Russian’s suggestion for how I could do it failed, they never came up with a Plan B. Instead, they found the failure of their plans to be a welcome opportunity to philosophize about how human plans so often come to naught in this vail of tears, my friend.

    I finally explained my problem to a visiting Dutchman. He handed me his cell phone and then I sent him a check for the cost of the call.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal
    Perhaps that's why the French and Russians tend to get on well (minor details such as Napoleon and the Crimean War aside).

    A cynic might suggest it's just due to having a powerful common rival parked right between them, geographically speaking, but perhaps their shared tendency to take philosophising too seriously, over practical concerns and getting things done, also has something to do with it.

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.
    , @benjaminl
    https://books.google.com/books?id=KKZSBKO_QpEC&pg=PA114#v=onepage&q&f=false

    Every morning I called Aeroflot to ask about my suitcase. "Oh, it's you," sighed the clerk. "Yes, I have your request right here. Address: Yasnaya Polyana, Tolstoy's house. When we find the suitcase we will send it to you. In the meantime, are you familiar with our Russian phrase resignation of the soul?"
  92. @Opinionator
    "from exactly such prosecutions"

    What sort of prosecutions do you mean?

    I expect he means prosecutions meant to stifle political discourse, debate, dissent, and opposition. The same racket was done againat Wilders in the Netherlands. Every modern nation save America now criminlises saying Mean Things and objecting to being genocidally disposessed. It’s one Hell of a coup toward taking over the government to formalise the invaders’ rule.

    Read More
  93. @Stealth
    "value-driven leadership"

    Which means?

    The CIA installing governments friendly to globalist interests.

    Read More
  94. @Opinionator

    in line with humanity as a whole
     
    What does this mean?

    That most people around the world live in societies which favor nationalism and hierarchy more than western values of equality, freedom, etc. In that sense Chinese values are really more like human values.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Westerners are excessively fashion-oriented, Chinese are too conservative, so that when they decided it's time for a change they jump all the way to Maoism.
    , @Yan Shen
    I'm more inclined to adopt a clash of civilizations perspective on all of this. I believe Fukuyama's mistake in proclaiming the end of history was that he failed to appreciate the vast cultural differences among humanity's various peoples and simply assumed the Western European experience to be universal. He's obviously been backtracking since then.

    Trump is routinely vilified in the US media as a bigot and a xenophobe, but as I've stated, I see in his approach to issues such as immigration, foreign policy, and international economics a remarkably East Asian way of thinking. If Bill Clinton was facetiously referred to as the first African American president, might we also somewhat with tongue-in-cheek refer to Trump as the first East Asian American president? He seems awfully buddy buddy with Shinzo Abe, one of the few good international relationships hes managed to cultivate thus far. Contrast that with his interactions with the Australians or the Europeans, all who seem to despise him.

    I believe that Tiger Mother, admittedly a book which I've yet to read, was only the first Confucian salvo fired against the excesses of modern day liberalism in this country. But certainly it sparked a conversation that we hadn't quite yet had before in America, giving birth to the eponymous neologism.

    I suspect that other such shots will be fired, especially if and when the situation increasingly worsens. PC liberalism seems to me to be ill suited for the modern day global economy we find ourselves in, its misguided assumptions and inherent contradictions inimical to the well-being of a prosperous and long lasting society. We've heard on this blog and elsewhere for instance the dire predictions of a quadrupling of the population of sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2100. Already major cities in Europe like London and Paris scarcely resemble their European past. My belief is that as the West increasingly grapples with the contradictions of multicultural liberalism, the contrasting East Asian example will also correspondingly serve as a refutation of these widely held dogmas among today's PC elites. Laugh now, but in a few decades we may actually find that the legacy of Confucianism is the one thing that saves the West from itself.

    , @ben tillman

    That most people around the world live in societies which favor nationalism and hierarchy more than western values of equality, freedom, etc. In that sense Chinese values are really more like human values.
     
    There's plenty of hierarchy in the Western tradition, and it remains part of the conservative ideal.
  95. @Steve Sailer
    One question is whether Confucianism is more of a religion or a political ideology. Confucius seems more like Aristotle on politics than like, say, the Buddha.

    Right. Properly understood, Buddhism, Taoism, and Confucianism are philosophical schools of thought more so than religions, in my opinion. (They do not focus on theology.) Shinto is in an even more nebulous area….

    Perhaps readers who are actual practicioners can share expertise. Surely Mr. Derbyshire has thoughts on Confucianism and how the Chinese approach it in daily life.

    Read More
  96. @Randal
    This broad truth that you have referenced here interacts with another, which is that Chinese thinking in the mid-C20th was to some extent corrupted by the aggressively universalist ideology of that time, which was revolutionary communism.

    But today, Chinese elites seem to have largely reverted to type and mostly don't appear to be prey to any universalist ideology, much as with the Russian elites, whereas US elites are now largely prisoners of the aggressively universalist and destabilising ideology of modern times, which is perhaps best termed globalist democratism and is founded upon the dogmas of the modern US left - social liberalism, activism and interventionism, and internationalist anti-nationalism.

    This is why in the mid-late C20th I supported the US and my country's alliance with it, whereas today I regard the US as the primary menace to humanity and my country's alliance with it as a serious problem.

    Whether Trump will succeed in making any substantive changes to that situation remains to be seen. I suspect he lacks the power to do so.

    That is a good stance to take. The new battlelines are now drawn between the postmodern left, and the rest of humanity, and these factions extend beyond borders.

    Too many nationalists are still fighting with nationalists from next door over yesterday’s grudges.

    Read More
    • Agree: Kyle McKenna
    • Replies: @Randal
    I agree. That's why imo Trump, Le Pen, Farage etc are all "the good guys" as far as I'm concerned.
    , @Desiderius
    Rivalry is a constant, not yesterday's grudge. Better to encourage healthy means for its expression than to pretend it away.
  97. @guest
    I'd tend to think of the quintessential Deep Stater as being a WASP. Can a Mormon be a WASP? They've historically been treated more like Scientologists than just another sort of protestant.

    Then again, I'm out of touch. I've heard lately of intelligence being jam-packed with Mormons, but I can't think their roots are that deep.

    Then again, I’m out of touch. I’ve heard lately of intelligence being jam-packed with Mormons, but I can’t think their roots are that deep.

    The missions they go on tend to foster language skills. Their religion also prioritizes education and promotes clean living (i.e., no drugs, alcohol, or extra-marital sex). That leaves fewer issues to come up for security clearances. The FBI for years has been a “Mormon mafia” (supposedly something like one-fifth of FBI hires are Mormons).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Perhaps the lack of wisdom among the ruling class is due to a lack of the mistakes that engender it.
  98. @Jason Liu
    That most people around the world live in societies which favor nationalism and hierarchy more than western values of equality, freedom, etc. In that sense Chinese values are really more like human values.

    Westerners are excessively fashion-oriented, Chinese are too conservative, so that when they decided it’s time for a change they jump all the way to Maoism.

    Read More
  99. @Steve Sailer
    much as with the Russian elites

    Russian elites, and even the masses, tended to be super-philosophical. See Stoppard's "Coast of Utopia" for the Russian tendency to philosophize everything.

    I noticed the same thing when I visited Russia in the early 2000s. I needed to place a phone call home, and every time some Russian's suggestion for how I could do it failed, they never came up with a Plan B. Instead, they found the failure of their plans to be a welcome opportunity to philosophize about how human plans so often come to naught in this vail of tears, my friend.

    I finally explained my problem to a visiting Dutchman. He handed me his cell phone and then I sent him a check for the cost of the call.

    Perhaps that’s why the French and Russians tend to get on well (minor details such as Napoleon and the Crimean War aside).

    A cynic might suggest it’s just due to having a powerful common rival parked right between them, geographically speaking, but perhaps their shared tendency to take philosophising too seriously, over practical concerns and getting things done, also has something to do with it.

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Perhaps that’s why the French and Russians tend to get on well (minor details such as Napoleon and the Crimean War aside).
     
    That and Peter coming along during a period of French ascendancy.
    , @Mr. Anon

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.
     
    One could argue that the most disruptive revolution was the American revolution. And perhaps, from the vantage point of later history, not in a good way either.
  100. @Jason Liu
    That is a good stance to take. The new battlelines are now drawn between the postmodern left, and the rest of humanity, and these factions extend beyond borders.

    Too many nationalists are still fighting with nationalists from next door over yesterday's grudges.

    I agree. That’s why imo Trump, Le Pen, Farage etc are all “the good guys” as far as I’m concerned.

    Read More
  101. @Jason Liu
    That most people around the world live in societies which favor nationalism and hierarchy more than western values of equality, freedom, etc. In that sense Chinese values are really more like human values.

    I’m more inclined to adopt a clash of civilizations perspective on all of this. I believe Fukuyama’s mistake in proclaiming the end of history was that he failed to appreciate the vast cultural differences among humanity’s various peoples and simply assumed the Western European experience to be universal. He’s obviously been backtracking since then.

    Trump is routinely vilified in the US media as a bigot and a xenophobe, but as I’ve stated, I see in his approach to issues such as immigration, foreign policy, and international economics a remarkably East Asian way of thinking. If Bill Clinton was facetiously referred to as the first African American president, might we also somewhat with tongue-in-cheek refer to Trump as the first East Asian American president? He seems awfully buddy buddy with Shinzo Abe, one of the few good international relationships hes managed to cultivate thus far. Contrast that with his interactions with the Australians or the Europeans, all who seem to despise him.

    I believe that Tiger Mother, admittedly a book which I’ve yet to read, was only the first Confucian salvo fired against the excesses of modern day liberalism in this country. But certainly it sparked a conversation that we hadn’t quite yet had before in America, giving birth to the eponymous neologism.

    I suspect that other such shots will be fired, especially if and when the situation increasingly worsens. PC liberalism seems to me to be ill suited for the modern day global economy we find ourselves in, its misguided assumptions and inherent contradictions inimical to the well-being of a prosperous and long lasting society. We’ve heard on this blog and elsewhere for instance the dire predictions of a quadrupling of the population of sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2100. Already major cities in Europe like London and Paris scarcely resemble their European past. My belief is that as the West increasingly grapples with the contradictions of multicultural liberalism, the contrasting East Asian example will also correspondingly serve as a refutation of these widely held dogmas among today’s PC elites. Laugh now, but in a few decades we may actually find that the legacy of Confucianism is the one thing that saves the West from itself.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jason Liu
    Perhaps, although I'm not sure it would be due to Confucianism. I think Asian values of communalism, nationalism, and social roles go far deeper than Confucius, and could well be an inborn biological trait. It's probably not even unique to Asians.

    If HBD is as significant as some here believe, then it may be that whites are innately attracted to individualism, contrarianism, guilt and abstract ideological extremism (like "equality" above all things). Therefore their demographic demise is baked into their genes. Any resisters would not be numerous enough to overcome the inborn tendencies of their entire race, and thus nothing the outside world does will fix PC liberalism among whites.

    However, as far as ideology goes, I notice a striking similarity between so-called "Neoreactionary" thought and the classic Chinese doctrine of Legalism. In fact, Neoreactionaries like Nick Land seem to harbor some legalistic ideas due to his years in China and his admiration for Lee Kuan Yew, although it doesn't sound like he's aware of their legalist roots.

    I think Confucianism is seen as stuffy and and old-fashioned and unlikely to be adopted by westerners, although one could certainly promote "traditionalism" among them. Personally I favor the legalism of Shen Buhai as the alternative to liberal democracy that's most compatible with western mentalities, due to its strong meritocracy. Just don't mention its Chinese origins too much and they might accept it.
    , @Kyle McKenna

    Laugh now, but in a few decades we may actually find that the legacy of Confucianism is the one thing that saves the West from itself.
     
    All of your (genuinely thoughtful) remarks seem many years too late. Not that you yourself are late, but that any such awakening will be long after the fact. The 'multi-culturalists' have been expert at taking a leaf from the Israeli playbook about 'Facts on the Ground' and 'Demography is Destiny'.

    Even if third-world immigration to the USA were stopped tomorrow, it would be too late. The numbers + their fecundity would assure it.

    Hence, it doesn't just need stopping.
    It needs reversing.

  102. mcmuffin’s vision: mexican underclass clicking on LDS sponsored content all day; ruled over by gay mormon cia elite. tacos only legal food. – MrDickHollywood

    Read More
  103. Look on the bright side. If this dodgy-looking 40-year-old bachelor with two mommies is the best white shill the open-borders globalists can come up with, they must be getting desperate.

    Read More
  104. @Jeremy Cooper
    McMullin is a strange guy, like he was created in some lab to be the perfect globalist. A "conservative" that manages never to say a single thing that angers the left. 40 year old Mormon that's never been married, indicating he's a virgin. Actually quite strange, as Mormons are encouraged to marry young and are able to do so if they're decent providers. So what's his deal? Conveniently popped up out of nowhere, agreeing with the deep state on every single issue, right when they were hoping that someone could come along, split the conservative vote and keep Trump from winning.

    Something strange is going on here. Surprising that no internet sleuths have looked into this.

    McMullin claims his mother’s family fled Poland to escape the Nazis.
    Thus I suspect that McMullin is Irish in the way that Country Joe McDonald (of Country Joe and the Fish) was: Jewish (and Leftist) on his mother’s side. That would explain a lot.

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  105. @Jefferson
    "Does anyone know what Walter Mondale,"

    Walter Mondale is still alive? He must be 200 years old by now, after all he already had a shit load of gray hair all the way back in 1984 and that was a whopping 33 years ago.

    Well Jimmy Carter and his wife are still alive, so why not?

    Mondale is 89, but his daughter died at 51

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  106. @Olorin
    Egg is dogwhistling an r/The_Donald (subreddit) anagram:

    it's groovy, centipedes!

    Egg is dogwhistling an r/The_Donald (subreddit) anagram:

    it’s groovy, centipedes!

    You blew my mind there.

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  107. McMullin seems to have let the alt right twitter trolling get inside his capacious head.

    He started out as the (second or third choice) true conservative to rescue the GOP from any chance of winning in 2016, then turned to become the caricature antithesis of Trump. He’s just bizarre in every way – leaving aside his resemblance to the aliens in Mars Attacks – now refuting age old verities about the United States. That’s how you get to despotism = leaving other nations to decide their own affairs when there is no vital U.S. interest at stake.

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  108. @Yan Shen
    I'm more inclined to adopt a clash of civilizations perspective on all of this. I believe Fukuyama's mistake in proclaiming the end of history was that he failed to appreciate the vast cultural differences among humanity's various peoples and simply assumed the Western European experience to be universal. He's obviously been backtracking since then.

    Trump is routinely vilified in the US media as a bigot and a xenophobe, but as I've stated, I see in his approach to issues such as immigration, foreign policy, and international economics a remarkably East Asian way of thinking. If Bill Clinton was facetiously referred to as the first African American president, might we also somewhat with tongue-in-cheek refer to Trump as the first East Asian American president? He seems awfully buddy buddy with Shinzo Abe, one of the few good international relationships hes managed to cultivate thus far. Contrast that with his interactions with the Australians or the Europeans, all who seem to despise him.

    I believe that Tiger Mother, admittedly a book which I've yet to read, was only the first Confucian salvo fired against the excesses of modern day liberalism in this country. But certainly it sparked a conversation that we hadn't quite yet had before in America, giving birth to the eponymous neologism.

    I suspect that other such shots will be fired, especially if and when the situation increasingly worsens. PC liberalism seems to me to be ill suited for the modern day global economy we find ourselves in, its misguided assumptions and inherent contradictions inimical to the well-being of a prosperous and long lasting society. We've heard on this blog and elsewhere for instance the dire predictions of a quadrupling of the population of sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2100. Already major cities in Europe like London and Paris scarcely resemble their European past. My belief is that as the West increasingly grapples with the contradictions of multicultural liberalism, the contrasting East Asian example will also correspondingly serve as a refutation of these widely held dogmas among today's PC elites. Laugh now, but in a few decades we may actually find that the legacy of Confucianism is the one thing that saves the West from itself.

    Perhaps, although I’m not sure it would be due to Confucianism. I think Asian values of communalism, nationalism, and social roles go far deeper than Confucius, and could well be an inborn biological trait. It’s probably not even unique to Asians.

    If HBD is as significant as some here believe, then it may be that whites are innately attracted to individualism, contrarianism, guilt and abstract ideological extremism (like “equality” above all things). Therefore their demographic demise is baked into their genes. Any resisters would not be numerous enough to overcome the inborn tendencies of their entire race, and thus nothing the outside world does will fix PC liberalism among whites.

    However, as far as ideology goes, I notice a striking similarity between so-called “Neoreactionary” thought and the classic Chinese doctrine of Legalism. In fact, Neoreactionaries like Nick Land seem to harbor some legalistic ideas due to his years in China and his admiration for Lee Kuan Yew, although it doesn’t sound like he’s aware of their legalist roots.

    I think Confucianism is seen as stuffy and and old-fashioned and unlikely to be adopted by westerners, although one could certainly promote “traditionalism” among them. Personally I favor the legalism of Shen Buhai as the alternative to liberal democracy that’s most compatible with western mentalities, due to its strong meritocracy. Just don’t mention its Chinese origins too much and they might accept it.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    "I think Asian values of communalism, nationalism, and social roles go far deeper than Confucius"

    Ditto. The common Westerner doesn't really hear much about traditional values anymore; aside from churches using the word "family" in contexts of varying veracity, he got the message long ago that "God, family, nation, values" are items either to be raspberried or cant words for his dispossession (e.g., neocon conception of "national" interest, "values" devolving on antiracism/nation of immigrants/open borders, etc.).

    To read about Confucian thinking can be a bit disorienting (disoccidenting?) to us (although I assume that our commoners of 100 years ago would have recognized better what the Confucian tradition taught regarding family/state). The real trouble is, we are so wrecked (socially as well as educationally) that the students of Confucius might as well have been describing an alien planet as far as we are concerned.

    Is it our DNA? I have to go with nurture over nature on this one. We, too, once had traditional societies; and the China of Mao wasn't especially traditional. We've been pozzed.
  109. @Chrisnonymous
    He's referring to Russia, I think. By "value-driven leadership" he means not respecting the sovereignty of a nation if it has "leadership we don't like", i.e., "despotism". I take the "for" in his sentence to be poor writing. Otherwise, he's crazy

    I henceforth demand the right to engage in "value-driven investing".

    "Value-driven bla blah blah": another example of the way in which "business English" represents a kind of Orwellian manipulation of the language.

    I prefer vacuous gas-baggery, but I think you’re spot-on!

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  110. @Jokah Macpherson
    How dare he respect the right of all nations to chart their own path! Doesn't he know that the United States should chart it for them instead?

    McMuffin wants the US to be a home for all potential Mormons, even the intergalactic ones…

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  111. @JerseyGuy
    I've said it before. I would actually prefer to be governed by Jeb Bush over Evan McMullin.

    McMullin seems to have taken True Conservatism to an autistic level. He is insane.

    By the way, Mark Steyn had his show cancelled by CRTV. He is suing them. Wonder what happened? Hopefully it wasn't because he mentioned your name on his show? ;)

    It’s really hard to take McMullin seriously. He is straight out of central casting.

    He is either ethnic Scottish or Irish? What has happened to my Celts?

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  112. @guest
    I'm used to elite-speak, neo-con-speak, and political folderol, but McMuffin lost me. That's happening with greater frequency lately. The likes of David Brooks, Bill Kristol, etc. are going in for what I've characterized as Symbolist poetry. But what is this? What is he even saying? Let's parse.

    Putinspeak. I'll let them have their evil talisman. What is it Trump said that resembles things Putin has said? Nevermind. So long as what Trump said was bad, it's putinesque, because Putin stands for everything bad in the world.

    So what did Trump say? Well, whatever it is, it's not driven by "values," and has something to do with "despotic sovereignty." Is it despotic because it's not driven by "values?" Or is there something inherently despotic about sovereignty itself? Are Americans in good standing allowed to question sovereignty these days?

    Go ahead and take it for granted that Trump is a despot: possessed of great power which he misuses for malign purposes. How is his despotism manifesting itself here, specifically? Apart from not being driven by values and having something to do with sovereignty. Well, Trump wants to represent the U.S., not the world. That's it. Such is what set Egg McMuffin off about Putin and despotism.

    Which is odd for Trump to say, admittedly, given he's the recently elected Emperor of the World. Wait a sec...there's no such thing as world emperor, is there? That's right, my mistake. Trump was elected president of a particular nation, coincidentally the nation he said he wanted to represent. Don't that just scream "despot?"

    By the way, what values are supposed to be driving Trump, presumably in the opposite direction from solely representing the country of which he is president? Those enumerated in the Zeroth Amendment, perhaps? Invade the World/Invite the World?

    It actually does sound as if Egg McMuffin doesn't believe in sovereignty. Or maybe he just disbelieves in any sovereignty but that of a One World State.

    The mask is off. Can you even imagine people supposedly on the right openly talking like this before the Trump campaign got off the ground, let alone, say. 10 years ago?

    The lynchpin of American Empire is the belief among its advocates (and beneficiaries, but I repeat myself) that they constitute an elect uniquely suited to rule, and that the world would tumble into chaos and war without them in charge.

    What makes them uniquely suited? Their values. Which values? Principally nonjudgmentalism (stop laughing) and deracination.

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    • Replies: @guest
    I would expand American to Anglo-American empire, because they learned a lot from Mother.

    Non-judgmentalism? I don't know. I blame Puritanism (that's one of my hobbies), and it has a reputation for judgment. (What about certain other, parenthetical people? I'm too tired to speak or even think about them right now.) Our ruling class is extremely judgemental, in my opinion. It just doesn't seem that way because they induce you to take their judgements for granted.

  113. @Randal
    Perhaps that's why the French and Russians tend to get on well (minor details such as Napoleon and the Crimean War aside).

    A cynic might suggest it's just due to having a powerful common rival parked right between them, geographically speaking, but perhaps their shared tendency to take philosophising too seriously, over practical concerns and getting things done, also has something to do with it.

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.

    Perhaps that’s why the French and Russians tend to get on well (minor details such as Napoleon and the Crimean War aside).

    That and Peter coming along during a period of French ascendancy.

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  114. @Thomas

    Then again, I’m out of touch. I’ve heard lately of intelligence being jam-packed with Mormons, but I can’t think their roots are that deep.
     
    The missions they go on tend to foster language skills. Their religion also prioritizes education and promotes clean living (i.e., no drugs, alcohol, or extra-marital sex). That leaves fewer issues to come up for security clearances. The FBI for years has been a "Mormon mafia" (supposedly something like one-fifth of FBI hires are Mormons).

    Perhaps the lack of wisdom among the ruling class is due to a lack of the mistakes that engender it.

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  115. @Jason Liu
    That is a good stance to take. The new battlelines are now drawn between the postmodern left, and the rest of humanity, and these factions extend beyond borders.

    Too many nationalists are still fighting with nationalists from next door over yesterday's grudges.

    Rivalry is a constant, not yesterday’s grudge. Better to encourage healthy means for its expression than to pretend it away.

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  116. The right is talking more openly about the reality of race and culture, and the left is talking more openly about the desire for open borders and the destruction of sovereignty. This is a good thing.

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  117. @snorlax
    OT: Bad news; CNN reporting "federal investigators" (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he "failed to disclose" ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    I think Trump had a number of grievances with Flynn, and this was just the last straw. I believe Trump felt he was misled by Flynn on various things, such as the elevation of Bannon to the NSC. He is much more in tune with Sessions. This is just another kerfuffle caused by the media. In the end, I think a lot of Trump’s enemies will be in court.

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  118. @Randal
    This broad truth that you have referenced here interacts with another, which is that Chinese thinking in the mid-C20th was to some extent corrupted by the aggressively universalist ideology of that time, which was revolutionary communism.

    But today, Chinese elites seem to have largely reverted to type and mostly don't appear to be prey to any universalist ideology, much as with the Russian elites, whereas US elites are now largely prisoners of the aggressively universalist and destabilising ideology of modern times, which is perhaps best termed globalist democratism and is founded upon the dogmas of the modern US left - social liberalism, activism and interventionism, and internationalist anti-nationalism.

    This is why in the mid-late C20th I supported the US and my country's alliance with it, whereas today I regard the US as the primary menace to humanity and my country's alliance with it as a serious problem.

    Whether Trump will succeed in making any substantive changes to that situation remains to be seen. I suspect he lacks the power to do so.

    Whether Trump will succeed in making any substantive changes to that situation remains to be seen. I suspect he lacks the power to do so.

    That’s the nut. It’s why many Western world leaders “seem to” despise Trump. They’re waiting to see whether the coast is clear – i.e. whether he’s really in charge or whether the deep state that’s also kept them under the boot is.

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  119. @Anonym
    Utah is the only majority Mormon state on the planet and Evan McMullin still lost Utah to the Non Mormon Donald J. Trump. Evan McMullin is a pathetic loser.

    Trump is more authentically Mormon than Power Bottom Egg McMuffin. He has more wives and children, that's for sure.

    I would not be surprised if McMuffin had some personal, sexual reason for wanting to keep up the flow of migrants.

    Trump is more authentically Mormon than Power Bottom Egg McMuffin.

    Okay, now there’s a phrase I never thought I’d read, much less at the UR. Salut

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  120. @Achmed E. Newman
    I understand that you lumped Mr. Perot in that crowd because they were all on the losing side of presidential elections, Mr. Authchthon, but I really wish we could hear from Ross Perot, and especially about Trump.

    Ross Perot was a real patriot and it was a shame that he was coerced, blackmailed, who-knows into dropping out of the race in 1992. He got back in and got a significant portion of the vote, ushering in the Clinton dynasty, if you recall this history. However, the drop-out/re-up thing seemed flaky behavior at the time to us voters. Ross Perot was a earlier and better version of Donald Trump in my opinion.

    How come you don't hear anything like a comparison between these 2 guys? Oh, I understand the LP would want no part of it, but how about some bloggers? I think it would be very interesting.

    You raise some excellent points here. I supported Perot in 1992 but I haven’t really thought too much (until now) about how the world might be different had he not been in the race. Sad to say, our two-party monster relegates any and all third-party efforts to the status of spoilers, at best.

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  121. @War for Blair Mountain
    Ben Tillman

    Don't quote the Python's anymore. Eric Idle and Terry Gilliam want war with Christian Russia. Graham Chapman was a known pedophile.

    I think I am only among a dozen or so people on the Planet to hear Terry Jones give a lecture....front row seat actually...on "Who murdered Chaucer"

    The Pythons have had to do a lot of backing-and-filling, given that Flying Circus was probably the most ‘incorrect’ show ever to air.

    Eric Idle and Terry Gilliam were always the dumbest Pythons, so what they say isn’t so important. Your slur against Graham Chapman remains–shall we say–unproven, though I wouldn’t stake big money on it either way.

    Suffice to say, we’ll continue quoting them so long as they continue to be genius, which will be roughly forever. Now make yourself useful and remove the laugh tracks from those old shows. They’re very irritating.

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  122. My suspicion is that McMuffin is jockeying for Orrin Hatch’s seat when that clown finally gets carried out on a stretcher or in a bad bag.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon

    My suspicion is that McMuffin is jockeying for Orrin Hatch’s seat when that clown finally gets carried out on a stretcher or in a bad bag.
     
    I was surprised to learn recently that Orrin Hatch was 1.) still alive, and 2.) still in the Senate. And I was surprised in that order.

    He used to be ubiquitous on TV, but now seems to be rarely seen.
  123. @Yan Shen
    I'm more inclined to adopt a clash of civilizations perspective on all of this. I believe Fukuyama's mistake in proclaiming the end of history was that he failed to appreciate the vast cultural differences among humanity's various peoples and simply assumed the Western European experience to be universal. He's obviously been backtracking since then.

    Trump is routinely vilified in the US media as a bigot and a xenophobe, but as I've stated, I see in his approach to issues such as immigration, foreign policy, and international economics a remarkably East Asian way of thinking. If Bill Clinton was facetiously referred to as the first African American president, might we also somewhat with tongue-in-cheek refer to Trump as the first East Asian American president? He seems awfully buddy buddy with Shinzo Abe, one of the few good international relationships hes managed to cultivate thus far. Contrast that with his interactions with the Australians or the Europeans, all who seem to despise him.

    I believe that Tiger Mother, admittedly a book which I've yet to read, was only the first Confucian salvo fired against the excesses of modern day liberalism in this country. But certainly it sparked a conversation that we hadn't quite yet had before in America, giving birth to the eponymous neologism.

    I suspect that other such shots will be fired, especially if and when the situation increasingly worsens. PC liberalism seems to me to be ill suited for the modern day global economy we find ourselves in, its misguided assumptions and inherent contradictions inimical to the well-being of a prosperous and long lasting society. We've heard on this blog and elsewhere for instance the dire predictions of a quadrupling of the population of sub-Saharan Africa by the year 2100. Already major cities in Europe like London and Paris scarcely resemble their European past. My belief is that as the West increasingly grapples with the contradictions of multicultural liberalism, the contrasting East Asian example will also correspondingly serve as a refutation of these widely held dogmas among today's PC elites. Laugh now, but in a few decades we may actually find that the legacy of Confucianism is the one thing that saves the West from itself.

    Laugh now, but in a few decades we may actually find that the legacy of Confucianism is the one thing that saves the West from itself.

    All of your (genuinely thoughtful) remarks seem many years too late. Not that you yourself are late, but that any such awakening will be long after the fact. The ‘multi-culturalists’ have been expert at taking a leaf from the Israeli playbook about ‘Facts on the Ground’ and ‘Demography is Destiny’.

    Even if third-world immigration to the USA were stopped tomorrow, it would be too late. The numbers + their fecundity would assure it.

    Hence, it doesn’t just need stopping.
    It needs reversing.

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  124. @Randal
    Perhaps that's why the French and Russians tend to get on well (minor details such as Napoleon and the Crimean War aside).

    A cynic might suggest it's just due to having a powerful common rival parked right between them, geographically speaking, but perhaps their shared tendency to take philosophising too seriously, over practical concerns and getting things done, also has something to do with it.

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.

    One could argue that the most disruptive revolution was the American revolution. And perhaps, from the vantage point of later history, not in a good way either.

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    • Replies: @LondonBob
    It was the American War of Independence, never understood when or why the appellation revolution got attached. What was revolutionary about it?
    , @Randal
    I tend to class the American independence war as a secessionist war representing just a change of control from imperial elites to local elites, rather than a revolution in which the elites are actually overthrown by other groups. Clearly it had some influence on the French revolution, both in terms of inspiration and costs to the French regime, but really the ideologies at work there were partly common to both, rather than being derived from US thinking.

    But certainly given the sheer power of the US later, it changed a lot, so in that sense there's a case to be made for it being disruptive.

  125. @Wilkey
    My suspicion is that McMuffin is jockeying for Orrin Hatch's seat when that clown finally gets carried out on a stretcher or in a bad bag.

    My suspicion is that McMuffin is jockeying for Orrin Hatch’s seat when that clown finally gets carried out on a stretcher or in a bad bag.

    I was surprised to learn recently that Orrin Hatch was 1.) still alive, and 2.) still in the Senate. And I was surprised in that order.

    He used to be ubiquitous on TV, but now seems to be rarely seen.

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    • Replies: @Wilkey
    When Hatch ran for re-election back in 2012 he all but promised it would be his last term. Of course he's suggested his next term would be his last a few times before, and he's broken promises before.

    His increasing scarcity on the teevee newscasts suggests that his health ain't great and he may actually be ready to hang it up, but I wouldn't put it past him to want to try to break records for length of Senate service and for oldest senator. To break the latter record he'd have to serve almost 3 more terms - until 2034. If he does stay that long he will be 100-years-old and have spent 68 years in the Senate. I don't see that happening, but who knows?
  126. @Kyle a
    No vagina outside the continental United States?

    I’m sure there’s some kind of network for expatriate Mormons seeking spouses.

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    • Replies: @Lugash
    Going by personal interactions with Mormons(I live in a heavily Mormon area) there aren't that many expatriate Mormons, and they don't have much interest in the exotic or foreign, despite their exposure to foreign cultures. They do their mission as an obligation, come home, and put the experience on the shelf.
  127. @guest
    I think most people assume he's a homo, not a virgin. I suppose he could be a virgin homo, but that's a strange combination these days.

    These Late Days Mormosexuals are hand-picked for being ideology -fluid and co-patriotic oriented creatures.

    And then, there is Lindsey too.

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  128. @syonredux

    European Union legislators have “overwhelmingly” voted to lift the EU parliamentary immunity of French presidential candidate Marine Le Pen for tweeting pictures of Isis violence.

    Ms Le Pen, a member of the European parliament, is under investigation in France for posting three graphic images of Isis executions on Twitter in 2015, including the beheading of the United States journalist James Foley.

    Responding to a request from the French judiciary, the EU MEPs in the legal affairs committee voted to lift her immunity, EU officials said. The committee's decision will have to be backed by the whole parliament in a second vote, possibly this week.
    Ms Le Pen's immunity shields her from prosecution and lifting it would permit legal action against her. The offence being considered is “publishing violent images,” which under certain circumstances can carry a penalty of three years in prison and a fine of €75,000 (£64,000).
     
    http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/european-union-vote-lift-marine-le-pen-immunity-tweet-isis-violence-a7604506.html

    French politics are the most evolved. In other democracies, the best candidate is supposed to win. In France, the one not formally charged is the winner.

    http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/world/2017/03/01/french-presidential-candidate-francois-fillon-wont-surrender-despite-pending-charges/98571932/

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  129. For instance, China’s affair towards engaging with Africa has been almost entirely economic, with none of the usual Western haranguing of the native governments about the importance of democratic governance, etc.

    You’re lucky you aren’t White, Yan. Talk like that can get a White spurned. I mean, what is the point of leftism, if you’re not going to use it as an excuse to invade, invite, oppress, or remake someone? That would be like leftism, without a boot stamping forever on a White face – pointless!

    Sessions said that he didn’t meet with the Russians to discuss the campaign. Unless the Democrats (and Lindsay Graham) can prove that Sessions was talking with the Russians specifically about the campaign, it’s not technically perjury.

    Just using the language as you’ve presented it, but, even if Sessions met with the Russians and discussed the campaign, that doesn’t mean they met to discuss the campaign.

    In a word, it means ‘independence’.

    Right. And any independence that doesn’t increase “Diversity” is despotic.

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  130. Of course, if you called Israel “despotic” within earshot of McMuffin, his heart would probably explode.

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  131. Evan McMullin is perfectly representative of the evil treason that permeates the Deep State of the American Empire.

    Evan McMullin is evil. It is very difficult to root out evil. President Trump must begin mass firings of all Deep State government workers. You can’t reason with them; you must fire them and sever any contacts they have in the US national security state.

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  132. @Steve Sailer
    One question is whether Confucianism is more of a religion or a political ideology. Confucius seems more like Aristotle on politics than like, say, the Buddha.

    Well, maybe we have to define “religion” first. From the Latin “re-ligare” religion is held to be the beliefs and practices related to transcendence and humanity that “hold together” a community.

    However, there is another definition which is useful. Religion are those organizing systems of belief that require “faith” in some of its ideas. That is, ideas that cannot be proven in the reality around us. In Catholicism for example, those articles of faith include the Trinity or the Inmaculate Conception, or the Real Presence.

    In Buddhism, there are plenty of articles of faith: that the soul exists, that it transmigrates, that Nirvana exists and that “illumination” is possible. So yes, Buddhism is a religion, which in fact was originally aimed at monastic orders, had a founding text (the Pali canon), councils that deliberated said text and a Constantine-like ruler that institutionalized its practice around 250 b.C. Buddha simply did not have the inclination/talent to answer the question of whether a God/gods existed, or why there is something instead of nothing. That is why people say it is an atheistic belief system.

    Under this definition, other organizing systems of belief such as Communism could be considered “religious” for they too require the individual to act on articles of faith: that private property can be abolished, that the engine of history is class struggle, etc.

    Confucianism was born in times of much internal strife, and I believe was more concerned with how to order society in a positive way, how to foster better individual conduct for better results, as well as some conceptions about the State . It lacks the transcendent or non immediate focus of religions, and does not propose articles of faith. It would thus have more in common with an ethics system.

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  133. @Kyle a
    No vagina outside the continental United States?

    If course, but observant Mormon men don’t partake. It’s hard to understand in modern America, but Mormons take their values seriously.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Mormons take their values seriously
     
    Seriously enough to overthrow a non-values-driven government?
  134. @Rob McX
    I'm sure there's some kind of network for expatriate Mormons seeking spouses.

    Going by personal interactions with Mormons(I live in a heavily Mormon area) there aren’t that many expatriate Mormons, and they don’t have much interest in the exotic or foreign, despite their exposure to foreign cultures. They do their mission as an obligation, come home, and put the experience on the shelf.

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    • Replies: @27 year old
    >Mormons, and they don’t have much interest in the exotic or foreign, despite their exposure to foreign cultures

    Despite? Or because of?
  135. @Lugash
    Going by personal interactions with Mormons(I live in a heavily Mormon area) there aren't that many expatriate Mormons, and they don't have much interest in the exotic or foreign, despite their exposure to foreign cultures. They do their mission as an obligation, come home, and put the experience on the shelf.

    >Mormons, and they don’t have much interest in the exotic or foreign, despite their exposure to foreign cultures

    Despite? Or because of?

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  136. @Lugash
    If course, but observant Mormon men don't partake. It's hard to understand in modern America, but Mormons take their values seriously.

    Mormons take their values seriously

    Seriously enough to overthrow a non-values-driven government?

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  137. @Steve Sailer
    much as with the Russian elites

    Russian elites, and even the masses, tended to be super-philosophical. See Stoppard's "Coast of Utopia" for the Russian tendency to philosophize everything.

    I noticed the same thing when I visited Russia in the early 2000s. I needed to place a phone call home, and every time some Russian's suggestion for how I could do it failed, they never came up with a Plan B. Instead, they found the failure of their plans to be a welcome opportunity to philosophize about how human plans so often come to naught in this vail of tears, my friend.

    I finally explained my problem to a visiting Dutchman. He handed me his cell phone and then I sent him a check for the cost of the call.

    https://books.google.com/books?id=KKZSBKO_QpEC&pg=PA114#v=onepage&q&f=false

    Every morning I called Aeroflot to ask about my suitcase. “Oh, it’s you,” sighed the clerk. “Yes, I have your request right here. Address: Yasnaya Polyana, Tolstoy’s house. When we find the suitcase we will send it to you. In the meantime, are you familiar with our Russian phrase resignation of the soul?”

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  138. @Steve Sailer
    One question is whether Confucianism is more of a religion or a political ideology. Confucius seems more like Aristotle on politics than like, say, the Buddha.

    Confucius would see that question as a false dichotomy. Divination and ritual are both integral parts of the ideal Confucian state. The ruler is not only the temporal leader, but also the high priest. Conducting the rites and interceding on behalf of his people is his most important job, hence the Chinese concept of “mandate of heaven.”

    This is why the Jesuits ultimately failed in China. For an emperor to accept the pope’s authority in these matters he would have to cede his position as high priest, which by Chinese custom would effectively delegitimize his rule, and naturally emperors were unwilling to do so. It is also why rebellions – like the Taiping – that claim heaven’s mandate are so dangerous and taken very seriously.

    The old temples still stand in Beijing. The Temple of Heaven is my favorite. I used to go there during Chinese festivals when all the Chinese were home with family. The huge bronze cauldrons and braziers in which the sacrifices were burnt allow one to imagine what a spectacle the rituals must have been.

    I expect that in the not too distant future the Chinese will again commence the old rituals, offer sacrifices and reestablish the traditional state religion, or some version of it. There will be a global religious revival if, as appears likely, we run into diminishing returns from science and secular philosophy, and I think that will be the Chinese response.

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  139. @Mr. Anon

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.
     
    One could argue that the most disruptive revolution was the American revolution. And perhaps, from the vantage point of later history, not in a good way either.

    It was the American War of Independence, never understood when or why the appellation revolution got attached. What was revolutionary about it?

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    • Replies: @guest
    "What was revolutionary about it."

    Ask the Tories.
    , @va-con
    One might argue that it was a conservative revolution, but secession works too. The colonists fought for true English liberty. Same for the Confederacy.
  140. @reiner Tor
    Yes, as I wrote elsewhere, a strong leader usually defends his stupid subordinate, and then gets rid of him later, after the storm has passed. That way he can show he's such a strong leader that he can afford to protect the most inept (corrupt, etc.) of his subordinates, while not actually retaining them for long. It also shows him to be loyal to his followers, however stupid they might be. By protecting a stupid subordinate the leader signals that his first instinct is to stand by his subordinates no matter what (and yell at them only behind closed doors), which in turn will make his followers more loyal.

    He could've (and probably should've) fired Flynn a few months later, long after the controversy has died down. This would also have been important, to signal to the same subordinates that being stupid is not advisable. (I'm assuming Flynn really was stupid, as seemed to be the case. I'm not totally sure, though.)

    And now Sessions is reclusing himself from the investigations. Trump is looking weaker and weaker. What will happen if they find something? They haven’t found anything so far, but it’s almost as if two members of his administration have already been found guilty. Do they really need a crime for an impeachment (which both parties crave)?

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    • Replies: @Randal

    Do they really need a crime for an impeachment (which both parties crave)?
     
    No, they need a "crime", combined with insufficient popular support for the president from voters for Senators and Congressmen of his own party not to fear the backlash of voting for impeachment. Obviously the closer the "crime" is to an actual crime, the less danger of a backlash for the betrayers.

    It's a political process, in reality, as I suppose it must be.

    Still too soon imo for more than a few of the worst, most open traitors amongst elected Republicans (the likes of McCain) to openly vote for an impeachment.
  141. I believe, following a CIA-defending shill who accused me of being a Russian on the grounds that my word choice “revealed Russian language structures,” that this is the real basis to the Trump-Putin fantasy. Their “evidence” is coincidental overlap of opinion and wording.
    These people live in an echo chamber and have no exposure to dissent. They have “thought leaders” instead of thoughts. They look at a coincidental overlap of opinion as being all the proof you ever needed that something must have originated in the place you associate it with.
    In other words, in their minds, they are in a cartoon East Berlin. Shoes come from the shoe factory, there’s only one shoe factory, and if you have shoes, you must have gotten them from there. The idea that multiple, different, independent people could look at the situation in Europe and arrive at the same conclusion without any help or collusion is not something they have considered.
    Remember, after McMullin left his job as a lying neocon warmonger, he started a profitable refugee storage and exploitation business. He personally profits from the migration scam. If refugees are so bad, why is he making so much money?

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  142. @reiner Tor
    And now Sessions is reclusing himself from the investigations. Trump is looking weaker and weaker. What will happen if they find something? They haven't found anything so far, but it's almost as if two members of his administration have already been found guilty. Do they really need a crime for an impeachment (which both parties crave)?

    Do they really need a crime for an impeachment (which both parties crave)?

    No, they need a “crime”, combined with insufficient popular support for the president from voters for Senators and Congressmen of his own party not to fear the backlash of voting for impeachment. Obviously the closer the “crime” is to an actual crime, the less danger of a backlash for the betrayers.

    It’s a political process, in reality, as I suppose it must be.

    Still too soon imo for more than a few of the worst, most open traitors amongst elected Republicans (the likes of McCain) to openly vote for an impeachment.

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  143. @Mr. Anon

    And of course arguably the two most disruptive revolutions in world history have taken place in France and in Russia.
     
    One could argue that the most disruptive revolution was the American revolution. And perhaps, from the vantage point of later history, not in a good way either.

    I tend to class the American independence war as a secessionist war representing just a change of control from imperial elites to local elites, rather than a revolution in which the elites are actually overthrown by other groups. Clearly it had some influence on the French revolution, both in terms of inspiration and costs to the French regime, but really the ideologies at work there were partly common to both, rather than being derived from US thinking.

    But certainly given the sheer power of the US later, it changed a lot, so in that sense there’s a case to be made for it being disruptive.

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    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    Yes, I agree with that, and with what London Bob wrote.
  144. @Steve Sailer
    I read a book called China in World History by a New Zealand historian that was very interesting. Jesuit Matteo Ricci was his hero.

    And was the second stage of my learning about Memory Palaces. I suggest you look up the subject, Mr. Sailer, it’s quite interesting and surprisingly useful.

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  145. @snorlax
    OT: Bad news; CNN reporting "federal investigators" (i.e. Deep State) have unearthed that Jeff Sessions met with the Russian ambassador last year, which he "failed to disclose" ahead of his confirmation hearing. This is the same gambit used to fell Flynn. This is why I said it was such a huge unforced error to hand the vultures a scalp by firing Flynn.

    And now Sessions says he’ll recuse himself from the Russia witch hunt.

    I have to say the Trump admin seems really amateur/naive on this stuff. They don’t realize that they’re pouring tanker trucks of gasoline on the fire.

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  146. @Mr. Anon

    My suspicion is that McMuffin is jockeying for Orrin Hatch’s seat when that clown finally gets carried out on a stretcher or in a bad bag.
     
    I was surprised to learn recently that Orrin Hatch was 1.) still alive, and 2.) still in the Senate. And I was surprised in that order.

    He used to be ubiquitous on TV, but now seems to be rarely seen.

    When Hatch ran for re-election back in 2012 he all but promised it would be his last term. Of course he’s suggested his next term would be his last a few times before, and he’s broken promises before.

    His increasing scarcity on the teevee newscasts suggests that his health ain’t great and he may actually be ready to hang it up, but I wouldn’t put it past him to want to try to break records for length of Senate service and for oldest senator. To break the latter record he’d have to serve almost 3 more terms – until 2034. If he does stay that long he will be 100-years-old and have spent 68 years in the Senate. I don’t see that happening, but who knows?

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  147. @Desiderius
    The lynchpin of American Empire is the belief among its advocates (and beneficiaries, but I repeat myself) that they constitute an elect uniquely suited to rule, and that the world would tumble into chaos and war without them in charge.

    What makes them uniquely suited? Their values. Which values? Principally nonjudgmentalism (stop laughing) and deracination.

    I would expand American to Anglo-American empire, because they learned a lot from Mother.

    Non-judgmentalism? I don’t know. I blame Puritanism (that’s one of my hobbies), and it has a reputation for judgment. (What about certain other, parenthetical people? I’m too tired to speak or even think about them right now.) Our ruling class is extremely judgemental, in my opinion. It just doesn’t seem that way because they induce you to take their judgements for granted.

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    Our ruling class is extremely judgemental, in my opinion.
     
    Of course. It's a measure of their unprecedented self-delusion that they've convinced themselves otherwise.
  148. @Randal
    I tend to class the American independence war as a secessionist war representing just a change of control from imperial elites to local elites, rather than a revolution in which the elites are actually overthrown by other groups. Clearly it had some influence on the French revolution, both in terms of inspiration and costs to the French regime, but really the ideologies at work there were partly common to both, rather than being derived from US thinking.

    But certainly given the sheer power of the US later, it changed a lot, so in that sense there's a case to be made for it being disruptive.

    Yes, I agree with that, and with what London Bob wrote.

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  149. @LondonBob
    It was the American War of Independence, never understood when or why the appellation revolution got attached. What was revolutionary about it?

    “What was revolutionary about it.”

    Ask the Tories.

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    • Replies: @LondonBob
    Perhaps it is the same reason the rather sedate replacement of James II by William and Mary is termed the Glorious Revolution but the highly revolutionary English Civil War is termed the Civil War and Interregnum. In inspiration and outcome the War of Independence has more to do with 1688 than the events of the 1640s and 50s.
  150. @Thea
    It's really hard to take McMullin seriously. He is straight out of central casting.

    He is either ethnic Scottish or Irish? What has happened to my Celts?

    There’s always the left tail on the bell curve.

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  151. @guest
    "What was revolutionary about it."

    Ask the Tories.

    Perhaps it is the same reason the rather sedate replacement of James II by William and Mary is termed the Glorious Revolution but the highly revolutionary English Civil War is termed the Civil War and Interregnum. In inspiration and outcome the War of Independence has more to do with 1688 than the events of the 1640s and 50s.

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    • Replies: @guest
    The War for Independence wasn't very revolutionary compared to, say, the French or Russian versions. But maybe you're comparing it to the wrong thing. Maybe you should be thinking of it next to a time of peace or Canadian history, for instance. Then all the tarring and feathering, expropriation of property, privateering, rabble-rousing, overthrowing of aristocracy, repudiation of monarchy and official state religion, and so forth, appears much more radical. But it wasn't all that radical, as these things go.
    , @ben tillman
    Of course, the Glorious Revolution and the Civil War were just two acts in the same revolutionary play.
  152. Remember, McMullin was the True Conservative™ of 2016. He is a literal walking parody, something the famous @DemsRRealRacist Twitter account really nailed.

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  153. @LondonBob
    It was the American War of Independence, never understood when or why the appellation revolution got attached. What was revolutionary about it?

    One might argue that it was a conservative revolution, but secession works too. The colonists fought for true English liberty. Same for the Confederacy.

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  154. @slumber_j

    Egg is dogwhistling an r/The_Donald (subreddit) anagram:

    it’s groovy, centipedes!
     
    You blew my mind there.

    meme magic

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  155. @guest
    I would expand American to Anglo-American empire, because they learned a lot from Mother.

    Non-judgmentalism? I don't know. I blame Puritanism (that's one of my hobbies), and it has a reputation for judgment. (What about certain other, parenthetical people? I'm too tired to speak or even think about them right now.) Our ruling class is extremely judgemental, in my opinion. It just doesn't seem that way because they induce you to take their judgements for granted.

    Our ruling class is extremely judgemental, in my opinion.

    Of course. It’s a measure of their unprecedented self-delusion that they’ve convinced themselves otherwise.

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  156. @LondonBob
    Perhaps it is the same reason the rather sedate replacement of James II by William and Mary is termed the Glorious Revolution but the highly revolutionary English Civil War is termed the Civil War and Interregnum. In inspiration and outcome the War of Independence has more to do with 1688 than the events of the 1640s and 50s.

    The War for Independence wasn’t very revolutionary compared to, say, the French or Russian versions. But maybe you’re comparing it to the wrong thing. Maybe you should be thinking of it next to a time of peace or Canadian history, for instance. Then all the tarring and feathering, expropriation of property, privateering, rabble-rousing, overthrowing of aristocracy, repudiation of monarchy and official state religion, and so forth, appears much more radical. But it wasn’t all that radical, as these things go.

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  157. @Jason Liu
    That most people around the world live in societies which favor nationalism and hierarchy more than western values of equality, freedom, etc. In that sense Chinese values are really more like human values.

    That most people around the world live in societies which favor nationalism and hierarchy more than western values of equality, freedom, etc. In that sense Chinese values are really more like human values.

    There’s plenty of hierarchy in the Western tradition, and it remains part of the conservative ideal.

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  158. @LondonBob
    Perhaps it is the same reason the rather sedate replacement of James II by William and Mary is termed the Glorious Revolution but the highly revolutionary English Civil War is termed the Civil War and Interregnum. In inspiration and outcome the War of Independence has more to do with 1688 than the events of the 1640s and 50s.

    Of course, the Glorious Revolution and the Civil War were just two acts in the same revolutionary play.

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  159. @Jefferson
    I read that Evan McMullin is a closet Homosexual who was raised by 2 Dyke mothers. That certainly would explain why he is extremely hostile towards the idea of America remaining a majority White
    Heterosexual nation, because most Homos lean politically to the Left.

    “Confirmed bachelor”. “Just hasn’t met the right girl yet.”

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  160. @Achmed E. Newman
    I understand that you lumped Mr. Perot in that crowd because they were all on the losing side of presidential elections, Mr. Authchthon, but I really wish we could hear from Ross Perot, and especially about Trump.

    Ross Perot was a real patriot and it was a shame that he was coerced, blackmailed, who-knows into dropping out of the race in 1992. He got back in and got a significant portion of the vote, ushering in the Clinton dynasty, if you recall this history. However, the drop-out/re-up thing seemed flaky behavior at the time to us voters. Ross Perot was a earlier and better version of Donald Trump in my opinion.

    How come you don't hear anything like a comparison between these 2 guys? Oh, I understand the LP would want no part of it, but how about some bloggers? I think it would be very interesting.

    Perot laid the groundwork for Trump, just as Goldwater did for Reagan. They tapped into the same vein of support, with many of the same causes, with Trump’s campaign “benefitting” from the fact that the USA was 25 years further down the drain and the RealAmericans were 25 years more woke. Perot lacked The Don’s media savvy, personal appearance/magnetism, and NYC big brass ones, but he showed in 1992 how a Nationalist-Populist could attract a multitude of voters.

    I found it strange that no one interviewed Perot for his comments on the Trump phenomenon during the 2016 campaign. Perhaps his age was a factor?

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  161. @Jason Liu
    Perhaps, although I'm not sure it would be due to Confucianism. I think Asian values of communalism, nationalism, and social roles go far deeper than Confucius, and could well be an inborn biological trait. It's probably not even unique to Asians.

    If HBD is as significant as some here believe, then it may be that whites are innately attracted to individualism, contrarianism, guilt and abstract ideological extremism (like "equality" above all things). Therefore their demographic demise is baked into their genes. Any resisters would not be numerous enough to overcome the inborn tendencies of their entire race, and thus nothing the outside world does will fix PC liberalism among whites.

    However, as far as ideology goes, I notice a striking similarity between so-called "Neoreactionary" thought and the classic Chinese doctrine of Legalism. In fact, Neoreactionaries like Nick Land seem to harbor some legalistic ideas due to his years in China and his admiration for Lee Kuan Yew, although it doesn't sound like he's aware of their legalist roots.

    I think Confucianism is seen as stuffy and and old-fashioned and unlikely to be adopted by westerners, although one could certainly promote "traditionalism" among them. Personally I favor the legalism of Shen Buhai as the alternative to liberal democracy that's most compatible with western mentalities, due to its strong meritocracy. Just don't mention its Chinese origins too much and they might accept it.

    “I think Asian values of communalism, nationalism, and social roles go far deeper than Confucius”

    Ditto. The common Westerner doesn’t really hear much about traditional values anymore; aside from churches using the word “family” in contexts of varying veracity, he got the message long ago that “God, family, nation, values” are items either to be raspberried or cant words for his dispossession (e.g., neocon conception of “national” interest, “values” devolving on antiracism/nation of immigrants/open borders, etc.).

    To read about Confucian thinking can be a bit disorienting (disoccidenting?) to us (although I assume that our commoners of 100 years ago would have recognized better what the Confucian tradition taught regarding family/state). The real trouble is, we are so wrecked (socially as well as educationally) that the students of Confucius might as well have been describing an alien planet as far as we are concerned.

    Is it our DNA? I have to go with nurture over nature on this one. We, too, once had traditional societies; and the China of Mao wasn’t especially traditional. We’ve been pozzed.

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  162. […] while ago Steve Sailer wrote that he saw a market for a book on Confucianism, and someone nice mentioned me on the comments out […]

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