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From USA Today:

People are canceling their Iowa vacations because of Steve King’s words

USA TODAY NETWORK Kevin Hardy, The Des Moines Register

March 18, 2017

Commenter Kyle McKenna observes:

It’s 29°F in Dubuque right now. Gotta admire those ‘Social Grievance Warriors’ for the sacrifices they make, huh.

Iowa is the most pleasant-looking part of I-80 between South Pass, Wyoming and the Appalachians. My impression from roaring by on I-80 is that Charles Murray’s hometown of Newton is Peak Iowa Scenery.

On the other hand, I can also empathize with the character in a Jay McInerney novel who says: “I visited the Midwest once. There was nothing to see and nothing to keep you from seeing it.”

 
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  1. Iowa is the most pleasant-looking part of I-80 between Denver and the Appalachians.

    I-80 runs through Cheyenne, not Denver.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Hrw-500
    There was a time when I-76 between Nebraska border and Denver was known as a fork of I-80 as I-80S until 1975. http://www.interstate-guide.com/i-076_west.html
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_76_(Colorado%E2%80%93Nebraska)
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  2. Many pass-throughs have confirmed that the most memorable thing is how all the signs for hundreds of miles keep taunting you with how far away Des Moines is.

    Des Moines is the center of the galaxy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kyle a
    Recent transplants from the finer parts of Illinois are slowly stalling that galaxy like a black hole.
  3. So apparently a few dozen SJWs, who probably never had any intention of going to Iowa anyway, crying on twitter is serious enough that the third most widely distributed newspaper in the US writes an article on it. Let’s not forget the utterly gratuitous yet completely predictable reference to a powerless old man who was part of a KKK chapter before most Americans were born, and the absurd hyperbole of a random merchant living in corn country.

    Diversity is our strength!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Iowa swung hard against the Democrats last year. Trump was arguably the winner of neighboring MN too, when you discount the votes of resettled Somalis that have no business in this country. (Recall that when resettlement started, it was promised they would return when the war was over)

    The left is hoping that Midwestern nice causes people to feel bad when the bicoastal left calls them evil. Don't knock the strategy, it worked vis-a-vis the LDS after 2008.
  4. Iowans vacation in Minnesota, 10,000 lakes and all.
    Vacationing in Iowa is as rare as nasty bloodstains on menopausal Ashley Judd’s bed sheets.
    Both were mentioned to create a buzz that would make people assume they actually exist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I grew up in Mason City Iowa. We drove notth to Minnesota for vacations.

    Haven't been in Iowa in decades but as I recall, this time of year there is a foot of snow and cold as Hillary's soul.
  5. I grew up in Newton and drove I-80 many times between Newton and Iowa City, and later between Omaha and Newton. Jasper County is probably the most scenic county along Interstate 80, particularly Autrey Bluffs west of Colfax.

    I guess that I should schedule a trip back just to compensate for all those tourists cancelling their trips to Pella’s Tulip Time, the Bix Beiderbecke festival, or the Drake Relays! Maybe they’ll even stop inviting the University of Iowa Hawkeyes to be humiliated at another pointless Bowl Game!

    Go, Steve King, go!!

    Read More
  6. Iowa, the state south of Minnesota that did not take in thousands of wacky, welfare loving Somalis and Hmong. Why? Not enough Lutherans? Lutheran churches were behind Minnesotans open borders policies.

    Read More
  7. ” The economic development authority, which oversees the Iowa Tourism Office, says tourism contributes $8 billion in economic activity to the state”

    I would love to see the workings to come up with eight bill.

    As a child I lived in Grinnell for half a year. I can’t remember being taken to any site worthy of note.

    Nice place to live though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @dr kill
    The Iowa Tourist Board should pay that Shia La Beef kid to fly his anti- Trump flag someplace deserving. Talk about stimulating the economy and creating a buzz!!!
  8. One definition of terrorism is that it targets the innocent.

    Considering that, typically, half the population is registered to vote; half actually vote; and roughly half vote for the sitting senator; maybe one-eighth of Iowa actually marked an X for King, yet our favorite SJWs are happy to economically bomb the entire state in service to their cause…

    Read More
  9. That’s kind of the point of living there, right? Plenty of space and no annoying tourists.

    Read More
  10. @AndrewR
    So apparently a few dozen SJWs, who probably never had any intention of going to Iowa anyway, crying on twitter is serious enough that the third most widely distributed newspaper in the US writes an article on it. Let's not forget the utterly gratuitous yet completely predictable reference to a powerless old man who was part of a KKK chapter before most Americans were born, and the absurd hyperbole of a random merchant living in corn country.

    Diversity is our strength!

    Iowa swung hard against the Democrats last year. Trump was arguably the winner of neighboring MN too, when you discount the votes of resettled Somalis that have no business in this country. (Recall that when resettlement started, it was promised they would return when the war was over)

    The left is hoping that Midwestern nice causes people to feel bad when the bicoastal left calls them evil. Don’t knock the strategy, it worked vis-a-vis the LDS after 2008.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Half Canadian
    In regards to the LDS church, I don't think it made much of a change. Same-sex attraction is still considered sinful, children of married homosexual couples can't be baptized until adulthood, and homosexuals who do marry lose their church membership.
    Yeah, we don't organize smear-the-queer tournaments anymore /sarcasm, but that's hardly unreasonable.
  11. Once you get the i-80 into north central Ohio, it starts to go through dense forests that I would say look better than the plains and cornfields in Iowa. For example

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuyahoga_Valley_National_Park

    Read More
    • Replies: @Kyle a
    There's some dense Forrest in Iowa. I was a regular on the mushroom hunting circuit there for some years.
    , @FPD72
    Does the park have a plaque or anything else commemorating when the Cuyahoga River caught fire a few miles to the north of the park?
  12. There are tulip festivals in Pella and Orange City that do draw a number of people from the region. The RAGBRAI bicycle trip also draws in people from out of state and there are some lakes in King’s district that are popular in summer. It’s not a major destination, but they do have some regional draws.

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    • Replies: @FPD72
    I would expect an area with a large number of Dutch Calvinists to have a TULIP festival.

    Total Depravity
    Unconditional Election
    Limited Atonement
    Irresistable Grace
    Perseverance of the Saints
  13. Personally, I really like driving through the plains states. The vast fields of crops and endless flat expanses are impressive and beautiful in their own way.

    My wife and I are taking a Midwest road trip this summer, if we decide to hit Iowa it will probably more than balance out this nonexistent cancellation trend.

    Read More
  14. Dubuque, Iowa is a great city to visit, and so reccomend people do so. Take a riverboat cruise on the Mississippi, dine out, ride the Fenelon Place funicular and much more.

    The neighboring are of SW Wisconsin are also fantastic. It’s easy to spend a couple weeks on vacation between these two areas. You will have a blast!

    Too few people give America a chance for vacation outside of the big cities and Florida. ”Tis a shame, but it means there are no lines or crowds at the attractions.

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    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    Dubuque, Iowa is a great city to visit, and so reccomend people do so. Take a riverboat cruise on the Mississippi, dine out, ride the Fenelon Place funicular and much more.
     
    Not a Dubuque guy, but been through numerous times to see Iowa family since I was a pup.

    Recommend Eagle Point Park--nice views of the Mississippi. And--a half hour out of town--Beitbach's, is a nice place for a good feed. He's a terrific guy. (Come hungry and have the buffet.)
  15. Bernstein, a Sioux City businessman appointed to the board, said the backlash this week reached a “new level.”

    “This was the worst one ever. I live in his district and have been following him a long time,” he said. “And, being Jewish, I am particularly sensitive to his perspective…”

    Really? Even in Iowa?

    And then they say that people who “see Jews in their ham sandwich” are the crazy ones…

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    • Replies: @AnotherDad

    And then they say that people who “see Jews in their ham sandwich” are the crazy ones…
     
    Don't worry GabrielM will be by any minute to tell you you're insane for noticing.

    It's flat out ridiculous to get lectures on "tolerance" and "eugenics" from a people whose salient characteristic for the past couple thousand years has been a steadfast refusal to integrate with their actual neighbors and have explicit religous strictures on association with outsiders and explicit heriditary membership qualification.

    Despite Bernstein's comment being all too typical Jewish lecturing and hectoring it does have a certain comic insanity. Because, outside of its general bio-cultural tautology for any people, isn't


    "understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies."
     
    a pretty fair description of the essential Jewish program for the past few thousand years?
  16. A lot of my friends and family who are in Iowa have been wailing nonstop about King’s comments on their social media accounts. Some of them are outright apologizing for the state to nobody in particular. They don’t seem to understand that the coastal elites they desperately want approval from already see them as backward relics of flyover country, no matter how crazy and wacky (and right) their local US representative is. The only time anyone even acknowledges states like Iowa exist is during the primaries and when a new Alexander Payne movie comes out.

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    • Replies: @Buck Turgidson
    You said it. The good little violent stupid lefties in Iowa have a major leftist inferiority complex. They so so desperately want the kewl kid lefties on the coasts to acknowledge that they exist. They overcompensate badly and go overboard with purple hair and nose tattoos and just a little too much obsession with the failing new york times. Could not have said it better: the coastal elites will always see them as backward mouth-breathing hillbilly trailer-inhabiting canned beer swilling rednecks. The midwesterners should grow some backbone and ignore the kewl koastal kids and do they own thing, but they always are going to read the nyt and watch mslgb+-/ TV and never will get there.
    , @AnotherDad

    A lot of my friends and family who are in Iowa have been wailing nonstop about King’s comments on their social media accounts.
     
    Get on their and tell them to have some effing self-respect.

    Seriously this is insane. Steve King didn't say anything the least bit "offensive" or even "racist" just a statement of fact:


    Wilders understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies.
     
    I'd tell 'em if they think King's remarks are offensive, essentially they've signed on to a death cult, and consigned their race and culture to disappear.

    Serious, we can't win unless those of us who are not yet blind, call b.s. on this nonsense and assert the truth.

  17. funny stuff. My mother once stated while on a flight and admiring the Oklahoma landscape from 30,000 ft. “That’s some flat land.They should just give it back to the indians.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonym
    “That’s some flat land.They should just give it back to the indians.”

    For tractors, flat land is a feature not a bug.
  18. @Buzz Mohawk
    Many pass-throughs have confirmed that the most memorable thing is how all the signs for hundreds of miles keep taunting you with how far away Des Moines is.

    Des Moines is the center of the galaxy.

    Recent transplants from the finer parts of Illinois are slowly stalling that galaxy like a black hole.

    Read More
  19. Absolutely right Steve – that section of Rt. 80 in Iowa has beautiful scenery and the nicest govt tourist rest stops . On the other hand the drive west of Omaha on 80 is great for “gunning it ” . Hit 90 mph and it felt like 50 .

    Read More
  20. @Lot
    Once you get the i-80 into north central Ohio, it starts to go through dense forests that I would say look better than the plains and cornfields in Iowa. For example

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuyahoga_Valley_National_Park

    There’s some dense Forrest in Iowa. I was a regular on the mushroom hunting circuit there for some years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    Sure, but have a look at a satellite map. It is yellowish for nearly all of Iowa v large amounts of dark green in NE Ohio.
  21. I’ve done I-80 several times and I always thought Iowa was a nice change of pace after Nebraska, but my kids drove I-80 just last year and they raved about Nebraska. It takes all kinds.

    Read More
    • Replies: @istever_reader
    Mr. Moore,
    I once did I-80, Chicago to California, by myself. Nebraska was so boring even the Nebraskans noted it. I stopped the night in North Platte and saw completely black post cards with the description on the back of "North Platte at night."
    For me the landscape was mesmerising in that I usually do not drive very fast, but found myself often over 90. The landscape changes dramatically entering Wyoming, but I was still going too fast such that I was stopped by the highway patrol. When he asked how fast I was going I answered honestly the speed and my thoughts that driving in Nebraska was so dull that I lost track of the speed. He totally agreed and commiserated with me for 5-10 minutes and let me go with a warning.
    ps I find your comments an interesting addition to Steve's blog
    , @Seth Largo
    I-80 through the Nebraska panhandle is beautiful high plains scenery. Rolling hills of sage, grasslands, and scattered pine forests beneath high sandstone bluffs (including the famous Chimney Peak). Much more similar to eastern Wyoming than the rest of the state. Once you descend into the Platte River Valley, it's dull going unless you happen to catch the crane migrations at sunset---tens of thousands of four foot tall birds filling the skies is quite a sight and has probably caused more than one car accident.
    , @Boomer the Dog
    The best driving in Nebraska, if you have the time, can actually be found about 60 miles north of I-80, up in the Sand Hills region, where Ben Crenshaw, Bill Coore and Jack Nicklaus have designed some world-class golf courses on some of the most stunning terrain I have ever seen. I remember taking a detour from I-80 somewhere around North Platte, driving north to Thedford and following NE Route 2 southeast all the way back down to Grand Island. A truly memorable experience.
  22. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Sounds like fake news. The internet organized SJW network have tweeted and e-mailed a flurry of messages and there’s some guy who is quoted a lot in the story giving the ‘that’s not who we are’ cliche. It’s doubtful the complainers are potential tourists and no evidence of any amount that may have been lost is given. Part of the propaganda environment we’re all in.

    Read More
  23. It seems improbable that anyone from outside Iowa would ever go there for a vacation, but I suppose if you are the owner of a local business like a hotel or restaurant that caters to locals or people traveling from neighboring states, you might have some worries about whether adverse publicity could affect your business.

    At the time of BP’s Macondo oil rig disaster off the coast of Louisiana, I remember that hoteliers in Tampa Florida were claiming they had large numbers of vacation booking cancellations and looking for compensation even though no oil had been within hundreds of miles of Tampa area beaches (which are not much to look at anyway.)

    Read More
    • Replies: @Marty T
    Iowa voted for Trump by almost double digits. Most of the neighboring states voted for him. And leftists don't vacation in Iowa anyway. Steve King wins re-election easily. Iowans don't have anything to apologize for, and I'd like to visit sometime to check out their less stressful way of life.
  24. OT: The eye of Soros is coming for Koreans, telling them to jump, and the locals are only asking “how high?” Will China and Japan hold out?

    Earlier this month, K-Pop girl group Mamamoo landed in some hot water after a video clip of the quartet in what many interpreted to be blackface aired at their Seoul concert.

    [T]he group apologized via Facebook the next day, admitting that there was “no excuse” for their “insensitive actions.”

    “We were extremely ignorant of blackface and did not understand the implications of our actions,” they posted. “We will be taking time to understand more about our international fans to ensure this never happens again. We hope that you will help to educate us on these and other issues so that we can become better people and better artists.”

    One study, for instance, says that Korea, despite being “rich, well-educated, peaceful” is also ethnically homogenous and demonstrates trends that coincide with racial intolerance. The most damning of this evidence? More than one in three South Koreans don’t want a neighbor of a different race, according to the results of a 2010 report by the World Values Survey.

    [O]ne of the group’s members, Hwasa, came under fire for singing the N-word in her cover of Beyoncé’s “Irreplaceable” just a few weeks ago.

    Mamamoo isn’t even the first K-Pop group or artist to don blackface — in 2012, Big Bang’s G-Dragon (who have been called the “biggest band in Asia”) posted a horrific photo that many believed was a reference to Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen who was gunned down by a vigilante neighborhood watchdog.

    I especially like the condemnation of the Korean girl for simply singing a song a Negress sang, with lyrics containing a slur written by the Negress (or, more likely, her songwriters). Talk about a no-win situation….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    The fuss over racism in Asia is continual but doesn't come to much...

    http://www.newsslinger.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/rsz_ana-racist-advert-japan-01.jpg

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6qfTIeaS65E/UcMTpNxazqI/AAAAAAAAHPo/cNdpsksZm20/s1600/Screen+Shot+2013-06-20+at+10.32.00+AM.png

    , @Buffalo Joe
    Auto, Negress rhymes with regress, seems appropriate.
    , @bored identity



    "We were extremely ignorant of blackface..."

     

    Too bad.
    Pruneface ain't ignorant of you.


    Willkommen to Slander Properly Low Center Holodex.
  25. I vaguely recall a road-sign somewhere in eastern Iowa proclaiming some connection to Ronald Reagan … I bet you could see whatever sight is connected to that in an hour or so added to the three or so it takes to traverse the state. Aside from that and Fat Jaks in Council Bluffs (which you can visit while staying in Omaha), there is not much worth visiting between there and Davenport.

    Read More
  26. @(((Owen)))

    Iowa is the most pleasant-looking part of I-80 between Denver and the Appalachians.
     
    I-80 runs through Cheyenne, not Denver.

    There was a time when I-76 between Nebraska border and Denver was known as a fork of I-80 as I-80S until 1975. http://www.interstate-guide.com/i-076_west.html

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Interstate_76_(Colorado%E2%80%93Nebraska)

    Read More
  27. not much going on scenery-wise in newton you don’t see all the way from the nebraska border

    despite the commenter’s joke in the OP, the driftless area (decorah, dubuque) easily wins for iowa landscape. nobody who has been there would mock it, honestly. it is a 180 from the stereotypical/coastal imagination of what boring old stupid white iowa looks like.

    Read More
  28. First Prize, One night in Des Moines, Second prize, Two Nights in Des Moines.

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    • LOL: Kyle McKenna
    • Replies: @EriK
    Joe,
    I appreciate most of your comments (even this one), but with Buffalo in your moniker I'm suggesting you excersise a bit less enthusiasm for ragging on other cities.
    , @candid_observer
    Third, and all subsequent Prizes: Combine the previous two awards.

    Call them the "Fibonacci Goes To Iowa Awards".
  29. @SPMoore8
    I've done I-80 several times and I always thought Iowa was a nice change of pace after Nebraska, but my kids drove I-80 just last year and they raved about Nebraska. It takes all kinds.

    Mr. Moore,
    I once did I-80, Chicago to California, by myself. Nebraska was so boring even the Nebraskans noted it. I stopped the night in North Platte and saw completely black post cards with the description on the back of “North Platte at night.”
    For me the landscape was mesmerising in that I usually do not drive very fast, but found myself often over 90. The landscape changes dramatically entering Wyoming, but I was still going too fast such that I was stopped by the highway patrol. When he asked how fast I was going I answered honestly the speed and my thoughts that driving in Nebraska was so dull that I lost track of the speed. He totally agreed and commiserated with me for 5-10 minutes and let me go with a warning.
    ps I find your comments an interesting addition to Steve’s blog

    Read More
    • Agree: SPMoore8
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    reader, I drove up from Salt Lake City to Jackson Hole through Idaho's Swan Valley. Straight road, level ground, wife sleeping in the front passenger seat, my two youngest daughters asleep in the back seat and mountains way off in the distance. Nothing to judge your speed by and soon I am pushing 100 mph, but no real sensation of speed. Never saw a cop but I loved the signs, in the middle of nowhere, that read, "Watch for School Buses," to pick up whom?
  30. Are there beaches in Iowa?

    Once made out with a chick from Iowa on Rush Street.She was hot, I think.

    Read More
  31. OT: I ran across a neat infographic about the upcoming French election: http://rilos.ru/en/blog/492-carte-des-parrainages-a-lelection-presidentielle-francaise
    The funny thing though is that I understand Marine Le Pen to be leading the polls:

    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/735118/French-election-2017-results-latest-polls-odds-tracker-win

    but the infographic lumps her into the “other” category which unless I am missing something makes it impossible to just look at her vote or compare her with just the other front runners. Fascinating.
    Here is more info about the election: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_presidential_election,_2017

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    France has a primary with the top two finishers going to the next round. Le Pen will come in first place in the first round, but is behind in the polls by about 22 points in the second round that determines the winner.

    In the recent regional elections where the FN got to the second round, it failed to win any of the elections, though it got within 5 points of winning in a few.
  32. The article quotes David Bernstein of the Iowa Economic Development Authority, talking about Steve King’s comment:

    “This was the worst one ever. I live in his district and have been following him a long time,” he said. “And, being Jewish, I am particularly sensitive to his perspective. This was by far the worst set of comments he ever made.”

    Bernstein apparently wants the US to take in more and more Muslims until it becomes as safe for Jews as France has become.

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  33. I always chuckle at the thought that there might be someone, somewhere, dim enough to believe “People are canceling their Iowa vacations because of Steve King’s words”.

    Read More
  34. Joke about Iowa all you want. If I had to choose between being forced to spend the rest of my life in Iowa, or any non-U.S. country, I’d pick Iowa in a heartbeat. I’d also pick Iowa over most of the serious blue states. (For some reason, Iowa is reliably the most blue of the grain belt states).

    Read More
    • Replies: @SFG
    The unions were strong there, back in the day.
    , @S. Anonyia
    You'd pick Iowa over Switzerland?
    , @Dr. X

    Joke about Iowa all you want. If I had to choose between being forced to spend the rest of my life in Iowa, or any non-U.S. country, I’d pick Iowa in a heartbeat.
     
    Any non-U.S. country? Hell, compared to half the United States (Bronx, Chiraq, Detroit, Cleveland, Compton, Oakland, East St. Louis, etc.) Iowa is paradise.
  35. I grew up near Dubuque, Iowa. The Mississippi River valley area of Eastern Iowa is, contrary to popular belief, a land of rolling hills, bluffs, and hardwood forests reminiscent of Western Massachusetts or Connecticut. It’s a beautiful area of the country all year around, but particularly beautiful in the autumn. Dubuque even has an incline railway.

    https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/show_picture.pl?l=english&rais=1&oiu=https%3A%2F%2Ffarm7.staticflickr.com%2F6151%2F6215493286_bde38a3310_b.jpg&sp=c4efbbfad9245c0c06fa85e7766f9e02

    The farther West you travel in Iowa the flatter the landscape gets, but it’s nothing like the hellishly flat landscape of Nebraska.

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    • Replies: @Buck Turgidson
    I too grew up near Dubuque and will attest to the beauty of my native Driftless Area. A week spent between Dubuque and LaCrosse WI would be a fine vacation, esp in the fall. That stretch of the river is the Upper Miss R National Fish and Wildlife Refuge and if you could get on the river and into some of the backwater areas, you have it all to yourself (ducks, cranes, geese). No beaches but a lot of great sand bars and a birder's paradise. Good fishing in places. No traffic, good food (real food no McDonalds), low prices, very nice people. You won't get much diversity but you won't get your windows smashed out, either, and besides you can't have everything. I talked a friend into taking his wife there for their 25th wedding anniversary and she still speaks with me. Lots of beautiful old churches, too.
  36. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I lived in a small town of about 9,000 in Iowa for a few years and liked it. I used to walk back home after doing work very late and would take shortcuts right through the back alleys in the center of that little downtown–in the middle of the night–and was absolutely safe doing so. You can’t say that of very many other places. I also walked almost everywhere, because in a town that small you could do it very easily for everything except for hauling groceries.

    Driving through Iowa isn’t very scenic, but it’s better than my current state’s roadside scenery, which mainly consists of a ‘Visit Wall Drug! billboard about once every mile along I-90. I eventually learned that in the Midwest, the scenery is all in the sky, not on the ground. The best skys and sunsets I’ve ever seen are in the Midwest.

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  37. Perhaps I “ought to give Iowa a try.”

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    • Replies: @Formerly CARealist
    Only took 40 comments for someone to get to the music man.

    "nice looking animal you've got there."
    "yeah, for a horse."
    , @Marty T
    Me too! And I even have a little Jewish blood. I'd check out a lake during the summer and maybe a nice farmer's museum or something. Maybe an early season football game while I'm at it.
  38. Is there no limit to the awesome destructive powers of Steve King?!? All this talk about ‘babies,’ is he trying to incite a riot? On Purim, no less! I am sure his constituents in NW Iowa are really upset about that. Now he is going to reign evil and destruction on the booming Iowa tourism industry! Does this mean that there will be no throngs of people visiting the world’s largest strawberry in Strawberry Point this summer? and the throngs who visit Fort Atkinson, and the boyhood home of Radar O’Reilly in Ottumwa? As a native Iowan I have to stifle laughter at the concept of an “Iowa vacation.” I expect that anyone who does vacation in Iowa (some nice glacial kettle lakes in NW, MS R valley in NE) does not know Steve King from the man in the moon.

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  39. Does this mean no more HUD Section 8 “Affirmatively Furthering Fair Housing” (AFFH) tenants from Chicago? Or will Western Iowa also become part of Chicago as “Eastern Iowa Is Now Part of Chicago.”

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  40. When they boycott wheat, corn, ginseng and soybeans, we’ll know they are serious.

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  41. SJW: Well, I am not visiting Iowa!

    Iowans: Whew. ( smile ) Nothing to see here. Move along.

    Read More
  42. Bernstein, a Sioux City businessman appointed to the board, said the backlash this week reached a “new level.”

    “This was the worst one ever. I live in his district and have been following him a long time,” he said. “And, being Jewish, I am particularly sensitive to his perspective. This was by far the worst set of comments he ever made.”

    LOL

    Can Israel have a Jewish state with Palestinian babies? Go ahead. Tell us.

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  43. @Buffalo Joe
    First Prize, One night in Des Moines, Second prize, Two Nights in Des Moines.

    Joe,
    I appreciate most of your comments (even this one), but with Buffalo in your moniker I’m suggesting you excersise a bit less enthusiasm for ragging on other cities.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    EriK, Yeah, hmmm, but we're talking about Des Moines.
  44. Fake news. Feature articles with a partisan activist agenda. There really is no reason to read a newspaper–there’s no news in it.

    Read More
  45. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Ahh, the sacrifices the SJWs make for the rest of us benighted pilgrims!

    Read More
  46. The White boobs who avoid vacationing in Iowa because of Steve King can go to Illinois or Indiana instead. Steve King has a honker quite similar to the two car garage which sat in the middle of Karl Malden’s face. Malden was born in Chicago, Illinois and was raised in Gary, Indiana.

    Here is the Steve King Tweet which caught the attention of the White boobs:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Forbes
    I must've had an impoverished childhood (and life) as I completely missed out on the Walt Disney classic, "The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin." Probably as popular as vacationing in Iowa...
  47. I would be rejoicing if a group of mentally unbalanced people decided not to holiday in my general area, though I suspect many of the bookings and the subsequent cancellations were mostly imaginary anyway.

    Read More
  48. @SPMoore8
    I've done I-80 several times and I always thought Iowa was a nice change of pace after Nebraska, but my kids drove I-80 just last year and they raved about Nebraska. It takes all kinds.

    I-80 through the Nebraska panhandle is beautiful high plains scenery. Rolling hills of sage, grasslands, and scattered pine forests beneath high sandstone bluffs (including the famous Chimney Peak). Much more similar to eastern Wyoming than the rest of the state. Once you descend into the Platte River Valley, it’s dull going unless you happen to catch the crane migrations at sunset—tens of thousands of four foot tall birds filling the skies is quite a sight and has probably caused more than one car accident.

    Read More
  49. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    They can always come to Frisco, Texas

    http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Texas-Attorney-General-Raises-Concerns-over-Frisco-School-Prayer-Room-416443563.html

    How long until we see SJWs convert to Islam in large numbers to stick it in the eye of Badwhites?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Difference between California and Texas: no one in Texas is offended if you call their city "Frisco".
  50. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Sell grandma for a few vacation $! Get your lowest cost grandmas right here! Get with the program, it’s the invisible hand, what are you, some kind throwback?

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  51. On the other hand, I can also empathize with the character in a Jay McInerney novel who says: “I visited the Midwest once. There was nothing to see and nothing to keep you from seeing it.”

    Reminds me of the description of Texas as “miles and miles of miles and miles”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Joe Schmoe

    Reminds me of the description of Texas as “miles and miles of miles and miles”.

     

    Apparently beauty is in the eye of the beholder as West Texas A&M mean SAT math 480 reading 480 but still manages to attract 2% 0f its student body from overseas.
  52. @SPMoore8
    I've done I-80 several times and I always thought Iowa was a nice change of pace after Nebraska, but my kids drove I-80 just last year and they raved about Nebraska. It takes all kinds.

    The best driving in Nebraska, if you have the time, can actually be found about 60 miles north of I-80, up in the Sand Hills region, where Ben Crenshaw, Bill Coore and Jack Nicklaus have designed some world-class golf courses on some of the most stunning terrain I have ever seen. I remember taking a detour from I-80 somewhere around North Platte, driving north to Thedford and following NE Route 2 southeast all the way back down to Grand Island. A truly memorable experience.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I flew over the Nebraska Sand Hills in 1992 and thought, "Somebody should build a golf course there."
    , @Anon
    I've driven the Sand Hills route from North Platte up to Murdo, South Dakota several times, and the Sand Hills during a dry season are very scenic. But it's the sort of route that makes you hope your car doesn't break down. You'll pass another car maybe once every twenty minutes or so. I've driven some of the other small highways all the way through Nebraska and much prefer them to the interstate. They remind you of what car travel was like in the US pre-1980s with little traffic to bother you, and you end up stopping in all sorts of oddball places.
    , @Anonymous
    Normally if somebody ends up in Thedford, it's by accident. Or they are headed up to Sturgis.
  53. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    OT:
    Steve, did you write this: http://www.claremont.org/crb/basicpage/the-flight-93-election/

    “The Megaphone,” “Invade the World, Invite the World,” and references to Ben Franklin’s “Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    No.
    , @Lot
    The author came out after the election and is now working for Trump.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Anton
  54. This is great news! The lines will be so much shorter at the Cattlemen’s Quarters to buy a hot beef sundae at the Iowa State Fair this summer. No waiting to see the butter cow sculpture! Maybe I would rather have the pork chop on a stick? Oh what to do? I sure hope there are helicopter rides again.

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  55. That last quote from Jay McInerny sounds like an allusion to Samuel Johnson’s reply to someone who told him Stonehenge was something to see. “It’s worth seeing, but not worth going to see.” Or something like that. I remember laughing pretty heartily at Spy Magazine’s old satirical Cliff Note’s to Bright Lights, Big City. Spy went after J Mac almost as hard as they went after Trump.

    Read More
  56. Forbes, however, says it’s hard to lose money on an NBA team because the owners outsmarted the players’ union in getting player salaries capped at 51% of revenue. He’s probably not making a big return on his vast investment, but he’s worth $29.9 billion, so what does he care?

    Like movies. Alec Guinness was either naive or in tune with some strange force to take a share of the profits from Star Wars.

    Read More
  57. thanks to Sailer for showing us how the media amplifies certain narratives. You are the Hamilton Nolan of Unz review

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  58. @anon
    OT:
    Steve, did you write this: http://www.claremont.org/crb/basicpage/the-flight-93-election/

    "The Megaphone," "Invade the World, Invite the World," and references to Ben Franklin's "Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind."

    No.

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  59. @Boomer the Dog
    The best driving in Nebraska, if you have the time, can actually be found about 60 miles north of I-80, up in the Sand Hills region, where Ben Crenshaw, Bill Coore and Jack Nicklaus have designed some world-class golf courses on some of the most stunning terrain I have ever seen. I remember taking a detour from I-80 somewhere around North Platte, driving north to Thedford and following NE Route 2 southeast all the way back down to Grand Island. A truly memorable experience.

    I flew over the Nebraska Sand Hills in 1992 and thought, “Somebody should build a golf course there.”

    Read More
  60. In summer 1976 my buddy and I drove from CA to D.C. for the bicentennial. On the way back we ran out of money and worked two weeks in Baxter (north of Newton) on a farm hoeing milkweed on soybean fields. Great people and it was eye-opening for this surfer boy.

    Iowa is awesome in most places but these nitwits would LOVE Iowa City, Moonbat Central of IA, which I learned working on a project a few years ago.

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  61. @Buffalo Joe
    First Prize, One night in Des Moines, Second prize, Two Nights in Des Moines.

    Third, and all subsequent Prizes: Combine the previous two awards.

    Call them the “Fibonacci Goes To Iowa Awards”.

    Read More
  62. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    My father, born in 1927, remembers playing golf with his grandfather in the Sandhills in the 1930s.

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  63. @Anon
    They can always come to Frisco, Texas

    http://www.nbcdfw.com/news/local/Texas-Attorney-General-Raises-Concerns-over-Frisco-School-Prayer-Room-416443563.html

    How long until we see SJWs convert to Islam in large numbers to stick it in the eye of Badwhites?

    Difference between California and Texas: no one in Texas is offended if you call their city “Frisco”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    Fun fact: Frisco, TX takes its name from the STL-San Francisco railroad (the Frisco).

    Anyhow, it's being overrun by subcontinenters.
  64. Which reminds me, how can we get the NAACP to boycott our state?

    That’s almost as difficult as getting Puerto Rico to leave.

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  65. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Reg Cæsar
    Difference between California and Texas: no one in Texas is offended if you call their city "Frisco".

    Fun fact: Frisco, TX takes its name from the STL-San Francisco railroad (the Frisco).

    Anyhow, it’s being overrun by subcontinenters.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    Amazing how many parts of the country of which this is now true. Would be interesting to get an actual estimate of how many are now here. It has to be 5 million plus.
  66. @Lot
    Once you get the i-80 into north central Ohio, it starts to go through dense forests that I would say look better than the plains and cornfields in Iowa. For example

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Cuyahoga_Valley_National_Park

    Does the park have a plaque or anything else commemorating when the Cuyahoga River caught fire a few miles to the north of the park?

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  67. low on scenery, high on smells – iowa provides many memorable smells when driving through it.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Some of that smell is from the soil. Iowa is blessed with some of the best topsoil on earth.
  68. Hsst!….USA TODAY!….

    People don’t descend upon Iowa for drunken bacchanals and twerking contests – they live there.

    It’s the sight of all those white people – it scratches that itch that only shitlibs pretend they don’t feel deep down in their DNA.

    Read More
    • Replies: @the cruncher
    Yeah - I drove across country recently from California, and stopped at a McDonald's in, I think, Wyoming. It was amazing - all white workers, and all white customers, at least for 15 minutes.
  69. @Kyle a
    There's some dense Forrest in Iowa. I was a regular on the mushroom hunting circuit there for some years.

    Sure, but have a look at a satellite map. It is yellowish for nearly all of Iowa v large amounts of dark green in NE Ohio.

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  70. @anon
    OT:
    Steve, did you write this: http://www.claremont.org/crb/basicpage/the-flight-93-election/

    "The Megaphone," "Invade the World, Invite the World," and references to Ben Franklin's "Observations Concerning the Increase of Mankind."

    The author came out after the election and is now working for Trump.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Michael_Anton

    Read More
  71. I would take the lush scenery of Iowa over the dirt ugly hills of So. California in the summer. Outside of the Pacific coast, So Cal is not that scenic, that is assuming you can see it through the tan colored atmospheric murk.

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  72. @Barnard
    There are tulip festivals in Pella and Orange City that do draw a number of people from the region. The RAGBRAI bicycle trip also draws in people from out of state and there are some lakes in King's district that are popular in summer. It's not a major destination, but they do have some regional draws.

    I would expect an area with a large number of Dutch Calvinists to have a TULIP festival.

    Total Depravity
    Unconditional Election
    Limited Atonement
    Irresistable Grace
    Perseverance of the Saints

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  73. @res
    OT: I ran across a neat infographic about the upcoming French election: http://rilos.ru/en/blog/492-carte-des-parrainages-a-lelection-presidentielle-francaise
    The funny thing though is that I understand Marine Le Pen to be leading the polls:
    http://www.express.co.uk/news/world/735118/French-election-2017-results-latest-polls-odds-tracker-win
    but the infographic lumps her into the "other" category which unless I am missing something makes it impossible to just look at her vote or compare her with just the other front runners. Fascinating.
    Here is more info about the election: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/French_presidential_election,_2017

    France has a primary with the top two finishers going to the next round. Le Pen will come in first place in the first round, but is behind in the polls by about 22 points in the second round that determines the winner.

    In the recent regional elections where the FN got to the second round, it failed to win any of the elections, though it got within 5 points of winning in a few.

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  74. @Charles Pewitt
    https://twitter.com/RudyHavenstein/status/836831556060729344

    The White boobs who avoid vacationing in Iowa because of Steve King can go to Illinois or Indiana instead. Steve King has a honker quite similar to the two car garage which sat in the middle of Karl Malden's face. Malden was born in Chicago, Illinois and was raised in Gary, Indiana.

    Here is the Steve King Tweet which caught the attention of the White boobs:

    https://twitter.com/SteveKingIA/status/840980755236999169

    I must’ve had an impoverished childhood (and life) as I completely missed out on the Walt Disney classic, “The Adventures of Bullwhip Griffin.” Probably as popular as vacationing in Iowa…

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  75. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Chet
    Iowans vacation in Minnesota, 10,000 lakes and all.
    Vacationing in Iowa is as rare as nasty bloodstains on menopausal Ashley Judd's bed sheets.
    Both were mentioned to create a buzz that would make people assume they actually exist.

    I grew up in Mason City Iowa. We drove notth to Minnesota for vacations.

    Haven’t been in Iowa in decades but as I recall, this time of year there is a foot of snow and cold as Hillary’s soul.

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  76. Hey Steve , I want to thank you for all the posts you did not pass . I mean it’s only the internet and you have no interest in protecting me from myself , and yet you do . Thanks Steve .

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  77. @Random Dude on the Internet
    A lot of my friends and family who are in Iowa have been wailing nonstop about King's comments on their social media accounts. Some of them are outright apologizing for the state to nobody in particular. They don't seem to understand that the coastal elites they desperately want approval from already see them as backward relics of flyover country, no matter how crazy and wacky (and right) their local US representative is. The only time anyone even acknowledges states like Iowa exist is during the primaries and when a new Alexander Payne movie comes out.

    You said it. The good little violent stupid lefties in Iowa have a major leftist inferiority complex. They so so desperately want the kewl kid lefties on the coasts to acknowledge that they exist. They overcompensate badly and go overboard with purple hair and nose tattoos and just a little too much obsession with the failing new york times. Could not have said it better: the coastal elites will always see them as backward mouth-breathing hillbilly trailer-inhabiting canned beer swilling rednecks. The midwesterners should grow some backbone and ignore the kewl koastal kids and do they own thing, but they always are going to read the nyt and watch mslgb+-/ TV and never will get there.

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  78. @Hugh
    " The economic development authority, which oversees the Iowa Tourism Office, says tourism contributes $8 billion in economic activity to the state"

    I would love to see the workings to come up with eight bill.

    As a child I lived in Grinnell for half a year. I can't remember being taken to any site worthy of note.

    Nice place to live though.

    The Iowa Tourist Board should pay that Shia La Beef kid to fly his anti- Trump flag someplace deserving. Talk about stimulating the economy and creating a buzz!!!

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  79. @Cloudbuster
    Joke about Iowa all you want. If I had to choose between being forced to spend the rest of my life in Iowa, or any non-U.S. country, I'd pick Iowa in a heartbeat. I'd also pick Iowa over most of the serious blue states. (For some reason, Iowa is reliably the most blue of the grain belt states).

    The unions were strong there, back in the day.

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  80. @bihhng
    I grew up near Dubuque, Iowa. The Mississippi River valley area of Eastern Iowa is, contrary to popular belief, a land of rolling hills, bluffs, and hardwood forests reminiscent of Western Massachusetts or Connecticut. It's a beautiful area of the country all year around, but particularly beautiful in the autumn. Dubuque even has an incline railway.

    https://ixquick-proxy.com/do/show_picture.pl?l=english&rais=1&oiu=https%3A%2F%2Ffarm7.staticflickr.com%2F6151%2F6215493286_bde38a3310_b.jpg&sp=c4efbbfad9245c0c06fa85e7766f9e02

    The farther West you travel in Iowa the flatter the landscape gets, but it's nothing like the hellishly flat landscape of Nebraska.

    I too grew up near Dubuque and will attest to the beauty of my native Driftless Area. A week spent between Dubuque and LaCrosse WI would be a fine vacation, esp in the fall. That stretch of the river is the Upper Miss R National Fish and Wildlife Refuge and if you could get on the river and into some of the backwater areas, you have it all to yourself (ducks, cranes, geese). No beaches but a lot of great sand bars and a birder’s paradise. Good fishing in places. No traffic, good food (real food no McDonalds), low prices, very nice people. You won’t get much diversity but you won’t get your windows smashed out, either, and besides you can’t have everything. I talked a friend into taking his wife there for their 25th wedding anniversary and she still speaks with me. Lots of beautiful old churches, too.

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  81. @Autochthon
    OT: The eye of Soros is coming for Koreans, telling them to jump, and the locals are only asking "how high?" Will China and Japan hold out?

    Earlier this month, K-Pop girl group Mamamoo landed in some hot water after a video clip of the quartet in what many interpreted to be blackface aired at their Seoul concert.

    [T]he group apologized via Facebook the next day, admitting that there was "no excuse" for their "insensitive actions."

    “We were extremely ignorant of blackface and did not understand the implications of our actions,” they posted. “We will be taking time to understand more about our international fans to ensure this never happens again. We hope that you will help to educate us on these and other issues so that we can become better people and better artists.”

    One study, for instance, says that Korea, despite being "rich, well-educated, peaceful" is also ethnically homogenous and demonstrates trends that coincide with racial intolerance. The most damning of this evidence? More than one in three South Koreans don't want a neighbor of a different race, according to the results of a 2010 report by the World Values Survey.

    [O]ne of the group's members, Hwasa, came under fire for singing the N-word in her cover of Beyoncé's "Irreplaceable" just a few weeks ago.

    Mamamoo isn't even the first K-Pop group or artist to don blackface — in 2012, Big Bang's G-Dragon (who have been called the "biggest band in Asia") posted a horrific photo that many believed was a reference to Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen who was gunned down by a vigilante neighborhood watchdog.
     

    I especially like the condemnation of the Korean girl for simply singing a song a Negress sang, with lyrics containing a slur written by the Negress (or, more likely, her songwriters). Talk about a no-win situation....
    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh
    So far, Japan and China remain bastions of resistance from what I can tell. Japan by simply not having the levers of her government being all that vulnerable to democracy; China by not having a democracy and outright resisting foreign influence because it'd be bad for the Party.

    Korea has demonstrated little will to resist, for one reason or another - that I know of, anyway.

    Perhaps the best tell of the future is what appears as "cool" to the population. You would know better than me, as I haven't visited Japan much, but so far, liberal values haven't quite reached highest levels of status in Japan.

  82. @Autochthon
    Wall Drug.

    http://www.walldrug.com/ is in South Dakota.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Wow, really? It's almost as if I were making a jest about how dull and monotonous driving through Iowa (and the Midwest generally) is, using the famous Wall Drug and its ubiquitous billboards....
  83. Eh, this is a lot of “fake news.” Basically, a lot of lefties are swarming and sending angry emails/tweets and “vowing” to cancel their trips, but there’s no mention of hard numbers or metrics in the article. Just a lot of pointing and kvetching and some blue-leaning Iowans harping on it.

    This is nothing more than the classic Alinskyite/SJW tactic of picking a target, polarizing, freezing it, and making a lot of noise and screaming about retribution without any real action. Iowa and Steve King should relax and laugh at them. They’ll simmer down and forget all about it once they move onto their next outrage du jour.

    This reminds of that Crazy Ex-Girlfriend number Steve linked to once, where in the middle of haranguing her daughter the Jewish mother stops to mention about how she and the rest of her synagogue are boycotting cheddar cheese because a Wisconsin Catholic Bishop said “something anti-Semitic” (at the 2:10 mark):

    This boycott of Iowa will last about as long as that musical number.

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    • Replies: @Boomstick
    Exactly. It's just more kabuki outrage.

    It's a well-worn plot, or "narrative" as everyone likes to call it today. The press reports a story they think will hurt someone they don't like. The usual idiots get outraged, or claim they're outraged. A minor and ineffectual mob forms on twitter. In this case the Iowa tourism office is a member of the group whipping up the mob; 60 complaints per day for a story the press reported with national scope is noise. Then the press reports on the ineffectual mob in an effort to keep the mob whipped up.
    , @Ivy
    Post-election exodus to Canada by various tabloid people seems to have tapered off to zero. That leaves more time for domestic focus, and Iowa is having its caucuses probed.
  84. People go on vacation to Iowa? I thought people went on vacation to get away from it all. If you live in Iowa, you already are away from it all.

    I grew up in the Flint Hills in Kansas. I loved the openness … the nothingness. Driving two hours and never seeing another car. It quiets the soul, something I suspect many people living in New York City have never experienced.

    Read More
    • Replies: @S. Anonyia
    I experienced the same thing driving through Eastern Colorado.

    When I first approached the high plains in north Texas, the flatness/emptiness of the landscape was disconcerting and almost vertigo inducing. I had NEVER driven through an area with no trees before. After I got used to it, it was calming and enjoyable. I liked the views of the wind turbines.

    But only on the way TO my destination. On the way back it was monotonous and I couldn't wait to get home and back to normal scenery.
  85. OT: Steve, did you see this?

    http://www.salon.com/2017/03/15/everyones-wrong-on-immigration-open-borders-are-the-only-way-to-defeat-trump-and-build-a-better-world

    (archive.org link if you don’t want to give salon.com clicks)

    http://web.archive.org/web/20170316204516/http://www.salon.com/2017/03/15/everyones-wrong-on-immigration-open-borders-are-the-only-way-to-defeat-trump-and-build-a-better-world/

    Everyone’s wrong on immigration: Open borders are the only way to defeat Trump and build a better world. This entire debate is built on cruel and false assumptions. Here’s the truth: Immigrants’ rights are human rights
    ANIS SHIVANI

    > Every time we say that we should let immigrants stay because they do the dirtiest work that native-born folks aren’t willing to do, we should remember that we do not justify our ancestors’ arrival with that logic. We deserve to be here because we have a human right to be, just as we accepted this in the centuries preceding racist federal bureaucracies. We are here because we are humans, not because of our utility toward someone else’s comfort.

    ‘Course maybe it gets exhausting writing the same deeply painful piece over and over.

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    • Replies: @Hrw-500
    There's also Archive.is who could be useful as well, https://archive.is/CLmHb especially the articles then Salon deleted from their website then you won't find on Salon anymore then the RalphRetort mentionned. http://theralphretort.com/salon-removes-old-articles-tried-justify-pedophilia-2020017/
    https://archive.is/0pMoj
    https://archive.is/5FUeq
    https://archive.is/54KOU
  86. @istever_reader
    Mr. Moore,
    I once did I-80, Chicago to California, by myself. Nebraska was so boring even the Nebraskans noted it. I stopped the night in North Platte and saw completely black post cards with the description on the back of "North Platte at night."
    For me the landscape was mesmerising in that I usually do not drive very fast, but found myself often over 90. The landscape changes dramatically entering Wyoming, but I was still going too fast such that I was stopped by the highway patrol. When he asked how fast I was going I answered honestly the speed and my thoughts that driving in Nebraska was so dull that I lost track of the speed. He totally agreed and commiserated with me for 5-10 minutes and let me go with a warning.
    ps I find your comments an interesting addition to Steve's blog

    reader, I drove up from Salt Lake City to Jackson Hole through Idaho’s Swan Valley. Straight road, level ground, wife sleeping in the front passenger seat, my two youngest daughters asleep in the back seat and mountains way off in the distance. Nothing to judge your speed by and soon I am pushing 100 mph, but no real sensation of speed. Never saw a cop but I loved the signs, in the middle of nowhere, that read, “Watch for School Buses,” to pick up whom?

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    • Replies: @William Badwhite
    Driving across eastern Montana once (from VA) to attend a wedding in Oregon, I was driving into the setting sun, late fall time frame. I had the cruise control set on however fast my traveling companion's minivan would go - I seem to recall a top end of 95mph or so. I was just staring out the window...I eventually glanced into the rear view mirror and saw a state trooper getting larger and larger in the mirror. I reached over and switched off the cruise control, figuring maybe I could slow down to 80 or so before he caught up. As he got to maybe 100 yards behind me he eased into the left lane and blew past me without a glance. By the time he passed I was down to about 85 mph and he went by me like we weren't moving. We estimated he was going about 120. Maybe his shift hand ended and he was trying to get home.

    This was early Clinton Administration, say 1992 about. Montana's official speed limit was 70. Prior to Clinton the speed limit on wide open interstates was "Reasonable and Prudent". The federal government demanded they have a real speed limit. They responded by making it 70mph, but set the maximum speeding fine at $5 and any given driver could receive no more than one ticket per day.
  87. @Ragno
    Hsst!....USA TODAY!....

    People don't descend upon Iowa for drunken bacchanals and twerking contests - they live there.

    It's the sight of all those white people - it scratches that itch that only shitlibs pretend they don't feel deep down in their DNA.

    Yeah – I drove across country recently from California, and stopped at a McDonald’s in, I think, Wyoming. It was amazing – all white workers, and all white customers, at least for 15 minutes.

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  88. @Autochthon
    OT: The eye of Soros is coming for Koreans, telling them to jump, and the locals are only asking "how high?" Will China and Japan hold out?

    Earlier this month, K-Pop girl group Mamamoo landed in some hot water after a video clip of the quartet in what many interpreted to be blackface aired at their Seoul concert.

    [T]he group apologized via Facebook the next day, admitting that there was "no excuse" for their "insensitive actions."

    “We were extremely ignorant of blackface and did not understand the implications of our actions,” they posted. “We will be taking time to understand more about our international fans to ensure this never happens again. We hope that you will help to educate us on these and other issues so that we can become better people and better artists.”

    One study, for instance, says that Korea, despite being "rich, well-educated, peaceful" is also ethnically homogenous and demonstrates trends that coincide with racial intolerance. The most damning of this evidence? More than one in three South Koreans don't want a neighbor of a different race, according to the results of a 2010 report by the World Values Survey.

    [O]ne of the group's members, Hwasa, came under fire for singing the N-word in her cover of Beyoncé's "Irreplaceable" just a few weeks ago.

    Mamamoo isn't even the first K-Pop group or artist to don blackface — in 2012, Big Bang's G-Dragon (who have been called the "biggest band in Asia") posted a horrific photo that many believed was a reference to Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen who was gunned down by a vigilante neighborhood watchdog.
     

    I especially like the condemnation of the Korean girl for simply singing a song a Negress sang, with lyrics containing a slur written by the Negress (or, more likely, her songwriters). Talk about a no-win situation....

    Auto, Negress rhymes with regress, seems appropriate.

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  89. @EriK
    Joe,
    I appreciate most of your comments (even this one), but with Buffalo in your moniker I'm suggesting you excersise a bit less enthusiasm for ragging on other cities.

    EriK, Yeah, hmmm, but we’re talking about Des Moines.

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  90. @Patrick Harris
    Perhaps I "ought to give Iowa a try."

    Only took 40 comments for someone to get to the music man.

    “nice looking animal you’ve got there.”
    “yeah, for a horse.”

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  91. @Maj. Kong
    Iowa swung hard against the Democrats last year. Trump was arguably the winner of neighboring MN too, when you discount the votes of resettled Somalis that have no business in this country. (Recall that when resettlement started, it was promised they would return when the war was over)

    The left is hoping that Midwestern nice causes people to feel bad when the bicoastal left calls them evil. Don't knock the strategy, it worked vis-a-vis the LDS after 2008.

    In regards to the LDS church, I don’t think it made much of a change. Same-sex attraction is still considered sinful, children of married homosexual couples can’t be baptized until adulthood, and homosexuals who do marry lose their church membership.
    Yeah, we don’t organize smear-the-queer tournaments anymore /sarcasm, but that’s hardly unreasonable.

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  92. @egregious philbin
    low on scenery, high on smells - iowa provides many memorable smells when driving through it.

    Some of that smell is from the soil. Iowa is blessed with some of the best topsoil on earth.

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  93. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Boomer the Dog
    The best driving in Nebraska, if you have the time, can actually be found about 60 miles north of I-80, up in the Sand Hills region, where Ben Crenshaw, Bill Coore and Jack Nicklaus have designed some world-class golf courses on some of the most stunning terrain I have ever seen. I remember taking a detour from I-80 somewhere around North Platte, driving north to Thedford and following NE Route 2 southeast all the way back down to Grand Island. A truly memorable experience.

    I’ve driven the Sand Hills route from North Platte up to Murdo, South Dakota several times, and the Sand Hills during a dry season are very scenic. But it’s the sort of route that makes you hope your car doesn’t break down. You’ll pass another car maybe once every twenty minutes or so. I’ve driven some of the other small highways all the way through Nebraska and much prefer them to the interstate. They remind you of what car travel was like in the US pre-1980s with little traffic to bother you, and you end up stopping in all sorts of oddball places.

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  94. @Andrew
    Dubuque, Iowa is a great city to visit, and so reccomend people do so. Take a riverboat cruise on the Mississippi, dine out, ride the Fenelon Place funicular and much more.

    The neighboring are of SW Wisconsin are also fantastic. It's easy to spend a couple weeks on vacation between these two areas. You will have a blast!

    Too few people give America a chance for vacation outside of the big cities and Florida. ''Tis a shame, but it means there are no lines or crowds at the attractions.

    Dubuque, Iowa is a great city to visit, and so reccomend people do so. Take a riverboat cruise on the Mississippi, dine out, ride the Fenelon Place funicular and much more.

    Not a Dubuque guy, but been through numerous times to see Iowa family since I was a pup.

    Recommend Eagle Point Park–nice views of the Mississippi. And–a half hour out of town–Beitbach’s, is a nice place for a good feed. He’s a terrific guy. (Come hungry and have the buffet.)

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  95. People are canceling their Iowa vacations because of Steve King’s words.

    Fewer a*holes passing through. I call that a flat out win for the people of Iowa!

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  96. In September 1972 in my brand new two-seater ragtop, whose payments I could afford only because I’d left out the dealer-installed radio, I drove I-80 solo, east to west, coast to coast.

    No radio. All. The. Way.

    First day, all through Pennsylvania was a white-knuckle slog through cacophonous thunderstorms and pelting rain. The rains ended just before Pittsburgh, then West Virginia’s thin slice went by in a wink. Ohio and Indiana conspired to make the driving rather boring – endless rolling landcape of endless “you’ve seen one, you’ve seen ‘em all” farms. By nightfall I’d crossed into Illinois and lodged there overnight. Crossing Illinois was pretty much like crossing Ohio and Indiana. Meh.

    Iowa’s undulating hills of near-ripe cornfields yielded zillions of insects whose collision-burst corpses completely obscured the windshield. Had to stop three times to wipe – no, actually to smear – the aggregation of bug splatters enough to be able see where I was going (at day’s end I had to buy an ice scraper because liberal applications of Windex and rag-scrubbing merely smeared the glazing’s insect cemetery into opacity). Yes, Iowa is a lovely state to behold. When I could see it.

    Nebraska’s dead flat, arrow-straight span of I-80, flanked by cornfields extending to what seemed must be the Edge of The World, with the highway view running into monotonous infinity-perspective, got so boring that, from time to time I engaged the cruise control, sat sideways with my legs over the center console while resting my tootsies on the passenger seat; and because I was bereft of a radio, I twisted the rear-view mirror and had a conversation with myself. Told myself I’d never again buy a car that lacked a radio. (I had my transistor radio with me but for the entire solitary anabasis it never picked up a station.)

    Eyestrain and fatigue impelled me to spend the night lodged in Kearney. Not much happening in Kearney. At least not in those days. But at least I found a motel bar and enjoyed sipping a couple or seven cocktails.

    As I’d never seen the West, the climb through eastern Wyoming, through Medicine Bow forest, up into the Rockies was a majestic, breathtaking revelation. The rest of Wyoming soon got boring. Real fast. Lots of strata-streaked big mountains, few trees, hardscrabble vegetation.

    As my car was brand-new and I had in mind my Dad’s warning not to tax its performance too hard during its break-in period, I stopped in Rawlins for an oil change. The mechanics had no metric tools to remove my European car’s sump plug. Even if they’d had metric tools, the car’s sump plug was not a bolt, but was an externally threaded nipple whose Allen key cavity sported on one of its inner faces a key that was meant to force owners to take their car for oil changes back to the dealer, whose service department had the special cavity-on-one-face Allen key for oil changes. But good old Rocky Mountain ingenuity prevailed: into the plug’s cavity the mechanics hammered the head of an English-threaded bolt and removed the plug by vise-grip-wrenching the bolt’s shank. They even managed to withdraw the bolt head from the re-seated sump plug’s cavity.

    That night I lodged in Cheyenne. Saw my first-ever cowboys! And felt like the east coast tenderfoot that I was.

    By the time I’d threaded across Utah’s rugged crags I felt exhausted. But I pressed on and with night falling as I left Salt Lake City, monstrous electrical storms and downpours of vision-obliterating biblical rains hammered my three hour white-knuckle crossing of the Bonneville Salt Flats to Wendover, where I took lodging for the night in an ancient room reeking of dank – even the mattress and bedding felt sodden – in a rundown fleabag motel.

    The next morning dawned clear, crisp, and dry. In those days there were no speed limits in Nevada, so that for about two or three hundred miles I had the ragtop’s speedometer needle buried at its 140 mph limit peg. The speed was so high that I began to worry that it would buffet the buttoned-up ragtop clear off the windshield and just tear the entire contraption clear off the car, so I slowed down to 90, which felt like I’d regressed to a snail’s pace.

    The worst of the high-altitude driving was that my car was normally aspirated through its carburetor, so that as I ascended mountains its performance dropped off dramatically, to the point at which on climbs, huge semis, with their fuel-injected diesel motors, easily roared past my gasping four-banger. On the downhills, though, I raced madly.

    Crossing into California (at long last!), I pulled into the Truckee Agricultural Inspection Station whose agents had me open the vestigial trunk so they could gaze impassively upon my half-flattened sea bag and small suitcase.

    The last night of lodging I spent in a Holiday Inn in, I think, Daly City. The next morning on Route 84 I navigated up the long series of hairpin switchbacks of the coastal range – I just had to take Route 84 because, after having read Tom Wolfe’s The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, I was keen to see what Ken Kesey’s Merry Pranksters’ former La Honda hangout looked like, and it turned out to be anti-climactically bucolic. Not one vestige of Day-Glo pigment to be seen.

    Down Route 84 to the west face of the coastal range, the sight of the heaving sea just west of Pescadero off California Highway 1, and then at my Monterey duty station, came as a tremendous relief. For the next fifteen months in California, mostly together with my shipmates but sometimes alone, I enjoyed the most memorable peregrinations and adventures.

    Now let’s backtrack a way.

    Iowa is a pretty state. It has fine, bearable summers but has winters more than a mite too cold for my liking – there I once shivered through two winter nights when the mercury had plunged to 13 below zero, and stayed that low also during the daytime. I hope the Social Justice Warriors leave Iowa alone for its own decent Midwestern Nice folks. After all, I’ve since been back to witness the grave damage that Social Justice “Progressives” wreaked upon my erstwhile lovely California haunts.

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    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @marty
    Great story, but, um - I'm from Daly City, and we didn't have a Holiday Inn in '72. Still don't.
  97. Thank you for a fun and informative travelogue. That was a great time to travel and gas was still cheap, too.

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  98. @Random Dude on the Internet
    A lot of my friends and family who are in Iowa have been wailing nonstop about King's comments on their social media accounts. Some of them are outright apologizing for the state to nobody in particular. They don't seem to understand that the coastal elites they desperately want approval from already see them as backward relics of flyover country, no matter how crazy and wacky (and right) their local US representative is. The only time anyone even acknowledges states like Iowa exist is during the primaries and when a new Alexander Payne movie comes out.

    A lot of my friends and family who are in Iowa have been wailing nonstop about King’s comments on their social media accounts.

    Get on their and tell them to have some effing self-respect.

    Seriously this is insane. Steve King didn’t say anything the least bit “offensive” or even “racist” just a statement of fact:

    Wilders understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.

    I’d tell ‘em if they think King’s remarks are offensive, essentially they’ve signed on to a death cult, and consigned their race and culture to disappear.

    Serious, we can’t win unless those of us who are not yet blind, call b.s. on this nonsense and assert the truth.

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  99. @Anon
    Fun fact: Frisco, TX takes its name from the STL-San Francisco railroad (the Frisco).

    Anyhow, it's being overrun by subcontinenters.

    Amazing how many parts of the country of which this is now true. Would be interesting to get an actual estimate of how many are now here. It has to be 5 million plus.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Anecdote: I took my family to an indoor entertainment complex in Frisco recen0 tly. I counted 100 people in the area my family and I were in. Out of that 100, 20 were white, 15 were East Asian and the rest were from the subcontinent. Talk about bowling alone.
  100. @Kyle a
    funny stuff. My mother once stated while on a flight and admiring the Oklahoma landscape from 30,000 ft. "That's some flat land.They should just give it back to the indians."

    “That’s some flat land.They should just give it back to the indians.”

    For tractors, flat land is a feature not a bug.

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  101. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I’m sure Iowans everywhere will be verklempt that GLAAD won’t be blessing Des Moines this year with a Lesbian Transgenders of Color parade.

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  102. @Auntie Analogue
    In September 1972 in my brand new two-seater ragtop, whose payments I could afford only because I'd left out the dealer-installed radio, I drove I-80 solo, east to west, coast to coast.

    No radio. All. The. Way.

    First day, all through Pennsylvania was a white-knuckle slog through cacophonous thunderstorms and pelting rain. The rains ended just before Pittsburgh, then West Virginia's thin slice went by in a wink. Ohio and Indiana conspired to make the driving rather boring - endless rolling landcape of endless "you've seen one, you've seen 'em all" farms. By nightfall I'd crossed into Illinois and lodged there overnight. Crossing Illinois was pretty much like crossing Ohio and Indiana. Meh.

    Iowa's undulating hills of near-ripe cornfields yielded zillions of insects whose collision-burst corpses completely obscured the windshield. Had to stop three times to wipe - no, actually to smear - the aggregation of bug splatters enough to be able see where I was going (at day's end I had to buy an ice scraper because liberal applications of Windex and rag-scrubbing merely smeared the glazing's insect cemetery into opacity). Yes, Iowa is a lovely state to behold. When I could see it.

    Nebraska's dead flat, arrow-straight span of I-80, flanked by cornfields extending to what seemed must be the Edge of The World, with the highway view running into monotonous infinity-perspective, got so boring that, from time to time I engaged the cruise control, sat sideways with my legs over the center console while resting my tootsies on the passenger seat; and because I was bereft of a radio, I twisted the rear-view mirror and had a conversation with myself. Told myself I'd never again buy a car that lacked a radio. (I had my transistor radio with me but for the entire solitary anabasis it never picked up a station.)

    Eyestrain and fatigue impelled me to spend the night lodged in Kearney. Not much happening in Kearney. At least not in those days. But at least I found a motel bar and enjoyed sipping a couple or seven cocktails.

    As I'd never seen the West, the climb through eastern Wyoming, through Medicine Bow forest, up into the Rockies was a majestic, breathtaking revelation. The rest of Wyoming soon got boring. Real fast. Lots of strata-streaked big mountains, few trees, hardscrabble vegetation.

    As my car was brand-new and I had in mind my Dad's warning not to tax its performance too hard during its break-in period, I stopped in Rawlins for an oil change. The mechanics had no metric tools to remove my European car's sump plug. Even if they'd had metric tools, the car's sump plug was not a bolt, but was an externally threaded nipple whose Allen key cavity sported on one of its inner faces a key that was meant to force owners to take their car for oil changes back to the dealer, whose service department had the special cavity-on-one-face Allen key for oil changes. But good old Rocky Mountain ingenuity prevailed: into the plug's cavity the mechanics hammered the head of an English-threaded bolt and removed the plug by vise-grip-wrenching the bolt's shank. They even managed to withdraw the bolt head from the re-seated sump plug's cavity.

    That night I lodged in Cheyenne. Saw my first-ever cowboys! And felt like the east coast tenderfoot that I was.

    By the time I'd threaded across Utah's rugged crags I felt exhausted. But I pressed on and with night falling as I left Salt Lake City, monstrous electrical storms and downpours of vision-obliterating biblical rains hammered my three hour white-knuckle crossing of the Bonneville Salt Flats to Wendover, where I took lodging for the night in an ancient room reeking of dank - even the mattress and bedding felt sodden - in a rundown fleabag motel.

    The next morning dawned clear, crisp, and dry. In those days there were no speed limits in Nevada, so that for about two or three hundred miles I had the ragtop's speedometer needle buried at its 140 mph limit peg. The speed was so high that I began to worry that it would buffet the buttoned-up ragtop clear off the windshield and just tear the entire contraption clear off the car, so I slowed down to 90, which felt like I'd regressed to a snail's pace.

    The worst of the high-altitude driving was that my car was normally aspirated through its carburetor, so that as I ascended mountains its performance dropped off dramatically, to the point at which on climbs, huge semis, with their fuel-injected diesel motors, easily roared past my gasping four-banger. On the downhills, though, I raced madly.

    Crossing into California (at long last!), I pulled into the Truckee Agricultural Inspection Station whose agents had me open the vestigial trunk so they could gaze impassively upon my half-flattened sea bag and small suitcase.

    The last night of lodging I spent in a Holiday Inn in, I think, Daly City. The next morning on Route 84 I navigated up the long series of hairpin switchbacks of the coastal range - I just had to take Route 84 because, after having read Tom Wolfe's The Electric Kool-Aid Acid Test, I was keen to see what Ken Kesey's Merry Pranksters' former La Honda hangout looked like, and it turned out to be anti-climactically bucolic. Not one vestige of Day-Glo pigment to be seen.

    Down Route 84 to the west face of the coastal range, the sight of the heaving sea just west of Pescadero off California Highway 1, and then at my Monterey duty station, came as a tremendous relief. For the next fifteen months in California, mostly together with my shipmates but sometimes alone, I enjoyed the most memorable peregrinations and adventures.

    Now let's backtrack a way.

    Iowa is a pretty state. It has fine, bearable summers but has winters more than a mite too cold for my liking - there I once shivered through two winter nights when the mercury had plunged to 13 below zero, and stayed that low also during the daytime. I hope the Social Justice Warriors leave Iowa alone for its own decent Midwestern Nice folks. After all, I've since been back to witness the grave damage that Social Justice "Progressives" wreaked upon my erstwhile lovely California haunts.

    Great story, but, um – I’m from Daly City, and we didn’t have a Holiday Inn in ’72. Still don’t.

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    • Replies: @Auntie Analogue
    My dear marty, thank you for your kind compliment and for your help to me in clarifying where I might have lodged on that night, which was why I wrote "a Holiday Inn in, I think, Daly City."

    The Holiday Inn may have been in Redwood City. It's most likely that it was north of where Route 84 meets the 101. There's a small possibility that the motel was south of that junction, and that on the morning I checked out I may have backtracked a bit to turn west onto Route 84.

  103. @Cloudbuster
    Joke about Iowa all you want. If I had to choose between being forced to spend the rest of my life in Iowa, or any non-U.S. country, I'd pick Iowa in a heartbeat. I'd also pick Iowa over most of the serious blue states. (For some reason, Iowa is reliably the most blue of the grain belt states).

    You’d pick Iowa over Switzerland?

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  104. @Cloudbuster
    Joke about Iowa all you want. If I had to choose between being forced to spend the rest of my life in Iowa, or any non-U.S. country, I'd pick Iowa in a heartbeat. I'd also pick Iowa over most of the serious blue states. (For some reason, Iowa is reliably the most blue of the grain belt states).

    Joke about Iowa all you want. If I had to choose between being forced to spend the rest of my life in Iowa, or any non-U.S. country, I’d pick Iowa in a heartbeat.

    Any non-U.S. country? Hell, compared to half the United States (Bronx, Chiraq, Detroit, Cleveland, Compton, Oakland, East St. Louis, etc.) Iowa is paradise.

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  105. @Dr. X

    Bernstein, a Sioux City businessman appointed to the board, said the backlash this week reached a "new level."

    "This was the worst one ever. I live in his district and have been following him a long time," he said. "And, being Jewish, I am particularly sensitive to his perspective..."
     
    Really? Even in Iowa?

    And then they say that people who "see Jews in their ham sandwich" are the crazy ones...

    And then they say that people who “see Jews in their ham sandwich” are the crazy ones…

    Don’t worry GabrielM will be by any minute to tell you you’re insane for noticing.

    It’s flat out ridiculous to get lectures on “tolerance” and “eugenics” from a people whose salient characteristic for the past couple thousand years has been a steadfast refusal to integrate with their actual neighbors and have explicit religous strictures on association with outsiders and explicit heriditary membership qualification.

    Despite Bernstein’s comment being all too typical Jewish lecturing and hectoring it does have a certain comic insanity. Because, outside of its general bio-cultural tautology for any people, isn’t

    “understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We can’t restore our civilization with somebody else’s babies.”

    a pretty fair description of the essential Jewish program for the past few thousand years?

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    • Replies: @Marty T
    Over 50 percent of Jews marry non Jews in America. I'd say that's a lot of integrating going on.
  106. Why did I think this comment thread was going to devolve into a discussion about Iowa

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  107. @TheJester
    People go on vacation to Iowa? I thought people went on vacation to get away from it all. If you live in Iowa, you already are away from it all.

    I grew up in the Flint Hills in Kansas. I loved the openness ... the nothingness. Driving two hours and never seeing another car. It quiets the soul, something I suspect many people living in New York City have never experienced.

    I experienced the same thing driving through Eastern Colorado.

    When I first approached the high plains in north Texas, the flatness/emptiness of the landscape was disconcerting and almost vertigo inducing. I had NEVER driven through an area with no trees before. After I got used to it, it was calming and enjoyable. I liked the views of the wind turbines.

    But only on the way TO my destination. On the way back it was monotonous and I couldn’t wait to get home and back to normal scenery.

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  108. @marty
    Great story, but, um - I'm from Daly City, and we didn't have a Holiday Inn in '72. Still don't.

    My dear marty, thank you for your kind compliment and for your help to me in clarifying where I might have lodged on that night, which was why I wrote “a Holiday Inn in, I think, Daly City.”

    The Holiday Inn may have been in Redwood City. It’s most likely that it was north of where Route 84 meets the 101. There’s a small possibility that the motel was south of that junction, and that on the morning I checked out I may have backtracked a bit to turn west onto Route 84.

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  109. @anonguy

    On the other hand, I can also empathize with the character in a Jay McInerney novel who says: “I visited the Midwest once. There was nothing to see and nothing to keep you from seeing it.”
     
    Reminds me of the description of Texas as "miles and miles of miles and miles".

    Reminds me of the description of Texas as “miles and miles of miles and miles”.

    Apparently beauty is in the eye of the beholder as West Texas A&M mean SAT math 480 reading 480 but still manages to attract 2% 0f its student body from overseas.

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  110. @whorefinder
    Eh, this is a lot of "fake news." Basically, a lot of lefties are swarming and sending angry emails/tweets and "vowing" to cancel their trips, but there's no mention of hard numbers or metrics in the article. Just a lot of pointing and kvetching and some blue-leaning Iowans harping on it.

    This is nothing more than the classic Alinskyite/SJW tactic of picking a target, polarizing, freezing it, and making a lot of noise and screaming about retribution without any real action. Iowa and Steve King should relax and laugh at them. They'll simmer down and forget all about it once they move onto their next outrage du jour.

    This reminds of that Crazy Ex-Girlfriend number Steve linked to once, where in the middle of haranguing her daughter the Jewish mother stops to mention about how she and the rest of her synagogue are boycotting cheddar cheese because a Wisconsin Catholic Bishop said "something anti-Semitic" (at the 2:10 mark):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJg1zRgkbno

    This boycott of Iowa will last about as long as that musical number.

    Exactly. It’s just more kabuki outrage.

    It’s a well-worn plot, or “narrative” as everyone likes to call it today. The press reports a story they think will hurt someone they don’t like. The usual idiots get outraged, or claim they’re outraged. A minor and ineffectual mob forms on twitter. In this case the Iowa tourism office is a member of the group whipping up the mob; 60 complaints per day for a story the press reported with national scope is noise. Then the press reports on the ineffectual mob in an effort to keep the mob whipped up.

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    • Replies: @Lurker

    A minor and ineffectual mob forms on twitter
     
    Exactly. A handful of bed wetters.

    But the MSM gleefully quote them as an example of "what the internet is thinking". See also Faceberg.

    But they don't go to unz.com or to Disqus. I can't think why!
  111. There’s a certain beauty to endless cornfields under towering cumulonimbus, with the smells of the country to go with it. 40 years ago I took Iowa at 100 miles a day, on my bicycle. I was never bored, and I met friendly people wherever I stopped.

    The most awesome thing though, was that for thousands of miles (I started in California) it was America, full of Americans. I can’t believe that some people are eager to piss all that away.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Yeah, there are a lot of friendly people in areas where diversity in thin on the ground. I have been driving around Alaska for the past week. I got gas one morning at Haines Junction Yukon. It was 5 above at 7am. The guy walking out of the motel at the same time said it was warming up; he was right - it was -28 the morning before in Fairbanks. I bought gas and the lady said the cup of coffee I poured was free.

    Clerks call me sweetie and hon. I had to cancel a non-refundable hotel reservation last Tuesday because of bad weather and Todd said it was ok that I could use it later. I called the hotel today; Todd wasn't there but the guy who was said he'd take my word for what Todd said.

    Very refreshing to be in a high trust world; I remember when the whole country was like this.
    , @AnotherDad

    The most awesome thing though, was that for thousands of miles (I started in California) it was America, full of Americans. I can’t believe that some people are eager to piss all that away.
     
    Well said IJ. Beautifully said in fact.

    I'm not a big world traveler, but I've visited around 20 nations, including a handful of Latin American ones. They all have their own thing going on with their own character, which has a certain "charm". But, of course, so does *my* nation--which I like even better! It's utterly unclear to me why i'm obliged to turn over my nation to make yet another Latin American one--or some sort of Latinized pastiche. It's a rude, appalling and vicious idea.

    Your statement captured this perfectly--beautifully. Well done.
  112. @Jim Don Bob
    www.walldrug.com/ is in South Dakota.

    Wow, really? It’s almost as if I were making a jest about how dull and monotonous driving through Iowa (and the Midwest generally) is, using the famous Wall Drug and its ubiquitous billboards….

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  113. @International Jew
    There's a certain beauty to endless cornfields under towering cumulonimbus, with the smells of the country to go with it. 40 years ago I took Iowa at 100 miles a day, on my bicycle. I was never bored, and I met friendly people wherever I stopped.

    The most awesome thing though, was that for thousands of miles (I started in California) it was America, full of Americans. I can't believe that some people are eager to piss all that away.

    Yeah, there are a lot of friendly people in areas where diversity in thin on the ground. I have been driving around Alaska for the past week. I got gas one morning at Haines Junction Yukon. It was 5 above at 7am. The guy walking out of the motel at the same time said it was warming up; he was right – it was -28 the morning before in Fairbanks. I bought gas and the lady said the cup of coffee I poured was free.

    Clerks call me sweetie and hon. I had to cancel a non-refundable hotel reservation last Tuesday because of bad weather and Todd said it was ok that I could use it later. I called the hotel today; Todd wasn’t there but the guy who was said he’d take my word for what Todd said.

    Very refreshing to be in a high trust world; I remember when the whole country was like this.

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  114. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Boomer the Dog
    The best driving in Nebraska, if you have the time, can actually be found about 60 miles north of I-80, up in the Sand Hills region, where Ben Crenshaw, Bill Coore and Jack Nicklaus have designed some world-class golf courses on some of the most stunning terrain I have ever seen. I remember taking a detour from I-80 somewhere around North Platte, driving north to Thedford and following NE Route 2 southeast all the way back down to Grand Island. A truly memorable experience.

    Normally if somebody ends up in Thedford, it’s by accident. Or they are headed up to Sturgis.

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  115. I’ve driven through the Driftless region, on both the Iowa and the Wisconsin side, during the winter, and will add my agreement that its a beautiful area. But it actually is a good example of the problem with a Midwestern vacation for people not from the region.

    I grew up in the Northeast, and the Driftless region reminded me a good deal of Vermont. The problem is that if you are from the Northeast, and you like that sort of thing, you don’t have to travel all the way to Wisconsin or Iowa. You can just go to Vermont. Vermont still does “Vermont” better than anyplace else n the country. Even the good parts of the Midwest are sort of knock-offs of what you can get in the other regions of the country.

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  116. I, for one, will be enjoying my Iowa vacation this summer with heightened zest and zeal!

    I encourage all readers to visit Orange City, in iSteve-noted Sioux County, home of a famed annual Tulip Festival, and starting point for this year’s RAGBRAI, i.e. the Register’s Annual Great Bicycle Ride Across Iowa.

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  117. This is like a family reunion. Breitbach’s? You know the owner, too? A beloved character in NE Iowa whose restaurant people will drive hundreds of miles to visit for family style dining. He greets every person in the restaurant and makes sure you are getting what you want. The view of the MS R valley out the back door is spectacular. So is Eagle Pt Park. If you get farther north, Pikes Peak St Park offers another fantastic view of the MS River valley and confluence w the Wisconsin River 400 feet below. Yes, the same Zebulon Pike of the Colorado mountain fame, he got around. If you are a cyclist, it’s great riding territory. The locals won’t run you off the road either.

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  118. @Boomstick
    Exactly. It's just more kabuki outrage.

    It's a well-worn plot, or "narrative" as everyone likes to call it today. The press reports a story they think will hurt someone they don't like. The usual idiots get outraged, or claim they're outraged. A minor and ineffectual mob forms on twitter. In this case the Iowa tourism office is a member of the group whipping up the mob; 60 complaints per day for a story the press reported with national scope is noise. Then the press reports on the ineffectual mob in an effort to keep the mob whipped up.

    A minor and ineffectual mob forms on twitter

    Exactly. A handful of bed wetters.

    But the MSM gleefully quote them as an example of “what the internet is thinking”. See also Faceberg.

    But they don’t go to unz.com or to Disqus. I can’t think why!

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  119. I almost forgot this old gem ….

    Q: What’s the best thing to come out of Iowa?
    A: I-80

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  120. @Autochthon
    OT: The eye of Soros is coming for Koreans, telling them to jump, and the locals are only asking "how high?" Will China and Japan hold out?

    Earlier this month, K-Pop girl group Mamamoo landed in some hot water after a video clip of the quartet in what many interpreted to be blackface aired at their Seoul concert.

    [T]he group apologized via Facebook the next day, admitting that there was "no excuse" for their "insensitive actions."

    “We were extremely ignorant of blackface and did not understand the implications of our actions,” they posted. “We will be taking time to understand more about our international fans to ensure this never happens again. We hope that you will help to educate us on these and other issues so that we can become better people and better artists.”

    One study, for instance, says that Korea, despite being "rich, well-educated, peaceful" is also ethnically homogenous and demonstrates trends that coincide with racial intolerance. The most damning of this evidence? More than one in three South Koreans don't want a neighbor of a different race, according to the results of a 2010 report by the World Values Survey.

    [O]ne of the group's members, Hwasa, came under fire for singing the N-word in her cover of Beyoncé's "Irreplaceable" just a few weeks ago.

    Mamamoo isn't even the first K-Pop group or artist to don blackface — in 2012, Big Bang's G-Dragon (who have been called the "biggest band in Asia") posted a horrific photo that many believed was a reference to Trayvon Martin, an unarmed black teen who was gunned down by a vigilante neighborhood watchdog.
     

    I especially like the condemnation of the Korean girl for simply singing a song a Negress sang, with lyrics containing a slur written by the Negress (or, more likely, her songwriters). Talk about a no-win situation....

    “We were extremely ignorant of blackface…”

    Too bad.
    Pruneface ain’t ignorant of you.

    Willkommen to Slander Properly Low Center Holodex.

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  121. @International Jew
    There's a certain beauty to endless cornfields under towering cumulonimbus, with the smells of the country to go with it. 40 years ago I took Iowa at 100 miles a day, on my bicycle. I was never bored, and I met friendly people wherever I stopped.

    The most awesome thing though, was that for thousands of miles (I started in California) it was America, full of Americans. I can't believe that some people are eager to piss all that away.

    The most awesome thing though, was that for thousands of miles (I started in California) it was America, full of Americans. I can’t believe that some people are eager to piss all that away.

    Well said IJ. Beautifully said in fact.

    I’m not a big world traveler, but I’ve visited around 20 nations, including a handful of Latin American ones. They all have their own thing going on with their own character, which has a certain “charm”. But, of course, so does *my* nation–which I like even better! It’s utterly unclear to me why i’m obliged to turn over my nation to make yet another Latin American one–or some sort of Latinized pastiche. It’s a rude, appalling and vicious idea.

    Your statement captured this perfectly–beautifully. Well done.

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  122. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Bleuteaux
    Amazing how many parts of the country of which this is now true. Would be interesting to get an actual estimate of how many are now here. It has to be 5 million plus.

    Anecdote: I took my family to an indoor entertainment complex in Frisco recen0 tly. I counted 100 people in the area my family and I were in. Out of that 100, 20 were white, 15 were East Asian and the rest were from the subcontinent. Talk about bowling alone.

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    • Replies: @Bleuteaux
    I've mentioned this previously, but I live in a modest sized population part of the Midwest, with one major private sector employer left and one major public sector employer. An associate with a kid in grade school has told me that in the two best school districts (upper class) in the area, 60-70% of the kids in preschool and kindergarten are Indian.
  123. Farmers don’t do tourism. Maybe the SJW’s should show solidarity by refusing to eat the produce of red counties!

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  124. @the cruncher
    OT: Steve, did you see this?

    http://www.salon.com/2017/03/15/everyones-wrong-on-immigration-open-borders-are-the-only-way-to-defeat-trump-and-build-a-better-world

    (archive.org link if you don't want to give salon.com clicks)

    http://web.archive.org/web/20170316204516/http://www.salon.com/2017/03/15/everyones-wrong-on-immigration-open-borders-are-the-only-way-to-defeat-trump-and-build-a-better-world/

    Everyone’s wrong on immigration: Open borders are the only way to defeat Trump and build a better world. This entire debate is built on cruel and false assumptions. Here's the truth: Immigrants' rights are human rights
    ANIS SHIVANI

    > Every time we say that we should let immigrants stay because they do the dirtiest work that native-born folks aren’t willing to do, we should remember that we do not justify our ancestors’ arrival with that logic. We deserve to be here because we have a human right to be, just as we accepted this in the centuries preceding racist federal bureaucracies. We are here because we are humans, not because of our utility toward someone else’s comfort.

    'Course maybe it gets exhausting writing the same deeply painful piece over and over.

    There’s also Archive.is who could be useful as well, https://archive.is/CLmHb especially the articles then Salon deleted from their website then you won’t find on Salon anymore then the RalphRetort mentionned. http://theralphretort.com/salon-removes-old-articles-tried-justify-pedophilia-2020017/

    https://archive.is/0pMoj

    https://archive.is/5FUeq

    https://archive.is/54KOU

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  125. Charles Murray was born in Iowa. I’m surprised the state is still permitted to remain in the nation.

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  126. @Jonathan Mason
    It seems improbable that anyone from outside Iowa would ever go there for a vacation, but I suppose if you are the owner of a local business like a hotel or restaurant that caters to locals or people traveling from neighboring states, you might have some worries about whether adverse publicity could affect your business.

    At the time of BP's Macondo oil rig disaster off the coast of Louisiana, I remember that hoteliers in Tampa Florida were claiming they had large numbers of vacation booking cancellations and looking for compensation even though no oil had been within hundreds of miles of Tampa area beaches (which are not much to look at anyway.)

    Iowa voted for Trump by almost double digits. Most of the neighboring states voted for him. And leftists don’t vacation in Iowa anyway. Steve King wins re-election easily. Iowans don’t have anything to apologize for, and I’d like to visit sometime to check out their less stressful way of life.

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  127. @Patrick Harris
    Perhaps I "ought to give Iowa a try."

    Me too! And I even have a little Jewish blood. I’d check out a lake during the summer and maybe a nice farmer’s museum or something. Maybe an early season football game while I’m at it.

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    • Replies: @Buck Turgidson
    You guys should do RAGBRAI the last week of July. It's a northern route this year, which means more scenery, more hills, the kettle lakes and Lake Okoboji in NW Iowa, better farmland and topsoil/magic dirt, cooler temperatures, more greenery. Major party. Great food. Pork chops and Iowa-style burritos and frozen latte drinks and booze along the route every day. The ride ends in Lansing, home of Kee High school and the nation's winningest high school baseball coach ever. RAGBRAI logistics can be kinda gnarly though, alotta people and you might end up sleeping in a tent at the county fairgounds in a thunderstorm with 2,000 new friends.
  128. @Anon
    Anecdote: I took my family to an indoor entertainment complex in Frisco recen0 tly. I counted 100 people in the area my family and I were in. Out of that 100, 20 were white, 15 were East Asian and the rest were from the subcontinent. Talk about bowling alone.

    I’ve mentioned this previously, but I live in a modest sized population part of the Midwest, with one major private sector employer left and one major public sector employer. An associate with a kid in grade school has told me that in the two best school districts (upper class) in the area, 60-70% of the kids in preschool and kindergarten are Indian.

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  129. @AnotherDad

    And then they say that people who “see Jews in their ham sandwich” are the crazy ones…
     
    Don't worry GabrielM will be by any minute to tell you you're insane for noticing.

    It's flat out ridiculous to get lectures on "tolerance" and "eugenics" from a people whose salient characteristic for the past couple thousand years has been a steadfast refusal to integrate with their actual neighbors and have explicit religous strictures on association with outsiders and explicit heriditary membership qualification.

    Despite Bernstein's comment being all too typical Jewish lecturing and hectoring it does have a certain comic insanity. Because, outside of its general bio-cultural tautology for any people, isn't


    "understands that culture and demographics are our destiny. We can't restore our civilization with somebody else's babies."
     
    a pretty fair description of the essential Jewish program for the past few thousand years?

    Over 50 percent of Jews marry non Jews in America. I’d say that’s a lot of integrating going on.

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  130. @Marty T
    Me too! And I even have a little Jewish blood. I'd check out a lake during the summer and maybe a nice farmer's museum or something. Maybe an early season football game while I'm at it.

    You guys should do RAGBRAI the last week of July. It’s a northern route this year, which means more scenery, more hills, the kettle lakes and Lake Okoboji in NW Iowa, better farmland and topsoil/magic dirt, cooler temperatures, more greenery. Major party. Great food. Pork chops and Iowa-style burritos and frozen latte drinks and booze along the route every day. The ride ends in Lansing, home of Kee High school and the nation’s winningest high school baseball coach ever. RAGBRAI logistics can be kinda gnarly though, alotta people and you might end up sleeping in a tent at the county fairgounds in a thunderstorm with 2,000 new friends.

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  131. @whorefinder
    Eh, this is a lot of "fake news." Basically, a lot of lefties are swarming and sending angry emails/tweets and "vowing" to cancel their trips, but there's no mention of hard numbers or metrics in the article. Just a lot of pointing and kvetching and some blue-leaning Iowans harping on it.

    This is nothing more than the classic Alinskyite/SJW tactic of picking a target, polarizing, freezing it, and making a lot of noise and screaming about retribution without any real action. Iowa and Steve King should relax and laugh at them. They'll simmer down and forget all about it once they move onto their next outrage du jour.

    This reminds of that Crazy Ex-Girlfriend number Steve linked to once, where in the middle of haranguing her daughter the Jewish mother stops to mention about how she and the rest of her synagogue are boycotting cheddar cheese because a Wisconsin Catholic Bishop said "something anti-Semitic" (at the 2:10 mark):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VJg1zRgkbno

    This boycott of Iowa will last about as long as that musical number.

    Post-election exodus to Canada by various tabloid people seems to have tapered off to zero. That leaves more time for domestic focus, and Iowa is having its caucuses probed.

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  132. @Buffalo Joe
    reader, I drove up from Salt Lake City to Jackson Hole through Idaho's Swan Valley. Straight road, level ground, wife sleeping in the front passenger seat, my two youngest daughters asleep in the back seat and mountains way off in the distance. Nothing to judge your speed by and soon I am pushing 100 mph, but no real sensation of speed. Never saw a cop but I loved the signs, in the middle of nowhere, that read, "Watch for School Buses," to pick up whom?

    Driving across eastern Montana once (from VA) to attend a wedding in Oregon, I was driving into the setting sun, late fall time frame. I had the cruise control set on however fast my traveling companion’s minivan would go – I seem to recall a top end of 95mph or so. I was just staring out the window…I eventually glanced into the rear view mirror and saw a state trooper getting larger and larger in the mirror. I reached over and switched off the cruise control, figuring maybe I could slow down to 80 or so before he caught up. As he got to maybe 100 yards behind me he eased into the left lane and blew past me without a glance. By the time he passed I was down to about 85 mph and he went by me like we weren’t moving. We estimated he was going about 120. Maybe his shift hand ended and he was trying to get home.

    This was early Clinton Administration, say 1992 about. Montana’s official speed limit was 70. Prior to Clinton the speed limit on wide open interstates was “Reasonable and Prudent”. The federal government demanded they have a real speed limit. They responded by making it 70mph, but set the maximum speeding fine at $5 and any given driver could receive no more than one ticket per day.

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    • Replies: @FPD72
    Actually, the national speed limit was eliminated in 1995 while Clinton was in office. It had been modified to 65 for rural interstates in 1987 but some states continued the 55 limit even on interstates until the national limit was eliminated. Most states returned to their pre-1973 limits, although a few raised then higher and some raised them but didn't return them to their previous highs.

    I'm no fan of the Clinton clan but am content to blame Bill for his actual misdeeds. That target environment is rich enough for this critic.
  133. @William Badwhite
    Driving across eastern Montana once (from VA) to attend a wedding in Oregon, I was driving into the setting sun, late fall time frame. I had the cruise control set on however fast my traveling companion's minivan would go - I seem to recall a top end of 95mph or so. I was just staring out the window...I eventually glanced into the rear view mirror and saw a state trooper getting larger and larger in the mirror. I reached over and switched off the cruise control, figuring maybe I could slow down to 80 or so before he caught up. As he got to maybe 100 yards behind me he eased into the left lane and blew past me without a glance. By the time he passed I was down to about 85 mph and he went by me like we weren't moving. We estimated he was going about 120. Maybe his shift hand ended and he was trying to get home.

    This was early Clinton Administration, say 1992 about. Montana's official speed limit was 70. Prior to Clinton the speed limit on wide open interstates was "Reasonable and Prudent". The federal government demanded they have a real speed limit. They responded by making it 70mph, but set the maximum speeding fine at $5 and any given driver could receive no more than one ticket per day.

    Actually, the national speed limit was eliminated in 1995 while Clinton was in office. It had been modified to 65 for rural interstates in 1987 but some states continued the 55 limit even on interstates until the national limit was eliminated. Most states returned to their pre-1973 limits, although a few raised then higher and some raised them but didn’t return them to their previous highs.

    I’m no fan of the Clinton clan but am content to blame Bill for his actual misdeeds. That target environment is rich enough for this critic.

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  134. @Chrisnonymous
    The fuss over racism in Asia is continual but doesn't come to much...

    http://www.newsslinger.com/wp-content/uploads/2014/01/rsz_ana-racist-advert-japan-01.jpg

    http://3.bp.blogspot.com/-6qfTIeaS65E/UcMTpNxazqI/AAAAAAAAHPo/cNdpsksZm20/s1600/Screen+Shot+2013-06-20+at+10.32.00+AM.png

    So far, Japan and China remain bastions of resistance from what I can tell. Japan by simply not having the levers of her government being all that vulnerable to democracy; China by not having a democracy and outright resisting foreign influence because it’d be bad for the Party.

    Korea has demonstrated little will to resist, for one reason or another – that I know of, anyway.

    Perhaps the best tell of the future is what appears as “cool” to the population. You would know better than me, as I haven’t visited Japan much, but so far, liberal values haven’t quite reached highest levels of status in Japan.

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    • Replies: @dfordoom

    So far, Japan and China remain bastions of resistance from what I can tell. Japan by simply not having the levers of her government being all that vulnerable to democracy; China by not having a democracy
     
    It seems quite possible that every country foolish enough to embrace democracy will eventually destroy itself. Democracy is cancer.
  135. @Daniel Chieh
    So far, Japan and China remain bastions of resistance from what I can tell. Japan by simply not having the levers of her government being all that vulnerable to democracy; China by not having a democracy and outright resisting foreign influence because it'd be bad for the Party.

    Korea has demonstrated little will to resist, for one reason or another - that I know of, anyway.

    Perhaps the best tell of the future is what appears as "cool" to the population. You would know better than me, as I haven't visited Japan much, but so far, liberal values haven't quite reached highest levels of status in Japan.

    So far, Japan and China remain bastions of resistance from what I can tell. Japan by simply not having the levers of her government being all that vulnerable to democracy; China by not having a democracy

    It seems quite possible that every country foolish enough to embrace democracy will eventually destroy itself. Democracy is cancer.

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Comments are closed.

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