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Commenter Irish Paleo offers a summary of lessons from the Google Fiasco:

The number of “irony overload” moments I’ve had with this Google memo story is unreal:

1. Man writes memo in which he complains, inter alia, that his employer is hostile to dissenting points of view. Employer plays straight into the stereotype by firing him for expressing a dissenting point of view.

2. Man writes memo in which he suggests that women are more emotional than men. Feminists and prominent tech industry women have public emotional meltdown and employer fires man for hurting their delicate feelings, thereby playing (you guessed it) straight into the stereotype.

3. Man writes memo defending his employer’s hiring policies against accusations of discrimination. Employer responds by firing him, thereby implicitly validating accusations to the effect that its hiring policies are discriminatory.

4. A company with a US$650 billion market cap and a CEO who took home US$200 million last year fires an employee for expressing his opinions on an internal forum curated by the company itself in probable violation of California labour laws designed to protect, inter alia, union organising and nobody on the political left can stop gloating and come to the defence of the fired worker.

5. A company which has made literally hundreds of billions monetising the skills of highly intelligent Aspergerish males is shocked (Shocked, I tell ya!!!!) that some of them might:

(a) not unquestioningly believe that millions of years of evolution and the vastly different selection pressures to which different populations and sub-groups of populations have been subject over those millions of years cannot possibly, conceivably have anything to with the demographic profile of industries and professions; and

(b) might not have the social cop-on to keep that lack of credulity to themselves.

6. A company whose executives are supposedly so prejudiced and bigoted that they turn away obvious talent based on biological factors that have nothing whatsoever to do with the bottom line somehow ended up being worth US$650 billion and having close to monopolistic power in the provision of internet search facilities and nobody in the mainstream commentariat can bring themselves to notice the complete incongruity and irreconcilability of the two foregoing propositions.

Here, in my view, are the take-outs from the l’affaire Damore:

1. When an industry (e.g. manufacturing) is sucked into the bureaucratic vortex created by parasitic social justice jihadis and gradually accretes layer-after-layer of inert bureaucracy dedicated to the manufacture and management of grievance, it becomes less profitable and throws off progressively fewer surplus resources for rent seekers to feed off and the social justice jihadis start to lose interest in it.

2. Conversely, when an industry (e.g. ICT) manages to stay out of the vortex’s gravitational pull, it becomes much more profitable and, in so doing, generates vast billions’ worth of surplus cash which attracts social justice jihadis in their droves just as refuse attracts rats.



In the long term, therefore, both honest commerce and the social justice jihad are doomed. If an industry manages to avoid the parasites for long enough, it becomes too big and juicy for the parasites to ignore. However, once the parasites engorge themselves, they’ll make that industry as inert and uninteresting as those they have already infested.

3. Sailer theorises (and he’s almost certainly correct to a point) that Google is being plagued by a phenomenon that it thought would never afflict it. However, I fear that this may be somewhat over-optimistic. It cannot have escaped the attention of Google, now that it has gone from plucky upstart to a massive scale gigantised incumbent, that there are two ways to make money in a business environment increasingly defined by administrative state harassment.

(a) The first is to escape the attention of the administrative state and the social justice jihadis and to operate in one of the few remaining corners of the economy where the free market’s writ still runs.

(b) The second is that, like the financial services sector, you effectively convert yourself into a de facto emanation of the administrative state and make money through influencing public policy rather than creating wealth. IT is an “adapt or die” industry. It has perhaps occurred to people like Google CEO Sundar Pichai that if Google can lead the IT industry into a massively bureaucratised business model with layers of HR administrators, sensitivity coaches, VPs for diversity and community relations and “equality” tsars, it can, by voluntarily loading its body up with parasites, require all industry players to do the same – including small start-up players whose competitive threat to Google can be eliminated by virtue of social justice jihadis crushing them with their increasingly ridiculous financial demands.

4. For decades, companies like Google were able to avoid the wrath of social justice jihadis because, as new players which had no institutional history within the supposedly dark ages of 1900 to 1980, they could claim to be “new” and thus entirely “meritocratic”. The problem is that, being run by people who were ruthlessly greedy for money and brought up in the culturally Marxist environs of the western metropolitan areas of the late 20th century, their claims to be entirely meritocratic in their hiring policies have largely turned out to be correct – which is the problem. Social justice jihadis have been utterly humiliated by the fact the most politically correct industry there is, which did everything it possibly could and more to fight “privilege” and “bias” ended up being one of the least “diverse” (as the jihadis define the term), hence their feral obsession with destroying it.

5. I can’t say I feel too sorry for Mr. Damore. I read his memo and it’s full of PC tropes about “valuing” the richness of “diversity” and it is, in fact, a manifesto for precisely the sort of bland centrism that has banished precisely the rational thought whose absence Mr. Damore rightly feels impoverishes modern policy discourse. In any event, I presume that (a) Peter Thiel will give him a job; and (b) it’ll pay rather better than the one he lost at Google. In any event, good luck to him but I shed no tears.

6. Speaking of the aforementioned Mr. Thiel, he does point to an alternative future for the IT industry, namely to get into bed with Mr. Crony Capitalism himself, namely Donald Trump. If they can hold their collective nose and do business with the Donald, he might return the favour by releasing his wrath onto the jihadis by, for instance, eliminating funding for universities which teach and promote bogus concepts like “privilege” and “microaggressions”. Of course, that might require them to do something about their addiction to cheap immigrant labour imported by virtue of H-1B Visas, but hey, there’s a price for everything in life.

 
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    []
  1. Melendwyr says: • Website

    So either way, freedom and justice are doomed? The only choice is which boot we’re crushed beneath?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rapparee
    "The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance."

    -John Philpot Curran

    , @Nico
    The thing is, your pessimism ironically is born of the same ideology that has animated these parasites: Cartesianism.

    The obsession with an efficient and effective government is part and parcel of the Party of Reason. There is no room for favoritism because every man, woman and child is a bland, faceless interchangeable algebraic entity. All that matters is consent and "objectivity."

    In reality this is hogwash. Suppose the U.S. had the choice of awarding a defense contract to a British company and awarding the same to a Gulf country. All other things being equal, I think we would agree that the contract should be awarded to the British company for reasons that regular iSteve readers (except Corvinus) must be acutely aware. (George W. Bush, by the way, favored transferring the contract to the Jihadist power, in the real-life scenario that inspired this tale.)

    Here's the thing: we are also acutely aware that all other things are NOT equal between a Western-run company and an Arab-run one.

    (In fact, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the laws of thermodynamics suggest that they never are. Of the many ways in which they do so, this is how the social sciences trip up the most often: because social observations amount to documentations of abstractions at the highest level, a mind which is too disconnected or too specialized looks for parallels and comparisons in the most absurd of places. And the U.S.'s ever-tightening valuation of specialized credentials explain why our country has done such damage in the social sciences, by cranking out so many "thinkers" who cannot contextualize anything.)

    But the minute you begin to notice a difference between the West and the rest and act upon this observation, you have acted in violation of the liberal Cartesian narrative whereupon everything should be translated to squared-off numbers on a balance sheet. The critics will warn that if you keep pushing this "instinctive" favoritism and prejudice you may push over the deep edge into entrenched privilege and corruption.

    Indeed, this is the "crony capitalism" à la Trump spoken above. But as Irish Paleo points out there is a price for everything. A human society, in which I am free to discriminate in favor of what I know to be tried and true, seems worth the risk of a bit of cronyism, and the liberty to go about my affairs under the nose of an inefficient and ineffective government definitely has some appeal. (Though I must admit I have a high enough opinion of my abilities that I am confident I could carve out a rentable niche in the new "unfair," pseodo-feudal and illiberal - but NOT totalitarian - playing field.)

    If you're still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that "life is not a sojourn," allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?
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  2. Rapparee says:
    @Melendwyr
    So either way, freedom and justice are doomed? The only choice is which boot we're crushed beneath?

    The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance.

    -John Philpot Curran

    Read More
  3. Nico says:
    @Melendwyr
    So either way, freedom and justice are doomed? The only choice is which boot we're crushed beneath?

    The thing is, your pessimism ironically is born of the same ideology that has animated these parasites: Cartesianism.

    The obsession with an efficient and effective government is part and parcel of the Party of Reason. There is no room for favoritism because every man, woman and child is a bland, faceless interchangeable algebraic entity. All that matters is consent and “objectivity.”

    In reality this is hogwash. Suppose the U.S. had the choice of awarding a defense contract to a British company and awarding the same to a Gulf country. All other things being equal, I think we would agree that the contract should be awarded to the British company for reasons that regular iSteve readers (except Corvinus) must be acutely aware. (George W. Bush, by the way, favored transferring the contract to the Jihadist power, in the real-life scenario that inspired this tale.)

    Here’s the thing: we are also acutely aware that all other things are NOT equal between a Western-run company and an Arab-run one.

    (In fact, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the laws of thermodynamics suggest that they never are. Of the many ways in which they do so, this is how the social sciences trip up the most often: because social observations amount to documentations of abstractions at the highest level, a mind which is too disconnected or too specialized looks for parallels and comparisons in the most absurd of places. And the U.S.’s ever-tightening valuation of specialized credentials explain why our country has done such damage in the social sciences, by cranking out so many “thinkers” who cannot contextualize anything.)

    But the minute you begin to notice a difference between the West and the rest and act upon this observation, you have acted in violation of the liberal Cartesian narrative whereupon everything should be translated to squared-off numbers on a balance sheet. The critics will warn that if you keep pushing this “instinctive” favoritism and prejudice you may push over the deep edge into entrenched privilege and corruption.

    Indeed, this is the “crony capitalism” à la Trump spoken above. But as Irish Paleo points out there is a price for everything. A human society, in which I am free to discriminate in favor of what I know to be tried and true, seems worth the risk of a bit of cronyism, and the liberty to go about my affairs under the nose of an inefficient and ineffective government definitely has some appeal. (Though I must admit I have a high enough opinion of my abilities that I am confident I could carve out a rentable niche in the new “unfair,” pseodo-feudal and illiberal – but NOT totalitarian – playing field.)

    If you’re still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    Read More
    • Agree: Mikey Darmody
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Dr. Lexus has examined your writings and offers the following diagnosis:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oCIo4MCO-_U
    , @Anonymous
    The idea of an efficient, lean government scrupulously dispensing services with no corruption is a kind of prog/libertoid millenarian cult notion. For a good satire of this chimera cf. the Yes, Minister episode "The Great Middle Class Rip-Off"
    , @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in?"

    Something in between not getting chopped up, dumped in a car trunk, and buried in an undisclosed area a la Scorcese's "Goodfellas".


    "The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today?"

    Mobster Henry Hill, of "Goodfellas" made a second comeback, so to speak, by going to Vegas and cashing in on the Rat Pack nostalgia, Vegas was better back in the days of Bugsy, the Syndicate, etc.

    The good ol' days weren't always so good. Plus they didn't offer much in the way of cool stuff. No five star hotels, few gourmet restaurants. Just the basics: Gamble, gamble, $2 buffets, extra scotch, Bobby Darin, Frank, Dino, Sammy, and later Elvis at the Sands, Cesars, and Desert Inn. But say the wrong word to the wrong connect-a-guy and one could wind up like Jimmy Hoffa.

    Nothing wrong with modern Vegas per se. What is disturbing is the continued presence of illegals flooding the Strip passing out fliers. Clean up illegal immigration and the city's not so bad for 2017.


    "And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?"

    While I would never presume to speak for The Last Real Calvinist, do allow me to mention John 3:16. And that's well worth the price of sojurning thru modern Vegas, with or without the buffet.

    , @Anonymous
    If you’re still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    Vegas cool in the JFK/MM era was the height of men being men and women being women. Of course, all the casinos were owned and run by the mafia, and everyone knew it. But it was ring-a-ding-ding, and watching movies of it all shows that everyone, men and women, were having a really good time. By contrast, today it's just a way to lose money and sleep in clean, but crummy hotel rooms.

    The recent news of Britney Spears being charged by a demented fan onstage in LV reminds us that things have changed for the worse. Just the fact that Britney Spears is the modern Las Vegas entertainment is bad enough.
    , @Yak-15
    I can easily use empirical evidence, as most here do, to document why I would rather go with the Brits over the Gulfies. The intellectual heft of noticing is undeniable because there are numerous statistics and research pieces that underlie it.

    This is why I track all the research of HBD, IQ, etc - so as to have irrefutable evidence of my worldview when questioned by others.
  4. SteveM says:

    Parenthetically, speaking of diversity, I wonder what the percentage is of software developers at Google (and Silicon Valley generally) who are over 45?

    I wonder how many experienced developers/programmers who are 45+ would even get an interview at those companies.

    If a senior level developer published those statistics and ruminated about age discrimination, I wonder what the response would be in the C-Suites to that legal time-bomb.

    Read More
    • Replies: @the cruncher
    If you can pass the interview(s), they'll take you. The older ones tend to stick around longer anyway, and not run off to a startup (my not massively-backed-up observation). It's true that the crowd is majority younger, but when I was there, it looked like that's where all of the Valley's missing older white guys were.
  5. Jack D says:
    @Nico
    The thing is, your pessimism ironically is born of the same ideology that has animated these parasites: Cartesianism.

    The obsession with an efficient and effective government is part and parcel of the Party of Reason. There is no room for favoritism because every man, woman and child is a bland, faceless interchangeable algebraic entity. All that matters is consent and "objectivity."

    In reality this is hogwash. Suppose the U.S. had the choice of awarding a defense contract to a British company and awarding the same to a Gulf country. All other things being equal, I think we would agree that the contract should be awarded to the British company for reasons that regular iSteve readers (except Corvinus) must be acutely aware. (George W. Bush, by the way, favored transferring the contract to the Jihadist power, in the real-life scenario that inspired this tale.)

    Here's the thing: we are also acutely aware that all other things are NOT equal between a Western-run company and an Arab-run one.

    (In fact, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the laws of thermodynamics suggest that they never are. Of the many ways in which they do so, this is how the social sciences trip up the most often: because social observations amount to documentations of abstractions at the highest level, a mind which is too disconnected or too specialized looks for parallels and comparisons in the most absurd of places. And the U.S.'s ever-tightening valuation of specialized credentials explain why our country has done such damage in the social sciences, by cranking out so many "thinkers" who cannot contextualize anything.)

    But the minute you begin to notice a difference between the West and the rest and act upon this observation, you have acted in violation of the liberal Cartesian narrative whereupon everything should be translated to squared-off numbers on a balance sheet. The critics will warn that if you keep pushing this "instinctive" favoritism and prejudice you may push over the deep edge into entrenched privilege and corruption.

    Indeed, this is the "crony capitalism" à la Trump spoken above. But as Irish Paleo points out there is a price for everything. A human society, in which I am free to discriminate in favor of what I know to be tried and true, seems worth the risk of a bit of cronyism, and the liberty to go about my affairs under the nose of an inefficient and ineffective government definitely has some appeal. (Though I must admit I have a high enough opinion of my abilities that I am confident I could carve out a rentable niche in the new "unfair," pseodo-feudal and illiberal - but NOT totalitarian - playing field.)

    If you're still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that "life is not a sojourn," allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    Dr. Lexus has examined your writings and offers the following diagnosis:

    Read More
  6. Sunbeam says:

    The post is interesting.

    But there is an outside.

    By that I mean I can use a Chinese search engine, use Ali Baba instead of Amazon, Facebook, and EBay.

    “It has perhaps occurred to people like Google CEO Sundar Pichai that if Google can lead the IT industry into a massively bureaucratised business model with layers of HR administrators, sensitivity coaches, VPs for diversity and community relations and “equality” tsars, it can, by voluntarily loading its body up with parasites, require all industry players to do the same – including small start-up players whose competitive threat to Google can be eliminated by virtue of social justice jihadis crushing them with their increasingly ridiculous financial demands.”

    How is this going to work, when in a manner akin to overseas manufacturers avoiding US safety and environmental laws, foreign competitors compete directly with these Silicon Valley concerns?

    These guys (Silicon Valley) don’t have sh#t. This is the easiest freaking thing in the universe for a foreign competitor to compete directly with all these guys. For god’s sake a foreign concern doesn’t even have higher transportation costs for shipping their widgets from Shanghai instead of Cleveland.

    Seriously what’s left out there? All these “Tech” things are software. Things that are easily (relatively speaking) duplicated somewhere else. Not sure how much chip manufacture and design still takes place out there, but is someone going to tell me that:

    1) It can’t be done in China? (Or Japan or Korea or Russia for that matter?)
    2) That it won’t be?

    Basically nothing left in a sense but “Virtual” things. All the names you used to hear: Intel, Fairchild, HP, etc. nothing like what they were.

    And my contention is that the speed these things vanished is as nothing compared to the speed a Google can vanish.

    The animal spirits done got up and went if you ask me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Why did Jack Ma choose the name "Alibaba" for his marketplace website? I'm instantly reminded of "40 Thieves."
    , @Anonymous
    You're ignoring network effects and vendor lock in. That's what these Silicon Valley companies are based on. People use Facebook because everyone else already does. They're self-reinforcing. Once network effects are established, it's hard to switch even though the service or platform is no good or declines.
    , @Jack D
    Switching search engines is easier than buying all new VCR tapes but there's still a lot of stickiness, especially since Google is now much more than just a search engine - there's a whole google ecosystem - Android and Gmail and Chrome, etc. that's all tied together. Half the users in America probably couldn't even figure out HOW to switch the search engine in their browser if they wanted to.

    BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner's manual translated into Engrish? It's going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that's not even considering Chinese government interference. Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?
    , @J
    Sunbeam: I had the same reaction. Google is sensitive to pressure and foreign competition. Yet, if Google can turn the tables and assimilate the US Government attack and acquire instead Gov protection, then large colonial markets will open up for it. I mean Google is having problems in the EU and in China, but with US Gov giving it its full support, it can enter and conquer those markets. For Google it is vital to be considered a strategic Gov asset. If to be able to do business it has to hire a few hundred disgusting PC commissars, well, consider it done before the end of the day.
  7. Spud Boy says:

    “A company whose executives are supposedly so prejudiced and bigoted that they turn away obvious talent based on biological factors that have nothing whatsoever to do with the bottom line somehow ended up being worth US$650 billion and having close to monopolistic power in the provision of internet search facilities and nobody in the mainstream commentariat can bring themselves to notice the complete incongruity and irreconcilability of the two foregoing propositions.

    I’ve been saying this for years. On the one hand we’re supposed to believe that companies are evil, blood sucking monsters that care only about profit, but somehow they put that all aside in hiring practices and deliberately send away good candidates because of their biology, skin color, etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Seamus Padraig
    There are ways of making money that have nothing to do with ability, merit, etc. Or do you think all the investment banks are run by honest geniuses?
  8. @Sunbeam
    The post is interesting.

    But there is an outside.

    By that I mean I can use a Chinese search engine, use Ali Baba instead of Amazon, Facebook, and EBay.

    "It has perhaps occurred to people like Google CEO Sundar Pichai that if Google can lead the IT industry into a massively bureaucratised business model with layers of HR administrators, sensitivity coaches, VPs for diversity and community relations and “equality” tsars, it can, by voluntarily loading its body up with parasites, require all industry players to do the same – including small start-up players whose competitive threat to Google can be eliminated by virtue of social justice jihadis crushing them with their increasingly ridiculous financial demands."

    How is this going to work, when in a manner akin to overseas manufacturers avoiding US safety and environmental laws, foreign competitors compete directly with these Silicon Valley concerns?

    These guys (Silicon Valley) don't have sh#t. This is the easiest freaking thing in the universe for a foreign competitor to compete directly with all these guys. For god's sake a foreign concern doesn't even have higher transportation costs for shipping their widgets from Shanghai instead of Cleveland.

    Seriously what's left out there? All these "Tech" things are software. Things that are easily (relatively speaking) duplicated somewhere else. Not sure how much chip manufacture and design still takes place out there, but is someone going to tell me that:

    1) It can't be done in China? (Or Japan or Korea or Russia for that matter?)
    2) That it won't be?

    Basically nothing left in a sense but "Virtual" things. All the names you used to hear: Intel, Fairchild, HP, etc. nothing like what they were.

    And my contention is that the speed these things vanished is as nothing compared to the speed a Google can vanish.

    The animal spirits done got up and went if you ask me.

    Why did Jack Ma choose the name “Alibaba” for his marketplace website? I’m instantly reminded of “40 Thieves.”

    Read More
    • Agree: CK
    • Replies: @Jack D
    From the wiki:

    One day I [Jack Ma] was in San Francisco in a coffee shop, and I was thinking Alibaba is a good name. And then a waitress came, and I said, "Do you know about Alibaba?" And she said yes. I said, "What do you know about?", and she said, "Open Sesame". And I said, "Yes, this is the name!" Then I went on to the street and found 30 people and asked them, "Do you know Alibaba?" People from India, people from Germany, people from Tokyo and China … they all knew about Alibaba. Alibaba – open sesame. Alibaba is a kind, smart business person, and he helped the village. So … easy to spell, and globally known. Alibaba opens sesame for small- to medium-sized companies
     
    , @Studley
    Maybe trying to nationalize his (Taki's) yacht or expropriate his shipping business to the Greek State but Taki made me laugh back in the last millennium in his Spectator column when he referred to Greek Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou as...Ali Babandreou.

    So from then to now and Taki to Ma, the meaning of Ali Baba has changed.
    , @anonymous coward

    Why did Jack Ma choose the name “Alibaba” for his marketplace website?
     
    Because it looks good in Chinese: 阿里巴巴
  9. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Nico
    The thing is, your pessimism ironically is born of the same ideology that has animated these parasites: Cartesianism.

    The obsession with an efficient and effective government is part and parcel of the Party of Reason. There is no room for favoritism because every man, woman and child is a bland, faceless interchangeable algebraic entity. All that matters is consent and "objectivity."

    In reality this is hogwash. Suppose the U.S. had the choice of awarding a defense contract to a British company and awarding the same to a Gulf country. All other things being equal, I think we would agree that the contract should be awarded to the British company for reasons that regular iSteve readers (except Corvinus) must be acutely aware. (George W. Bush, by the way, favored transferring the contract to the Jihadist power, in the real-life scenario that inspired this tale.)

    Here's the thing: we are also acutely aware that all other things are NOT equal between a Western-run company and an Arab-run one.

    (In fact, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the laws of thermodynamics suggest that they never are. Of the many ways in which they do so, this is how the social sciences trip up the most often: because social observations amount to documentations of abstractions at the highest level, a mind which is too disconnected or too specialized looks for parallels and comparisons in the most absurd of places. And the U.S.'s ever-tightening valuation of specialized credentials explain why our country has done such damage in the social sciences, by cranking out so many "thinkers" who cannot contextualize anything.)

    But the minute you begin to notice a difference between the West and the rest and act upon this observation, you have acted in violation of the liberal Cartesian narrative whereupon everything should be translated to squared-off numbers on a balance sheet. The critics will warn that if you keep pushing this "instinctive" favoritism and prejudice you may push over the deep edge into entrenched privilege and corruption.

    Indeed, this is the "crony capitalism" à la Trump spoken above. But as Irish Paleo points out there is a price for everything. A human society, in which I am free to discriminate in favor of what I know to be tried and true, seems worth the risk of a bit of cronyism, and the liberty to go about my affairs under the nose of an inefficient and ineffective government definitely has some appeal. (Though I must admit I have a high enough opinion of my abilities that I am confident I could carve out a rentable niche in the new "unfair," pseodo-feudal and illiberal - but NOT totalitarian - playing field.)

    If you're still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that "life is not a sojourn," allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    The idea of an efficient, lean government scrupulously dispensing services with no corruption is a kind of prog/libertoid millenarian cult notion. For a good satire of this chimera cf. the Yes, Minister episode “The Great Middle Class Rip-Off”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin

    The idea of an efficient, lean government scrupulously dispensing services with no corruption is a kind of prog/libertoid millenarian cult notion
     
    Republican progressives of the late 19th and early 20th century, actually.
  10. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Why did Jack Ma choose the name "Alibaba" for his marketplace website? I'm instantly reminded of "40 Thieves."

    From the wiki:

    One day I [Jack Ma] was in San Francisco in a coffee shop, and I was thinking Alibaba is a good name. And then a waitress came, and I said, “Do you know about Alibaba?” And she said yes. I said, “What do you know about?”, and she said, “Open Sesame”. And I said, “Yes, this is the name!” Then I went on to the street and found 30 people and asked them, “Do you know Alibaba?” People from India, people from Germany, people from Tokyo and China … they all knew about Alibaba. Alibaba – open sesame. Alibaba is a kind, smart business person, and he helped the village. So … easy to spell, and globally known. Alibaba opens sesame for small- to medium-sized companies

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Sounds too good to be true. I like the 40 thieves reference better.
  11. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Sunbeam
    The post is interesting.

    But there is an outside.

    By that I mean I can use a Chinese search engine, use Ali Baba instead of Amazon, Facebook, and EBay.

    "It has perhaps occurred to people like Google CEO Sundar Pichai that if Google can lead the IT industry into a massively bureaucratised business model with layers of HR administrators, sensitivity coaches, VPs for diversity and community relations and “equality” tsars, it can, by voluntarily loading its body up with parasites, require all industry players to do the same – including small start-up players whose competitive threat to Google can be eliminated by virtue of social justice jihadis crushing them with their increasingly ridiculous financial demands."

    How is this going to work, when in a manner akin to overseas manufacturers avoiding US safety and environmental laws, foreign competitors compete directly with these Silicon Valley concerns?

    These guys (Silicon Valley) don't have sh#t. This is the easiest freaking thing in the universe for a foreign competitor to compete directly with all these guys. For god's sake a foreign concern doesn't even have higher transportation costs for shipping their widgets from Shanghai instead of Cleveland.

    Seriously what's left out there? All these "Tech" things are software. Things that are easily (relatively speaking) duplicated somewhere else. Not sure how much chip manufacture and design still takes place out there, but is someone going to tell me that:

    1) It can't be done in China? (Or Japan or Korea or Russia for that matter?)
    2) That it won't be?

    Basically nothing left in a sense but "Virtual" things. All the names you used to hear: Intel, Fairchild, HP, etc. nothing like what they were.

    And my contention is that the speed these things vanished is as nothing compared to the speed a Google can vanish.

    The animal spirits done got up and went if you ask me.

    You’re ignoring network effects and vendor lock in. That’s what these Silicon Valley companies are based on. People use Facebook because everyone else already does. They’re self-reinforcing. Once network effects are established, it’s hard to switch even though the service or platform is no good or declines.

    Read More
  12. Jack D says:
    @Sunbeam
    The post is interesting.

    But there is an outside.

    By that I mean I can use a Chinese search engine, use Ali Baba instead of Amazon, Facebook, and EBay.

    "It has perhaps occurred to people like Google CEO Sundar Pichai that if Google can lead the IT industry into a massively bureaucratised business model with layers of HR administrators, sensitivity coaches, VPs for diversity and community relations and “equality” tsars, it can, by voluntarily loading its body up with parasites, require all industry players to do the same – including small start-up players whose competitive threat to Google can be eliminated by virtue of social justice jihadis crushing them with their increasingly ridiculous financial demands."

    How is this going to work, when in a manner akin to overseas manufacturers avoiding US safety and environmental laws, foreign competitors compete directly with these Silicon Valley concerns?

    These guys (Silicon Valley) don't have sh#t. This is the easiest freaking thing in the universe for a foreign competitor to compete directly with all these guys. For god's sake a foreign concern doesn't even have higher transportation costs for shipping their widgets from Shanghai instead of Cleveland.

    Seriously what's left out there? All these "Tech" things are software. Things that are easily (relatively speaking) duplicated somewhere else. Not sure how much chip manufacture and design still takes place out there, but is someone going to tell me that:

    1) It can't be done in China? (Or Japan or Korea or Russia for that matter?)
    2) That it won't be?

    Basically nothing left in a sense but "Virtual" things. All the names you used to hear: Intel, Fairchild, HP, etc. nothing like what they were.

    And my contention is that the speed these things vanished is as nothing compared to the speed a Google can vanish.

    The animal spirits done got up and went if you ask me.

    Switching search engines is easier than buying all new VCR tapes but there’s still a lot of stickiness, especially since Google is now much more than just a search engine – there’s a whole google ecosystem – Android and Gmail and Chrome, etc. that’s all tied together. Half the users in America probably couldn’t even figure out HOW to switch the search engine in their browser if they wanted to.

    BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner’s manual translated into Engrish? It’s going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that’s not even considering Chinese government interference. Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Good points.

    As for the last part, savvy people will know better than to trust a Chinese search engine for accurate info on topics sensitive to the Chinese government, just like few people would go to foxnews.com for a sympathetic take on BLM. One must always consider the source.
    , @Cloudbuster
    If you switch to DuckDuckGo and still occasionally use Google for the 1-in-X instances where you're not satisfied with the DuckDuckGo results (and what is that value of X? 10? 50? 100?), you have reduced your contribution to Google's monetization of you by several orders of magnitude.

    Repeat that a few hundred million times, and it starts to hurt.
  13. 3. Man writes memo defending his employer’s hiring policies against accusations of discrimination. Employer responds by firing him, thereby implicitly validating accusations to the effect that its hiring policies are discriminatory.

    My surmise is that Google’s office of General Counsel has a number of legal memoranda which probably make arguments similar to some of Damores’ in proposing a legal strategy to fend off DOJ’s suit. Those arguments will probably make it into public pleadings in the case too.

    I wonder if Google can be brought to heel so that it doesn’t use arguments in Court proceedings which may be correct or useful but which make female Googlers “can’t even?”

    Read More
  14. Sunbeam says:

    Switching search engines is easier than buying all new VCR tapes but there’s still a lot of stickiness, especially since Google is now much more than just a search engine – there’s a whole google ecosystem – Android and Gmail and Chrome, etc. that’s all tied together. Half the users in America probably couldn’t even figure out HOW to switch the search engine in their browser if they wanted to.

    That’s a valid point, but people still switched search engines from Yahoo to Google, switched browsers from Netscape to IE, Firefox, Opera, Safar, Chrome…

    Heck they switched from Mindspace to Facebook with little trouble that I heard of. It can happen.

    BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner’s manual translated into Engrish? It’s going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that’s not even considering Chinese government interference.

    Does bing suck compared to google? Really? I can’t tell much difference between any of them honestly.

    As for the rest of what you said, well I just don’t believe these problems are major or insoluble. Actually I think they are easily solved. My opinion though.

    Come on, if China called you up, offered you the position of Supreme Tech Leader for North America, gave you control of Ali Baba and a couple billion dollars to do some marketing…

    You don’t think you could rock Amazon and Ebay’s world world for one?

    Come to think of it, they need to give me Tencent too. I can think of all kinds of things to take on Facebook with, assuming I had a large amount of servers and connectivity backing me.

    You know, you seem to think this stuff is profound. I tend to think it is more like switching from Nike to Puma.

    Remember that couple billion I mentioned? First thing I do for Tencent is sign a bunch of Rappers to use Tencent exclusively. Actually I’ll get a cool commercial made with 50 Cent and run it in all kinds of venues no one on Unz would watch. Heck I’ll pay him to write a rap “50 Cent is Tencent.”

    Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?

    The question is can I get unbiased results from Google? And if both are equally biased, does Google’s biases make it inherently less reliable than a Chinese search engine? Me really not caring much about either Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama.

    Read More
  15. BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner’s manual translated into Engrish? It’s going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that’s not even considering Chinese government interference. Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?

    You don’t get unbiased results NOW from Goolag. One of the best examples is typing “I want my husband to…” and seeing the results. In 2009, the top response was “dominate me,” from the auto fill. That was dispensed with, but I know where to view a screen cap of the original.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    One area in which PRC online service has caught up with, or even surpassed, western alternatives is in travel-planning.

    Ctrip now seem to be better than Expedia, hotels.com, etc. We Calvinists use it regularly, and get both better deals and better customer service than we've been seeing from western alternatives.

    , @snorlax

    You don’t get unbiased results NOW from Goolag. One of the best examples is typing “I want my husband to…” and seeing the results. In 2009, the top response was “dominate me,” from the auto fill. That was dispensed with, but I know where to view a screen cap of the original.
     
    I suspect (given male and female browsing habits) that suggestion actually was a mistake; Google suggestions likely used a simple Markov text generation algorithm when it was first introduced (which was in 2009), which actually works pretty well for the most part but is bound to produce some embarrassing screwups when the source text includes billions of searches by men looking for porn.
  16. Abe says: • Website

    In a way I kind of feel bad for ol’ GOOG. Its collective diversity strategy was to keep its heads down, its mouth shut, and swallow its pride every couple of years when employee stats would come out by copping to its own deplorableness (“we have not yet achieved the diversity we so cherish; it’s not who we are and we are striving to improve”) while doing absolutely nothing to change it (or doing so at such a glacial pace it effectively amounts to the same thing). And then young Damore comes along and blows it all to hell, ruining it for everyone, by providing a face, a time, and words which can now be endlessly twisted by militant feminists and SJW opportunists to their own ends. Before any ill will towards GOOG by these sort of people was diffuse and inchoate, lacking a concrete locus of outrage. Damore, whether wittingly or not, has now provided that locus. The diversity regime in the US never forgives, never forgets, and somehow manages to twist even events where it was obviously in the wrong into YOUR FAULT- in other words, it’s basically your ex-wife.

    GOOG did not create nor really endorse this regime that has now crept up on us and is threatening to devour all. It simply ducked-n-weaved, kowtowed, passed the buck, until it too was finally cornered and driven to ground. So three cheers for Donald Trump, the most significant person in American public life to be fighting this. He is an Olympian-scale figure and he is slaying the hydra for us. Wonder how much of the disdain among plutocrats and other assorted elitists is the knowledge that despite wealth, prestige, and other tokens of social approval, they are dancing to a sh!tty song with the sh!ttiest title in the history of the TOP 40, something called THE INVISIBLE KNAPSACK, and they know they are too cowardly and soft and owned by their possessions to stop, while Trump isn’t, and so they hate him the more for it.

    Read More
  17. george says:

    Man writes memo blah blah blah

    Why do all these apergery nerds have full manifestos written with foot notes? Google CEO Pachai could have diffused the whole thing by giving Damore 6 months to get married (to a woman) or quit. Google would pay match making fees to smooth things over. Dude needs someone to set him straight and keep him away from editing his manifesto.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon

    Why do all these apergery nerds have full manifestos written with foot notes?
     
    Ha. Yea. At least they didn't hire the Unibomber.
    , @Frau Katze
    I wonder if Damore is on the spectrum himself?

    I would not dream of writing about such a controversial topic at work. I've read, for example, of too many people being fired over something on Facebook.

    Not just that, he doesn't seem to sense that the topic is controversial.

    IMO, it shouldn't be controversial but we don't get to pick our culture. We have live in it and navigate as best as we can.

    Reading a piece by someone on spectrum got me thinking. The man might simply not have known that such a furor would result.

    The piece I read is here,

    http://quillette.com/2017/07/18/neurodiversity-case-free-speech/
  18. AndrewR says:
    @Jack D
    Switching search engines is easier than buying all new VCR tapes but there's still a lot of stickiness, especially since Google is now much more than just a search engine - there's a whole google ecosystem - Android and Gmail and Chrome, etc. that's all tied together. Half the users in America probably couldn't even figure out HOW to switch the search engine in their browser if they wanted to.

    BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner's manual translated into Engrish? It's going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that's not even considering Chinese government interference. Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?

    Good points.

    As for the last part, savvy people will know better than to trust a Chinese search engine for accurate info on topics sensitive to the Chinese government, just like few people would go to foxnews.com for a sympathetic take on BLM. One must always consider the source.

    Read More
  19. JohnJ says:

    Just like trying to get out of your cell phone plan.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    Just like trying to get out of your cell phone plan.

     

    In the spirit of turning the Left's Alinskyite tactics back against them, it's helpful to remember that all of these services we buy or use for 'free' are just social constructions that can crumble even more quickly than they sprang up.

    To consider another example we've discussed repeatedly on iSteve, the SJW takeover of Big Sports has disappointed and angered many conservatives. But watching sports is the quintessential example of a social construction. If enough fans change their behavior, the whole sports landscape can be reshaped.

    Right now ESPN and its parent company Disney are reeling. In response to terrible performance and big losses, Disney has pulled its flagship content from Netflix and will launch its own streaming service. Disney's also going all-in for streaming at ESPN, as that network continues its implosion. See the details here: LINK

    And here's a chaser: if you're a devoted sports fan -- let's say a college football fan, to be specific -- and you think it would be impossible to resist signing up for ESPN's new college football streaming service, just take a look at the photo at the top of this story (LINK) and then think about what you're devoting so much time, energy and money to.

    All it would take, pour encourager des autres, as Steve likes to say, would be to undermine just one tower on Big Sport's castle wall.

  20. anon says: • Disclaimer

    “1. When an industry (e.g. manufacturing) is sucked into the bureaucratic vortex created by parasitic social justice jihadis and gradually accretes layer-after-layer of inert bureaucracy dedicated to the manufacture and management of grievance, it becomes less profitable and throws off progressively fewer surplus resources for rent seekers to feed off and the social justice jihadis start to lose interest in it.”

    I worked for a mega multi national that had adapted pretty well to extortionist lawsuits. In terms of profitability, it was scale advantages vs compliance costs. Of course, competitors also have to do compliance. They had a corporate ‘ethics’ program. This was designed to push accountability down to the lowest possible level. It isn’t like it took a lot of time. But it was totally impossible to violate any law or regulation and claim that the company made you do it.

    Of course, they had been around for years and also had the advantage of not really believing in their own specialness. In fact, there was roughly zero handwringing because the policy was to follow the rules. Period. And that was it.

    Plus they seemed to hire the best lawyers when there was a hint of real trouble.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lurker

    Plus they seemed to hire the best lawyers when there was a hint of real trouble.
     
    Who were, of course, split 50/50 and male/female plus various gays, trannies and ethnic groups.
  21. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @george
    Man writes memo blah blah blah

    Why do all these apergery nerds have full manifestos written with foot notes? Google CEO Pachai could have diffused the whole thing by giving Damore 6 months to get married (to a woman) or quit. Google would pay match making fees to smooth things over. Dude needs someone to set him straight and keep him away from editing his manifesto.

    Why do all these apergery nerds have full manifestos written with foot notes?

    Ha. Yea. At least they didn’t hire the Unibomber.

    Read More
  22. Twinkie says:
    @Rapparee
    "The condition upon which God hath given liberty to man is eternal vigilance."

    -John Philpot Curran

    Indeed!

    Read More
  23. AndrewR says:

    Mick boy is pretty hard on Damore. Yes, Damore’s repeated qualifiers and pro-diversity pablum was slightly exasperating, and obviously it was in vain, but had he omitted it then he would have essentially guaranteed his firing. As it was, it took goolag a few days to decide to fire him. I imagine his firing took at least some of us heretics by surprise.

    Read More
  24. Here’s a list of alternative websites. Someone recommended Dogpile as a good one.

    http://www.ebizmba.com/articles/search-engines

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    I have DDG, IXquick, and Dogpile on bmark bars of Firefox, SeaMonkey, and Safari. Probably like the dog and the duck best.

    I like Wolfram Alpha for certain quanty/sci things.

    I've always only ever used Google Advanced Search, Advanced Scholar, and Advanced Book.

    Yahoo can bite me for killing AltaVista.
  25. @TomSchmidt
    BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner’s manual translated into Engrish? It’s going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that’s not even considering Chinese government interference. Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?

    You don't get unbiased results NOW from Goolag. One of the best examples is typing "I want my husband to..." and seeing the results. In 2009, the top response was "dominate me," from the auto fill. That was dispensed with, but I know where to view a screen cap of the original.

    One area in which PRC online service has caught up with, or even surpassed, western alternatives is in travel-planning.

    Ctrip now seem to be better than Expedia, hotels.com, etc. We Calvinists use it regularly, and get both better deals and better customer service than we’ve been seeing from western alternatives.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Ctrip, huh? I had to type that twice to avoid autocorrect. I'll check it out, thanks.
  26. What more can I do to discourage Google? I’ve known for years that #GoogleIsEvil. I don’t use their search – I use DuckDuckGo. I don’t see their ads – I use AdBlock+. I never signed up for their Gmail spying “service”. I do use their Chrome browser, but I use a plugin that randomizes the browser signature so they can’t monetize me that way, either.
    What more can I do?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Olorin
    Get a hobby like archery or gardening and focus more on that.
  27. @JohnJ
    Just like trying to get out of your cell phone plan.

    Just like trying to get out of your cell phone plan.

    In the spirit of turning the Left’s Alinskyite tactics back against them, it’s helpful to remember that all of these services we buy or use for ‘free’ are just social constructions that can crumble even more quickly than they sprang up.

    To consider another example we’ve discussed repeatedly on iSteve, the SJW takeover of Big Sports has disappointed and angered many conservatives. But watching sports is the quintessential example of a social construction. If enough fans change their behavior, the whole sports landscape can be reshaped.

    Right now ESPN and its parent company Disney are reeling. In response to terrible performance and big losses, Disney has pulled its flagship content from Netflix and will launch its own streaming service. Disney’s also going all-in for streaming at ESPN, as that network continues its implosion. See the details here: LINK

    And here’s a chaser: if you’re a devoted sports fan — let’s say a college football fan, to be specific — and you think it would be impossible to resist signing up for ESPN’s new college football streaming service, just take a look at the photo at the top of this story (LINK) and then think about what you’re devoting so much time, energy and money to.

    All it would take, pour encourager des autres, as Steve likes to say, would be to undermine just one tower on Big Sport’s castle wall.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ripple Earthdevil
    Now that is a bizarre photo. What are they thinking? Has ESPN been taken over by the gay mafia?
  28. @Jack D
    Switching search engines is easier than buying all new VCR tapes but there's still a lot of stickiness, especially since Google is now much more than just a search engine - there's a whole google ecosystem - Android and Gmail and Chrome, etc. that's all tied together. Half the users in America probably couldn't even figure out HOW to switch the search engine in their browser if they wanted to.

    BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner's manual translated into Engrish? It's going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that's not even considering Chinese government interference. Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?

    If you switch to DuckDuckGo and still occasionally use Google for the 1-in-X instances where you’re not satisfied with the DuckDuckGo results (and what is that value of X? 10? 50? 100?), you have reduced your contribution to Google’s monetization of you by several orders of magnitude.

    Repeat that a few hundred million times, and it starts to hurt.

    Read More
    • Replies: @PiltdownMan

    If you switch to DuckDuckGo and still occasionally use Google for the 1-in-X instances where you’re not satisfied with the DuckDuckGo results (and what is that value of X? 10? 50? 100?), you have reduced your contribution to Google’s monetization of you by several orders of magnitude.

    Repeat that a few hundred million times, and it starts to hurt.

     

    Product boycotts and economic activism are the left's favorite placebo for actual engagement and effectuating change, and are a prime virtue signaling mechanism.

    It's a fantasy version of actually getting things done. "Repeat that a few hundred million times, and it starts to hurt " is a pleasant little lie, a Freudian slip that signals impotence.

    Let's not go there.

  29. @Nico
    The thing is, your pessimism ironically is born of the same ideology that has animated these parasites: Cartesianism.

    The obsession with an efficient and effective government is part and parcel of the Party of Reason. There is no room for favoritism because every man, woman and child is a bland, faceless interchangeable algebraic entity. All that matters is consent and "objectivity."

    In reality this is hogwash. Suppose the U.S. had the choice of awarding a defense contract to a British company and awarding the same to a Gulf country. All other things being equal, I think we would agree that the contract should be awarded to the British company for reasons that regular iSteve readers (except Corvinus) must be acutely aware. (George W. Bush, by the way, favored transferring the contract to the Jihadist power, in the real-life scenario that inspired this tale.)

    Here's the thing: we are also acutely aware that all other things are NOT equal between a Western-run company and an Arab-run one.

    (In fact, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the laws of thermodynamics suggest that they never are. Of the many ways in which they do so, this is how the social sciences trip up the most often: because social observations amount to documentations of abstractions at the highest level, a mind which is too disconnected or too specialized looks for parallels and comparisons in the most absurd of places. And the U.S.'s ever-tightening valuation of specialized credentials explain why our country has done such damage in the social sciences, by cranking out so many "thinkers" who cannot contextualize anything.)

    But the minute you begin to notice a difference between the West and the rest and act upon this observation, you have acted in violation of the liberal Cartesian narrative whereupon everything should be translated to squared-off numbers on a balance sheet. The critics will warn that if you keep pushing this "instinctive" favoritism and prejudice you may push over the deep edge into entrenched privilege and corruption.

    Indeed, this is the "crony capitalism" à la Trump spoken above. But as Irish Paleo points out there is a price for everything. A human society, in which I am free to discriminate in favor of what I know to be tried and true, seems worth the risk of a bit of cronyism, and the liberty to go about my affairs under the nose of an inefficient and ineffective government definitely has some appeal. (Though I must admit I have a high enough opinion of my abilities that I am confident I could carve out a rentable niche in the new "unfair," pseodo-feudal and illiberal - but NOT totalitarian - playing field.)

    If you're still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that "life is not a sojourn," allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    “which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in?”

    Something in between not getting chopped up, dumped in a car trunk, and buried in an undisclosed area a la Scorcese’s “Goodfellas”.

    “The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today?”

    Mobster Henry Hill, of “Goodfellas” made a second comeback, so to speak, by going to Vegas and cashing in on the Rat Pack nostalgia, Vegas was better back in the days of Bugsy, the Syndicate, etc.

    The good ol’ days weren’t always so good. Plus they didn’t offer much in the way of cool stuff. No five star hotels, few gourmet restaurants. Just the basics: Gamble, gamble, $2 buffets, extra scotch, Bobby Darin, Frank, Dino, Sammy, and later Elvis at the Sands, Cesars, and Desert Inn. But say the wrong word to the wrong connect-a-guy and one could wind up like Jimmy Hoffa.

    Nothing wrong with modern Vegas per se. What is disturbing is the continued presence of illegals flooding the Strip passing out fliers. Clean up illegal immigration and the city’s not so bad for 2017.

    “And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?”

    While I would never presume to speak for The Last Real Calvinist, do allow me to mention John 3:16. And that’s well worth the price of sojurning thru modern Vegas, with or without the buffet.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    No one got whacked in Vegas, not even mob guys. When Greenberg got killed, they waited a long time for him to leave town.

    And as a civilian, you rarely if ever even saw a real mob guy. If you did they were on the down low.

    You might get beat up if you were caught cheating, or the cops would run you out of town. But basically Vegas was very safe.
    , @Nico

    No five star hotels, few gourmet restaurants. Just the basics: Gamble, gamble, $2 buffets, extra scotch, Bobby Darin, Frank, Dino, Sammy, and later Elvis at the Sands, Cesars, and Desert Inn.
     
    That sounds pretty nice, actually. I have never seen a five-star hotel or a "gourmet" restaurant in ANY country that was worth the price tag.

    I have eaten at very good restaurants which were *not* cheap per se: think in total $150 for a hearty starter, a carefully prepared main and a sumptuous dessert plus an aperitive drink, a bottle of nicely-aged Burgundy wine shared with another and a shot of Armagnac, all ordered à la carte by the way. From my experience a comparable meal at a yuppy "gourmet" place costs at least twice as much, does not allow à la carte switching and serves probably half the quantity of alcohol.

    But say the wrong word to the wrong connect-a-guy and one could wind up like Jimmy Hoffa.
     
    The people who get popped off by the Mafia are usually 1. other Mafiosi or their underlings who are for one reason or another "in the way" or otherwise a nuisance, 2. tributaries who don't pay their dues or stir up trouble in the territory, and 3. police/detectives/prosecutors on their trail. Not saying this makes them "good guys" but I don't know what a tourist would have to fear. It's not good business to kill paying customers from the Außland, or even to rough them up or be anything but courteous to them (unless they're obnoxious jerks ruining the experience for other, better customers).

    While I would never presume to speak for The Last Real Calvinist, do allow me to mention John 3:16. And that’s well worth the price of sojurning thru modern Vegas, with or without the buffet.
     
    Maybe at some point in the past I would have exited Sin City with some sins to confess. When I saw the LV Strip for the first and hopefully only time in my life in 2007 I thought maybe I was being punished for my sins.
  30. snorlax says:
    @TomSchmidt
    BUT, what you switch to has to be demonstrably better than Google. Microsoft spent billions on Bing and it still sucks compared to google. Have you ever tried Chinese software or read a Chinese owner’s manual translated into Engrish? It’s going to be a rong, rong time before Chinese search engine better than Google. And that’s not even considering Chinese government interference. Do you think you are going to get unbiased results on Falun Gong or the Dalai Lama or anything like that from a Chinese engine?

    You don't get unbiased results NOW from Goolag. One of the best examples is typing "I want my husband to..." and seeing the results. In 2009, the top response was "dominate me," from the auto fill. That was dispensed with, but I know where to view a screen cap of the original.

    You don’t get unbiased results NOW from Goolag. One of the best examples is typing “I want my husband to…” and seeing the results. In 2009, the top response was “dominate me,” from the auto fill. That was dispensed with, but I know where to view a screen cap of the original.

    I suspect (given male and female browsing habits) that suggestion actually was a mistake; Google suggestions likely used a simple Markov text generation algorithm when it was first introduced (which was in 2009), which actually works pretty well for the most part but is bound to produce some embarrassing screwups when the source text includes billions of searches by men looking for porn.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    AH, yes, Markov. Not looked at for 22 years. That explains how it originated.

    Note: they did NOT change the autosuggest, at the time, for "I want my wife to..."
  31. Studley says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Why did Jack Ma choose the name "Alibaba" for his marketplace website? I'm instantly reminded of "40 Thieves."

    Maybe trying to nationalize his (Taki’s) yacht or expropriate his shipping business to the Greek State but Taki made me laugh back in the last millennium in his Spectator column when he referred to Greek Prime Minister Andreas Papandreou as…Ali Babandreou.

    So from then to now and Taki to Ma, the meaning of Ali Baba has changed.

    Read More
  32. @george
    Man writes memo blah blah blah

    Why do all these apergery nerds have full manifestos written with foot notes? Google CEO Pachai could have diffused the whole thing by giving Damore 6 months to get married (to a woman) or quit. Google would pay match making fees to smooth things over. Dude needs someone to set him straight and keep him away from editing his manifesto.

    I wonder if Damore is on the spectrum himself?

    I would not dream of writing about such a controversial topic at work. I’ve read, for example, of too many people being fired over something on Facebook.

    Not just that, he doesn’t seem to sense that the topic is controversial.

    IMO, it shouldn’t be controversial but we don’t get to pick our culture. We have live in it and navigate as best as we can.

    Reading a piece by someone on spectrum got me thinking. The man might simply not have known that such a furor would result.

    The piece I read is here,

    http://quillette.com/2017/07/18/neurodiversity-case-free-speech/

    Read More
  33. Harold says:

    5. A company which has made literally hundreds of billions monetising the skills of highly intelligent Aspergerish males is shocked (Shocked, I tell ya!!!!)…

    They are not ‘shocked shocked’, which implies the shock is feigned, they, like Susan Wojcicki, are all true believers.

    Our elites really are just dumb, and get their opinions from popular culture like everyone else.

    Read More
  34. Lurker says:
    @anon
    "1. When an industry (e.g. manufacturing) is sucked into the bureaucratic vortex created by parasitic social justice jihadis and gradually accretes layer-after-layer of inert bureaucracy dedicated to the manufacture and management of grievance, it becomes less profitable and throws off progressively fewer surplus resources for rent seekers to feed off and the social justice jihadis start to lose interest in it."

    I worked for a mega multi national that had adapted pretty well to extortionist lawsuits. In terms of profitability, it was scale advantages vs compliance costs. Of course, competitors also have to do compliance. They had a corporate 'ethics' program. This was designed to push accountability down to the lowest possible level. It isn't like it took a lot of time. But it was totally impossible to violate any law or regulation and claim that the company made you do it.

    Of course, they had been around for years and also had the advantage of not really believing in their own specialness. In fact, there was roughly zero handwringing because the policy was to follow the rules. Period. And that was it.

    Plus they seemed to hire the best lawyers when there was a hint of real trouble.

    Plus they seemed to hire the best lawyers when there was a hint of real trouble.

    Who were, of course, split 50/50 and male/female plus various gays, trannies and ethnic groups.

    Read More
  35. @The Last Real Calvinist

    Just like trying to get out of your cell phone plan.

     

    In the spirit of turning the Left's Alinskyite tactics back against them, it's helpful to remember that all of these services we buy or use for 'free' are just social constructions that can crumble even more quickly than they sprang up.

    To consider another example we've discussed repeatedly on iSteve, the SJW takeover of Big Sports has disappointed and angered many conservatives. But watching sports is the quintessential example of a social construction. If enough fans change their behavior, the whole sports landscape can be reshaped.

    Right now ESPN and its parent company Disney are reeling. In response to terrible performance and big losses, Disney has pulled its flagship content from Netflix and will launch its own streaming service. Disney's also going all-in for streaming at ESPN, as that network continues its implosion. See the details here: LINK

    And here's a chaser: if you're a devoted sports fan -- let's say a college football fan, to be specific -- and you think it would be impossible to resist signing up for ESPN's new college football streaming service, just take a look at the photo at the top of this story (LINK) and then think about what you're devoting so much time, energy and money to.

    All it would take, pour encourager des autres, as Steve likes to say, would be to undermine just one tower on Big Sport's castle wall.

    Now that is a bizarre photo. What are they thinking? Has ESPN been taken over by the gay mafia?

    Read More
  36. @Cloudbuster
    If you switch to DuckDuckGo and still occasionally use Google for the 1-in-X instances where you're not satisfied with the DuckDuckGo results (and what is that value of X? 10? 50? 100?), you have reduced your contribution to Google's monetization of you by several orders of magnitude.

    Repeat that a few hundred million times, and it starts to hurt.

    If you switch to DuckDuckGo and still occasionally use Google for the 1-in-X instances where you’re not satisfied with the DuckDuckGo results (and what is that value of X? 10? 50? 100?), you have reduced your contribution to Google’s monetization of you by several orders of magnitude.

    Repeat that a few hundred million times, and it starts to hurt.

    Product boycotts and economic activism are the left’s favorite placebo for actual engagement and effectuating change, and are a prime virtue signaling mechanism.

    It’s a fantasy version of actually getting things done. “Repeat that a few hundred million times, and it starts to hurt “ is a pleasant little lie, a Freudian slip that signals impotence.

    Let’s not go there.

    Read More
  37. @SteveM
    Parenthetically, speaking of diversity, I wonder what the percentage is of software developers at Google (and Silicon Valley generally) who are over 45?

    I wonder how many experienced developers/programmers who are 45+ would even get an interview at those companies.

    If a senior level developer published those statistics and ruminated about age discrimination, I wonder what the response would be in the C-Suites to that legal time-bomb.

    If you can pass the interview(s), they’ll take you. The older ones tend to stick around longer anyway, and not run off to a startup (my not massively-backed-up observation). It’s true that the crowd is majority younger, but when I was there, it looked like that’s where all of the Valley’s missing older white guys were.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Why did you leave Google? I know a guy who works there who has thought about quitting but says they keep throwing 3 year out stock options at him.
  38. Dee says:

    10 years ago, Bill Gates was pushing his ‘kinder, gentler, capitalism’ meme. He wanted every company to divert 10-15% of its profits to a do-gooder project.

    Of course that would act to handicap all the small start-ups, the bunch Gates has been bat shit crazy about doing to Microsoft, what Microsoft did to the big guys in its early days. (IBM, among others)

    It’ll be a lot tougher than when MS did it, but as Trump demonstrated, unexpected things do happen.

    Now tech will get to divert 10-15% of their profits dealing with the SJW clowns….

    Tech really does have a massive age discrimination problem. By the time you hit 45, your college time is 20 years in the past, along with your knowledge. Knew a bunch of techies that got canned right around the 45 b-day. A few hung on to 50, but they were the exception.

    Read More
    • Replies: @James Richard

    your college time is 20 years in the past, along with your knowledge
     
    LOL! Whose fault was that if they failed to keep up? When I was 45 I was progressing nicely into both my peak earning years and beach time.
  39. Admittedly Damoregate isn’t just about HBD realism regarding gender, it’s also about HBD realism regarding political orientation and work performance. If you’ve seen Damore’s interview with Peterson, he has also been dragged under the coals for suggesting liberals are lazier than conservatives.From a business perspective, this is an even more explosive controversy. Damore has suggested that conscientious conservatives are just as valuable to a business as creative liberals, and a business run solely by liberals fail. This argument also happens to one of Peterson’s pet causes.

    It’s a bit like the Bell Curve controversy. The Bell Curve bruhaha wasn’t just about race. No one really cares if working class blacks aren’t very smart. The really controversial part was suggesting that high IQ blacks are socially and economically better off than whites with similar IQs and qualifications.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The biggest problem with blacks overall is that less than half of them are even working class. A third are functionally, clinically retarded. Working class presupposes an IQ in the low nineties.

    But the talented tenth are, thanks to AA, doing financially above their real merit in the free market. A 110 IQ black can go to a top tier school and be employed as a token minority, rather than be where he belongs, a schoolteacher, a tradesman or a low level retail manager. The latter would give him a real sense of self worth and some genuine achievement, whereas the former means he knows he's a fraud, and that is devastating to anyone, but especially blacks.

    And whites naturally resent blacks all the more for the obvious fact that they are passed over for good jobs to hire less qualified blacks and other diversity hires.
    , @Dee
    " The really controversial part was suggesting that high IQ blacks are socially and economically better off than whites with similar IQs and qualifications."

    I read the White Privilege test is to ask yourself if your life is better because you're white. If it is, then you have White Privilege.

    But knowing what I do now, if I had been a black with my IQ and ability, I'd have been recruited out of college by the best companies or public agencies and would have been on my way to the 95th percentile or better.

    Instead, being white, among the million whites that graduated that year, I was nothing special in that group and had to make own way into the 80th percentile or so....
  40. Olorin says:
    @Anonymous
    The idea of an efficient, lean government scrupulously dispensing services with no corruption is a kind of prog/libertoid millenarian cult notion. For a good satire of this chimera cf. the Yes, Minister episode "The Great Middle Class Rip-Off"

    The idea of an efficient, lean government scrupulously dispensing services with no corruption is a kind of prog/libertoid millenarian cult notion

    Republican progressives of the late 19th and early 20th century, actually.

    Read More
  41. Olorin says:
    @Macumazahn
    What more can I do to discourage Google? I've known for years that #GoogleIsEvil. I don't use their search - I use DuckDuckGo. I don't see their ads - I use AdBlock+. I never signed up for their Gmail spying "service". I do use their Chrome browser, but I use a plugin that randomizes the browser signature so they can't monetize me that way, either.
    What more can I do?

    Get a hobby like archery or gardening and focus more on that.

    Read More
  42. Olorin says:
    @attilathehen
    Here's a list of alternative websites. Someone recommended Dogpile as a good one.

    http://www.ebizmba.com/articles/search-engines

    I have DDG, IXquick, and Dogpile on bmark bars of Firefox, SeaMonkey, and Safari. Probably like the dog and the duck best.

    I like Wolfram Alpha for certain quanty/sci things.

    I’ve always only ever used Google Advanced Search, Advanced Scholar, and Advanced Book.

    Yahoo can bite me for killing AltaVista.

    Read More
  43. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Nico
    The thing is, your pessimism ironically is born of the same ideology that has animated these parasites: Cartesianism.

    The obsession with an efficient and effective government is part and parcel of the Party of Reason. There is no room for favoritism because every man, woman and child is a bland, faceless interchangeable algebraic entity. All that matters is consent and "objectivity."

    In reality this is hogwash. Suppose the U.S. had the choice of awarding a defense contract to a British company and awarding the same to a Gulf country. All other things being equal, I think we would agree that the contract should be awarded to the British company for reasons that regular iSteve readers (except Corvinus) must be acutely aware. (George W. Bush, by the way, favored transferring the contract to the Jihadist power, in the real-life scenario that inspired this tale.)

    Here's the thing: we are also acutely aware that all other things are NOT equal between a Western-run company and an Arab-run one.

    (In fact, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the laws of thermodynamics suggest that they never are. Of the many ways in which they do so, this is how the social sciences trip up the most often: because social observations amount to documentations of abstractions at the highest level, a mind which is too disconnected or too specialized looks for parallels and comparisons in the most absurd of places. And the U.S.'s ever-tightening valuation of specialized credentials explain why our country has done such damage in the social sciences, by cranking out so many "thinkers" who cannot contextualize anything.)

    But the minute you begin to notice a difference between the West and the rest and act upon this observation, you have acted in violation of the liberal Cartesian narrative whereupon everything should be translated to squared-off numbers on a balance sheet. The critics will warn that if you keep pushing this "instinctive" favoritism and prejudice you may push over the deep edge into entrenched privilege and corruption.

    Indeed, this is the "crony capitalism" à la Trump spoken above. But as Irish Paleo points out there is a price for everything. A human society, in which I am free to discriminate in favor of what I know to be tried and true, seems worth the risk of a bit of cronyism, and the liberty to go about my affairs under the nose of an inefficient and ineffective government definitely has some appeal. (Though I must admit I have a high enough opinion of my abilities that I am confident I could carve out a rentable niche in the new "unfair," pseodo-feudal and illiberal - but NOT totalitarian - playing field.)

    If you're still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that "life is not a sojourn," allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    If you’re still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    Vegas cool in the JFK/MM era was the height of men being men and women being women. Of course, all the casinos were owned and run by the mafia, and everyone knew it. But it was ring-a-ding-ding, and watching movies of it all shows that everyone, men and women, were having a really good time. By contrast, today it’s just a way to lose money and sleep in clean, but crummy hotel rooms.

    The recent news of Britney Spears being charged by a demented fan onstage in LV reminds us that things have changed for the worse. Just the fact that Britney Spears is the modern Las Vegas entertainment is bad enough.

    Read More
  44. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @unpc downunder
    Admittedly Damoregate isn't just about HBD realism regarding gender, it's also about HBD realism regarding political orientation and work performance. If you've seen Damore's interview with Peterson, he has also been dragged under the coals for suggesting liberals are lazier than conservatives.From a business perspective, this is an even more explosive controversy. Damore has suggested that conscientious conservatives are just as valuable to a business as creative liberals, and a business run solely by liberals fail. This argument also happens to one of Peterson's pet causes.

    It's a bit like the Bell Curve controversy. The Bell Curve bruhaha wasn't just about race. No one really cares if working class blacks aren't very smart. The really controversial part was suggesting that high IQ blacks are socially and economically better off than whites with similar IQs and qualifications.

    The biggest problem with blacks overall is that less than half of them are even working class. A third are functionally, clinically retarded. Working class presupposes an IQ in the low nineties.

    But the talented tenth are, thanks to AA, doing financially above their real merit in the free market. A 110 IQ black can go to a top tier school and be employed as a token minority, rather than be where he belongs, a schoolteacher, a tradesman or a low level retail manager. The latter would give him a real sense of self worth and some genuine achievement, whereas the former means he knows he’s a fraud, and that is devastating to anyone, but especially blacks.

    And whites naturally resent blacks all the more for the obvious fact that they are passed over for good jobs to hire less qualified blacks and other diversity hires.

    Read More
  45. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in?"

    Something in between not getting chopped up, dumped in a car trunk, and buried in an undisclosed area a la Scorcese's "Goodfellas".


    "The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today?"

    Mobster Henry Hill, of "Goodfellas" made a second comeback, so to speak, by going to Vegas and cashing in on the Rat Pack nostalgia, Vegas was better back in the days of Bugsy, the Syndicate, etc.

    The good ol' days weren't always so good. Plus they didn't offer much in the way of cool stuff. No five star hotels, few gourmet restaurants. Just the basics: Gamble, gamble, $2 buffets, extra scotch, Bobby Darin, Frank, Dino, Sammy, and later Elvis at the Sands, Cesars, and Desert Inn. But say the wrong word to the wrong connect-a-guy and one could wind up like Jimmy Hoffa.

    Nothing wrong with modern Vegas per se. What is disturbing is the continued presence of illegals flooding the Strip passing out fliers. Clean up illegal immigration and the city's not so bad for 2017.


    "And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?"

    While I would never presume to speak for The Last Real Calvinist, do allow me to mention John 3:16. And that's well worth the price of sojurning thru modern Vegas, with or without the buffet.

    No one got whacked in Vegas, not even mob guys. When Greenberg got killed, they waited a long time for him to leave town.

    And as a civilian, you rarely if ever even saw a real mob guy. If you did they were on the down low.

    You might get beat up if you were caught cheating, or the cops would run you out of town. But basically Vegas was very safe.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    This is 2017, not 1957. Those days aren't coming back.

    Vegas now has way more cool stuff for the individual tourist. Back then, there was very little in the way of entertainment, because everyone went there to gamble. For decades, Vegas was the main site for gambling in the US.

    Now, with many states having legalized gambling and building regional/local casinos, Vegas has had to offer other entertainment to keep the tourists. It's now possible to spend a week in Vegas, have a great time doing many things, while never once spending a single minute inside a casino. The local casinos (whether Indian owned, etc.) give one a sense of what classic Vegas's ambience back in the day must've felt like. Very scaled down, just the basics, occasionally top rate talent, etc. but people who go to local casinos in the US now are going mainly to gamble and that's about it.

    Wouldn't be surprised if Vegas were to open a super deluxe resort, say, the Atlantis, or a Dubai type of resort. (e.g. the world's tallest hotel building, indoor skiing, etc.). Now THAT would be most interesting. Both Dubai and Vegas are in the desert so it would be cool to see which one would win the title of which oasis has the coolest stuff to offer tourists. Right now Dubai has the edge, but with American know how, don't bet vs. Vegas just yet, should it decide to challenge Dubai for most amazing things to offer the everyday tourist.

  46. J says:
    @Sunbeam
    The post is interesting.

    But there is an outside.

    By that I mean I can use a Chinese search engine, use Ali Baba instead of Amazon, Facebook, and EBay.

    "It has perhaps occurred to people like Google CEO Sundar Pichai that if Google can lead the IT industry into a massively bureaucratised business model with layers of HR administrators, sensitivity coaches, VPs for diversity and community relations and “equality” tsars, it can, by voluntarily loading its body up with parasites, require all industry players to do the same – including small start-up players whose competitive threat to Google can be eliminated by virtue of social justice jihadis crushing them with their increasingly ridiculous financial demands."

    How is this going to work, when in a manner akin to overseas manufacturers avoiding US safety and environmental laws, foreign competitors compete directly with these Silicon Valley concerns?

    These guys (Silicon Valley) don't have sh#t. This is the easiest freaking thing in the universe for a foreign competitor to compete directly with all these guys. For god's sake a foreign concern doesn't even have higher transportation costs for shipping their widgets from Shanghai instead of Cleveland.

    Seriously what's left out there? All these "Tech" things are software. Things that are easily (relatively speaking) duplicated somewhere else. Not sure how much chip manufacture and design still takes place out there, but is someone going to tell me that:

    1) It can't be done in China? (Or Japan or Korea or Russia for that matter?)
    2) That it won't be?

    Basically nothing left in a sense but "Virtual" things. All the names you used to hear: Intel, Fairchild, HP, etc. nothing like what they were.

    And my contention is that the speed these things vanished is as nothing compared to the speed a Google can vanish.

    The animal spirits done got up and went if you ask me.

    Sunbeam: I had the same reaction. Google is sensitive to pressure and foreign competition. Yet, if Google can turn the tables and assimilate the US Government attack and acquire instead Gov protection, then large colonial markets will open up for it. I mean Google is having problems in the EU and in China, but with US Gov giving it its full support, it can enter and conquer those markets. For Google it is vital to be considered a strategic Gov asset. If to be able to do business it has to hire a few hundred disgusting PC commissars, well, consider it done before the end of the day.

    Read More
  47. @Steve Sailer
    Why did Jack Ma choose the name "Alibaba" for his marketplace website? I'm instantly reminded of "40 Thieves."

    Why did Jack Ma choose the name “Alibaba” for his marketplace website?

    Because it looks good in Chinese: 阿里巴巴

    Read More
  48. @Spud Boy

    "A company whose executives are supposedly so prejudiced and bigoted that they turn away obvious talent based on biological factors that have nothing whatsoever to do with the bottom line somehow ended up being worth US$650 billion and having close to monopolistic power in the provision of internet search facilities and nobody in the mainstream commentariat can bring themselves to notice the complete incongruity and irreconcilability of the two foregoing propositions.
     
    I've been saying this for years. On the one hand we're supposed to believe that companies are evil, blood sucking monsters that care only about profit, but somehow they put that all aside in hiring practices and deliberately send away good candidates because of their biology, skin color, etc.

    There are ways of making money that have nothing to do with ability, merit, etc. Or do you think all the investment banks are run by honest geniuses?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dee
    "There are ways of making money that have nothing to do with ability, merit, etc. Or do you think all the investment banks are run by honest geniuses?"

    They do it the old fashioned way; trading with insider information. But because (((they))) were protected by the last administration, they got away with it.

    As opposed to Martha Stewart, Polish Catholic, who did 5 months in prison when she tried to avoid taking a $45K loss by trading on insider information.
  49. Yak-15 says:
    @Nico
    The thing is, your pessimism ironically is born of the same ideology that has animated these parasites: Cartesianism.

    The obsession with an efficient and effective government is part and parcel of the Party of Reason. There is no room for favoritism because every man, woman and child is a bland, faceless interchangeable algebraic entity. All that matters is consent and "objectivity."

    In reality this is hogwash. Suppose the U.S. had the choice of awarding a defense contract to a British company and awarding the same to a Gulf country. All other things being equal, I think we would agree that the contract should be awarded to the British company for reasons that regular iSteve readers (except Corvinus) must be acutely aware. (George W. Bush, by the way, favored transferring the contract to the Jihadist power, in the real-life scenario that inspired this tale.)

    Here's the thing: we are also acutely aware that all other things are NOT equal between a Western-run company and an Arab-run one.

    (In fact, the Heisenberg Uncertainty Principle and the laws of thermodynamics suggest that they never are. Of the many ways in which they do so, this is how the social sciences trip up the most often: because social observations amount to documentations of abstractions at the highest level, a mind which is too disconnected or too specialized looks for parallels and comparisons in the most absurd of places. And the U.S.'s ever-tightening valuation of specialized credentials explain why our country has done such damage in the social sciences, by cranking out so many "thinkers" who cannot contextualize anything.)

    But the minute you begin to notice a difference between the West and the rest and act upon this observation, you have acted in violation of the liberal Cartesian narrative whereupon everything should be translated to squared-off numbers on a balance sheet. The critics will warn that if you keep pushing this "instinctive" favoritism and prejudice you may push over the deep edge into entrenched privilege and corruption.

    Indeed, this is the "crony capitalism" à la Trump spoken above. But as Irish Paleo points out there is a price for everything. A human society, in which I am free to discriminate in favor of what I know to be tried and true, seems worth the risk of a bit of cronyism, and the liberty to go about my affairs under the nose of an inefficient and ineffective government definitely has some appeal. (Though I must admit I have a high enough opinion of my abilities that I am confident I could carve out a rentable niche in the new "unfair," pseodo-feudal and illiberal - but NOT totalitarian - playing field.)

    If you're still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that "life is not a sojourn," allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    I can easily use empirical evidence, as most here do, to document why I would rather go with the Brits over the Gulfies. The intellectual heft of noticing is undeniable because there are numerous statistics and research pieces that underlie it.

    This is why I track all the research of HBD, IQ, etc – so as to have irrefutable evidence of my worldview when questioned by others.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico
    All very well and good. But, how many conversions have you made, how many policies have you influenced? How about any of us on here?

    The problem is that such empirical evidence contradicts the thesis that all men* are created equal and eliminates the possibility of the neat little application of a Cartesian grid. Thus the social Cartesian a.k.a. liberal will find any explanation that does NOT lead to the conclusion you demonstrate. The irony of course is that liberals are the ones to wank the hardest to the idea of "reason" yet their reactions to the field of behavioral genetics and to unfavorable comparisons of any one non-Western cultural tradition to the West demonstrate the necessary irrationality of the human mind.

    But as they say, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink.

    * Should be all male, female, questioning, crossed-over and non-binary trans inter LGBTQWERTYXZC persons, I know. And don't forget the gay Muslim furries. Never forget the gay Muslim furries.
  50. @Jack D
    From the wiki:

    One day I [Jack Ma] was in San Francisco in a coffee shop, and I was thinking Alibaba is a good name. And then a waitress came, and I said, "Do you know about Alibaba?" And she said yes. I said, "What do you know about?", and she said, "Open Sesame". And I said, "Yes, this is the name!" Then I went on to the street and found 30 people and asked them, "Do you know Alibaba?" People from India, people from Germany, people from Tokyo and China … they all knew about Alibaba. Alibaba – open sesame. Alibaba is a kind, smart business person, and he helped the village. So … easy to spell, and globally known. Alibaba opens sesame for small- to medium-sized companies
     

    Sounds too good to be true. I like the 40 thieves reference better.

    Read More
  51. @the cruncher
    If you can pass the interview(s), they'll take you. The older ones tend to stick around longer anyway, and not run off to a startup (my not massively-backed-up observation). It's true that the crowd is majority younger, but when I was there, it looked like that's where all of the Valley's missing older white guys were.

    Why did you leave Google? I know a guy who works there who has thought about quitting but says they keep throwing 3 year out stock options at him.

    Read More
  52. Nico says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in?"

    Something in between not getting chopped up, dumped in a car trunk, and buried in an undisclosed area a la Scorcese's "Goodfellas".


    "The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today?"

    Mobster Henry Hill, of "Goodfellas" made a second comeback, so to speak, by going to Vegas and cashing in on the Rat Pack nostalgia, Vegas was better back in the days of Bugsy, the Syndicate, etc.

    The good ol' days weren't always so good. Plus they didn't offer much in the way of cool stuff. No five star hotels, few gourmet restaurants. Just the basics: Gamble, gamble, $2 buffets, extra scotch, Bobby Darin, Frank, Dino, Sammy, and later Elvis at the Sands, Cesars, and Desert Inn. But say the wrong word to the wrong connect-a-guy and one could wind up like Jimmy Hoffa.

    Nothing wrong with modern Vegas per se. What is disturbing is the continued presence of illegals flooding the Strip passing out fliers. Clean up illegal immigration and the city's not so bad for 2017.


    "And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?"

    While I would never presume to speak for The Last Real Calvinist, do allow me to mention John 3:16. And that's well worth the price of sojurning thru modern Vegas, with or without the buffet.

    No five star hotels, few gourmet restaurants. Just the basics: Gamble, gamble, $2 buffets, extra scotch, Bobby Darin, Frank, Dino, Sammy, and later Elvis at the Sands, Cesars, and Desert Inn.

    That sounds pretty nice, actually. I have never seen a five-star hotel or a “gourmet” restaurant in ANY country that was worth the price tag.

    I have eaten at very good restaurants which were *not* cheap per se: think in total $150 for a hearty starter, a carefully prepared main and a sumptuous dessert plus an aperitive drink, a bottle of nicely-aged Burgundy wine shared with another and a shot of Armagnac, all ordered à la carte by the way. From my experience a comparable meal at a yuppy “gourmet” place costs at least twice as much, does not allow à la carte switching and serves probably half the quantity of alcohol.

    But say the wrong word to the wrong connect-a-guy and one could wind up like Jimmy Hoffa.

    The people who get popped off by the Mafia are usually 1. other Mafiosi or their underlings who are for one reason or another “in the way” or otherwise a nuisance, 2. tributaries who don’t pay their dues or stir up trouble in the territory, and 3. police/detectives/prosecutors on their trail. Not saying this makes them “good guys” but I don’t know what a tourist would have to fear. It’s not good business to kill paying customers from the Außland, or even to rough them up or be anything but courteous to them (unless they’re obnoxious jerks ruining the experience for other, better customers).

    While I would never presume to speak for The Last Real Calvinist, do allow me to mention John 3:16. And that’s well worth the price of sojurning thru modern Vegas, with or without the buffet.

    Maybe at some point in the past I would have exited Sin City with some sins to confess. When I saw the LV Strip for the first and hopefully only time in my life in 2007 I thought maybe I was being punished for my sins.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "When I saw the LV Strip for the first and hopefully only time in my life in 2007 I thought maybe I was being punished for my sins."

    So then, you actually visited Vegas in 2007? In other words the new Vegas didn't stop you from visiting.

    "That sounds pretty nice, actually. I have never seen a five-star hotel or a “gourmet” restaurant in ANY country that was worth the price tag."

    Ok. Gone are the days of 22oz. Steak dinner for $4.99; Lobster Tail for $7.99, and an excellent vodka martini for $1.75. Gas, even in some parts of LA up to about 1972, was going for 29 cents a gallon.

    Those days aren't coming back.

    It all depends on the point of view. The fact that more and more of these resorts are being built tends to suggest that the consensus strongly favors modernity. I would venture to state that the world's five star hotels compared to say, a century ago or even fifty years ago, stand heads and shoulders above what the past could have offered as far as amenities and cool stuff. I mean, a nifty five star-ish hotel ca.1920 would've had such amenities as: A chain toilet; possible single car garage (for the entire hotel) for the relatively few automobiles then on the road. The Waldorf Salad was a relatively new item on the menu. That's just in NY, SF, ChiTown. Vegas ca.1917 wasn't much more than prairie dust and cactuses and the only table games one could play were the ol' shell game and paper, rock, scissors.

    Fast forward to 1967, still the classic era Vegas, and the world of $2 buffets, Dino, Frank, Sammy. You know, even today, Motel 6 and Days Inn offers better grub than most hotels back in the day.

    For the most part, I enjoy living in 2017. Contrary to what Marty McFly may have led you to believe, you can't actually go back in time, at least until the Flux Capacator is found to be in working order.

  53. Dee says:
    @unpc downunder
    Admittedly Damoregate isn't just about HBD realism regarding gender, it's also about HBD realism regarding political orientation and work performance. If you've seen Damore's interview with Peterson, he has also been dragged under the coals for suggesting liberals are lazier than conservatives.From a business perspective, this is an even more explosive controversy. Damore has suggested that conscientious conservatives are just as valuable to a business as creative liberals, and a business run solely by liberals fail. This argument also happens to one of Peterson's pet causes.

    It's a bit like the Bell Curve controversy. The Bell Curve bruhaha wasn't just about race. No one really cares if working class blacks aren't very smart. The really controversial part was suggesting that high IQ blacks are socially and economically better off than whites with similar IQs and qualifications.

    ” The really controversial part was suggesting that high IQ blacks are socially and economically better off than whites with similar IQs and qualifications.”

    I read the White Privilege test is to ask yourself if your life is better because you’re white. If it is, then you have White Privilege.

    But knowing what I do now, if I had been a black with my IQ and ability, I’d have been recruited out of college by the best companies or public agencies and would have been on my way to the 95th percentile or better.

    Instead, being white, among the million whites that graduated that year, I was nothing special in that group and had to make own way into the 80th percentile or so….

    Read More
  54. Dee says:
    @Seamus Padraig
    There are ways of making money that have nothing to do with ability, merit, etc. Or do you think all the investment banks are run by honest geniuses?

    “There are ways of making money that have nothing to do with ability, merit, etc. Or do you think all the investment banks are run by honest geniuses?”

    They do it the old fashioned way; trading with insider information. But because (((they))) were protected by the last administration, they got away with it.

    As opposed to Martha Stewart, Polish Catholic, who did 5 months in prison when she tried to avoid taking a $45K loss by trading on insider information.

    Read More
  55. @Anonymous
    No one got whacked in Vegas, not even mob guys. When Greenberg got killed, they waited a long time for him to leave town.

    And as a civilian, you rarely if ever even saw a real mob guy. If you did they were on the down low.

    You might get beat up if you were caught cheating, or the cops would run you out of town. But basically Vegas was very safe.

    This is 2017, not 1957. Those days aren’t coming back.

    Vegas now has way more cool stuff for the individual tourist. Back then, there was very little in the way of entertainment, because everyone went there to gamble. For decades, Vegas was the main site for gambling in the US.

    Now, with many states having legalized gambling and building regional/local casinos, Vegas has had to offer other entertainment to keep the tourists. It’s now possible to spend a week in Vegas, have a great time doing many things, while never once spending a single minute inside a casino. The local casinos (whether Indian owned, etc.) give one a sense of what classic Vegas’s ambience back in the day must’ve felt like. Very scaled down, just the basics, occasionally top rate talent, etc. but people who go to local casinos in the US now are going mainly to gamble and that’s about it.

    Wouldn’t be surprised if Vegas were to open a super deluxe resort, say, the Atlantis, or a Dubai type of resort. (e.g. the world’s tallest hotel building, indoor skiing, etc.). Now THAT would be most interesting. Both Dubai and Vegas are in the desert so it would be cool to see which one would win the title of which oasis has the coolest stuff to offer tourists. Right now Dubai has the edge, but with American know how, don’t bet vs. Vegas just yet, should it decide to challenge Dubai for most amazing things to offer the everyday tourist.

    Read More
  56. @Dee
    10 years ago, Bill Gates was pushing his 'kinder, gentler, capitalism' meme. He wanted every company to divert 10-15% of its profits to a do-gooder project.

    Of course that would act to handicap all the small start-ups, the bunch Gates has been bat shit crazy about doing to Microsoft, what Microsoft did to the big guys in its early days. (IBM, among others)

    It'll be a lot tougher than when MS did it, but as Trump demonstrated, unexpected things do happen.

    Now tech will get to divert 10-15% of their profits dealing with the SJW clowns....

    Tech really does have a massive age discrimination problem. By the time you hit 45, your college time is 20 years in the past, along with your knowledge. Knew a bunch of techies that got canned right around the 45 b-day. A few hung on to 50, but they were the exception.

    your college time is 20 years in the past, along with your knowledge

    LOL! Whose fault was that if they failed to keep up? When I was 45 I was progressing nicely into both my peak earning years and beach time.

    Read More
  57. @The Last Real Calvinist
    One area in which PRC online service has caught up with, or even surpassed, western alternatives is in travel-planning.

    Ctrip now seem to be better than Expedia, hotels.com, etc. We Calvinists use it regularly, and get both better deals and better customer service than we've been seeing from western alternatives.

    Ctrip, huh? I had to type that twice to avoid autocorrect. I’ll check it out, thanks.

    Read More
  58. @snorlax

    You don’t get unbiased results NOW from Goolag. One of the best examples is typing “I want my husband to…” and seeing the results. In 2009, the top response was “dominate me,” from the auto fill. That was dispensed with, but I know where to view a screen cap of the original.
     
    I suspect (given male and female browsing habits) that suggestion actually was a mistake; Google suggestions likely used a simple Markov text generation algorithm when it was first introduced (which was in 2009), which actually works pretty well for the most part but is bound to produce some embarrassing screwups when the source text includes billions of searches by men looking for porn.

    AH, yes, Markov. Not looked at for 22 years. That explains how it originated.

    Note: they did NOT change the autosuggest, at the time, for “I want my wife to…”

    Read More
    • Replies: @snorlax
    Markov text generation was a really big fad among developers in 08-10 (note the date on the article I linked) and the suggestions feature originated as a single engineer's side project. So I'm almost certainly right.

    Scratch that, I am right: https://www.themarysue.com/google-scribe/1347103536000/

    Note: they did NOT change the autosuggest, at the time, for “I want my wife to…”
     
    Probably because they didn't get many complaints about it. The hatefact behind the current brouhaha is that men and women are different.

    When a woman searches for "I want my husband to […]," 99% of the time she's looking for soothing affirmations that she's a strong, brave, beautiful soul and her husband is a no-good jerk.

    When a man searches for "I want my wife to […]," 99% of the time he's looking for something sex-related.
  59. Nico says:
    @Yak-15
    I can easily use empirical evidence, as most here do, to document why I would rather go with the Brits over the Gulfies. The intellectual heft of noticing is undeniable because there are numerous statistics and research pieces that underlie it.

    This is why I track all the research of HBD, IQ, etc - so as to have irrefutable evidence of my worldview when questioned by others.

    All very well and good. But, how many conversions have you made, how many policies have you influenced? How about any of us on here?

    The problem is that such empirical evidence contradicts the thesis that all men* are created equal and eliminates the possibility of the neat little application of a Cartesian grid. Thus the social Cartesian a.k.a. liberal will find any explanation that does NOT lead to the conclusion you demonstrate. The irony of course is that liberals are the ones to wank the hardest to the idea of “reason” yet their reactions to the field of behavioral genetics and to unfavorable comparisons of any one non-Western cultural tradition to the West demonstrate the necessary irrationality of the human mind.

    But as they say, you can lead a horse to water, but you can’t make him drink.

    * Should be all male, female, questioning, crossed-over and non-binary trans inter LGBTQWERTYXZC persons, I know. And don’t forget the gay Muslim furries. Never forget the gay Muslim furries.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yak-15
    I have definitely brought more people to understand a nuanced view of reality. Not sure about "conversions" but they are starting to see the empirical realities of our worldview. It's a beginning.
  60. Nico says:
    @Anonymous
    If you’re still not convinced, let me offer you this: which Las Vegas would you prefer to sojourn in? The seedy racketeer town of 50 years yonder, or the sterile gay Disneyland of today? And if you object that “life is not a sojourn,” allow me to ask, when did you find the key to living forever and where can I get the same?

    Vegas cool in the JFK/MM era was the height of men being men and women being women. Of course, all the casinos were owned and run by the mafia, and everyone knew it. But it was ring-a-ding-ding, and watching movies of it all shows that everyone, men and women, were having a really good time. By contrast, today it's just a way to lose money and sleep in clean, but crummy hotel rooms.

    The recent news of Britney Spears being charged by a demented fan onstage in LV reminds us that things have changed for the worse. Just the fact that Britney Spears is the modern Las Vegas entertainment is bad enough.

    Quod erat demonstrandum.

    Read More
  61. snorlax says:
    @TomSchmidt
    AH, yes, Markov. Not looked at for 22 years. That explains how it originated.

    Note: they did NOT change the autosuggest, at the time, for "I want my wife to..."

    Markov text generation was a really big fad among developers in 08-10 (note the date on the article I linked) and the suggestions feature originated as a single engineer’s side project. So I’m almost certainly right.

    Scratch that, I am right: https://www.themarysue.com/google-scribe/1347103536000/

    Note: they did NOT change the autosuggest, at the time, for “I want my wife to…”

    Probably because they didn’t get many complaints about it. The hatefact behind the current brouhaha is that men and women are different.

    When a woman searches for “I want my husband to […],” 99% of the time she’s looking for soothing affirmations that she’s a strong, brave, beautiful soul and her husband is a no-good jerk.

    When a man searches for “I want my wife to […],” 99% of the time he’s looking for something sex-related.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Try "I want my husband to..." last time I did, about a year ago, the results were similar to 2009 with the dominate me one cut out. They're also heartbreaking.

    "I want my wife to" involved some sexual positions that the NYT debated printing in 1998. Now, no.

    Very interesting: I just tried "I want my husband to" on
    DuckDuckGo just now. "die" is the top suggestion. Heartbreaking, along with "come home," and a few others. At the bottom of the suggestions "dominate me."

    Time to switch to DuckDuckGo.
  62. @snorlax
    Markov text generation was a really big fad among developers in 08-10 (note the date on the article I linked) and the suggestions feature originated as a single engineer's side project. So I'm almost certainly right.

    Scratch that, I am right: https://www.themarysue.com/google-scribe/1347103536000/

    Note: they did NOT change the autosuggest, at the time, for “I want my wife to…”
     
    Probably because they didn't get many complaints about it. The hatefact behind the current brouhaha is that men and women are different.

    When a woman searches for "I want my husband to […]," 99% of the time she's looking for soothing affirmations that she's a strong, brave, beautiful soul and her husband is a no-good jerk.

    When a man searches for "I want my wife to […]," 99% of the time he's looking for something sex-related.

    Try “I want my husband to…” last time I did, about a year ago, the results were similar to 2009 with the dominate me one cut out. They’re also heartbreaking.

    “I want my wife to” involved some sexual positions that the NYT debated printing in 1998. Now, no.

    Very interesting: I just tried “I want my husband to” on
    DuckDuckGo just now. “die” is the top suggestion. Heartbreaking, along with “come home,” and a few others. At the bottom of the suggestions “dominate me.”

    Time to switch to DuckDuckGo.

    Read More
  63. @Nico

    No five star hotels, few gourmet restaurants. Just the basics: Gamble, gamble, $2 buffets, extra scotch, Bobby Darin, Frank, Dino, Sammy, and later Elvis at the Sands, Cesars, and Desert Inn.
     
    That sounds pretty nice, actually. I have never seen a five-star hotel or a "gourmet" restaurant in ANY country that was worth the price tag.

    I have eaten at very good restaurants which were *not* cheap per se: think in total $150 for a hearty starter, a carefully prepared main and a sumptuous dessert plus an aperitive drink, a bottle of nicely-aged Burgundy wine shared with another and a shot of Armagnac, all ordered à la carte by the way. From my experience a comparable meal at a yuppy "gourmet" place costs at least twice as much, does not allow à la carte switching and serves probably half the quantity of alcohol.

    But say the wrong word to the wrong connect-a-guy and one could wind up like Jimmy Hoffa.
     
    The people who get popped off by the Mafia are usually 1. other Mafiosi or their underlings who are for one reason or another "in the way" or otherwise a nuisance, 2. tributaries who don't pay their dues or stir up trouble in the territory, and 3. police/detectives/prosecutors on their trail. Not saying this makes them "good guys" but I don't know what a tourist would have to fear. It's not good business to kill paying customers from the Außland, or even to rough them up or be anything but courteous to them (unless they're obnoxious jerks ruining the experience for other, better customers).

    While I would never presume to speak for The Last Real Calvinist, do allow me to mention John 3:16. And that’s well worth the price of sojurning thru modern Vegas, with or without the buffet.
     
    Maybe at some point in the past I would have exited Sin City with some sins to confess. When I saw the LV Strip for the first and hopefully only time in my life in 2007 I thought maybe I was being punished for my sins.

    “When I saw the LV Strip for the first and hopefully only time in my life in 2007 I thought maybe I was being punished for my sins.”

    So then, you actually visited Vegas in 2007? In other words the new Vegas didn’t stop you from visiting.

    “That sounds pretty nice, actually. I have never seen a five-star hotel or a “gourmet” restaurant in ANY country that was worth the price tag.”

    Ok. Gone are the days of 22oz. Steak dinner for $4.99; Lobster Tail for $7.99, and an excellent vodka martini for $1.75. Gas, even in some parts of LA up to about 1972, was going for 29 cents a gallon.

    Those days aren’t coming back.

    It all depends on the point of view. The fact that more and more of these resorts are being built tends to suggest that the consensus strongly favors modernity. I would venture to state that the world’s five star hotels compared to say, a century ago or even fifty years ago, stand heads and shoulders above what the past could have offered as far as amenities and cool stuff. I mean, a nifty five star-ish hotel ca.1920 would’ve had such amenities as: A chain toilet; possible single car garage (for the entire hotel) for the relatively few automobiles then on the road. The Waldorf Salad was a relatively new item on the menu. That’s just in NY, SF, ChiTown. Vegas ca.1917 wasn’t much more than prairie dust and cactuses and the only table games one could play were the ol’ shell game and paper, rock, scissors.

    Fast forward to 1967, still the classic era Vegas, and the world of $2 buffets, Dino, Frank, Sammy. You know, even today, Motel 6 and Days Inn offers better grub than most hotels back in the day.

    For the most part, I enjoy living in 2017. Contrary to what Marty McFly may have led you to believe, you can’t actually go back in time, at least until the Flux Capacator is found to be in working order.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nico

    So then, you actually visited Vegas in 2007? In other words the new Vegas didn’t stop you from visiting.
     
    Sometimes you don't know what is there until you get there.

    Other times, like myself, you get stranded there from a missed flight connection and are carted into the city for a longer sojourn than you would ever have cared for.

    Ok. Gone are the days of 22oz. Steak dinner for $4.99; Lobster Tail for $7.99, and an excellent vodka martini for $1.75. Gas, even in some parts of LA up to about 1972, was going for 29 cents a gallon.

    Those days aren’t coming back.
     
    Umm, no s___, Sherlock, the past ain't coming back. In 1900 some bars offered caviar for free because the salt incited customers to buy drinks. That was when there were 5 times fewer people in the world and 10 times more caviar in the Black Sea.

    What's your point? That the effervescence of such phenomena makes them objectively inferior to what we have today?

    The fact that more and more of these resorts are being built tends to suggest that the consensus strongly favors modernity.
     
    The 2008 and 2012 U.S. presidential elections suggested that the consensus strongly favored intersectionality. That doesn't mean it's a good idea.

    I would venture to state that the world’s five star hotels compared to say, a century ago or even fifty years ago, stand heads and shoulders above what the past could have offered as far as amenities and cool stuff.
     
    And we all know "cool" is synonymous with "quality." Yawn. As for the sheer number of "amenities," I think Burger King established long ago that "when you have it your way, it just tastes better."

    YAWN.

    You know, even today, Motel 6 and Days Inn offers better grub than most hotels back in the day.
     
    You and I must not have been at the same "Motel 6" branches this year.

    Contrary to what Marty McFly may have led you to believe, you can’t actually go back in time, at least until the Flux Capacator is found to be in working order.
     
    After your citing Martin Scorsese films as your reference for why the "old" Vegas was undesirable, it does come as a relief to know that you do realize movies are just movies and not real life.
  64. Yak-15 says:
    @Nico
    All very well and good. But, how many conversions have you made, how many policies have you influenced? How about any of us on here?

    The problem is that such empirical evidence contradicts the thesis that all men* are created equal and eliminates the possibility of the neat little application of a Cartesian grid. Thus the social Cartesian a.k.a. liberal will find any explanation that does NOT lead to the conclusion you demonstrate. The irony of course is that liberals are the ones to wank the hardest to the idea of "reason" yet their reactions to the field of behavioral genetics and to unfavorable comparisons of any one non-Western cultural tradition to the West demonstrate the necessary irrationality of the human mind.

    But as they say, you can lead a horse to water, but you can't make him drink.

    * Should be all male, female, questioning, crossed-over and non-binary trans inter LGBTQWERTYXZC persons, I know. And don't forget the gay Muslim furries. Never forget the gay Muslim furries.

    I have definitely brought more people to understand a nuanced view of reality. Not sure about “conversions” but they are starting to see the empirical realities of our worldview. It’s a beginning.

    Read More
  65. Nico says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "When I saw the LV Strip for the first and hopefully only time in my life in 2007 I thought maybe I was being punished for my sins."

    So then, you actually visited Vegas in 2007? In other words the new Vegas didn't stop you from visiting.

    "That sounds pretty nice, actually. I have never seen a five-star hotel or a “gourmet” restaurant in ANY country that was worth the price tag."

    Ok. Gone are the days of 22oz. Steak dinner for $4.99; Lobster Tail for $7.99, and an excellent vodka martini for $1.75. Gas, even in some parts of LA up to about 1972, was going for 29 cents a gallon.

    Those days aren't coming back.

    It all depends on the point of view. The fact that more and more of these resorts are being built tends to suggest that the consensus strongly favors modernity. I would venture to state that the world's five star hotels compared to say, a century ago or even fifty years ago, stand heads and shoulders above what the past could have offered as far as amenities and cool stuff. I mean, a nifty five star-ish hotel ca.1920 would've had such amenities as: A chain toilet; possible single car garage (for the entire hotel) for the relatively few automobiles then on the road. The Waldorf Salad was a relatively new item on the menu. That's just in NY, SF, ChiTown. Vegas ca.1917 wasn't much more than prairie dust and cactuses and the only table games one could play were the ol' shell game and paper, rock, scissors.

    Fast forward to 1967, still the classic era Vegas, and the world of $2 buffets, Dino, Frank, Sammy. You know, even today, Motel 6 and Days Inn offers better grub than most hotels back in the day.

    For the most part, I enjoy living in 2017. Contrary to what Marty McFly may have led you to believe, you can't actually go back in time, at least until the Flux Capacator is found to be in working order.

    So then, you actually visited Vegas in 2007? In other words the new Vegas didn’t stop you from visiting.

    Sometimes you don’t know what is there until you get there.

    Other times, like myself, you get stranded there from a missed flight connection and are carted into the city for a longer sojourn than you would ever have cared for.

    Ok. Gone are the days of 22oz. Steak dinner for $4.99; Lobster Tail for $7.99, and an excellent vodka martini for $1.75. Gas, even in some parts of LA up to about 1972, was going for 29 cents a gallon.

    Those days aren’t coming back.

    Umm, no s___, Sherlock, the past ain’t coming back. In 1900 some bars offered caviar for free because the salt incited customers to buy drinks. That was when there were 5 times fewer people in the world and 10 times more caviar in the Black Sea.

    What’s your point? That the effervescence of such phenomena makes them objectively inferior to what we have today?

    The fact that more and more of these resorts are being built tends to suggest that the consensus strongly favors modernity.

    The 2008 and 2012 U.S. presidential elections suggested that the consensus strongly favored intersectionality. That doesn’t mean it’s a good idea.

    I would venture to state that the world’s five star hotels compared to say, a century ago or even fifty years ago, stand heads and shoulders above what the past could have offered as far as amenities and cool stuff.

    And we all know “cool” is synonymous with “quality.” Yawn. As for the sheer number of “amenities,” I think Burger King established long ago that “when you have it your way, it just tastes better.”

    YAWN.

    You know, even today, Motel 6 and Days Inn offers better grub than most hotels back in the day.

    You and I must not have been at the same “Motel 6″ branches this year.

    Contrary to what Marty McFly may have led you to believe, you can’t actually go back in time, at least until the Flux Capacator is found to be in working order.

    After your citing Martin Scorsese films as your reference for why the “old” Vegas was undesirable, it does come as a relief to know that you do realize movies are just movies and not real life.

    Read More
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