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As I’ve mentioned before, one of the most criminally understudied mental/physical wellbeing problems in the United States today is how the first semester away at college is often a disaster for freshmen, especially coeds. Tom Wolfe’s “I Am Charlotte Simmons” documents this downward spiral in excruciating detail, but universities haven’t been all that enthusiastic about studying this problem on their doorstep. (I believe UCLA is currently conducting a big multiyear study).

One often overlooked contributor is sleep dysfunction.

An Underappreciated Key to College Success: Sleep

Many college-bound students start out with dreadful sleep habits that are likely to get worse once the rigorous demands of courses and competing social and athletic activities kick in.

By Jane E. Brody
Aug. 13, 2018

Unfortunately, most of the advice in the article is intended for people with their own bedrooms, which is not most freshmen.

Advice more specific to college freshmen:

- Unless you are an intense morning person, don’t sign up for an 8 am class.

- Experiment to find the best earplugs. When you find the best type for you, buy several dozen pairs — a year’s supply — all at once.

- Consider an eye mask so your roommate turning on the light doesn’t wake you.

- If you get an opportunity for a dorm room single without a roommate, take it.

- Practice your “sleep arithmetic” before you’ll need it. A freshman once said to me: “I finally figured it out. When I have a 9 am class, if I go to bed at midnight, I can get 8 hours of sleep and still have an hour in the morning to get to class!”

Well, that’s a start …

But, honestly, what if it takes you 45 minutes each evening to get ready for bed and fall asleep? Well, then for a 9 o clock class you have to head for bed at 11:15 pm.

What if you only got 5 hours of sleep last night? Then you need 11 hours of sleep to make it up, so that means heading for bed at 8:15 pm tonight.

If that’s not feasible, what about making up half of your deficit by sleeping 9.5 hours tonight? Now the arithmetic is getting a little tricky. You have to start heading for bed at 9:45 pm.

Most students have different times for their first classes on MWF and Tu-Th, which further confuses them.

None of this is complicated, but my guess is that a large fraction of young people aren’t inclined to do this kind of arithmetic if nobody has made them practice it.

 
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  1. Lot says:

    People who sleep 8 hours a night die sooner than those who sleep 6.5 or 7. And have less fun along the way.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @reiner Tor
  2. Anonymous[276] • Disclaimer says:

    That’s what coffee and Adderall are for.

    I think college kids just prefer staying up and hanging out, goofing off, etc. They’d rather have less sleep, especially since they can make up for it with caffeine and other stimulants. Also smartphone and computer screens at night keep you awake.

    • Replies: @Stan d Mute
  3. Lot says:

    Dozens of masked “Swedish youths” launch well-coordinated firebombings and CarBQs in at least 8 cities, barricade roads, pelt police with rocks

    http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-6057119/Masked-attackers-set-cars-fire-hospital-car-park-rampage-Sweden.html

    Zero MSM coverage so far.

    More here:

    https://mobile.twitter.com/PeterSweden7

  4. When my son had an early morning class, he would just stay up all night, go to the class in the morning, then go to bed for a few hours. His sleep habits were terrible, but he still managed to stay on the Dean’s List most semesters.

    Why do they even have early morning classes? When I was in college I missed one of my early morning classes so often it helped me decide I might as well drop out, which I did.

  5. Tyrion 2 says:

    No screens an hour before bedtime or at least use a blue light filter. There’s no perfect substitute for routine either, though it may not be possible to keep to one. I also hear that it helps to have a bit of financial support, but that depends on how the éminence grise business is going these days.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @stillCARealist
  6. Tyrion 2 says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    A lot of professors like being sozzled by the afternoon?

  7. Anonymous[266] • Disclaimer says:

    - Experiment to find the best earplugs. When you find the best type for you, buy several dozen pairs — a year’s supply — all at once.

    This could be deadly in a fire. Instead, get a noise/sound machine app which will drown out ambient noise but won’t drown out a fire alarm. A delay in waking at the first sound of a fire alarm, even just 20-30 seconds, could prove deadly.

  8. It’s routine more than hours of sleep. Besides you’re going to stay up most of the night occasionally for hard tests. I think hours of sleep needed vary anyway by quite a lot depending on if you’ve got a cold or are stressed.

    Otherwise, caffeine or exercise too close to bedtime will keep you awake. And, my god, the use of electronic devices is a more recent problem that probably has a worse effect than caffeine or exercise. Though it can likely be dealt wth similarly. I vaguely remember something about not watching TV but I got my best sleep after Letterman.

  9. Wonderful advice indeed. Applies through all of life, sleep is a key undertaking.

    O/T Important Political Question:

    When does this master, this great man, aye this God Emperor, President Trump, make an issue, in his inimitable way, of Big Tech’s banning from their platforms the most important voices of what is currently the most unpopular racial minority’s* political ecosystem?

    I’d suggest he save it until early-to-mid 2020. That will give the few entitled megalomaniacs (Woznicki or whatever, Zuckerberg, Jack Twitter etc.) time to overreach grotesquely, thereby enraging what counts of the electorate.

    *Consider, friends, a 1938 Supreme Court decision: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/United_States_v._Carolene_Products_Co.#Significance

    • Replies: @Rosie
  10. I don’t think I stayed awake through a single 9am organic chemistry class my freshman year. I made it to most of the classes, but couldn’t keep my eyes open. I did pass though, I got really good at learning from textbooks.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  11. J.Ross says: • Website

    I didn’t sleep properly at all when I was younger and now I cannot function if I’ve underslept. This will be a very difficult thing to fix because it’s private and voluntary, and plus, when you’re younger, you really can miss sleep and still work.

  12. Alfa158 says:
    @Lot

    I was pleased to see that the Dailymail article used the term “ youngsters”. I’ve often complained that the more common word “youths” has now become a blatant euphemism for the “n” word, and should be replaced with the more wholesome “youngsters”. That would help us to have a more civil discourse.
    Yeah, that’s the ticket, a civil discourse will fix things like this.
    I always call people like this youngsters.

  13. Alfa158 says:
    @Chief Seattle

    It wasn’t the early start. Organic chemistry was the only class I ever fell asleep in. But then I was used to rising early. To make 8AM classes at USC, I had to catch the first bus at 6AM.
    ( oh and it was 10 below, hip deep snow, and uphill both ways. You know the old routine.)

  14. Anon[989] • Disclaimer says:

    Ear plugs and and eye mask: These are miraculous (but subwolfers will defeat the ear plugs). I have been sleeping with them for most of my adult life, starting during a period where I did a lot of night work.

    For me, a sufficiently cool room to sleep in is essential.

    Nobody thinks he needs 8 hours of sleep. Just assume that you do, since you probably do. It can be a miraculous realization when you suddenly discover you have never been getting enough sleep. Your entire attitude and personality changes.

    A good way to define sleep is “lying in a horizontal position for 8 hours in the dark.” Many people get up because they “can’t go go to sleep.” If the rule is you have to lie there for 8 hours, then your body will get the message, whether it be a few nights later or a month later. Eventually you will be able to go to sleep.

    No caffeine or other methylated xanthines after 5:00 p.m.

    It’s easy to find time to sleep: No television, movies, or social media. Voilá!

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    , @Jack D
  15. MC says:

    The sad irony of 8 AM classes is that the kids who end up having to take them are the ones least equipped to handle them. The Type A early risers have been hoovering up advice for success just like this, and they’re the ones who are at their computer logged into the online class registry at 12:00 AM on the day that online registration opens up. The kids in the 8 AM class are the ones who figured they’d pick their classes, “I dunno, a couple weeks before the semester? That’s soon enough isn’t it?”

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  16. Anon[425] • Disclaimer says:

    Internet made things much worse.

  17. Anonymous[264] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alfa158

    They’re now being called “teens” where I live. I guess that after the sock hop today’s teens like to go out and highjack some cars.

  18. @Anon

    Good tips.

    Melatonin, Tryptophan, and Valerian help speed up the sleep process and keep you from getting up. However, be aware that Melatonin can raise blood glucose levels.

    A white noise machine can help block out the sound.

    Try to block out as much light as possible, especially blue light.

  19. Young people used to stay up late partying and socializing.

    Now they stay up late looking at their smartphone. Which is actually worse from the perspective of trying to get a good night’s sleep. It’s much harder to disconnect from the 24-hour social media apps on your smartphone. Also, lots of blue light exposure.

    Beware the blue light.

  20. AndrewR says:
    @Lot

    I despise Nazis & Communists. Love beats hate.

    This boy sums up the schizophrenic, hateful “love” of the left today.

  21. El Dato says:
    @Lot

    Someone is big into spurious correlations, I see.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
  22. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alfa158

    I was pleased to see that the Dailymail article used the term “ youngsters”.

    I was amused to see that Steve used the term “co-eds” which dates from the 1940s & 50s.

  23. Take naps. Really, it’s a major key to surviving during college. You won’t have enough time to get assignments done, work, relax, or socialize if you attempt to keep to an 8 hour a day (which is too much, should be 6-7) hour sleep schedule every night.

    Also, sleep in late on the weekends. Don’t wake up before noon. Helps cut down on your sleep deficit.

    Lastly, plan your partying out in advance. Unless you’re completely anti-social, want to go insane from lack of social contact, or want to be known as that weird kid, you’re going to need to go out and have some fun. That being said, know what nights you can go out and plan accordingly; avoid spontaneous events (unless your schedule opens up unexpectedly).

  24. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @MC

    There are lots of morning people in the world. In fact, they rule it.

    Offices I’ve worked in, men arrived at 7am. Even a couple women.

    The other advantage (mentioned upthread) is needing only 4 or 5 hrs of sleep at night. That’s a colossal advantage in the working world, and it really is true for some people.

    • Replies: @O'Really
    , @Buck Turgidson
  25. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    However, be aware that Melatonin can raise blood glucose levels.

    News You Can Use. Thank you.

  26. Anonymous[337] • Disclaimer says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    The technology already exists for a type of ‘reverse video’ whereby the font color is amber and the background is black, not white. Blue light is minimized much better than with a filter. You can even set up certain Windows themes this way, but unfortunately most web designers haven’t a clue about it and many features are coded to be black without a corresponding contrast so they then vanish from sight.

    Imagery is usually a further complication, and the so-called ‘invert colors’ feature in Android isn’t a very effective simulation, as (naturally) it makes dark areas white.

  27. @JohnnyWalker123

    Melatonin, Tryptophan, and Valerian help speed up the sleep process and keep you from getting up. However, be aware that Melatonin can raise blood glucose levels.

    I’m taking melatonin right now to get over my jet-lag. It really does help me get back to sleep after the inevitable middle-of-the-night wake-ups, but it also gives me very strange and vivid dreams, some of which are not that pleasant. It may not be a solution over the long run.

    • Replies: @JohnnyWalker123
    , @ic1000
  28. @The Last Real Calvinist

    What’s your blood glucose? If you’re in the higher end of the pre-diabetes range, you might want to go easy on the Melatonin.

    strange and vivid dreams

    REM sleep. It’s good for you.

    http://valleysleepcenter.com/3-things-you-should-know-about-rem-sleep/

    REM sleep is important to your sleep cycle because it stimulates the areas of your brain that are essential in learning and making or retaining memories. According to the National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, a study depriving rats of REM sleep significantly shortened their life span, from two or three years to five weeks. Rats deprived of all sleep cycles lived only three weeks. The importance of REM sleep, in particular, is attributed to the fact that during this phase of sleep, your brain exercises important neural connections which are key to mental and overall well-being and health.

  29. Most students have different times for their first classes on MWF and Tu-Th, which further confuses them.

    If this is confusing for a college student, then perhaps college isn’t for you.

    • Replies: @Crew Cut Man
  30. eah says:

    Of course it goes without saying that expecting 18 y/o’s to manage their time appropriately is asking too much — but they can vote.

    • Replies: @Eagle Eye
  31. 8 hours of sleep: How cute is that?

    Anything more than 2 is for wimps. Of course, it helps to have an office with a door that closes, a luxury most college grads will never know. Even better if you have a sofa in there.

  32. O'Really says:
    @Anonymous

    Sleep privilege is the last frontier for SJWs.

    Early risers and 4-hour-sleepers oppress those of us who are a bit more nocturnal and/or drowsy.

    I swear I would join Antifa if they adopted this issue into their platform.

    • Replies: @Crew Cut Man
  33. @Anonymous

    I think that was back in the old days.

    These days I believe it’s more often ruled by wymyn who show up at 9:30 after having dropped their kids off at day care

    • Replies: @anon
  34. Anon[712] • Disclaimer says:
    @Alfa158

    These kind of rules never seem to make it into the AP Manual of Style or the NYT Manual of Style.

  35. I think sleep isn’t that big of a deal for college students. College age is prime fertile years which means a girl’s body is expecting to be raising children.

    Any late-child-having dual working 30s millennial household can tell you that sleep deprivation from newborns is a real bitch.

    I believe that during about age 16-22 needs far less sleep and is not as bothered by sleep interruptions or low quality sleep. This skill boost exists so that children can be parented more easily (men get the same boost intended for combat and then also child rearing)

    Instead, we’re using it to get shitfaced at Monday night karaoke. Then trying to parent without it 10-15 years later.

    To improve freshman success, during the first couple months or so colleges should issue every freshman beer and liquor directly, and probably some small quantity of other drugs too. Removing the 21yo drinking age would also accomplish the same thing more or less.

    The best way to improve freshman outcomes would be for girls to just stop going to college. Which to isn’t that far fetched.

    One sentiment that is extremely common among college/post college White guys is “my daughter is not going to college”. This is typically always the top comment on Old Row, Barstool, etc posts featuring female degeneracy, of which there are a never ending supply that are always ratcheting worse.

    We’ll see if we stay strong on this.

    By the way the founder of Old Row is 100% MAGA shitlord and very open about it. The White kids are alt-right.

  36. @O'Really

    Interesting. An expansion opportunity for either side..whoever gets there first.

  37. For me, I strongly wish I would have avoided alcohol and caffeine; I don’t think my college-age self could have done would have done that, though.

  38. @ScarletNumber

    College is for everyone now. What are you, a racist? All you have to be able to do is sign your name on the loan forms. Then, some number of years later, on the legal complaint saying you shouldn’t have to pay back your loans because you were hoodwinked into thinking you’d be making 100K per year despite being mentally incompetent–and still uneducated.

    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
  39. ic1000 says:
    @The Last Real Calvinist

    A month back, Scott Alexander posted Melatonin: Much More Than You Wanted To Know. Being SlateStarCodex, the post presents multiple points of view, sources hyperlinked, as well as the historical context. In other words, it’s long.

    Shorter Scott:
    * The right melatonin dose is 0.3 mg, hard to find. Most pills contain much higher amounts, which is counterproductive.
    * Don’t just take melatonin, also change other things to improve your sleep (search “treat delayed phase sleep disorder”).

  40. Ganderson says:
    @Lot

    “Swedish youths”- presumably named Sven, Ole, and Torvald, no doubt…

  41. Ian M. says:

    Unless you are an intense morning person, don’t sign up for an 8 am class.

    Ha, I made this mistake as a college freshman: I figured if I had been getting up for high school – which started at 7:50 am – five days a week, 8 or 8:30 three days a week would be no problem.

    What a rude awakening: I ended up missing well more than half of those classes.

    Experiment to find the best earplugs. When you find the best type for you, buy several dozen pairs — a year’s supply — all at once.

    The problem with the earplugs I’ve tried is that they fall out of my ears. I don’t know if I just need to try a different kind, if I’m inserting them into my ears incorrectly, or if I just have abnormally small ear canals.

    What if you only got 5 hours of sleep last night? Then you need 11 hours of sleep to make it up, so that means heading for bed at 8:15 pm tonight.

    Is making up sleep a one-to-one thing?

    ***

    Anyone know anything about segmented sleep, where you sleep for two four-hour periods with an hour of wakefulness in between? I’ve read somewhere that this used to be the norm. I’ve wondered if this would be better than sleeping eight hours straight. Although it makes me think of that Seinfeld episode where Kramer attempts Leonardo da Vinci’s sleep schedule and ends up in the Hudson River.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  42. @Lot

    Dozens of masked “Swedish youths” launch well-coordinated firebombings and CarBQs in at least 8 cities, barricade roads, pelt police with rocks

    What kind of crank are you, didn’t you ever TP or egg a neighborhood house or soap a car window? I suppose you never pelted anyone with a water balloon? “Teens” will be “teens” whether in Detroit, Baltimore, St Louis, Chicago, or Sweden. A little gang rape and firebombing here and there is just youthful exuberance! Sure, beheadings may go a bit too far on Long Island or Cuck Island, but “teens” have always pushed the boundaries haven’t they?

  43. @Anonymous

    That’s what coffee and Adderall are for.

    Not coffee, that’s expensive. Just Adderall. Nothing gets you going like some nearly free (depending on your co-pay) meth in the morning! And if you get up late, a quick crush and snort will have you jittery in a jiffy.

  44. @Anonymous

    I was amused to see that Steve used the term “co-eds” which dates from the 1940s & 50s.

    What IS the correct term today? Trans-eds? Poly-eds? Diversi-eds?

  45. Carol says:

    When I was a freshman at PCC there was a guy downstairs who’d drink beer and work on his car all night, revving the engine as high and as loud a possible. I don’t think even the industrial earplugs I wear now would have blocked thst out.

    When I was in high school it was the neighborhood dogs barking all night.

    It helps to be someone who can sleep through anything.

  46. Chase says:

    It’s been more than a decade for me, but looking back, I’d say alcohol was – by far – my biggest sleep impediment in college. I didn’t see it that way until I got to be about 27, how truly important sleep (and good, non-booze sleep) is. But if I had to go back and do it again, that is not the part of college I would change.

  47. @Harry Baldwin

    One of the more popular professors at my college not only scheduled his most popular class in the morning, but on Saturday morning to make sure no one would sign up who wasn’t serious.

  48. @Lot

    People who are healthy and breathe healthily (I suspect the latter is an especially important factor, snoring probably is quite unhealthy) will need less sleep than those who aren’t, and despite the less sleep, will live longer. However, if you’re unhealthy (especially your breathing, which could be both a cause and a result of poor health), then you’ll need more sleep, and sleep deprivation (i.e. sleeping just 6 hours snoring despite needing 9-10 hours of such bad quality sleep) will make your life even shorter, probably.

  49. Everything you need to know about college is that freshman year, my first class was 8:00, and senior year, my first class was at 11:30 one day a week, but my second class the other 4 days was at 3:00.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  50. @Anonymous

    Maybe if your fire alarms are oddly quiet. In every state I’m familiar with, the state government has mindlessly responded to every institutional fire death by increasing the required decibels of fire alarms to the point that the alarms are now disorientingly loud. Earplugs might actually improve your prospects nowadays.

    • Replies: @Lot
  51. @Alfa158

    I always call people like this youngsters.

    They have Amish in Sweden?

  52. If your roommate is a slut, none of your calculations will matter. We weren’t sexiled from our own rooms back then: she and her chew-toy would do it right in the bed across the room. Resident @$$h0l3 was little help, said policy was she had to keep it down to 3 nights per week. He had his own dorm room. Why didn’t they ever annoy his roommates?

    • Replies: @stillCARealist
  53. Bill says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    “Why do they even have early morning classes?”

    Faculty who make their living teaching teach four classes per semester. Students take five. The scheduling task is not really that easy, and imposing an extra constraint is likely to be costly. Also, because universities have been growing and growing and growing, space is constantly at a premium, so failing to use rooms from 8-10 is probably not a good plan. Extending teaching into the early evening sounds like a great idea right up until you teach an evening class.

    Also, in reality-land, 8am is not early, and we are allegedly preparing students for reality-land.

    • Replies: @MBlanc46
  54. Bill says:
    @Anonymous

    Is dying in dorm fires a risk worth worrying about?

  55. Jack D says:
    @Tyrion 2

    There is free software that will change the color temperature of your screen according to the time of day. It is even included as part of the latest edition of Windows 10 (though most people don’t even realize that it is there):

    https://www.pcworld.com/article/3189747/windows/how-to-use-night-light-in-the-windows-10-creators-update.html

    I don’t know whether it actually works but it couldn’t hurt.

  56. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    5PM is too late for caffeine, at least for me. It takes around 1 hr for caffeine to be absorbed and then its half life is around 6 hours. So half the caffeine in a cup of coffee at 5 will still be in your bloodstream at midnight. My cutoff for caffeine is early afternoon – say 2PM.

    OTOH, I know people who claim that they can have coffee after dinner and still sleep normally, so YMMV.

    • Agree: reiner Tor
  57. Spud Boy says:

    As part of my electrical engineering curriculum at the University of Illinois, I was required to take three semesters of physics, and all the lectures for those courses were at 8 a.m. on the other side of campus. I made it to the first three lectures of the first semester of physics and never went again after that. Fortunately, the lectures were not essential to passing the courses.

    By end of college, I was having difficulty getting up in time to attend my 11:00 classes; I would frequently come down to lunch at my fraternity house in my bath robe.

  58. Forbes says:

    Anything by Jane Brody should be received with a huge amount of skepticism–and perhaps doubt.

    As a science editor at the NYT, she was a huge advocate of high carbohydrate, low fat diet that the obese American public now suffers the consequence. She championed Senator George McGovern’s Agriculture Committee hearings that established the low fat/high carb mantra. The hearings, as typical, were based on so-called expert testimony, not scientific/nutrition research.

    This is “Jane Brody’s Nutrition Book” from 1981. Informative on nutrition, but wrong on dietary advice as it relied on opinion, not research. Brody “dined out” on this for years as she wrote several follow-up books.

    https://www.amazon.com/Jane-Brodys-Nutrition-Book-Lifetime/dp/0393014290/ref=sr_1_1?s=books&ie=UTF8&qid=1534261788&sr=1-1&keywords=jane+brody%27s+nutrition+book

    Anyone familiar with Gary Taubes or Nina Teicholz will recognize the massive error of the low fat/high carb diet Brody promoted.

    • Replies: @Flip
    , @AnotherDad
  59. res says:
    @JohnnyWalker123

    However, be aware that Melatonin can raise blood glucose levels.

    Thanks. Here is some more information: https://blog.humanos.me/research-reveals-an-odd-connection-between-melatonin-and-type-2-diabetes/

  60. AKAHorace says:

    A lot of good advice on this thread which would be useless if your roommate is a noisy asshole. Changing/rooms room mates can take weeks at best.

    For the amount that American students pay for tuition, a single room should be guaranteed by University administrators. It should also be semi sound proofed. This would be relatively cheap to do if the room was small enough and would be a big selling point for any uni.

  61. anonymous[401] • Disclaimer says:

    Tom Snyder.

  62. @Anonymous

    The sound machine is a good idea. They are cheap. Mine has several settings and I use one that’s supposed to be “rain” is quite white noisy.

    The other thing i’d mention is you don’t even need the eye mask. I use one on the plane–very useful. But at home a cotton t-shirt–dark color–draped over the head works very well. Soft, more comfortable, better breathability, better on the skin.

  63. Horpor says:
    @Alfa158

    As a non-American, may I please ask what a ‘n’ word means in American english? I see it sometimes popping up on Mr. Sailer’s blog and it makes me curious. Does it refer to something dangerous and mysterious of which one cannot speak loudly? Or is it a sign of some American deity, unknown to me as a simple barbarian from the plains of Île-de-France?
    Thank you in advance for your responses.

  64. “…big multiyear study” = kicking the can down the road

  65. @El Dato

    People who sleep 8 hours a night die sooner than those who sleep 6.5 or 7. And have less fun along the way.

    Someone is big into spurious correlations, I see.

    Swimmers are far more likely to drown than are those who can’t swim. Gee, I wonder why…

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
  66. @Horpor

    As a non-American, may I please ask what a[n] ‘[N-]’ word means in American [E]nglish?

    Let’s just say it’s a term with some, er, coloration. Using it in public would raise a hue and cry.

    • Replies: @Horpor
  67. @Horpor

    Hur-hurr, you’re jes’ tryin’ ta git me ta say “nigger”, ain’tcha Frenchie?
    Well you can’t fool me. You agent-provocateur, as we say in Middlesbrough.

  68. @Reg Cæsar

    I wonder if they tend to die in their sleep?

  69. Horpor says:
    @Reg Cæsar

    Thank You for your prompt answer. But I have to say that it only raises my curiosity. How a term implying a coloration could create a scandal in American public?
    There needs to be some grave mystery hidden in this ‘N’ word. What could it be? As I said before, maybe the ‘N’ is, just like the Mormon creed, an American religious creation? Would I be correct, gentlemen?

  70. @Horpor

    An “N” is a type of American who is not stronger or faster than any other type of American, but who for some unknown reason can knock out other Americans with a single punch any time he/she pleases and who can defeat two non-N American police officers in hand-to-hand combat but who, contrastingly, no one has ever seen being knocked out by a non-n American.

  71. @Horpor

    Since no one is willing to answer you, as a fellow non-American, let me answer it.

    The n-word usually means “nigger.” The taboo against this word is so strong in America (and I’d say in all English-speaking countries, and even among people speaking English as a foreign language) that people don’t anymore use it even to refer to its use by someone else. So if someone says to a black person “nigger” and as an eyewitness you are asked about it, they will ask if you heard him saying “the n-word” and you will also refer to it as “that guy using the n-word.”

    Actually, I’d do the same thing publicly, probably, though fortunately I never ever in my life had to refer to such an incident.

    • Replies: @Horpor
    , @Reg Cæsar
  72. Horpor says:
    @reiner Tor

    A son of the legendary Turan riders has had the fortitude to tell a fellow European the secret of the American ‘N’ word! I salute You for this.

    So, as I had already surmised, the ‘N’ word really represents an American deity, the magic Negro, who sprang from the American talking farm implements.
    The nigger seems indeed to be an American god, adored by all, his name only whispered and his image sprinkled with sacred water.
    Even on this blog, supposedly frequented by free thinking individuals, people use for ‘nigger’ an euphemistic ‘N’, just like the strange Hebrews do for their tribal Lord, when they shy away from spelling Yahveh and instead speak of G-d.

    Have some courage, American cousins, and shed the chains of your mental slavery, abscond from your current masters’ plantation, and the sun then will rise on your side! Speak no more in the tongue of your enemy!

    • Agree: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @jim jones
  73. @27 year old

    “This skill boost exists so that children can be parented more easily (men get the same boost intended for combat and then also child rearing). Instead, we’re using it to get shitfaced at Monday night karaoke. Then trying to parent without it 10-15 years later. “

    This is a great insight about something very difficult to fix.

    “To improve freshman success, during the first couple months or so colleges should issue every freshman beer and liquor directly, and probably some small quantity of other drugs too.”

    Not quite sure what this is supposed to accomplish. Are you saying drinking is less adverse to under 22s?

    • Replies: @27 year old
  74. @reiner Tor

    Since no one is willing to answer you, as a fellow non-American, let me answer it.

    We Americans didn’t give him an answer, at least an explicit answer, because he didn’t need one. We detected the coyness in his comment and went along with the joke.

    I once gave a ride to a Dane I knew well. He saw my plastic trash bag which said, “When full, open window and throw on highway.” He blurted out, “But that’s illegal!” I had to explain that, yes, it was meant as a joke.

    And the Danes have the best sense of humor on the Continent. I fear for the rest.

    • LOL: reiner Tor
    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  75. @27 year old

    I believe that during about age 16-22 needs far less sleep and is not as bothered by sleep interruptions or low quality sleep. This skill boost exists so that children can be parented more easily (men get the same boost intended for combat and then also child rearing)

    Instead, we’re using it to get shitfaced at Monday night karaoke. Then trying to parent without it 10-15 years later.

    That’s probably a great insight.

    • Agree: Corn
  76. @Reg Cæsar

    Yes, but he wanted someone to tell it to him as it is, so that he’d be able to react to the answer.

    Anyway, have a nice day.

  77. Rod1963 says:
    @27 year old

    I believe that during about age 16-22 needs far less sleep and is not as bothered by sleep interruptions or low quality sleep. This skill boost exists so that children can be parented more easily (men get the same boost intended for combat and then also child rearing)

    Instead, we’re using it to get shitfaced at Monday night karaoke. Then trying to parent without it 10-15 years later.

    Spot on.

    College is ruining kids, not helping them, especially when you factor in the Marxist brainwashing you get and the massive debt load that turns students into debt serfs before leaving. Besides college has become a extension of high school where kids sans parents can act in all sorts of degenerate ways thanks to OPM.

    For women it’s worse, it ruins their chances at getting married and having children. Not to mention aquiring multiple STD’s on spring break.

    And for what? A stupid humanities degree that they could just have easily have gotten online and still be equally worthless as the one from a brick and mortar school that cost six figures. Which will never be paid off.

  78. Flip says:
    @Forbes

    “Anyone familiar with Gary Taubes or Nina Teicholz will recognize the massive error of the low fat/high carb diet Brody promoted.”

    Well, Dean Ornish, John McDougall, and Michael Greger would certainly disagree.

  79. jim jones says:
    @Horpor

    The word is very common in Mandarin and just means “hmm”, if you sit near some Chinese in a coffee shop you will hear it a lot.

  80. @Forbes

    As a science editor at the NYT, she was a huge advocate of high carbohydrate, low fat diet that the obese American public now suffers the consequence.

    But it wasn’t just her.

    One of the things i toss at the proponents of the elite mangeralism–essentially the “experts say” ideology of the establishment–is that they’ve been not just wrong, but laughably, cringeworthily bad during my lifetime. Gotten essentially everything wrong. Including muffing basic simple scientific stuff like ‘what’s a good diet”–instead telling people to ease up on meat and eat more grains, ergo carbs, which has helped Americans to balloon to blimp proportions and get diabetes. Well done experts!

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Forbes
  81. @Tyrion 2

    No screens an hour before bedtime

    Everyone says this, but does it really make a difference? I think it’s just folk wisdom that people are repeating without thinking. My and my parents’ generation went to sleep in front of the TV almost nightly. Didn’t matter one bit. Same thing with drinking alcohol before bed.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Lot
  82. @Anonymous

    Yeah, I tried to correct this a while back, but some of the commenters here are adamant. They’re happy to never say “Oriental” or “Negro” or “American Indian”, but “co-eds” makes them feel like they know a secret language or something.

  83. @Rosamond Vincy

    Unacceptable. You should have thrown a fit until someone higher up took action.

    But the larger point is that living in the same room as someone else is a constant pain. Every married couple knows this, and every sibling who had to share a room does too. I wonder what Steve’s driving at for a solution? Does he think every college student should get a private room? That sounds great, but highly expensive.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  84. Jack D says:
    @AnotherDad

    Consuming a small amount of whole grains is not so bad, but the carbs people were (are) getting was in the form of white flour, sugar, corn syrup and other highly processed forms that are lacking in fiber. And combined with sedentary lifestyle, deadly. You really don’t need that much meat in your diet, but you do need a certain amount of fat in order for your digestive system to signal your brain that you are full. When people eat a bag of low-fat cookies or chips with skim milk they just keep eating and eating because their brain never gets the “I’m full” signal. The low-fat diet thing was a horrible mistake but Big Food loved it because processed carbs are cheaper than fats and have longer shelf lives.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
  85. Forbes says:
    @AnotherDad

    Oh, assuredly it wasn’t just her. But late ’70s-’80s influence of the NYT was huge across all media long before cable TV alternatives took off. In the current environment, it’s hard to fathom how few information options there were 40 years ago.

    As well, your point about elite managerialism getting much wrong simply due to a reliance of so-called expert opinion–essentially elite credentialism. Much government dietary advice has been driven by farm subsidies and the farm lobby (including the sugar lobby), i.e. how we got both corn syrup and corn ethanol. In other words, dietary advice driven by politics, not nutritional science.

  86. Rosie says:
    @Uilleam Yr Alban

    When does this master, this great man, aye this God Emperor, President Trump, make an issue, in his inimitable way, of Big Tech’s banning from their platforms the most important voices of what is currently the most unpopular racial minority’s* political ecosystem?

    That is a very good question. The issue of censorship is almost as important as immigration, perhaps more so, because what can be done about immigration depends on the O-window.

    Freshman girls living a certain distance from home should live in dorms with a cerfew and no boys allowed. Duh!

  87. anon[349] • Disclaimer says:
    @Buck Turgidson

    These days I believe it’s more often ruled by wymyn who show up at 9:30 after having dropped their kids off at day care

    My last boss, a female, would sashay in to the office at 10:30am everyday and thought the workday just started; several of us had already been on the clock for 3.5 hours. One time she asked me to have some (insignificant) report on her desk “first thing in the morning”; when I inquired a little further, she meant 9:00.

    Melatonin and Valerian have helped me get to sleep. During a particularly stressful time in my life a few years ago, by doctor prescribed Wellbutrin for me. It greatly helped me to relax, let go of anger and resentment, and peacefully fall off to sleep w/o any side affects except for some vivid, colorful not-unpleasant dreams.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  88. njguy73 says:

    In 1994′s PCU, the most underrated college movie ever, a seventh-year senior named “Droz” is assigned to show a pre-frosh around campus. Here’s how one of their first conversations goes:

    Droz: Want some advice?

    Tom: Well, yeah.

    Droz: Well, here’s all you need to know. Classes: nothing before eleven. Beer: it’s your best friend, you drink a lot. Women? You’re a freshman, so it’s pretty much out of the question. Will you have a car?

    Tom: Uh, no.

    Droz: Someone on your floor will. Find them and make friends with them on the first day.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt0110759/quotes

  89. @stillCARealist

    One of my sons got into a new state of the art dorm his junior year and had an excellent year academically and socially. Was there a connection? I wouldn’t be surprised.

    The brand new dorm was built as a bunch of very compact 4 bedroom apartments. The single bedrooms were tiny, something like 9 feet by 7 feet with a loft bed over the desk. But the apartment had 2 bathrooms, a living room and a small kitchen. The total square footage wasn’t a whole lot greater than in a conventional dorm with double bedrooms, but the ability to sleep and study in peace was vastly higher. And you have 3 “suitemates” which is probably better socially than having 1 roommate, who might be driving you crazy.

    I wouldn’t be surprised if by 2050 most dorms look like this. But of course it will take forever to get there.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @Crew Cut Man
  90. @stillCARealist

    Different people are different and should experiment with different habits until they find one that works for them.

  91. @Ian M.

    Is making up sleep a one-to-one thing?

    More so than most people assume.

  92. @Almost Missouri

    Not quite sure what this is supposed to accomplish. Are you saying drinking is less adverse to under 22s?

    tl/dr;

    - Freshmen do a lot of really dumb shit when they first get to school because the social scene is driven by who can supply the booze

    - So my theory is take the issue of obtaining alcohol out of the equation (drop the drinking age or give them alcohol), and limit some of the highest risk, most self-destructive stuff which happens right away

  93. Pepe says:

    The cure for insomnia is not to lie awake in bed at night. Or limit the amount of time awake in bed.

    During about a week do the best you can to calculate how many hours a night you sleep. It’s not unusual for people with sleep problems to get only 4 or 5 hours of sleep after being in bed for 10 or more hours.

    So, you’ve figured you’re getting about 4 hours a sleep a night. Forget that you’re in bed for 10 hours. Figure when you need to get up.

    6 a.m.? OK. Then you can’t get in bed until 2 a.m. You must not go to bed earlier than your average sleep before you need to get up.

    You do this for about 10 days or so. It will get hairy, but stick with it. “No one ever died of insomnia.”

    The idea is that slowly you’ll be spending a higher percent of time in bed asleep. That’s the key.

    Once you get up to around 90% sleeping (you sleep about 3.5 hours between 2 and 6 a.m.), then you slowly start going to bed earlier. By about an hour a week.

    It won’t be long until you’re going to bed at 10 p.m., spending 8 hours in bed and getting around 7 hours of sleep.

    This works because it’s based on an understanding of sleep and insomnia.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
  94. Brutusale says:
    @Umich Anon

    My entire senior year was Tuesday-Thursday. I only had to worry about getting sleep Monday and Wednesday nights. Add in that my apartment was a 10-minute ride to school on the MBTA Green Line. My job was in Kenmore Square, a 12-minute ride on the train.

    Life was good.

  95. Lot says:
    @stillCARealist

    I think TVs only became small and cheap enough to have one in a bedroom around 1975-1980 for middle class Americans.

    It wasn’t that healthy habit then, but the amount of light reaching the eye from a distant TV turned inattentively to the Tonight Show is probably less than staring at a smart phone 1 foot away.

    I had a TV in my bedroom as a kid, but when I left it on I would get strange dreams so rarely did.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  96. Lot says:
    @Almost Missouri

    That is my experience. My dorm’s fire alarm went off a lot, and they were much louder than my home alarms.

    Eventually I stopped leaving they happened so often. Plugging my ears, they were still very loud and only barely bearable with earplugs.

    One year they also had strobe lights inside the rooms in addition to the very loud alarms in the hallway.

  97. anon[161] • Disclaimer says:

    Fun personal note about freshman roommates.

    The first time I ever had any long-term experience with a Mexican was my freshman roommate in college. Within about a month or so, he was cheating on his long-term Mexican girlfriend with a nice white girl. It was actually pretty great, because it meant that he was almost never there. His girlfriend from Mexico would call all the time, though, and I was instructed to simply reply “Antonio no esta aqui.” if she ever called, and to just pretend I didn’t know any more Spanish than that, if she tried to say anything else, even though I did.

    She only stopped calling when he didn’t go back to Mexico for spring break.

    The days before ubiquitous cellphones were a magical time for cheaters, apparently.

    • Replies: @Corn
  98. @ic1000

    Thanks very much for the reference.

  99. Anonymous[527] • Disclaimer says:

    A big problem, at least when I was an undergrad, was that no matter my own diligence about trying to get to sleep I might either have a roommate who wanted to stay up, or someone upstairs would blast some music with a heavy drum beat, or some idiot down the hall would kick a steel trash can down the hall at 3am, etc. I could pretty much count on not falling asleep before 1am when I was living in a dorm no matter how I structured my life, whether I wore ear plugs, etc. Not having an early morning class when in this situation is definitely wise. Waking up for MWF vs TTh should be much easier these days as most phones have alarms you can set for different days/times. I’d say to just wake up the same time each morning, which is probably healthier anyway. It is also good to find somewhere else to study besides your dorm room, such as an empty class room, the library, etc

  100. Anonymous[527] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    “My last boss, a female, would sashay in to the office at 10:30am everyday and thought the workday just started; several of us had already been on the clock for 3.5 hours.”

    What’s really bad is when those bosses think nothing of having a meeting at 6pm. After all, they haven’t been there even 8 hours yet, so no problem for them.

    You pretty much have to adapt to your boss’ schedule when it’s significantly different or you’re screwed.

  101. Anon87 says:

    If you can’t figure it out, you aren’t college material. Same with getting a high APR credit card and loading it up freshman year. Disqualifies yourself.

  102. Rosie says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The single bedrooms were tiny, something like 9 feet by 7 feet with a loft bed over the desk.

    Perfect. With a place like that, I could

  103. Anonymous[427] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    I was born in ’61 and we always had a color TV in the living room and black and white sets in the kitchen, the bedrooms and the back room. As time went on the black and white sets were replaced by color.

  104. Eagle Eye says:
    @eah

    expecting 18 y/o’s to manage their time appropriately is asking too much — but they can vote.

    Ann Coulter called for repeal of the disastrous 26th Amendment. As usual, her argument is trenchant:

    Adopted in 1971 at the tail end of the Worst Generation’s anti-war protests, the argument for allowing children to vote was that 18-year-olds could drink and be conscripted into the military, so they ought to be allowed to vote.

    But 18-year-olds aren’t allowed to drink anymore. We no longer have a draft. In fact, while repealing the 26th Amendment, we ought to add a separate right to vote for members of the military, irrespective of age.

    https://townhall.com/columnists/anncoulter/2010/11/10/repeal-the-26th-amendment!-n1252480

  105. @Jack D

    I have a passion for processed barley products.
    Everything else in the carb. dept. can go hang.

  106. @Pepe

    It will get hairy, but stick with it. “No one ever died of insomnia.”

    Can’t count the number of times I’ve nearly died spectacularly from nodding off at the wheel, though
    (scumbag neighbors, my own infant children, screeching drunks in the street, car shunts, attempted break-ins, all the usual urban “vibe”). So far have only ended up one wheel on the verge at worst, before snapping out of it. Super-alert after that!

  107. Corn says:
    @anon

    “The days before ubiquitous cellphones were a magical time for cheaters, apparently.”

    They’ve probably made cheaters get smarter.

  108. @Expletive Deleted

    I have a passion for processed barley products.

    Hmmm, interesting. I love barley as well — great taste and texture. Have you tried millet? Also good.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
  109. @Crew Cut Man

    Sadly the current zeitgeist is that everyone goes to college. Even the local community colleges are agitating to build dorms, even though their raison d’etre is to serve the local student who doesn’t belong in college in the first place.

  110. MBlanc46 says:

    Don’t take an 8:00 class. Most of the time you don’t have a choice. If you want or need to take the class, you take it when the prof decides to offer it.

  111. MBlanc46 says:
    @Bill

    Two of my math profs just liked teaching 8:00 and 8:30 classes. If you eere a math major, you had to learn to deal with it.

  112. @Steve Sailer

    Yep, I had a deal like that at one college I attended. It was vastly superior to the crapshoot of double occupancy.

  113. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I can only tolerate the liquid kind. Very very old liquids. On account of being ancient myself.

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