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Slate: Warm Socks Are Racist

Hygge” is a Danish word that has something to do with wool socks, hot beverages, and fireplaces. Sounds good to me. Cold toes are the bane of my existence.

Oh, by the way, hygge is racist / Trumpist, according to Slate:

Denmark’s Hygge Aesthetic Is Comfy, Cozy, and Complicit With the Rise of Xenophobic Populism

By Alex Robert Ross

This winter, in preparation for what looks to be a terrifying year, millions of people traumatized by the ceaseless death and social turmoil of 2016 have decided to crawl back into the womb. …

With a bilious mess of daddy-didn’t-love-me assuming the U.S. presidency in a matter of days and the Britain slowly inching its way out into the Atlantic, hygge—the Danish aesthetic import that elaborates comfort into a life philosophy—has crept towards the English-speaking West at just the right time. The endless stream of books published on the subject stress the benefits of Ugg-booted inertia and snug living rooms, covers pulled right up around adherents’ necks against the chilly world outside. These stocking-filler texts drive us towards a definition, too: The Little Book of Hygge has it as “cosiness of the soul;” Hygge, the Danish Art of Happiness compares it to “a compass, steering us towards small moments that money cannot buy.” …

Hygge’s turning inward against the world outside comes with a more sinister edge, however. As Charlotte Higgins pointed out in her deep dive for the Guardian last month, hygge’s ties to the far-right in Denmark are remarkably strong. Pia Kjærsgaard, the leader of the right-wing, anti-immigrant Danish People’s Party, has publicly extolled the virtues of the lifestyle, insisting that her office remain cozy and hyggelig at all times. Denmark’s welfare state and reputation for tolerance may be admired by progressives in the U.K. and U.S., but, as Higgins points out, the country’s love of hyggefied thatched cottages with closed doors suggests a conservative undercurrent. “Anything that threatens that safe community, including alien values and ideologies, cannot be tolerated,” she writes.

The journalist and author Michael Booth had the same sensation when he moved from England to Denmark. “Hygge can seem like self-administered social gagging, characterized more by a self-satisfied sense of its own exclusivity than notions of shared conviviality,” he wrote in The Almost Nearly Perfect People: The Truth About the Nordic Miracle. Bloom says that it falls in line with a “postcolonial drawbridge theory—the ‘What was lost without [will be found within]’ way of valuing what little cultural and economic capital Denmark had left after the loss of its empire.”

“The loss of its empire?” Iceland? The Danelaw? Vinland? The American Virgin Islands?

Indeed, Denmark has been struggling with its colonial legacy lately; a rise in the number of refugees over the past two years has uncovered the limits of Denmark’s famously progressive outlook.

As we all know, most of the Merkel Youth were from former Danish colonies, such as the Virgin Islands. Who can forget the brutal scene when Tim Duncan was turned away on the beach of Jutland?

The government can now seize any item worth more than $1,450 from a refugee in order to pay for their sustenance and upkeep in the country. And after slashing refugee benefits last year, the government advertised the news in Lebanese newspapers, just to be sure that the country didn’t seem quite so attractive to newcomers. The far right Danskernes Parti, or “Danes’ Party,” handed out ‘Asylum Spray’ in the port town of Haderslev in September. Pepper spray being illegal, they filled the cans with hairspray instead, but the message remained hideously clear. “We wanted to figure out a way for Danish people, in particular women, to protect themselves,” party leader Daniel Carlsen said. “In the short run we want to provide solutions to make life better and safer for the Danish people.”

If his words sounded a little hyggelig, it’s no coincidence. Poured into hygge’s candlelit sweetness, like a cloying cream filling, are inevitable and explicit cases of xenophobia and racism. In their recent study of online communities in Denmark, Ahmad Beltagui and Thomas Schmidt explored the hygge of the closed chat room. In one instance, this sense of community was fostered with “what one [user] referred to as a ‘‘little Hyggelig racist joke’.” This online interaction had an unsavory conclusion: “The rapid escalation saw the opponent being addressed in upper case text and accused of both not speaking Danish and being homosexual.”

Though such bullying, the researchers write, would not ordinarily be particularly hyggelig, the abuse came “from a user with the word Hygge in their username.” With racist, homophobic abuse online being a cornerstone of right-wing populism today, this little hyggelig anecdote should raise doubts about just how apolitical hygge can claim to be.

The next year promises to make good on all of 2016’s ominous misery. Responding to that in any meaningful way will mean dousing the log fire, leaving the house, and feeling a chill. It will mean engaging with other people, not just those we feel comfortable with. It will require collaboration, energy, and work. The ex-pat website Your Danish Life says that things are “only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,” where “you can share the vicissitudes of life, knowing that no one will challenge you on your opinions, and where their difficulties most likely resemble yours.” We tried that already; we’ll be dealing with the consequences for four more years.

I’m with her

In other words, anti-Trumpism equals wet feet.

P.S.

A reader sends CIA-level documented proof of this Slate article’s assertions:

pepe-xmas

 
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  1. What happened to the Vikings?

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The Vikings are the guys who left. The non-Vikings stayed home.

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/0d/06/0b/0d060b609480528c6e8e37f17698f673.jpg
    , @pyrrhus
    Vikings got wet feet and departed (remarkably wet) Denmark for cozier climes...
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Here are a coupla' remnants from the 1970's.

    Enjoy!
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  2. “Responding to that in any meaningful way will mean dousing the log fire, leaving the house, and feeling a chill. It will mean engaging with other people, not just those we feel comfortable with. It will require collaboration, energy, and work.”

    I’ve heard it before:

    “He is going to demand that you shed your cynicism. That you put down your divisions. That you come out of your isolation, that you move out of your comfort zones. That you push yourselves to be better. And that you engage. Barack will never allow you to go back to your lives as usual, uninvolved, uninformed. ”

    https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Michelle_Obama

    • Agree: Percy Gryce
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "“He is going to demand that you shed your cynicism. That you put down your divisions. That you come out of your isolation, that you move out of your comfort zones. That you push yourselves to be better. And that you engage. Barack will never allow you to go back to your lives as usual, uninvolved, uninformed. ”'

    I had almost forgotten that gem by the First Angry Black Lady. The Obamas - both of them - were insufferable right from the beginning. I can't remember having heard a single thing Michelle has said that wasn't offensive, hectoring, and insolent.

    TV talking heads keep repeating the fact that Obama has a high approval rating for an outgoing President - over 50%. I suspect that high number is an artifact; a lot of whites just don't want to openly admit that they don't like him, or even can't stand him.
    , @Lagertha
    but, it's January....and we are hunkering down because it is cold. Hygge is a term I know well, being Nordic and all. Hygge is the same as my American neighbor's saying they are "in for the night, eating comfort food."

    People who criticize Hygge, probably were not happy children. They did not have parents who let them roast hotdogs in the fireplace, make fondue in the pot that has been in mom's kitchen since the 60's; and learned to play the all important card games. Hygge is pretty universal as far as "I'm stayin' in, and getting into my jammies early."
  3. Alternet is known for similar inane stories. They follow some bastardized dialectic or just plain incomprehensible notion to gin up clickbaity stories.

    Re socks: there are many ‘smart wool’ socks that will keep your feet warm. Also, layer up to keep your body core warm so more blood flow is available to the extremities and put on a hat for more warmth. Since you probably sit for long stretches of research and writing, consider a heating pad as a foot warmer. You can imagine how I have so many warming up cold feet ideas.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Don't go layering socks, though; this causes one's boots or shoes to be too tight, negatively affecting circulation in the feet, and in fact making them colder. Thick socks also collect sweat and moisture, making feet colder than thinner socks which can wick it away. Unless one is indeed only lazing around the house, one should avoid thick socks. (Thick or layered socks are probably the most common mistake of novice skiers complaining of ill-fitting boots; I learned all this stuff when I was one!)
  4. The “hygge” hatred is just envy. The people who have miserable lives, miserable cultures, and made miserable choices, prefer to mindlessly attack what has worked – they are envious and resentful. They want to bring everything down, so they feel less inadequate.

  5. Thank you, Slate! I’d rather the symbols of xenophobic populism be crackling fires, warm socks, and sweaters than walls and razor wire. Progs really can’t stop shooting themselves in the foot, can they? While they are at it, why not declare kittens and puppies as right wing?

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    That's already happened: there have been numerous articles criticizing people who spend so much money on their pets. What sunk that ship a year or so ago, was the fact that gay men are a large group that adores pets, (little known fact) lavish their pets with the best of everything, and, are huge adopters of unwanted dogs and cats at shelters. So, I am so glad gays are as committed as I am to adopt shelter dogs. My boys, when they were toddlers could sometimes feel a little jealous of my affection for my dogs!
    , @NOTA
    A huge amount of the cultural product of the SJW world is like this--finding problematic things and talking about/denouncing them. It's a skill a lot of young smart kids have learned well, and it's probably a good way to get clicks and eyeballs, but it's also a really bad way to convince anyone who isn't already a believer.
  6. Warm socks are racist? Hygge, please.

    • LOL: ben tillman
    • Replies: @Percy Gryce
    Nice one.
    , @oh its just me too
    LOL!

    I seriously wonder if white liberals who write this stuff have even a hint of self awareness how ridiculous they sound... on the other hand... what we laugh at laughed at in the past has become taboo now... I predict lots of cold feet in denmark
  7. OT, but I came across this on social media about Obama’s Farewell speech from Dan Rather:

    “He spoke deeply about race, the undercurrent that coursed beneath his presidency as it has through all of American history. He spoke sympathetically of white Americans who feel worried and marginalized, but he then turned forcibly to a sense of all the racial progress left to be done and an inclusive outreach to immigrants. It was one America, perhaps without some of the naivete of his famed speech at the 2004 Democratic Convention. It seems to me that this will be his message going forward, combating what he called the “great sorting” of self-isolation according to cultural, region, religious, and ethnic lines.

    (my emphasis)

    I laughed so hard because: That’s what different countries are for!!!!

    • Replies: @guest
    You've just recapitulated the globalist mindset, minus the final step, "Therefore, we must eliminate nationhood."
  8. It amazes me that these countries are so PC crazed that the people allowed the government to take away basic self defense items like pepper spray.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Almost every time I cross the border into Canada, I get asked if I have any guns or pepper spray. I've always wanted to reply, "Do you mean semi or full auto?", but I learned years ago the customs guy have absolutely no sense of humor.
  9. Slate never disappoints.

    I remember when they were less crazy.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Yaqub has it right, I've seen for a while that Slate has been knowingly cranking out these sort of deranged self-parody stories as click bait to increase their traffic. I like to imagine their writers sitting in an office with old fashioned typewriters, cranking out thigh slapper stories like these, then passing the papers around while everyone has a laugh and compliments each other on how this one oughta get some clicks.
    , @Frau Katze
    Like so many news sites, Slate has gone downhill in the past eight years.
  10. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Wrap the neck if you’re older. Massive heat loss occurs at the neck.

  11. There’s something of a joke among world travelers and ex-pats that “hygge” is Danish for “hook up.” When a Danish girl takes you to show you “hygge,” it means you’re getting laid. The Danes are remarkably sexually liberal once you’re accepted but that’s a steep climb. I’ve never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.

    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    Sounds like a great place to be from.
    , @Frau Katze

    I’ve never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.
     
    Maybe that's why Denmark is dealing with the migrant influx (slightly) better than Sweden. The anti-immigration party in Denmark is more accepted than in Sweden, where there is extreme hostility to their own anti-immigration party.
    , @Pericles
    Well, scandinavians may be a bit standoffish but a further fault in our regional character is we don't lure away and torture some poor victim for hours for a laugh and some facebook likes. That's reserved for the happy, warm, friendly, entertaining people that everyone loves.
  12. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Bugg
    What happened to the Vikings?

    The Vikings are the guys who left. The non-Vikings stayed home.

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/0d/06/0b/0d060b609480528c6e8e37f17698f673.jpg

    • Replies: @yaqub the mad scientist
    Contemporary Britain vs American Heartland would be another example of guys who left vs guys who stayed home.
    , @Pericles
    And that map skipped the Russian side.
  13. Damn, Steve. You live in Southern California, too. Don’t ever move to Minnesota or the Dakotas. You don’t know the meaning of cold feet till you’ve stood outside in minus-twenty weather.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "Damn, Steve. You live in Southern California, too. Don’t ever move to Minnesota or the Dakotas. You don’t know the meaning of cold feet till you’ve stood outside in minus-twenty weather."

    What passes for cold in Southern California 60F degrees for example.
    , @Eric Novak
    Steve lived in Chicago in the 1980s and '90s. He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in '85. During that week, which was in the winter of my sophomore year, a lit Camel froze to my lip from the condensation of my breath while waiting for the CTA bus. As it dangled from my lips, it burned my lower face, so I hit it with my giant oven-mitt-sized mitten just as the bus came to the stop. I unwittingly knocked the cherry of the cigarette into my coat and didn't notice it until I sat down on the bus and one of my friends said, "what the hell is that?" and pointed to my smoldering mid-section. I ran off the bus before it pulled away and pummeled myself with sidewalk snow. My chin was blistered, and my cool wool Ike jacket with band patches all over it now had a large hole. I have fond memories of those winters.
    The following January, Jan. of 1986, was the glorious victory of Super Bowl XX. The temp. during the victory parade a day or two later was -12F. Reports from friends who blew off school to go downtown for the parade were that beers were freezing in pockets, though they were stashed as close as possible to max core body temp.
    Standout memories of those brutal winters are that of frosted single-pane windows at my parents' house, like that of Dr. Zhivago's dacha.
  14. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    May be she is including Greenland in Danish realm. Pretty large landmass, though few people.

    Or, she may be just confusing Dutch colonial history with Danish.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "May be she is including Greenland in Danish realm. Pretty large landmass, though few people."

    The Danes have a long history of oppressing ice. They are guilty of iceism.
  15. I’ve never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.

    Minnesota is like that.

    • Replies: @Thomas
    As Season 2 of Fargo taught us.

    https://youtu.be/mo2oq0UktAs?t=30s
    , @27 year old
    It's the same people, just different dirt
  16. A similar Dutch word is: Gezellig. It sort of means a warm cozy feeling/place in winter. It is not 100% translatable to English.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    The English don't do "comfort". It's just not British.
    Single glazing and cold running water all the way. Heating's a draughty hole in the wall with some inflammable sort of rocks in it.
    More ice in that bath, mate?
  17. @newrouter
    "Responding to that in any meaningful way will mean dousing the log fire, leaving the house, and feeling a chill. It will mean engaging with other people, not just those we feel comfortable with. It will require collaboration, energy, and work."

    I've heard it before:

    "He is going to demand that you shed your cynicism. That you put down your divisions. That you come out of your isolation, that you move out of your comfort zones. That you push yourselves to be better. And that you engage. Barack will never allow you to go back to your lives as usual, uninvolved, uninformed. "

    https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Michelle_Obama

    ““He is going to demand that you shed your cynicism. That you put down your divisions. That you come out of your isolation, that you move out of your comfort zones. That you push yourselves to be better. And that you engage. Barack will never allow you to go back to your lives as usual, uninvolved, uninformed. ”’

    I had almost forgotten that gem by the First Angry Black Lady. The Obamas – both of them – were insufferable right from the beginning. I can’t remember having heard a single thing Michelle has said that wasn’t offensive, hectoring, and insolent.

    TV talking heads keep repeating the fact that Obama has a high approval rating for an outgoing President – over 50%. I suspect that high number is an artifact; a lot of whites just don’t want to openly admit that they don’t like him, or even can’t stand him.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @The preferred nomenclature is...
    Case in point: the number of elected positions across the country on all levels now held by a R that were held by a D when Obummer first took office.

    Also, it is pretty amazing that a person can be more obnoxious than Obummer but his beard manages it.

    Damn I'll be glad when they have left the White House.
    , @Forbes

    TV talking heads keep repeating the fact that Obama has a high approval rating for an outgoing President – over 50%. I suspect that high number is an artifact; a lot of whites just don’t want to openly admit that they don’t like him, or even can’t stand him.
     
    Most people are quick learners--they tire of being called racist at every turn. So, indifference about Obama is feigned,while disagreeing with his policies and agenda. The propaganda, too, becomes tiresome. The same gimmick was used at his inauguration, where Obama had a 62% approval rating (IIRC), except someone noted it was only 7th highest since such polling began.

    The approval rating nonsense, like most opinion polling, is just more fake news of the sort to which we've grown accustomed.
  18. @Daniel Chieh
    Slate never disappoints.

    I remember when they were less crazy.

    Yaqub has it right, I’ve seen for a while that Slate has been knowingly cranking out these sort of deranged self-parody stories as click bait to increase their traffic. I like to imagine their writers sitting in an office with old fashioned typewriters, cranking out thigh slapper stories like these, then passing the papers around while everyone has a laugh and compliments each other on how this one oughta get some clicks.

    • Replies: @AKAHorace
    Salon is my go to site for this sort of story.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    I believe they've admitted to it in the past, but some point, they actually began to believe their own drivel. I can't deny that its pretty amusing.
  19. @anon
    May be she is including Greenland in Danish realm. Pretty large landmass, though few people.

    Or, she may be just confusing Dutch colonial history with Danish.

    “May be she is including Greenland in Danish realm. Pretty large landmass, though few people.”

    The Danes have a long history of oppressing ice. They are guilty of iceism.

  20. @Tom-in-VA
    Thank you, Slate! I'd rather the symbols of xenophobic populism be crackling fires, warm socks, and sweaters than walls and razor wire. Progs really can't stop shooting themselves in the foot, can they? While they are at it, why not declare kittens and puppies as right wing?

    That’s already happened: there have been numerous articles criticizing people who spend so much money on their pets. What sunk that ship a year or so ago, was the fact that gay men are a large group that adores pets, (little known fact) lavish their pets with the best of everything, and, are huge adopters of unwanted dogs and cats at shelters. So, I am so glad gays are as committed as I am to adopt shelter dogs. My boys, when they were toddlers could sometimes feel a little jealous of my affection for my dogs!

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas

    What sunk that ship a year or so ago, was the fact that gay men are a large group that adores pets, (little known fact) lavish their pets with the best of everything, and, are huge adopters of unwanted dogs and cats at shelters.
     
    This is true. In High School, one of my best friends worked in a Pet Store. They couldn't buy enough gerbils to keep in stock.
  21. things are “only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,”

    As opposed to being a white woman contemplating joining the upcoming Women’s March on Washington.

  22. @newrouter
    "Responding to that in any meaningful way will mean dousing the log fire, leaving the house, and feeling a chill. It will mean engaging with other people, not just those we feel comfortable with. It will require collaboration, energy, and work."

    I've heard it before:

    "He is going to demand that you shed your cynicism. That you put down your divisions. That you come out of your isolation, that you move out of your comfort zones. That you push yourselves to be better. And that you engage. Barack will never allow you to go back to your lives as usual, uninvolved, uninformed. "

    https://en.wikiquote.org/wiki/Michelle_Obama

    but, it’s January….and we are hunkering down because it is cold. Hygge is a term I know well, being Nordic and all. Hygge is the same as my American neighbor’s saying they are “in for the night, eating comfort food.”

    People who criticize Hygge, probably were not happy children. They did not have parents who let them roast hotdogs in the fireplace, make fondue in the pot that has been in mom’s kitchen since the 60′s; and learned to play the all important card games. Hygge is pretty universal as far as “I’m stayin’ in, and getting into my jammies early.”

    • Replies: @AnotherGuessModel
    People who criticize Hygge, probably were not happy children.

    Or alternatively, maybe it's those people who have made hygge so fashionable; young adults who grew up in unstable familes, and without a strong sense of community via religion or other set of collective values. From hygge bestselling books, to the South Dakota pipeline protests love-in, to Screeching Girl at Yale ("This was supposed to be a home!") to lately Michelle Obama making mother-figure speeches, there is a strong pattern of people asking to be comforted, sheltered, and mothered, no matter if the context is inappropriate. I'm no grouch and appreciate the idea of hygge, but as an exported trend, I also see it as a hollow simulation that capitalizes on the stable home and sense of community that so many people crave.
    , @Ivy
    Hygge, chez moi, is another typical day and night.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Lagertha, Yes indeed, "staying in and getting into my jammies early." I light the fireplace and then try to get into my wife's jammies. Sigh, that failure is how I wind up here.
  23. @Alfa158
    Yaqub has it right, I've seen for a while that Slate has been knowingly cranking out these sort of deranged self-parody stories as click bait to increase their traffic. I like to imagine their writers sitting in an office with old fashioned typewriters, cranking out thigh slapper stories like these, then passing the papers around while everyone has a laugh and compliments each other on how this one oughta get some clicks.

    Salon is my go to site for this sort of story.

  24. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    I’ll take ‘xenophobic populism’ , the will of a people to preserve their identity and homeland, over ‘ethnophobic elitism’ or ‘xenopathic elitism’, the agenda of globalist collaborators to flood and destroy every unique nation and culture and replace them with globalist-trash-culture and moral decadence.

  25. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    “What happened to the Vikings?”

    Can’t resist ;)

    Well, there’s:

    Tuesday (“Tīw’s Day, the day of Tiw or Týr, the god of single combat, victory and heroic glory in Norse mythology.”)

    Wednesday (“The name is derived from Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, “day of Woden”, reflecting the Viking invasions of the British Isles”, that is, Odin’s day.)

    Thursday (“The name is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning “Thor’s Day”. It was named after the Norse god of Thunder, Thor.”)

    Friday (Friday seems to be named after Frigg (“The English weekday name Friday (etymologically Old English “Frīge’s day”) bears her name. …Frigg is described as a goddess associated with foreknowledge and wisdom in Norse mythology …Frigg is the wife of the major god Odin…”) But it’s complicated, Friday might do double duty, because it might also be Freyja’s day (“In Norse mythology, Freyja (/ˈfreɪə/; Old Norse for “(the) Lady”) is a goddess associated with love, sex, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death. …the name for Friday in many Germanic languages… Scholars have theorized about whether Freyja and the goddess Frigg ultimately stem from a single goddess common among the Germanic peoples…”)

    • Replies: @snorlax
    One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.

    It must be a truly ancient (maybe the most ancient, if variations on "mama" and "papa" don't count) cultural artifact, predating the Indo-European/East Asian cultural split and maybe even the racial one.

    *Sunday: Sun
    Monday: Moon
    Tuesday: Mars (Tīw = Old English god equivalent to Mars)
    Wednesday: Mercury (Woden = Mercury)
    Thursday: Jupiter (Thor = Jupiter)
    Friday: Venus (Frigg = Venus)
    Saturday: Saturn

    , @Achmed E. Newman
    I don't know what western civ. textbook you've been reading, anonymous, but if it were me, I'd return it to the store for a full monetary refund.

    You want to know about the Vikings, go to the source:


    Aaaahahaaaaa, aah,
    We come from the land of the ice and snow,
    From the midnight sun where the hot springs blow.
    The hammer of the gods
    Will drive our ships to new lands,
    To fight the horde, singing and crying,
    Valhalla, I am coming!
    On we sweep with threshing oar,
    Our only goal will be the western shore.
    Ah, ah,
    We come from the land of the ice and snow,
    From the midnight sun where the hot springs blow.

    How soft your fields so green,
    Can whisper tales of gore,
    Of how we calmed the tides of war.
    We are your overlords.
    On we sweep with threshing oar,
    Our only goal will be the western shore.
    So now you'd better stop and rebuild all your ruins,
    For peace and trust can win the day
    Despite of all your losing.
     

    Of course, everything I'd learned about about California was from Led Zeppelin songs also, and that didn't work out so well once I first walked down Telegraph Avenue in Berzerkely.* So, don't quote me on this - your days-o-the-week meme could be literally the truth. ;-}

    *What I'm saying, man, is there was no beautiful girl with flowers in her hair, just a bunch of dirty stinking hippies! (and Joni had already turned into a feminista!)

  26. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Look at this guy’s cultural interests:

    https://noisey.vice.com/en_au/contributor/alex-robert-ross

    Just like that idiot half-Vietnamese Irish guy.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/dean-van-nguyen-white-privilege-is-real-and-it-exists-in-ireland/

    His idea of ‘culture’ is to fill the entire world with nothing but ghetto-trash rap Afro-culture.

    He thinks Europeans are crazy to want to preserve their identity and culture when they can have the blessings of countless black Africans coming to offer sex to white women and jungle music to cucked out white boys.

    Yeah, why preserve German or Polish identity and culture — so lame and ‘xenophobic’ — when you can have globo-ghetto-thug culture, which is so much superior?

    Notice Alex Ross’s music page has zero interest in different folk music and pop styles from all over the world. It’s all rap-thug-whore-skank-trash music. He is a globo-cultural imperialist seeking to impose Mondo Trasho Pop Culture on every nation.

    So, who needs European populism when you can have Afro-jungle-tribalism?

    I thought these Progs are into diversity and richness of unique cultures. Well, the world will remain diverse if people can maintain their homelands and cultures.

    In fact, these globo-Progs don’t give a crap about true diversity of the world. They want ALL THE WORLD to listen to the same ghetto jungle trash thug music, and they want everyone who wave the homo flag and worship homomania.

    Afro-Homo-Hegemony for all peoples. European nations must surrender their sovereignty and identity for homo vanity and Afro thuggery?

    • Agree: Clyde
    • Replies: @Clyde
    boffo--- clear put together of your world "take" as posted before. An all in one.
  27. Hygge is Danish for seasonal affective disorder. Dinner, I am going to eat a tummyful of homemade goulash and buttered rolls. Drink some plum schnapps, have two minutes sex (maybe) then crap out at 830PM

    • Replies: @al gore rhythms
    I've had worse nights than this.
    , @Buffalo Joe
    Clyde, The sex is with a partner, right?
  28. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Progs who believe that blacks should leave Africa and come to the West seem to be arguing on the basis that blacks are too stupid, dumb, and worthless to develop their own societies into modern functional ones. So, they must flee from their own kind to come to the West where white people run things much better.

    So, blacks in Africa have no hope as civilization builders or maintainers of modernity and organization. They must come to the White Man’s world to enjoy the good life. But since white folks lack rhythm, they must rely on blacks to show them how to jungle-boogie.

    Progs pretend to believe in the equality of races, but their positions would indicate that they do believe in racial differences, i.e. blacks are too dumb to build and maintain modern society, but they got boogie. White folks have the smarts and skills to create modern society, but they lack boogie. So, blacks should come to the West to live better lives and teach white folks to boogie.

    If Alex Robert Ross really believes that all races are equal, why doesn’t he expect Africans and Muslims to stay home and build modern societies in their own homelands instead of fleeing their own kind to live better lives in the White West?

  29. @Anon
    Look at this guy's cultural interests:

    https://noisey.vice.com/en_au/contributor/alex-robert-ross

    Just like that idiot half-Vietnamese Irish guy.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/dean-van-nguyen-white-privilege-is-real-and-it-exists-in-ireland/

    His idea of 'culture' is to fill the entire world with nothing but ghetto-trash rap Afro-culture.

    He thinks Europeans are crazy to want to preserve their identity and culture when they can have the blessings of countless black Africans coming to offer sex to white women and jungle music to cucked out white boys.

    Yeah, why preserve German or Polish identity and culture --- so lame and 'xenophobic' --- when you can have globo-ghetto-thug culture, which is so much superior?

    Notice Alex Ross's music page has zero interest in different folk music and pop styles from all over the world. It's all rap-thug-whore-skank-trash music. He is a globo-cultural imperialist seeking to impose Mondo Trasho Pop Culture on every nation.

    So, who needs European populism when you can have Afro-jungle-tribalism?

    I thought these Progs are into diversity and richness of unique cultures. Well, the world will remain diverse if people can maintain their homelands and cultures.

    In fact, these globo-Progs don't give a crap about true diversity of the world. They want ALL THE WORLD to listen to the same ghetto jungle trash thug music, and they want everyone who wave the homo flag and worship homomania.

    Afro-Homo-Hegemony for all peoples. European nations must surrender their sovereignty and identity for homo vanity and Afro thuggery?

    boffo— clear put together of your world “take” as posted before. An all in one.

  30. “I’m with her”?

    Probably your best caption since “the not late Angie Dickinson” of last year.

  31. @anonymous
    "What happened to the Vikings?"

    Can't resist ;)

    Well, there's:

    Tuesday ("Tīw's Day, the day of Tiw or Týr, the god of single combat, victory and heroic glory in Norse mythology.")

    Wednesday ("The name is derived from Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, "day of Woden", reflecting the Viking invasions of the British Isles", that is, Odin's day.)


    Thursday ("The name is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning "Thor's Day". It was named after the Norse god of Thunder, Thor.")

    Friday (Friday seems to be named after Frigg ("The English weekday name Friday (etymologically Old English "Frīge's day") bears her name. ...Frigg is described as a goddess associated with foreknowledge and wisdom in Norse mythology ...Frigg is the wife of the major god Odin...") But it's complicated, Friday might do double duty, because it might also be Freyja's day ("In Norse mythology, Freyja (/ˈfreɪə/; Old Norse for "(the) Lady") is a goddess associated with love, sex, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death. ...the name for Friday in many Germanic languages... Scholars have theorized about whether Freyja and the goddess Frigg ultimately stem from a single goddess common among the Germanic peoples...")

    One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.

    It must be a truly ancient (maybe the most ancient, if variations on “mama” and “papa” don’t count) cultural artifact, predating the Indo-European/East Asian cultural split and maybe even the racial one.

    *Sunday: Sun
    Monday: Moon
    Tuesday: Mars (Tīw = Old English god equivalent to Mars)
    Wednesday: Mercury (Woden = Mercury)
    Thursday: Jupiter (Thor = Jupiter)
    Friday: Venus (Frigg = Venus)
    Saturday: Saturn

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    So all Eurasians had a seven day calendar?
    , @AnotherGuessModel
    That's fascinating if true, where did you learn that? More likely it had do with the Hellenistic period's wide reach towards the east, and cultural diffusion between Greek and Nordic gods.
    , @Almost Missouri
    Agree that the current uniformity is remarkable, but disagree that it is so ancient.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_calendar#Nundinal_cycle

    Beware the Ides of March!

    Perhaps the seven day week, alongside Christianity, is a part of the Judaicising of the world.
    , @Autochthon
    Jupiter correlates with Zeus and Odin (Wotan) moreso than Thor, and Mercury with Hermes and ... I don't quite know what the best Norse analogue my be: Hermóðr? Ratatoskr? (The latter not properly a god....)

    Do you mean to distinguish the planets from the gods, such that, e.g., the planet closest to the sun was correlated by the Romans with (the god) Mercury and the Norse with Wotan, notwithstanding the two gods' lack of correlation?

    I genuinely don't follow the idea here; enlighten me.
    , @Frau Katze
    "Tiw" is cognate with Greek "Zeus". In Greek he was often call Zeus the father.

    "Zeus father" is cognate with Latin "Jupiter" (remember that "j" was pronounced as English "y")

    This suggests an Indo-European god called something like "Dyeus Pater".

    In Greek, the "dy" became "z".

    In English it became "ty" (d > t). In the US, the "y" is dropping out of the pronunciation of "Tuesday" but it is still standard in England.

    In Latin "dy" became just "y" and the "pitar" came from word for father. (In English, p > f and t > th).
  32. @Grumpy

    I’ve never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.
     
    Minnesota is like that.

    As Season 2 of Fargo taught us.

    • Replies: @guest
    That's called courtesy. It doesn't require you to actually be friendly in your heart of hearts. Funny how so many people miss that part.

    For Freud, politeness literally made you crazy. Minnesota is full of non-Freuds, though it had Coen Brothers.

  33. @Francis G.
    Damn, Steve. You live in Southern California, too. Don't ever move to Minnesota or the Dakotas. You don't know the meaning of cold feet till you've stood outside in minus-twenty weather.

    “Damn, Steve. You live in Southern California, too. Don’t ever move to Minnesota or the Dakotas. You don’t know the meaning of cold feet till you’ve stood outside in minus-twenty weather.”

    What passes for cold in Southern California 60F degrees for example.

    • Replies: @dearieme
    "What passes for cold in Southern California 60F degrees for example". Ancient headline in the Edinburgh Evening News: "Edinburgh sizzles in the seventies".
  34. I’ve very anti-hygge. My hairy toes will keep me plenty warm.

  35. @Clyde
    Hygge is Danish for seasonal affective disorder. Dinner, I am going to eat a tummyful of homemade goulash and buttered rolls. Drink some plum schnapps, have two minutes sex (maybe) then crap out at 830PM

    I’ve had worse nights than this.

  36. Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn’t fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts – in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me – I didn’t expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life – to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain – they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    "You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy! "

    There's a relevant Hardy quote, from a story about the interruption of a very hyggeish evening by the forces of modernity.

    "Enjoyment was pretty general, and so much the more prevailed in being unhampered by conventional restrictions. Absolute confidence in each other's good opinion begat perfect ease, while the finishing stroke of manner, amounting to a truly princely serenity, was lent to the majority by the absence of any expression or trait denoting that they wished to get on in the world, enlarge their minds, or do any eclipsing thing whatever - which nowadays so generally nips the bloom and bonhomie of all except the two extremes of the social scale."

    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/ThreStra.shtml
    , @ThreeCranes
    Shrewd observation and worthy comment.
    , @dilys
    My own big Theory of Everything in these matters is based on a layman's concept of the distinction in the human nervous array between the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems. (This came to my attention treating stress-related medical issues.)

    Because it's a TOE, I could go on at length. But suffice it to say that those who want to manipulate others prefer that their objects' stress-sensitive fight-or-flight "sympathetic" realm be activated, not the balanced primarily-unconscious experiential parasympathetic one, which hygge expresses.

    Progressives, and indeed many people, abhor the idea of a population they cannot constantly rouse with the prod of rapid-fire propositional demands and threats. And these same people are likely themselves addicted to the adrenaline associated with the activated "sympathetic" realm.

    Simple self-sufficiency and innocent creaturely pleasure in any form is thus deeply threatening both as concept and practice. It's a realm anchored in our common physiology, outside the range of the cattle chute.

    , @Desiderius
    Blaming it on capitalism is too broad. It's akin to blaming dishonesty on the alphabet, since lies are spelled with letters.
    , @ben tillman

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts – in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values.
     
    One way to define conservatism is as the belief that not all things are for sale.
    , @Anon
    People who were raised in a disastrous fashion by screw-ups who didn't give them a basic feeling of love and security will try to fill the void with money, power, and status symbols. This means they start chasing these things on a never-ending rat wheel. They have all experienced the little things in life that give comfort to normal people, but their psychological void was so gaping that small comforts could do nothing to fill it. That's why they became angry with you. They know there's something wrong with them, and they're furious that they can't seem to get it fixed while you can. They're jealous of your contentment.
    , @Seneca
    Good comment with some interesting replies by other posters.

    I have noticed something similar, but my take was slightly different.

    Their anger has more to do with shame and guilt and perhaps a little jealousy.

    More than a few of of my colleagues (currently in Academia) are spend thrifts who don't save much money. They love to spend money on travel and eating out. Travel and dining out are not that expensive, but doing it non stop can add up. Some of them are proud that they have never learned to cook for themselves (some women SJW types are especially keen to brag about this)!

    They are hardcore SWPL and SJW types who love to travel all over the the world. They want to visit every third world country on the planet and sample their cuisine. They are the Eat, Pray, Love crowd. I, on the other hand, prefer to cook at home and entertain friends in this way, and not I am not that keen on travel.

    Sometimes they seem apologetic talking about all the money they are spending on these things, as if they "know" that they should be more prudent.

    Personally, I don't care how they spend their time or money, and always tell them how the trips look so interesting (perhaps they feel guilty from my comments?).

    When I see their pictures from their travels I feel I am looking at a couple's baby pictures. What do you say? Of course your kid looks beautiful! LOL

    So when they say something which smacks of guilt "gee we probably should be saving more" it kinda of takes me off guard. They are perhaps a little jealous too that I don't suffer from their compulsions.... and not searching for something to fill a hole in my soul

    One thing that I find curious about them is that many of these SJW types who love to travel also want to make the world safe for Gay parades, Pussy riot church concerts, and transsexuals etc.

    I never quite understood how their passion for traveling to diverse unexplored regions untouched by civilization (or barely touched) and foreign cuisines jibes with their desire to impose a USA style global progressive mono culture. Don't they want cultural diversity?

    They seem like modern day gentlemen and church lady secular missionary types.

    Their growing willingness and advocacy of using force to do this (e.g. witness Nuland, Powers, Rice, and Cankles etc...) in the Middle East and other places and new strange progressive alliance with the old Military Industrial Complex Deep State (Russia is eeeeeeeevilll I tell you) has been talked about on other threads at Unz.

    The Deep Sate has long used the soft power of the US culture and progressive values to make inroads into other countries. The alliance is starting to look a little strange though.

    I would love for Steve to explore this strange alliance more.
  37. @snorlax
    One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.

    It must be a truly ancient (maybe the most ancient, if variations on "mama" and "papa" don't count) cultural artifact, predating the Indo-European/East Asian cultural split and maybe even the racial one.

    *Sunday: Sun
    Monday: Moon
    Tuesday: Mars (Tīw = Old English god equivalent to Mars)
    Wednesday: Mercury (Woden = Mercury)
    Thursday: Jupiter (Thor = Jupiter)
    Friday: Venus (Frigg = Venus)
    Saturday: Saturn

    So all Eurasians had a seven day calendar?

    • Replies: @ladderff
    Seconded as a potentially fascinating topic.
    , @Jus' Sayin'...
    Definitely not true of the Romans. Their "market week" was eight days. This was both informal and official. The months were also divided into three periods by the Kalends, Ides, and Nones. Only in the late Imperial period was the week redefined as seven days
  38. These wool socks must be a symbol for a resurging white-topia, here’s my story.
    My lovely bride bought me a pair of thick alpaca wool socks online from a seller in Russia.

    Included with the socks was a nice note along with a few current circulating coins and local hard candy. We both thought it was a brilliant show of kindness and we instantly had great affection towards our new Russian friends. The coins were new (worth something like .42 cents) and the candy was very fresh and yummy.

    Now, whenever we hear some pundit use the phrase (listen up Derbyshire…) “Russia is not great, what do they sell other than oil? What do you have in your house made in Russia?” other than the rocket-boosters we can immediately say that they do make nice thick wool socks and we proudly own Russian wool socks.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Portyanki are better than socks. You can steal boots several sizes too large, and just wrap your tootsies in ripped-up stolen laundry until they fit. Wear a hole in them? Just rejig the things.
    Those home-made felt slipper things are ace, too.
    Real Scandies would be stuffing their birchbark leggings with skogräs, I'd have thought.
  39. @Jefferson
    "Damn, Steve. You live in Southern California, too. Don’t ever move to Minnesota or the Dakotas. You don’t know the meaning of cold feet till you’ve stood outside in minus-twenty weather."

    What passes for cold in Southern California 60F degrees for example.

    “What passes for cold in Southern California 60F degrees for example”. Ancient headline in the Edinburgh Evening News: “Edinburgh sizzles in the seventies”.

  40. “The loss of its empire?” Not only Schleswig but also Holstein.

    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar
    Denmark was offered both, and turned them down. Lothrop Stoddard praised their common sense in taking only "all that is Danish", and nothing more. Now there's a sustainable southern border strategy!

    It always amazes me to see nations fighting (often to the death) to keep territories that they should instead be expelling, from Chechnya to Puerto Rico to Ulster to South Carolina.

  41. Are the same two Silicon Valley psychos who keep the always-in-the-red Salon from collapsing now supporting Slate, too?

    I know the Grahams (formerly owners of WaPo) have a hold of Slate (unless Bezos bought them too and nobody noticed), but this kind of hysterical nonsense sounds exactly what you’d find in Salon. Seriously, Slate has gone off the deep end, but there was at least a palpable difference between Salon and Slate.

  42. @AaronB
    Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn't fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts - in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me - I didn't expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life - to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain - they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    “You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy! “

    There’s a relevant Hardy quote, from a story about the interruption of a very hyggeish evening by the forces of modernity.

    “Enjoyment was pretty general, and so much the more prevailed in being unhampered by conventional restrictions. Absolute confidence in each other’s good opinion begat perfect ease, while the finishing stroke of manner, amounting to a truly princely serenity, was lent to the majority by the absence of any expression or trait denoting that they wished to get on in the world, enlarge their minds, or do any eclipsing thing whatever – which nowadays so generally nips the bloom and bonhomie of all except the two extremes of the social scale.”

    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/ThreStra.shtml

    • Replies: @AaronB
    Thanks for that wonderful quote! I have to reread my Hardy. I used to like him a lot when I was younger and still very much a die hard capitalist, I'm sure I'd find even more depths to him now.
  43. @snorlax
    One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.

    It must be a truly ancient (maybe the most ancient, if variations on "mama" and "papa" don't count) cultural artifact, predating the Indo-European/East Asian cultural split and maybe even the racial one.

    *Sunday: Sun
    Monday: Moon
    Tuesday: Mars (Tīw = Old English god equivalent to Mars)
    Wednesday: Mercury (Woden = Mercury)
    Thursday: Jupiter (Thor = Jupiter)
    Friday: Venus (Frigg = Venus)
    Saturday: Saturn

    That’s fascinating if true, where did you learn that? More likely it had do with the Hellenistic period’s wide reach towards the east, and cultural diffusion between Greek and Nordic gods.

  44. So Pajama Boy is racist? Oh wait, he’s gay and Jewish, so that can’t be possible.

    Hygge sounds a lot like what SWPLs would want to do in deepest darkest winter. Unlike SWPL traits, which serve to distinguish leftist whites from brown people, conservatives, and working class whites, “racist” traits are anything conservative whites do that distinguishes them, intentionally or not, from those who aren’t white.

    It’s all about who/whom.

    • Replies: @Jefferson
    "So Pajama Boy is racist? Oh wait, he’s gay and Jewish, so that can’t be possible."

    Milo Yiannopoulos is both Jewish & Gay and he is constantly called a racist by the mainstream media, same for Donald Sterling although he is only the former and not the latter. David Horowitz and Pamela Geller say they are always labeled as White racists when they visit college campuses and they are both part of The Tribe.

    , @mobi

    So Pajama Boy is racist? Oh wait, he’s gay and Jewish, so that can’t be possible.
     
    'Tomboys' are now officially racist, too (unless you're a dyke)

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/01/tomboy/512258/


    So says one Elizabeth King.

    ('King' - hmmm)

    The upside is that, when everything's racist, nothing's racist. We're getting closer.

  45. Sounds like hygge is the cold, rational white person’s version of feng shui and yoga, stripped of the pseudo-religious fantasies that make cultural-appropriating New Age white womyn who follow “I Fucking Love Science” feel all warm and fuzzy.

  46. “only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,” where “you can share the vicissitudes of life, knowing that no one will challenge you on your opinions, and where their difficulties most likely resemble yours.”

    Hygge sounds a lot like safe spaces. Hygge for me but not for thee.

    Strange to say on a supposedly “conservative” web site, but “progressives” seem to be intent upon dismantling the Nordic social welfare state.

    • Replies: @utu
    "“progressives” seem to be intent upon dismantling the Nordic social welfare state."

    Exactly this is the plan that is being in execution for quite some time already. The real progressives are the useful idiots in this while "progressives" are very shrewd operatives of the neoliberal system. Flooding Nordic countries with refugees to break down their traditional societal cohesion (trust and empathy) on which their welfare system depends is the part of it. In essence it is replication of America in countries that did not have slaveries nor colonies. The main reason America never could go the "Nordic social welfare state" is the presence of African Americans. The gift that keeps on giving for the class of owners.
  47. @AaronB
    Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn't fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts - in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me - I didn't expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life - to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain - they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    Shrewd observation and worthy comment.

  48. @Lagertha
    but, it's January....and we are hunkering down because it is cold. Hygge is a term I know well, being Nordic and all. Hygge is the same as my American neighbor's saying they are "in for the night, eating comfort food."

    People who criticize Hygge, probably were not happy children. They did not have parents who let them roast hotdogs in the fireplace, make fondue in the pot that has been in mom's kitchen since the 60's; and learned to play the all important card games. Hygge is pretty universal as far as "I'm stayin' in, and getting into my jammies early."

    People who criticize Hygge, probably were not happy children.

    Or alternatively, maybe it’s those people who have made hygge so fashionable; young adults who grew up in unstable familes, and without a strong sense of community via religion or other set of collective values. From hygge bestselling books, to the South Dakota pipeline protests love-in, to Screeching Girl at Yale (“This was supposed to be a home!”) to lately Michelle Obama making mother-figure speeches, there is a strong pattern of people asking to be comforted, sheltered, and mothered, no matter if the context is inappropriate. I’m no grouch and appreciate the idea of hygge, but as an exported trend, I also see it as a hollow simulation that capitalizes on the stable home and sense of community that so many people crave.

  49. @AaronB
    Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn't fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts - in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me - I didn't expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life - to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain - they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    My own big Theory of Everything in these matters is based on a layman’s concept of the distinction in the human nervous array between the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems. (This came to my attention treating stress-related medical issues.)

    Because it’s a TOE, I could go on at length. But suffice it to say that those who want to manipulate others prefer that their objects’ stress-sensitive fight-or-flight “sympathetic” realm be activated, not the balanced primarily-unconscious experiential parasympathetic one, which hygge expresses.

    Progressives, and indeed many people, abhor the idea of a population they cannot constantly rouse with the prod of rapid-fire propositional demands and threats. And these same people are likely themselves addicted to the adrenaline associated with the activated “sympathetic” realm.

    Simple self-sufficiency and innocent creaturely pleasure in any form is thus deeply threatening both as concept and practice. It’s a realm anchored in our common physiology, outside the range of the cattle chute.

    • Replies: @Njguy73

    Progressives, and indeed many people, abhor the idea of a population they cannot constantly rouse with the prod of rapid-fire propositional demands and threats.
     

    Simple self-sufficiency and innocent creaturely pleasure in any form is thus deeply threatening both as concept and practice.
     
    “Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.”

    ― H.L. Mencken, A Mencken Chrestomathy

    , @AaronB
    Interesting, and it seems true to me.

    Manipulators don't want you feeling happy and content, so to that extent its a tactic to keep you "aroused", but I also think the psycopathic manipulators tend to respond with rage if you question their whole life project of manipulating people to gain power and money.

    I have known quite a few people who I regard as sociopaths - and they were quite happy if you were like them and regarded defrauding and deceiving others as a great way to go through life, but reacted with rage or defensive mockery to the suggestion that there is a better way to live.

    Strange as it may seem, in my experience psycopaths actively try clone themselves in others, and go out of their way to do so, and are not happy if you don't buy into their values - its a bit uncanny and made me believe in the concept of evil in the religious sense for a while, and I'm still not sure what the reality is.

    And of course, what explains the rage of the ordinary people I knew who couldn't handle my growing disinterest in the rat race?

    But yes, tactic for manipulation, and defensive reaction to questioning a way of life - its both.
  50. Does that also mean that whole “Happiness is a warm puppy” meme from the 1960′s Peanuts might also be raycis?

  51. @Steve Sailer
    So all Eurasians had a seven day calendar?

    Definitely not true of the Romans. Their “market week” was eight days. This was both informal and official. The months were also divided into three periods by the Kalends, Ides, and Nones. Only in the late Imperial period was the week redefined as seven days

  52. @Anonymous Nephew
    "You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy! "

    There's a relevant Hardy quote, from a story about the interruption of a very hyggeish evening by the forces of modernity.

    "Enjoyment was pretty general, and so much the more prevailed in being unhampered by conventional restrictions. Absolute confidence in each other's good opinion begat perfect ease, while the finishing stroke of manner, amounting to a truly princely serenity, was lent to the majority by the absence of any expression or trait denoting that they wished to get on in the world, enlarge their minds, or do any eclipsing thing whatever - which nowadays so generally nips the bloom and bonhomie of all except the two extremes of the social scale."

    http://www.eastoftheweb.com/short-stories/UBooks/ThreStra.shtml

    Thanks for that wonderful quote! I have to reread my Hardy. I used to like him a lot when I was younger and still very much a die hard capitalist, I’m sure I’d find even more depths to him now.

  53. The ex-pat website Your Danish Life says that things are “only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,” where “you can share the vicissitudes of life, knowing that no one will challenge you on your opinions, and where their difficulties most likely resemble yours.” We tried that already; we’ll be dealing with the consequences for four more years.

    So safe spaces are now right-wing? That was a quick turnaround.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Yup. Although they're referred to as "bunkers" (the sandy kind, as well as the good ol' concrete ones).
    , @Paco Wové
    So safe spaces are now right-wing?"

    ... only for white people (or white heterosexual males, if you're being strict about it). They're ok for everyone else.

  54. @snorlax
    One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.

    It must be a truly ancient (maybe the most ancient, if variations on "mama" and "papa" don't count) cultural artifact, predating the Indo-European/East Asian cultural split and maybe even the racial one.

    *Sunday: Sun
    Monday: Moon
    Tuesday: Mars (Tīw = Old English god equivalent to Mars)
    Wednesday: Mercury (Woden = Mercury)
    Thursday: Jupiter (Thor = Jupiter)
    Friday: Venus (Frigg = Venus)
    Saturday: Saturn

    Agree that the current uniformity is remarkable, but disagree that it is so ancient.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Roman_calendar#Nundinal_cycle

    Beware the Ides of March!

    Perhaps the seven day week, alongside Christianity, is a part of the Judaicising of the world.

  55. @Grumpy

    I’ve never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.
     
    Minnesota is like that.

    It’s the same people, just different dirt

  56. @Anonymous
    The Vikings are the guys who left. The non-Vikings stayed home.

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/0d/06/0b/0d060b609480528c6e8e37f17698f673.jpg

    Contemporary Britain vs American Heartland would be another example of guys who left vs guys who stayed home.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    so weird: I have recently read some books of Scandinavian immigrants who returned...and all their angst; since sometimes, siblings stayed and stayed on in the timber and mining work in the upper Midwest and coastal Rust Belt/Plains states...and communication was so poor that they lost contact.

    Weird Factoid: Ashtabula, OH is a very old Finnish (almost gone/diluted now) enclave. Danes were all over Iowa, but they are also diminishing ...but weirdly, communities exist, here and there. Solvang in California is an old Danish town. Manhattan, MT is very Dutch (ok, I know, the Dutch are not Nordics, I just thought it was weird to name a town that :). And, the Dutch are into Hygge as much as everyone else in the world.
  57. @dilys
    My own big Theory of Everything in these matters is based on a layman's concept of the distinction in the human nervous array between the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems. (This came to my attention treating stress-related medical issues.)

    Because it's a TOE, I could go on at length. But suffice it to say that those who want to manipulate others prefer that their objects' stress-sensitive fight-or-flight "sympathetic" realm be activated, not the balanced primarily-unconscious experiential parasympathetic one, which hygge expresses.

    Progressives, and indeed many people, abhor the idea of a population they cannot constantly rouse with the prod of rapid-fire propositional demands and threats. And these same people are likely themselves addicted to the adrenaline associated with the activated "sympathetic" realm.

    Simple self-sufficiency and innocent creaturely pleasure in any form is thus deeply threatening both as concept and practice. It's a realm anchored in our common physiology, outside the range of the cattle chute.

    Progressives, and indeed many people, abhor the idea of a population they cannot constantly rouse with the prod of rapid-fire propositional demands and threats.

    Simple self-sufficiency and innocent creaturely pleasure in any form is thus deeply threatening both as concept and practice.

    “Puritanism: The haunting fear that someone, somewhere, may be happy.”

    ― H.L. Mencken, A Mencken Chrestomathy

  58. @Bugg
    What happened to the Vikings?

    Vikings got wet feet and departed (remarkably wet) Denmark for cozier climes…

  59. @dilys
    My own big Theory of Everything in these matters is based on a layman's concept of the distinction in the human nervous array between the parasympathetic and sympathetic systems. (This came to my attention treating stress-related medical issues.)

    Because it's a TOE, I could go on at length. But suffice it to say that those who want to manipulate others prefer that their objects' stress-sensitive fight-or-flight "sympathetic" realm be activated, not the balanced primarily-unconscious experiential parasympathetic one, which hygge expresses.

    Progressives, and indeed many people, abhor the idea of a population they cannot constantly rouse with the prod of rapid-fire propositional demands and threats. And these same people are likely themselves addicted to the adrenaline associated with the activated "sympathetic" realm.

    Simple self-sufficiency and innocent creaturely pleasure in any form is thus deeply threatening both as concept and practice. It's a realm anchored in our common physiology, outside the range of the cattle chute.

    Interesting, and it seems true to me.

    Manipulators don’t want you feeling happy and content, so to that extent its a tactic to keep you “aroused”, but I also think the psycopathic manipulators tend to respond with rage if you question their whole life project of manipulating people to gain power and money.

    I have known quite a few people who I regard as sociopaths – and they were quite happy if you were like them and regarded defrauding and deceiving others as a great way to go through life, but reacted with rage or defensive mockery to the suggestion that there is a better way to live.

    Strange as it may seem, in my experience psycopaths actively try clone themselves in others, and go out of their way to do so, and are not happy if you don’t buy into their values – its a bit uncanny and made me believe in the concept of evil in the religious sense for a while, and I’m still not sure what the reality is.

    And of course, what explains the rage of the ordinary people I knew who couldn’t handle my growing disinterest in the rat race?

    But yes, tactic for manipulation, and defensive reaction to questioning a way of life – its both.

    • Replies: @anonguy
    I agree that Evil does exist, is quite ambitious, and that psychopaths are a window/conduit to that Evil, but we are all susceptible to it, have it within our own selves. It is the fallen nature of Man, just more egregious in psychopaths.
    , @Lagertha
    Yes. Because my mother was an English teacher (HS level) I grew up reading a lot of books (and still do...the paper kind), I started to realize that the "rat race" and competition, the continuous striving, the shit storm that I was sailing toward as a college student, that I read about in novels of all ages and regions, was and, will continue to be, part of the "human condition."

    The thing that we all try to do, to battle/overcome/survive/thrive is the talk we all should have with whoever, about overcoming hardships, long ago, when we are really, fracking old. I miss my father's lectures about hardships! " ahmerikka is gud, you have to work hard and be positive - nobuddi likes a loosssser. " My father was a Trumpien, OMG!

    I think it is the most powerful thing in the world to say: I am happy and I am content with my life, because I have done the best I could; and anyone who is dependent on me is doing well...has been given the tools for the pursuit of happiness.

  60. @ThreeCranes
    "only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,” where “you can share the vicissitudes of life, knowing that no one will challenge you on your opinions, and where their difficulties most likely resemble yours.”

    Hygge sounds a lot like safe spaces. Hygge for me but not for thee.

    Strange to say on a supposedly "conservative" web site, but "progressives" seem to be intent upon dismantling the Nordic social welfare state.

    ““progressives” seem to be intent upon dismantling the Nordic social welfare state.”

    Exactly this is the plan that is being in execution for quite some time already. The real progressives are the useful idiots in this while “progressives” are very shrewd operatives of the neoliberal system. Flooding Nordic countries with refugees to break down their traditional societal cohesion (trust and empathy) on which their welfare system depends is the part of it. In essence it is replication of America in countries that did not have slaveries nor colonies. The main reason America never could go the “Nordic social welfare state” is the presence of African Americans. The gift that keeps on giving for the class of owners.

  61. Hygge, a lovely word, seems to sum up the idea of “home”, which rose in Northern Europe in parallel with the rise in status of women. See Witold Rybczynski’s Home: A Short History of an Idea. The focus on home interiors and women in Dutch genre painters like Jan Vermeer are another aspect of this. It is a rich, and very feminine cultural phenomenon, and was at the heart of the modern family. Attacking hygge is amazingly over the top even for Slate, and yet predictable, no? Shades here of Tolkien and his comfort-loving hobbits fighting armies of orcs and dark lords!

    • Replies: @Tom-in-VA
    That's the same image that occurred to me. Progs are Lotho Sackville-Baggins and Ted Sandyman, conservatives are Sam Gamgee.
  62. Watching the Left deconstruct itself is more sad – and more hilarious – than I ever thought it would be. You’re quite the warrior, Ross – cold feet and all.

  63. @anonymous
    "What happened to the Vikings?"

    Can't resist ;)

    Well, there's:

    Tuesday ("Tīw's Day, the day of Tiw or Týr, the god of single combat, victory and heroic glory in Norse mythology.")

    Wednesday ("The name is derived from Old English Wōdnesdæg and Middle English Wednesdei, "day of Woden", reflecting the Viking invasions of the British Isles", that is, Odin's day.)


    Thursday ("The name is derived from Old English Þūnresdæg and Middle English Thuresday (with loss of -n-, first in northern dialects, from influence of Old Norse Þorsdagr) meaning "Thor's Day". It was named after the Norse god of Thunder, Thor.")

    Friday (Friday seems to be named after Frigg ("The English weekday name Friday (etymologically Old English "Frīge's day") bears her name. ...Frigg is described as a goddess associated with foreknowledge and wisdom in Norse mythology ...Frigg is the wife of the major god Odin...") But it's complicated, Friday might do double duty, because it might also be Freyja's day ("In Norse mythology, Freyja (/ˈfreɪə/; Old Norse for "(the) Lady") is a goddess associated with love, sex, beauty, fertility, gold, seiðr, war, and death. ...the name for Friday in many Germanic languages... Scholars have theorized about whether Freyja and the goddess Frigg ultimately stem from a single goddess common among the Germanic peoples...")

    I don’t know what western civ. textbook you’ve been reading, anonymous, but if it were me, I’d return it to the store for a full monetary refund.

    You want to know about the Vikings, go to the source:

    Aaaahahaaaaa, aah,
    We come from the land of the ice and snow,
    From the midnight sun where the hot springs blow.
    The hammer of the gods
    Will drive our ships to new lands,
    To fight the horde, singing and crying,
    Valhalla, I am coming!
    On we sweep with threshing oar,
    Our only goal will be the western shore.
    Ah, ah,
    We come from the land of the ice and snow,
    From the midnight sun where the hot springs blow.

    How soft your fields so green,
    Can whisper tales of gore,
    Of how we calmed the tides of war.
    We are your overlords.
    On we sweep with threshing oar,
    Our only goal will be the western shore.
    So now you’d better stop and rebuild all your ruins,
    For peace and trust can win the day
    Despite of all your losing.

    Of course, everything I’d learned about about California was from Led Zeppelin songs also, and that didn’t work out so well once I first walked down Telegraph Avenue in Berzerkely.* So, don’t quote me on this – your days-o-the-week meme could be literally the truth. ;-}

    *What I’m saying, man, is there was no beautiful girl with flowers in her hair, just a bunch of dirty stinking hippies! (and Joni had already turned into a feminista!)

  64. @Ivy
    Alternet is known for similar inane stories. They follow some bastardized dialectic or just plain incomprehensible notion to gin up clickbaity stories.

    Re socks: there are many 'smart wool' socks that will keep your feet warm. Also, layer up to keep your body core warm so more blood flow is available to the extremities and put on a hat for more warmth. Since you probably sit for long stretches of research and writing, consider a heating pad as a foot warmer. You can imagine how I have so many warming up cold feet ideas.

    Don’t go layering socks, though; this causes one’s boots or shoes to be too tight, negatively affecting circulation in the feet, and in fact making them colder. Thick socks also collect sweat and moisture, making feet colder than thinner socks which can wick it away. Unless one is indeed only lazing around the house, one should avoid thick socks. (Thick or layered socks are probably the most common mistake of novice skiers complaining of ill-fitting boots; I learned all this stuff when I was one!)

  65. Screwed up may link to the post about the “girl with flowers in her hair”. How ’bout THIS?

    Note, not “If you’re going to San Francisco”, which Steve put up the other day.

  66. Hygge’s turning inward against the world outside comes with a more sinister edge, however. As Charlotte Higgins pointed out in her deep dive for the Guardian last month, hygge’s ties to the far-right in Denmark are remarkably strong.

    That’s bad writing. Why doesn’t an editor replace “sinister” (connoting “left”) in a sentence about the “far right”? Oh, that’s right — editors are a thing of the past.

  67. @Mr. Anon
    "“He is going to demand that you shed your cynicism. That you put down your divisions. That you come out of your isolation, that you move out of your comfort zones. That you push yourselves to be better. And that you engage. Barack will never allow you to go back to your lives as usual, uninvolved, uninformed. ”'

    I had almost forgotten that gem by the First Angry Black Lady. The Obamas - both of them - were insufferable right from the beginning. I can't remember having heard a single thing Michelle has said that wasn't offensive, hectoring, and insolent.

    TV talking heads keep repeating the fact that Obama has a high approval rating for an outgoing President - over 50%. I suspect that high number is an artifact; a lot of whites just don't want to openly admit that they don't like him, or even can't stand him.

    Case in point: the number of elected positions across the country on all levels now held by a R that were held by a D when Obummer first took office.

    Also, it is pretty amazing that a person can be more obnoxious than Obummer but his beard manages it.

    Damn I’ll be glad when they have left the White House.

  68. @snorlax
    One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.

    It must be a truly ancient (maybe the most ancient, if variations on "mama" and "papa" don't count) cultural artifact, predating the Indo-European/East Asian cultural split and maybe even the racial one.

    *Sunday: Sun
    Monday: Moon
    Tuesday: Mars (Tīw = Old English god equivalent to Mars)
    Wednesday: Mercury (Woden = Mercury)
    Thursday: Jupiter (Thor = Jupiter)
    Friday: Venus (Frigg = Venus)
    Saturday: Saturn

    Jupiter correlates with Zeus and Odin (Wotan) moreso than Thor, and Mercury with Hermes and … I don’t quite know what the best Norse analogue my be: Hermóðr? Ratatoskr? (The latter not properly a god….)

    Do you mean to distinguish the planets from the gods, such that, e.g., the planet closest to the sun was correlated by the Romans with (the god) Mercury and the Norse with Wotan, notwithstanding the two gods’ lack of correlation?

    I genuinely don’t follow the idea here; enlighten me.

  69. @Name Withheld
    A similar Dutch word is: Gezellig. It sort of means a warm cozy feeling/place in winter. It is not 100% translatable to English.

    The English don’t do “comfort”. It’s just not British.
    Single glazing and cold running water all the way. Heating’s a draughty hole in the wall with some inflammable sort of rocks in it.
    More ice in that bath, mate?

    • Replies: @Clyde
    Also don't forget having to shove coins in the slot for heat or some hot bath water. England. A few decades ago for me. Can you imagine some Muslim ingrate immigrants complying with this setup? yeah right!
  70. @Jack O'Fire
    These wool socks must be a symbol for a resurging white-topia, here's my story.
    My lovely bride bought me a pair of thick alpaca wool socks online from a seller in Russia.

    Included with the socks was a nice note along with a few current circulating coins and local hard candy. We both thought it was a brilliant show of kindness and we instantly had great affection towards our new Russian friends. The coins were new (worth something like .42 cents) and the candy was very fresh and yummy.

    Now, whenever we hear some pundit use the phrase (listen up Derbyshire...) "Russia is not great, what do they sell other than oil? What do you have in your house made in Russia?" other than the rocket-boosters we can immediately say that they do make nice thick wool socks and we proudly own Russian wool socks.

    Portyanki are better than socks. You can steal boots several sizes too large, and just wrap your tootsies in ripped-up stolen laundry until they fit. Wear a hole in them? Just rejig the things.
    Those home-made felt slipper things are ace, too.
    Real Scandies would be stuffing their birchbark leggings with skogräs, I’d have thought.

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Ex, Worked outside construction for years here in WNY. Wear athletic crew socks, put your foot in a grocery store plastic bag and then slip your foot into your boot. Warm and dry.
  71. @AaronB
    Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn't fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts - in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me - I didn't expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life - to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain - they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    Blaming it on capitalism is too broad. It’s akin to blaming dishonesty on the alphabet, since lies are spelled with letters.

  72. @Thomas
    There's something of a joke among world travelers and ex-pats that "hygge" is Danish for "hook up." When a Danish girl takes you to show you "hygge," it means you're getting laid. The Danes are remarkably sexually liberal once you're accepted but that's a steep climb. I've never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.

    Sounds like a great place to be from.

  73. In case anyone is wondering, “hygge” is pronounced something like “hew-guh”, the “y” in Scandinavian languages being equivalent to “ü” in German. The final “g” in “hyggelig” is silent, so that word is pronounced “hewgely”.

  74. A conservative under current! OH MY! What is the world coming to. A liberal under current! OH, that is perfectly OK.

  75. @SoCal Philosopher

    The ex-pat website Your Danish Life says that things are “only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,” where “you can share the vicissitudes of life, knowing that no one will challenge you on your opinions, and where their difficulties most likely resemble yours.” We tried that already; we’ll be dealing with the consequences for four more years.
     
    So safe spaces are now right-wing? That was a quick turnaround.

    Yup. Although they’re referred to as “bunkers” (the sandy kind, as well as the good ol’ concrete ones).

  76. @Tom-in-VA
    Thank you, Slate! I'd rather the symbols of xenophobic populism be crackling fires, warm socks, and sweaters than walls and razor wire. Progs really can't stop shooting themselves in the foot, can they? While they are at it, why not declare kittens and puppies as right wing?

    A huge amount of the cultural product of the SJW world is like this–finding problematic things and talking about/denouncing them. It’s a skill a lot of young smart kids have learned well, and it’s probably a good way to get clicks and eyeballs, but it’s also a really bad way to convince anyone who isn’t already a believer.

  77. @Lagertha
    but, it's January....and we are hunkering down because it is cold. Hygge is a term I know well, being Nordic and all. Hygge is the same as my American neighbor's saying they are "in for the night, eating comfort food."

    People who criticize Hygge, probably were not happy children. They did not have parents who let them roast hotdogs in the fireplace, make fondue in the pot that has been in mom's kitchen since the 60's; and learned to play the all important card games. Hygge is pretty universal as far as "I'm stayin' in, and getting into my jammies early."

    Hygge, chez moi, is another typical day and night.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    that is wonderful. I have aspired to live a Hygge-like life as much as possible...and I have tried to instill this idea for my sons, and their friends who may have been Hygge-deprived for whatever reason. Sheesh, we almost burned-down cabins or forests due to our campfires and wild-ass cooking.
  78. @Alfa158
    Yaqub has it right, I've seen for a while that Slate has been knowingly cranking out these sort of deranged self-parody stories as click bait to increase their traffic. I like to imagine their writers sitting in an office with old fashioned typewriters, cranking out thigh slapper stories like these, then passing the papers around while everyone has a laugh and compliments each other on how this one oughta get some clicks.

    I believe they’ve admitted to it in the past, but some point, they actually began to believe their own drivel. I can’t deny that its pretty amusing.

  79. @AaronB
    Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn't fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts - in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me - I didn't expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life - to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain - they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts – in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values.

    One way to define conservatism is as the belief that not all things are for sale.

  80. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @AaronB
    Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn't fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts - in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me - I didn't expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life - to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain - they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    People who were raised in a disastrous fashion by screw-ups who didn’t give them a basic feeling of love and security will try to fill the void with money, power, and status symbols. This means they start chasing these things on a never-ending rat wheel. They have all experienced the little things in life that give comfort to normal people, but their psychological void was so gaping that small comforts could do nothing to fill it. That’s why they became angry with you. They know there’s something wrong with them, and they’re furious that they can’t seem to get it fixed while you can. They’re jealous of your contentment.

  81. @Wilkey
    So Pajama Boy is racist? Oh wait, he's gay and Jewish, so that can't be possible.

    Hygge sounds a lot like what SWPLs would want to do in deepest darkest winter. Unlike SWPL traits, which serve to distinguish leftist whites from brown people, conservatives, and working class whites, "racist" traits are anything conservative whites do that distinguishes them, intentionally or not, from those who aren't white.

    It's all about who/whom.

    “So Pajama Boy is racist? Oh wait, he’s gay and Jewish, so that can’t be possible.”

    Milo Yiannopoulos is both Jewish & Gay and he is constantly called a racist by the mainstream media, same for Donald Sterling although he is only the former and not the latter. David Horowitz and Pamela Geller say they are always labeled as White racists when they visit college campuses and they are both part of The Tribe.

  82. Every time something like warm socks becomes a racist symbol I start thinking we might finally be at Peak SJWism. Kind of like how you might think a bubble is about to burst if a lot of people you know who have never shown interest in the markets quit their jobs to become day traders.

    But they just keep outdoing themselves.

  83. “The loss of its empire?” Iceland? The Danelaw? Vinland? The American Virgin Islands?

    Silence! History is a hatefact. One need hardly know about such things to write a right-thinking Jeremiad. In fact, ignorance can often be more conducive to telling the truer truth.

  84. I heard a podcast about hygge just a few days ago and I was gobsmacked. It reminds me a little of the #squadgoals craze-in-a-teapot from last year. #squadgoals is apparently a (then-new) hashtag that means doing activities with your friends. No one had heard of this before twitter introduced it to us. Likewise, hygge means sitting someplace comfortable and talking with your friends or family while drinking wine or herbal tea. This is evidently a recent import developed by the high-tech Danes.

    I guess the thing that we want to talk about somehow aren’t quite getting squarely at is this: hygge, which is of course a normal part of human social life, is in shorter supply than ever before because of our work-life balance problems, screens, and general bowling alone-ness. Acting like hygge is something somebody thought up is incredibly dumb, but the question should be: how can we Make America Hygge Again?

  85. Article good example of how Slate, the former home of Mike Kinsley, descends into Salon Magazine style silliness.

    The Forward already addressed the sinister side of hygge:

    http://jd.fo/HzY9

    Can Hygge Be Jewish?

    Money can’t buy hygge. This is its charm and its sinister element. It’s like citizenship that can’t be acquired. Or perhaps like nobility that can only, but barely, be married into. It makes me think of the late nineteenth century (anti-Semitic) stories about rich Jews trying to enter the aristocracy.

    • Replies: @Ivy

    Can Hygge Be Jewish?
     
    Probably better to embrace Hygge than Gemütlichkeit? There is almost a Puritanical streak in there somewhere.
  86. Can you get cold toes in Southern California ( And, Boy, did they warnya ! )
    When this Scotsman spent several years in the South of Spain, I never experienced cold toes at all.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Can you get cold toes in Southern California"

    From November thru February I wear two pairs of socks.

    My house isn't well insulated and the floor is cold in winter. But, yeah, it's mostly me being a wimp about my feet.

    , @Lot
    Southern California has warmer winters than Southern Spain.

    You can tell the transplants from the North from the native white Southern Californians like Steve by looking to see who is wearing a jacket or coat in the middle of winter. It is a funny sight to walk down the street and see the tourists from Canada and New York wearing shorts and t-shirts and the Mexicans and local whites bundled up. 55F is relative.
  87. Wild guess: the author of this article is around (but more likely under) the age of thirty.

  88. @Barnard
    It amazes me that these countries are so PC crazed that the people allowed the government to take away basic self defense items like pepper spray.

    Almost every time I cross the border into Canada, I get asked if I have any guns or pepper spray. I’ve always wanted to reply, “Do you mean semi or full auto?”, but I learned years ago the customs guy have absolutely no sense of humor.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, I ran into that too, Jim Don Bob. I was on the phone with the Canadian customs lady:

    After I gave her the names of those of us coming in to Victoria,
    CCL: "Do you have any alcohol?"
    Me: "Nope."
    CCL: "Do you have tobacco?"
    Me: "No."
    CCL: "Do you have any guns?"
    Me: "Yeah, I've got a lot of guns, but I won't bring em to Canada."

    15 minutes later:

    Me: "Listen I'm paying for my cell-minutes here; I don't have free nights!* Are we done?"

    Yeah, she searched the whole plane. I was finally all "listen, we have guns in America, cause we're a free country."** She's all "Well, Canada's a free country too." I'm all "yeah, whatever, we gotta get to dinner."

    * Circa 2002
    ** Circa back when we were a little bit like a free country still.
  89. @Lagertha
    but, it's January....and we are hunkering down because it is cold. Hygge is a term I know well, being Nordic and all. Hygge is the same as my American neighbor's saying they are "in for the night, eating comfort food."

    People who criticize Hygge, probably were not happy children. They did not have parents who let them roast hotdogs in the fireplace, make fondue in the pot that has been in mom's kitchen since the 60's; and learned to play the all important card games. Hygge is pretty universal as far as "I'm stayin' in, and getting into my jammies early."

    Lagertha, Yes indeed, “staying in and getting into my jammies early.” I light the fireplace and then try to get into my wife’s jammies. Sigh, that failure is how I wind up here.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    hahhhahhhaaa! That is the best! FYI: the latest trend with HS girls (my son's peers and gf) is: they are all sporting polar fleece footie pajamas! - however, not allowed at school. Footie pajamas; hooded; kinda' like the onesies my babies wore almost 2 decades ago for nighty-night time, are now the rage for teenage girls. Kinda' brilliant, 'cause "nothing is getting between me and my 'footie pajamas!" - as a good and clever husband, you might get some mileage with presenting her with fleece footie pj's. Did I tell you that my husband sleeps with his socks on in winter :)?

    Like you, Joe, we know what Hygge is. It's why everyone in New England has a fireplace/woodburning stove/hot tub/fire pit, etc. Hygge is just "stayin' in...", so not a political thing...or even culturally Danish. Cabin fever is the term when we start fighting with our spouse and teenagers in early March.

  90. @Clyde
    Hygge is Danish for seasonal affective disorder. Dinner, I am going to eat a tummyful of homemade goulash and buttered rolls. Drink some plum schnapps, have two minutes sex (maybe) then crap out at 830PM

    Clyde, The sex is with a partner, right?

    • Replies: @Clyde
    It could be a you tube video from a Brazilian beach
  91. Well it sure is good that the War on Terror is over so we can focus on other things. Apparently the inherent racism of wooly socks is the new political agenda. Maybe we can look deeper into this by identifying this problem at the source? Are the sheep they get the wool from White? Those damn White sheep have been discriminating against black sheep for ages haven’t they? Maybe its a sheep problem? That cloning of Dolly seems remarkably similar to movies about cloning Hitler in Brazil. Maybe someone can start a push to get Obama to look at a sheep/Nazi connection during the last ten days? Let me tell you this could be just the thing for Obama to look into during the last hours of his racism Jihad. Racist sheep can be nasty. What if they’re cloning Nazi Sheep? People are always looking for wolves in sheep’s clothing, but Nazi Sheep is something you’d never expect. Those all-White sheep have hardly any diversity at all. What about the black sheep? Who speaks for them? Baa baa is all you’ll hear.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    hahhhhahhhaaahahaa, cough. It's fantastic that Steve can write a post about "good things." a la' Martha Stewart. Being a designer (well, past now for me) I look forward to more posts about homes, fires/gardens maybe?, movies, dogs and golf courses/current tournament ramp-ups, especially, now that it is winter. I wish I could send a Pajamagram to all of you tonight!
  92. True Leftists hate everything that is good and ordinary. And this is just another way of saying that they hate the bourgeois and anything that is remotely “reactionary,” i.e. not utterly debased.

    And yes, , these are precisely the same people who think Tolkien is… gasp… problematic.

  93. @Verymuchalive
    Can you get cold toes in Southern California ( And, Boy, did they warnya ! )
    When this Scotsman spent several years in the South of Spain, I never experienced cold toes at all.

    “Can you get cold toes in Southern California”

    From November thru February I wear two pairs of socks.

    My house isn’t well insulated and the floor is cold in winter. But, yeah, it’s mostly me being a wimp about my feet.

  94. @Verymuchalive
    Can you get cold toes in Southern California ( And, Boy, did they warnya ! )
    When this Scotsman spent several years in the South of Spain, I never experienced cold toes at all.

    Southern California has warmer winters than Southern Spain.

    You can tell the transplants from the North from the native white Southern Californians like Steve by looking to see who is wearing a jacket or coat in the middle of winter. It is a funny sight to walk down the street and see the tourists from Canada and New York wearing shorts and t-shirts and the Mexicans and local whites bundled up. 55F is relative.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted

    55F is relative.
     
    Ah. "Room temperature", as it is known in England.
  95. @Lagertha
    That's already happened: there have been numerous articles criticizing people who spend so much money on their pets. What sunk that ship a year or so ago, was the fact that gay men are a large group that adores pets, (little known fact) lavish their pets with the best of everything, and, are huge adopters of unwanted dogs and cats at shelters. So, I am so glad gays are as committed as I am to adopt shelter dogs. My boys, when they were toddlers could sometimes feel a little jealous of my affection for my dogs!

    What sunk that ship a year or so ago, was the fact that gay men are a large group that adores pets, (little known fact) lavish their pets with the best of everything, and, are huge adopters of unwanted dogs and cats at shelters.

    This is true. In High School, one of my best friends worked in a Pet Store. They couldn’t buy enough gerbils to keep in stock.

    • LOL: Clyde, Buffalo Joe
    • Replies: @Lagertha
    haha. But, seriously, gerbils aside (why do I still think about Richard G after all these years?) , most people are left with simple pets to love them/stare into their eyes, care about their sorry, human ass, bc the pets mostly care about food, and, they don't wanna eat sh*t....even your High IQ sh*t.
  96. The ex-pat website Your Danish Life says that things are “only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,” where “you can share the vicissitudes of life, knowing that no one will challenge you on your opinions, and where their difficulties most likely resemble yours.” We tried that already; we’ll be dealing with the consequences for four more years.

    I think this is a little more sinister than anti-racist (anti-white) trolling. Hygge is, I think, a form of hearth and home, a zone of privacy, rest and mental repose. Naturally that includes the right to exclude the unwanted, the inconvenient, the foreign and the hostile. It’s where you go to gather yourself and prepare for the challenges of earning your daily bread. Of course this is just a unique Scandi word for the same thing in its local flavors.

    This guy is proposing that you’re not entitled to your home – that it’s not inviolate, a place of rest where you do what it is that contents your heart, speak freely, and invite only the people you want. I don’t think we need to recount in toto the relationship between totalitarianism in history and fiction and the prohibitions on a private life.

    Free men tend not to react well to such an invasion.

  97. @Buffalo Joe
    Clyde, The sex is with a partner, right?

    It could be a you tube video from a Brazilian beach

  98. @Dave Hopkins
    Hygge, a lovely word, seems to sum up the idea of "home", which rose in Northern Europe in parallel with the rise in status of women. See Witold Rybczynski's Home: A Short History of an Idea. The focus on home interiors and women in Dutch genre painters like Jan Vermeer are another aspect of this. It is a rich, and very feminine cultural phenomenon, and was at the heart of the modern family. Attacking hygge is amazingly over the top even for Slate, and yet predictable, no? Shades here of Tolkien and his comfort-loving hobbits fighting armies of orcs and dark lords!

    That’s the same image that occurred to me. Progs are Lotho Sackville-Baggins and Ted Sandyman, conservatives are Sam Gamgee.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    With Sharkey Soros pulling the strings behind the scenes.
  99. @Expletive Deleted
    The English don't do "comfort". It's just not British.
    Single glazing and cold running water all the way. Heating's a draughty hole in the wall with some inflammable sort of rocks in it.
    More ice in that bath, mate?

    Also don’t forget having to shove coins in the slot for heat or some hot bath water. England. A few decades ago for me. Can you imagine some Muslim ingrate immigrants complying with this setup? yeah right!

  100. @AaronB
    Quite aside from the obvious angle of this being an attack on traditional European culture, I think there is something more going on, in addition to that.

    Hygge is obviously something that doesn't fit well with neoliberal values, which are about being restless, insecure, and thus turning to consumerism to fill that empty hole.

    Hygge is about being happy, satisfied, content, not hustling, not on the make, satisfied with small comforts - in the original NYT article, a Danish person was quoted as saying the Danish are so happy because they take satisfaction in small things. Sounds almost Buddhist, although really all spiritual traditions counsel this approach, including most of the Hellenistic ones.

    Well, that is obviously a threat to capitalism and indeed the whole modern way of life!

    One thing I have discovered about people committed to capitalism and the neo-liberal way of life is that they are deeply, deeply, threatened by anyone or anything that seems to call into question their values. You must subscribe to their notion of the good life as being about buying stuff, gadgets, and working really hard to buy stuff and have gadgets, and under no circumstances must you be allowed to be satisfied with small comforts that make you happy!

    When I first started developing an interest in non-materialistic spiritual traditions the hostility and mockery I met with from the hard working neoliberal types was astonishing to me - I didn't expect sympathy, but I expected indifference at worse. They would pity me as the poor soul who missed out on the point of life - to work really hard to buy stuff, according to them.

    But no. What I got instead was something resembling rage. Clearly, I was challenging a very brittle facade they were trying to maintain - they knew on some level that they were missing out on the best things in life, and they responded with rage at my deviation from their accepted norm, which reminded them of what they had given up.

    Good comment with some interesting replies by other posters.

    I have noticed something similar, but my take was slightly different.

    Their anger has more to do with shame and guilt and perhaps a little jealousy.

    More than a few of of my colleagues (currently in Academia) are spend thrifts who don’t save much money. They love to spend money on travel and eating out. Travel and dining out are not that expensive, but doing it non stop can add up. Some of them are proud that they have never learned to cook for themselves (some women SJW types are especially keen to brag about this)!

    They are hardcore SWPL and SJW types who love to travel all over the the world. They want to visit every third world country on the planet and sample their cuisine. They are the Eat, Pray, Love crowd. I, on the other hand, prefer to cook at home and entertain friends in this way, and not I am not that keen on travel.

    Sometimes they seem apologetic talking about all the money they are spending on these things, as if they “know” that they should be more prudent.

    Personally, I don’t care how they spend their time or money, and always tell them how the trips look so interesting (perhaps they feel guilty from my comments?).

    When I see their pictures from their travels I feel I am looking at a couple’s baby pictures. What do you say? Of course your kid looks beautiful! LOL

    So when they say something which smacks of guilt “gee we probably should be saving more” it kinda of takes me off guard. They are perhaps a little jealous too that I don’t suffer from their compulsions…. and not searching for something to fill a hole in my soul

    One thing that I find curious about them is that many of these SJW types who love to travel also want to make the world safe for Gay parades, Pussy riot church concerts, and transsexuals etc.

    I never quite understood how their passion for traveling to diverse unexplored regions untouched by civilization (or barely touched) and foreign cuisines jibes with their desire to impose a USA style global progressive mono culture. Don’t they want cultural diversity?

    They seem like modern day gentlemen and church lady secular missionary types.

    Their growing willingness and advocacy of using force to do this (e.g. witness Nuland, Powers, Rice, and Cankles etc…) in the Middle East and other places and new strange progressive alliance with the old Military Industrial Complex Deep State (Russia is eeeeeeeevilll I tell you) has been talked about on other threads at Unz.

    The Deep Sate has long used the soft power of the US culture and progressive values to make inroads into other countries. The alliance is starting to look a little strange though.

    I would love for Steve to explore this strange alliance more.

    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    I never quite understood how their passion for traveling to diverse unexplored regions untouched by civilization (or barely touched) and foreign cuisines jibes with their desire to impose a USA style global progressive mono culture. Don’t they want cultural diversity?

    They seem like modern day gentlemen and church lady secular missionary types.

     

    I think their missionary zeal is mostly subconscious. Most progressive 'traveler' types deep down assume the superiority of deracinated, 'tolerant' western culture. But one aspect of this, i.e. their own culture, is that you consciously, conspicuously venerate The Others and their cultures, no matter how noxious they may be.

    So prog travelers go to third world hellholes and try to consciously celebrate what they're seeing, but the result is a lot of cognitive and emotional dissonance. This dissonance often manifests in incidents in which 'cool', 'tolerant', 'chill' progressive travelers absolutely lose their shit when something unexpectedly doesn't go their way.

    Such travelers are also very selectively concerned about how enjoying themselves in foreign cultures affects the native members of those cultures. For example, most people in SE Asian countries are pretty conservative about public nudity and sexually-themed displays, but prog travelers have no concern for this when they want to get wasted and dance dirty at beach raves and the like.

    So yes, these travelers are asserting their own cultural values and norms on the cultures they visit, but they will deny this vociferously if you confront them with it.

    It's when they return home that their missionary impulse is worked out consciously. They are happy to proselytize their peers about the 'amazing' 'life-changing' experiences they've had overseas. Lots of this is of course projection, seasoned with great lashings of status- and virtue-signaling.

    But what ultimately do they really want? I think they want to live in and impose a post-Christian western culture in which they are in charge, not only politically, but also morally/spiritually. They want to be seen as enlightened and good, but they go farther; they want to usurp the Christ himself in the great western narrative, i.e. they want to be saviors. For that, they need those who must be saved. That's where The Others -- who are seen as not quite fully human, so they lack agency -- are so useful: they are innocent, helpless pawns who can be saved. The problem is, it's pretty messy to try to save The Other when he's still living in his own country (ask the neocons, who operate from related motives). So it's nice to visit The Other in order to enhance one's own personal enlightenment narrative, but it's so much easier to save The Other when he's been imported and is conveniently on hand.

    , @Lagertha
    What I have always known about the people you describe on your post who seem to be traveling all the time, and posting annoying photos from like, Tazmania: Mommy and Daddy/ex-spouse settlement/trustfund/extreme White Privilege, is paying for all that travelin' and eating around the world. I can tell a phony in 5 minutes if they are old money, or new tech money. So, most of the time, family money paid for that trip...and may still be paying off the student loans of 30-40 year old people.
  101. @Jim Don Bob
    Almost every time I cross the border into Canada, I get asked if I have any guns or pepper spray. I've always wanted to reply, "Do you mean semi or full auto?", but I learned years ago the customs guy have absolutely no sense of humor.

    Yep, I ran into that too, Jim Don Bob. I was on the phone with the Canadian customs lady:

    After I gave her the names of those of us coming in to Victoria,
    CCL: “Do you have any alcohol?”
    Me: “Nope.”
    CCL: “Do you have tobacco?”
    Me: “No.”
    CCL: “Do you have any guns?”
    Me: “Yeah, I’ve got a lot of guns, but I won’t bring em to Canada.”

    15 minutes later:

    Me: “Listen I’m paying for my cell-minutes here; I don’t have free nights!* Are we done?”

    Yeah, she searched the whole plane. I was finally all “listen, we have guns in America, cause we’re a free country.”** She’s all “Well, Canada’s a free country too.” I’m all “yeah, whatever, we gotta get to dinner.”

    * Circa 2002
    ** Circa back when we were a little bit like a free country still.

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Years ago me and a couple of my long hair friends crossed the border at Buffalo in my 63 Volvo. The Canadian Customs guy asked if we had any money. I replied, "Oh, we have lots of money!". My tone must have been off because he told us to pull over. We took everything out of the car over the next half hour. The CC guy looked at it and told us we could go. Ever since that day, it has been Yes, sir.
  102. @AaronB
    Interesting, and it seems true to me.

    Manipulators don't want you feeling happy and content, so to that extent its a tactic to keep you "aroused", but I also think the psycopathic manipulators tend to respond with rage if you question their whole life project of manipulating people to gain power and money.

    I have known quite a few people who I regard as sociopaths - and they were quite happy if you were like them and regarded defrauding and deceiving others as a great way to go through life, but reacted with rage or defensive mockery to the suggestion that there is a better way to live.

    Strange as it may seem, in my experience psycopaths actively try clone themselves in others, and go out of their way to do so, and are not happy if you don't buy into their values - its a bit uncanny and made me believe in the concept of evil in the religious sense for a while, and I'm still not sure what the reality is.

    And of course, what explains the rage of the ordinary people I knew who couldn't handle my growing disinterest in the rat race?

    But yes, tactic for manipulation, and defensive reaction to questioning a way of life - its both.

    I agree that Evil does exist, is quite ambitious, and that psychopaths are a window/conduit to that Evil, but we are all susceptible to it, have it within our own selves. It is the fallen nature of Man, just more egregious in psychopaths.

  103. @Wilkey
    So Pajama Boy is racist? Oh wait, he's gay and Jewish, so that can't be possible.

    Hygge sounds a lot like what SWPLs would want to do in deepest darkest winter. Unlike SWPL traits, which serve to distinguish leftist whites from brown people, conservatives, and working class whites, "racist" traits are anything conservative whites do that distinguishes them, intentionally or not, from those who aren't white.

    It's all about who/whom.

    So Pajama Boy is racist? Oh wait, he’s gay and Jewish, so that can’t be possible.

    ‘Tomboys’ are now officially racist, too (unless you’re a dyke)

    https://www.theatlantic.com/health/archive/2017/01/tomboy/512258/

    So says one Elizabeth King.

    (‘King’ – hmmm)

    The upside is that, when everything’s racist, nothing’s racist. We’re getting closer.

  104. @SoCal Philosopher

    The ex-pat website Your Danish Life says that things are “only hyggelig when you meet up with people with whom you feel safe enough to be yourself,” where “you can share the vicissitudes of life, knowing that no one will challenge you on your opinions, and where their difficulties most likely resemble yours.” We tried that already; we’ll be dealing with the consequences for four more years.
     
    So safe spaces are now right-wing? That was a quick turnaround.

    So safe spaces are now right-wing?”

    … only for white people (or white heterosexual males, if you’re being strict about it). They’re ok for everyone else.

  105. @Jimi
    Article good example of how Slate, the former home of Mike Kinsley, descends into Salon Magazine style silliness.

    The Forward already addressed the sinister side of hygge:

    http://jd.fo/HzY9

    Can Hygge Be Jewish?

    Money can’t buy hygge. This is its charm and its sinister element. It’s like citizenship that can’t be acquired. Or perhaps like nobility that can only, but barely, be married into. It makes me think of the late nineteenth century (anti-Semitic) stories about rich Jews trying to enter the aristocracy.
     

    Can Hygge Be Jewish?

    Probably better to embrace Hygge than Gemütlichkeit? There is almost a Puritanical streak in there somewhere.

  106. @Expletive Deleted
    Portyanki are better than socks. You can steal boots several sizes too large, and just wrap your tootsies in ripped-up stolen laundry until they fit. Wear a hole in them? Just rejig the things.
    Those home-made felt slipper things are ace, too.
    Real Scandies would be stuffing their birchbark leggings with skogräs, I'd have thought.

    Ex, Worked outside construction for years here in WNY. Wear athletic crew socks, put your foot in a grocery store plastic bag and then slip your foot into your boot. Warm and dry.

  107. @Seneca
    Good comment with some interesting replies by other posters.

    I have noticed something similar, but my take was slightly different.

    Their anger has more to do with shame and guilt and perhaps a little jealousy.

    More than a few of of my colleagues (currently in Academia) are spend thrifts who don't save much money. They love to spend money on travel and eating out. Travel and dining out are not that expensive, but doing it non stop can add up. Some of them are proud that they have never learned to cook for themselves (some women SJW types are especially keen to brag about this)!

    They are hardcore SWPL and SJW types who love to travel all over the the world. They want to visit every third world country on the planet and sample their cuisine. They are the Eat, Pray, Love crowd. I, on the other hand, prefer to cook at home and entertain friends in this way, and not I am not that keen on travel.

    Sometimes they seem apologetic talking about all the money they are spending on these things, as if they "know" that they should be more prudent.

    Personally, I don't care how they spend their time or money, and always tell them how the trips look so interesting (perhaps they feel guilty from my comments?).

    When I see their pictures from their travels I feel I am looking at a couple's baby pictures. What do you say? Of course your kid looks beautiful! LOL

    So when they say something which smacks of guilt "gee we probably should be saving more" it kinda of takes me off guard. They are perhaps a little jealous too that I don't suffer from their compulsions.... and not searching for something to fill a hole in my soul

    One thing that I find curious about them is that many of these SJW types who love to travel also want to make the world safe for Gay parades, Pussy riot church concerts, and transsexuals etc.

    I never quite understood how their passion for traveling to diverse unexplored regions untouched by civilization (or barely touched) and foreign cuisines jibes with their desire to impose a USA style global progressive mono culture. Don't they want cultural diversity?

    They seem like modern day gentlemen and church lady secular missionary types.

    Their growing willingness and advocacy of using force to do this (e.g. witness Nuland, Powers, Rice, and Cankles etc...) in the Middle East and other places and new strange progressive alliance with the old Military Industrial Complex Deep State (Russia is eeeeeeeevilll I tell you) has been talked about on other threads at Unz.

    The Deep Sate has long used the soft power of the US culture and progressive values to make inroads into other countries. The alliance is starting to look a little strange though.

    I would love for Steve to explore this strange alliance more.

    I never quite understood how their passion for traveling to diverse unexplored regions untouched by civilization (or barely touched) and foreign cuisines jibes with their desire to impose a USA style global progressive mono culture. Don’t they want cultural diversity?

    They seem like modern day gentlemen and church lady secular missionary types.

    I think their missionary zeal is mostly subconscious. Most progressive ‘traveler’ types deep down assume the superiority of deracinated, ‘tolerant’ western culture. But one aspect of this, i.e. their own culture, is that you consciously, conspicuously venerate The Others and their cultures, no matter how noxious they may be.

    So prog travelers go to third world hellholes and try to consciously celebrate what they’re seeing, but the result is a lot of cognitive and emotional dissonance. This dissonance often manifests in incidents in which ‘cool’, ‘tolerant’, ‘chill’ progressive travelers absolutely lose their shit when something unexpectedly doesn’t go their way.

    Such travelers are also very selectively concerned about how enjoying themselves in foreign cultures affects the native members of those cultures. For example, most people in SE Asian countries are pretty conservative about public nudity and sexually-themed displays, but prog travelers have no concern for this when they want to get wasted and dance dirty at beach raves and the like.

    So yes, these travelers are asserting their own cultural values and norms on the cultures they visit, but they will deny this vociferously if you confront them with it.

    It’s when they return home that their missionary impulse is worked out consciously. They are happy to proselytize their peers about the ‘amazing’ ‘life-changing’ experiences they’ve had overseas. Lots of this is of course projection, seasoned with great lashings of status- and virtue-signaling.

    But what ultimately do they really want? I think they want to live in and impose a post-Christian western culture in which they are in charge, not only politically, but also morally/spiritually. They want to be seen as enlightened and good, but they go farther; they want to usurp the Christ himself in the great western narrative, i.e. they want to be saviors. For that, they need those who must be saved. That’s where The Others — who are seen as not quite fully human, so they lack agency — are so useful: they are innocent, helpless pawns who can be saved. The problem is, it’s pretty messy to try to save The Other when he’s still living in his own country (ask the neocons, who operate from related motives). So it’s nice to visit The Other in order to enhance one’s own personal enlightenment narrative, but it’s so much easier to save The Other when he’s been imported and is conveniently on hand.

    • Replies: @Lagertha
    this is exactly why I loathed all those expensive programs for HS students (here, in the Northeast) to go to Africa or something, to build stuff, or something. Bc they live in the Northeast and don't all have boatloads of travel money (flights/food/hotels). I always thought: why not go to Boston, Bronx, Philly, Hartford/New Haven/Newark to work with the kids in those cities in the summer? Commute in the 20 minutes and teach these kids something, something Hygge-like, that may actually be beneficial for them.
  108. @Tom-in-VA
    That's the same image that occurred to me. Progs are Lotho Sackville-Baggins and Ted Sandyman, conservatives are Sam Gamgee.

    With Sharkey Soros pulling the strings behind the scenes.

  109. Warm socks don’t hold a candle to “tight pussy, loose shoes, and a warm place to shit.”

    Oh, remember the halcyon days when a common Cabinet member could be that in tune with the common people!

    As Roy Blount, Jr, seconded, “I wish Jimmy had responded by saying it sounded like a set of priorities that a lot of people could identify with.”

  110. Warm socks don’t hold a candle to “tight pussy, loose shoes, and a warm place to shit”.

    Oh, remember the halcyon days when a common Cabinet member could be that in tune with the common people!

    As Roy Blount, Jr, seconded, “I wish Jimmy had responded by saying it sounded like a set of priorities that a lot of people could identify with.”

    hygge, n.: stramme kusse, løse sko, og et varmt sted at skide

  111. @Buffalo Joe
    Lagertha, Yes indeed, "staying in and getting into my jammies early." I light the fireplace and then try to get into my wife's jammies. Sigh, that failure is how I wind up here.

    hahhhahhhaaa! That is the best! FYI: the latest trend with HS girls (my son’s peers and gf) is: they are all sporting polar fleece footie pajamas! – however, not allowed at school. Footie pajamas; hooded; kinda’ like the onesies my babies wore almost 2 decades ago for nighty-night time, are now the rage for teenage girls. Kinda’ brilliant, ’cause “nothing is getting between me and my ‘footie pajamas!” – as a good and clever husband, you might get some mileage with presenting her with fleece footie pj’s. Did I tell you that my husband sleeps with his socks on in winter :)?

    Like you, Joe, we know what Hygge is. It’s why everyone in New England has a fireplace/woodburning stove/hot tub/fire pit, etc. Hygge is just “stayin’ in…”, so not a political thing…or even culturally Danish. Cabin fever is the term when we start fighting with our spouse and teenagers in early March.

  112. @Ivy
    Hygge, chez moi, is another typical day and night.

    that is wonderful. I have aspired to live a Hygge-like life as much as possible…and I have tried to instill this idea for my sons, and their friends who may have been Hygge-deprived for whatever reason. Sheesh, we almost burned-down cabins or forests due to our campfires and wild-ass cooking.

  113. @yaqub the mad scientist
    Contemporary Britain vs American Heartland would be another example of guys who left vs guys who stayed home.

    so weird: I have recently read some books of Scandinavian immigrants who returned…and all their angst; since sometimes, siblings stayed and stayed on in the timber and mining work in the upper Midwest and coastal Rust Belt/Plains states…and communication was so poor that they lost contact.

    Weird Factoid: Ashtabula, OH is a very old Finnish (almost gone/diluted now) enclave. Danes were all over Iowa, but they are also diminishing …but weirdly, communities exist, here and there. Solvang in California is an old Danish town. Manhattan, MT is very Dutch (ok, I know, the Dutch are not Nordics, I just thought it was weird to name a town that :). And, the Dutch are into Hygge as much as everyone else in the world.

  114. @AaronB
    Interesting, and it seems true to me.

    Manipulators don't want you feeling happy and content, so to that extent its a tactic to keep you "aroused", but I also think the psycopathic manipulators tend to respond with rage if you question their whole life project of manipulating people to gain power and money.

    I have known quite a few people who I regard as sociopaths - and they were quite happy if you were like them and regarded defrauding and deceiving others as a great way to go through life, but reacted with rage or defensive mockery to the suggestion that there is a better way to live.

    Strange as it may seem, in my experience psycopaths actively try clone themselves in others, and go out of their way to do so, and are not happy if you don't buy into their values - its a bit uncanny and made me believe in the concept of evil in the religious sense for a while, and I'm still not sure what the reality is.

    And of course, what explains the rage of the ordinary people I knew who couldn't handle my growing disinterest in the rat race?

    But yes, tactic for manipulation, and defensive reaction to questioning a way of life - its both.

    Yes. Because my mother was an English teacher (HS level) I grew up reading a lot of books (and still do…the paper kind), I started to realize that the “rat race” and competition, the continuous striving, the shit storm that I was sailing toward as a college student, that I read about in novels of all ages and regions, was and, will continue to be, part of the “human condition.”

    The thing that we all try to do, to battle/overcome/survive/thrive is the talk we all should have with whoever, about overcoming hardships, long ago, when we are really, fracking old. I miss my father’s lectures about hardships! ” ahmerikka is gud, you have to work hard and be positive – nobuddi likes a loosssser. ” My father was a Trumpien, OMG!

    I think it is the most powerful thing in the world to say: I am happy and I am content with my life, because I have done the best I could; and anyone who is dependent on me is doing well…has been given the tools for the pursuit of happiness.

  115. @Ripple Earthdevil
    In case anyone is wondering, "hygge" is pronounced something like "hew-guh", the "y" in Scandinavian languages being equivalent to "ü" in German. The final "g" in "hyggelig" is silent, so that word is pronounced "hewgely".

    Who..gehhhh

  116. @Dr. Doom
    Well it sure is good that the War on Terror is over so we can focus on other things. Apparently the inherent racism of wooly socks is the new political agenda. Maybe we can look deeper into this by identifying this problem at the source? Are the sheep they get the wool from White? Those damn White sheep have been discriminating against black sheep for ages haven't they? Maybe its a sheep problem? That cloning of Dolly seems remarkably similar to movies about cloning Hitler in Brazil. Maybe someone can start a push to get Obama to look at a sheep/Nazi connection during the last ten days? Let me tell you this could be just the thing for Obama to look into during the last hours of his racism Jihad. Racist sheep can be nasty. What if they're cloning Nazi Sheep? People are always looking for wolves in sheep's clothing, but Nazi Sheep is something you'd never expect. Those all-White sheep have hardly any diversity at all. What about the black sheep? Who speaks for them? Baa baa is all you'll hear.

    hahhhhahhhaaahahaa, cough. It’s fantastic that Steve can write a post about “good things.” a la’ Martha Stewart. Being a designer (well, past now for me) I look forward to more posts about homes, fires/gardens maybe?, movies, dogs and golf courses/current tournament ramp-ups, especially, now that it is winter. I wish I could send a Pajamagram to all of you tonight!

  117. @Alec Leamas

    What sunk that ship a year or so ago, was the fact that gay men are a large group that adores pets, (little known fact) lavish their pets with the best of everything, and, are huge adopters of unwanted dogs and cats at shelters.
     
    This is true. In High School, one of my best friends worked in a Pet Store. They couldn't buy enough gerbils to keep in stock.

    haha. But, seriously, gerbils aside (why do I still think about Richard G after all these years?) , most people are left with simple pets to love them/stare into their eyes, care about their sorry, human ass, bc the pets mostly care about food, and, they don’t wanna eat sh*t….even your High IQ sh*t.

  118. @Seneca
    Good comment with some interesting replies by other posters.

    I have noticed something similar, but my take was slightly different.

    Their anger has more to do with shame and guilt and perhaps a little jealousy.

    More than a few of of my colleagues (currently in Academia) are spend thrifts who don't save much money. They love to spend money on travel and eating out. Travel and dining out are not that expensive, but doing it non stop can add up. Some of them are proud that they have never learned to cook for themselves (some women SJW types are especially keen to brag about this)!

    They are hardcore SWPL and SJW types who love to travel all over the the world. They want to visit every third world country on the planet and sample their cuisine. They are the Eat, Pray, Love crowd. I, on the other hand, prefer to cook at home and entertain friends in this way, and not I am not that keen on travel.

    Sometimes they seem apologetic talking about all the money they are spending on these things, as if they "know" that they should be more prudent.

    Personally, I don't care how they spend their time or money, and always tell them how the trips look so interesting (perhaps they feel guilty from my comments?).

    When I see their pictures from their travels I feel I am looking at a couple's baby pictures. What do you say? Of course your kid looks beautiful! LOL

    So when they say something which smacks of guilt "gee we probably should be saving more" it kinda of takes me off guard. They are perhaps a little jealous too that I don't suffer from their compulsions.... and not searching for something to fill a hole in my soul

    One thing that I find curious about them is that many of these SJW types who love to travel also want to make the world safe for Gay parades, Pussy riot church concerts, and transsexuals etc.

    I never quite understood how their passion for traveling to diverse unexplored regions untouched by civilization (or barely touched) and foreign cuisines jibes with their desire to impose a USA style global progressive mono culture. Don't they want cultural diversity?

    They seem like modern day gentlemen and church lady secular missionary types.

    Their growing willingness and advocacy of using force to do this (e.g. witness Nuland, Powers, Rice, and Cankles etc...) in the Middle East and other places and new strange progressive alliance with the old Military Industrial Complex Deep State (Russia is eeeeeeeevilll I tell you) has been talked about on other threads at Unz.

    The Deep Sate has long used the soft power of the US culture and progressive values to make inroads into other countries. The alliance is starting to look a little strange though.

    I would love for Steve to explore this strange alliance more.

    What I have always known about the people you describe on your post who seem to be traveling all the time, and posting annoying photos from like, Tazmania: Mommy and Daddy/ex-spouse settlement/trustfund/extreme White Privilege, is paying for all that travelin’ and eating around the world. I can tell a phony in 5 minutes if they are old money, or new tech money. So, most of the time, family money paid for that trip…and may still be paying off the student loans of 30-40 year old people.

  119. @The Last Real Calvinist

    I never quite understood how their passion for traveling to diverse unexplored regions untouched by civilization (or barely touched) and foreign cuisines jibes with their desire to impose a USA style global progressive mono culture. Don’t they want cultural diversity?

    They seem like modern day gentlemen and church lady secular missionary types.

     

    I think their missionary zeal is mostly subconscious. Most progressive 'traveler' types deep down assume the superiority of deracinated, 'tolerant' western culture. But one aspect of this, i.e. their own culture, is that you consciously, conspicuously venerate The Others and their cultures, no matter how noxious they may be.

    So prog travelers go to third world hellholes and try to consciously celebrate what they're seeing, but the result is a lot of cognitive and emotional dissonance. This dissonance often manifests in incidents in which 'cool', 'tolerant', 'chill' progressive travelers absolutely lose their shit when something unexpectedly doesn't go their way.

    Such travelers are also very selectively concerned about how enjoying themselves in foreign cultures affects the native members of those cultures. For example, most people in SE Asian countries are pretty conservative about public nudity and sexually-themed displays, but prog travelers have no concern for this when they want to get wasted and dance dirty at beach raves and the like.

    So yes, these travelers are asserting their own cultural values and norms on the cultures they visit, but they will deny this vociferously if you confront them with it.

    It's when they return home that their missionary impulse is worked out consciously. They are happy to proselytize their peers about the 'amazing' 'life-changing' experiences they've had overseas. Lots of this is of course projection, seasoned with great lashings of status- and virtue-signaling.

    But what ultimately do they really want? I think they want to live in and impose a post-Christian western culture in which they are in charge, not only politically, but also morally/spiritually. They want to be seen as enlightened and good, but they go farther; they want to usurp the Christ himself in the great western narrative, i.e. they want to be saviors. For that, they need those who must be saved. That's where The Others -- who are seen as not quite fully human, so they lack agency -- are so useful: they are innocent, helpless pawns who can be saved. The problem is, it's pretty messy to try to save The Other when he's still living in his own country (ask the neocons, who operate from related motives). So it's nice to visit The Other in order to enhance one's own personal enlightenment narrative, but it's so much easier to save The Other when he's been imported and is conveniently on hand.

    this is exactly why I loathed all those expensive programs for HS students (here, in the Northeast) to go to Africa or something, to build stuff, or something. Bc they live in the Northeast and don’t all have boatloads of travel money (flights/food/hotels). I always thought: why not go to Boston, Bronx, Philly, Hartford/New Haven/Newark to work with the kids in those cities in the summer? Commute in the 20 minutes and teach these kids something, something Hygge-like, that may actually be beneficial for them.

  120. @dearieme
    “The loss of its empire?” Not only Schleswig but also Holstein.

    Denmark was offered both, and turned them down. Lothrop Stoddard praised their common sense in taking only “all that is Danish”, and nothing more. Now there’s a sustainable southern border strategy!

    It always amazes me to see nations fighting (often to the death) to keep territories that they should instead be expelling, from Chechnya to Puerto Rico to Ulster to South Carolina.

  121. @Francis G.
    Damn, Steve. You live in Southern California, too. Don't ever move to Minnesota or the Dakotas. You don't know the meaning of cold feet till you've stood outside in minus-twenty weather.

    Steve lived in Chicago in the 1980s and ’90s. He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in ’85. During that week, which was in the winter of my sophomore year, a lit Camel froze to my lip from the condensation of my breath while waiting for the CTA bus. As it dangled from my lips, it burned my lower face, so I hit it with my giant oven-mitt-sized mitten just as the bus came to the stop. I unwittingly knocked the cherry of the cigarette into my coat and didn’t notice it until I sat down on the bus and one of my friends said, “what the hell is that?” and pointed to my smoldering mid-section. I ran off the bus before it pulled away and pummeled myself with sidewalk snow. My chin was blistered, and my cool wool Ike jacket with band patches all over it now had a large hole. I have fond memories of those winters.
    The following January, Jan. of 1986, was the glorious victory of Super Bowl XX. The temp. during the victory parade a day or two later was -12F. Reports from friends who blew off school to go downtown for the parade were that beers were freezing in pockets, though they were stashed as close as possible to max core body temp.
    Standout memories of those brutal winters are that of frosted single-pane windows at my parents’ house, like that of Dr. Zhivago’s dacha.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in ’85

    That was a Super Bowl Sunday, right? I drove 40 miles out to Fox River Grove in my cruddy Datsun 310 to see a ski jumping tournament. I think I wore eleven layers.

    , @Francis G.
    And that, boys and girls (and "theys", too, we must be pan-gender inclusive!), is why you should never smoke.

    Seriously, though, anything below minus-20 and I wear a mask that covers my mouth and nose, otherwise the raw air stings when I breathe it.
    , @Jim McMahon
    A liquor store owner in downtown Chicago told me a few years ago that the day of the Bears' victory parade was easily the best day in the history of his store.
  122. @Eric Novak
    Steve lived in Chicago in the 1980s and '90s. He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in '85. During that week, which was in the winter of my sophomore year, a lit Camel froze to my lip from the condensation of my breath while waiting for the CTA bus. As it dangled from my lips, it burned my lower face, so I hit it with my giant oven-mitt-sized mitten just as the bus came to the stop. I unwittingly knocked the cherry of the cigarette into my coat and didn't notice it until I sat down on the bus and one of my friends said, "what the hell is that?" and pointed to my smoldering mid-section. I ran off the bus before it pulled away and pummeled myself with sidewalk snow. My chin was blistered, and my cool wool Ike jacket with band patches all over it now had a large hole. I have fond memories of those winters.
    The following January, Jan. of 1986, was the glorious victory of Super Bowl XX. The temp. during the victory parade a day or two later was -12F. Reports from friends who blew off school to go downtown for the parade were that beers were freezing in pockets, though they were stashed as close as possible to max core body temp.
    Standout memories of those brutal winters are that of frosted single-pane windows at my parents' house, like that of Dr. Zhivago's dacha.

    He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in ’85

    That was a Super Bowl Sunday, right? I drove 40 miles out to Fox River Grove in my cruddy Datsun 310 to see a ski jumping tournament. I think I wore eleven layers.

    • Replies: @Eric Novak
    Super Bowl XIX was a week before the deep freeze, Jan. 20, 1985. At least you didn't have a VW bug. You'd think the Germans would have the heater down by the 1970s.
    , @Eric Novak
    How the heck have I never heard of this place? Thanks for the winter activity suggestion. http://www.norgeskiclub.com
  123. @Lot
    Southern California has warmer winters than Southern Spain.

    You can tell the transplants from the North from the native white Southern Californians like Steve by looking to see who is wearing a jacket or coat in the middle of winter. It is a funny sight to walk down the street and see the tourists from Canada and New York wearing shorts and t-shirts and the Mexicans and local whites bundled up. 55F is relative.

    55F is relative.

    Ah. “Room temperature”, as it is known in England.

  124. @Thomas
    There's something of a joke among world travelers and ex-pats that "hygge" is Danish for "hook up." When a Danish girl takes you to show you "hygge," it means you're getting laid. The Danes are remarkably sexually liberal once you're accepted but that's a steep climb. I've never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.

    I’ve never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.

    Maybe that’s why Denmark is dealing with the migrant influx (slightly) better than Sweden. The anti-immigration party in Denmark is more accepted than in Sweden, where there is extreme hostility to their own anti-immigration party.

  125. @Daniel Chieh
    Slate never disappoints.

    I remember when they were less crazy.

    Like so many news sites, Slate has gone downhill in the past eight years.

  126. @Steve Sailer
    He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in ’85

    That was a Super Bowl Sunday, right? I drove 40 miles out to Fox River Grove in my cruddy Datsun 310 to see a ski jumping tournament. I think I wore eleven layers.

    Super Bowl XIX was a week before the deep freeze, Jan. 20, 1985. At least you didn’t have a VW bug. You’d think the Germans would have the heater down by the 1970s.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "The coldest day ever happened nearly 30 years ago on Jan. 20, 1985. It was 27 degrees below zero that day."

    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/01/06/the-coldest-days-ever-in-chicago-2/

    After the ski-jumping (I had to go because my cousin was singing the national anthem), I went to a Twyla Tharp show downtown.

    Evidently, I didn't understand the concept of hygge yet.

  127. @Steve Sailer
    He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in ’85

    That was a Super Bowl Sunday, right? I drove 40 miles out to Fox River Grove in my cruddy Datsun 310 to see a ski jumping tournament. I think I wore eleven layers.

    How the heck have I never heard of this place? Thanks for the winter activity suggestion. http://www.norgeskiclub.com

  128. @snorlax
    One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.

    It must be a truly ancient (maybe the most ancient, if variations on "mama" and "papa" don't count) cultural artifact, predating the Indo-European/East Asian cultural split and maybe even the racial one.

    *Sunday: Sun
    Monday: Moon
    Tuesday: Mars (Tīw = Old English god equivalent to Mars)
    Wednesday: Mercury (Woden = Mercury)
    Thursday: Jupiter (Thor = Jupiter)
    Friday: Venus (Frigg = Venus)
    Saturday: Saturn

    “Tiw” is cognate with Greek “Zeus”. In Greek he was often call Zeus the father.

    “Zeus father” is cognate with Latin “Jupiter” (remember that “j” was pronounced as English “y”)

    This suggests an Indo-European god called something like “Dyeus Pater”.

    In Greek, the “dy” became “z”.

    In English it became “ty” (d > t). In the US, the “y” is dropping out of the pronunciation of “Tuesday” but it is still standard in England.

    In Latin “dy” became just “y” and the “pitar” came from word for father. (In English, p > f and t > th).

  129. @Eric Novak
    Super Bowl XIX was a week before the deep freeze, Jan. 20, 1985. At least you didn't have a VW bug. You'd think the Germans would have the heater down by the 1970s.

    “The coldest day ever happened nearly 30 years ago on Jan. 20, 1985. It was 27 degrees below zero that day.”

    http://chicago.cbslocal.com/2014/01/06/the-coldest-days-ever-in-chicago-2/

    After the ski-jumping (I had to go because my cousin was singing the national anthem), I went to a Twyla Tharp show downtown.

    Evidently, I didn’t understand the concept of hygge yet.

  130. @Mr. Anon
    "“He is going to demand that you shed your cynicism. That you put down your divisions. That you come out of your isolation, that you move out of your comfort zones. That you push yourselves to be better. And that you engage. Barack will never allow you to go back to your lives as usual, uninvolved, uninformed. ”'

    I had almost forgotten that gem by the First Angry Black Lady. The Obamas - both of them - were insufferable right from the beginning. I can't remember having heard a single thing Michelle has said that wasn't offensive, hectoring, and insolent.

    TV talking heads keep repeating the fact that Obama has a high approval rating for an outgoing President - over 50%. I suspect that high number is an artifact; a lot of whites just don't want to openly admit that they don't like him, or even can't stand him.

    TV talking heads keep repeating the fact that Obama has a high approval rating for an outgoing President – over 50%. I suspect that high number is an artifact; a lot of whites just don’t want to openly admit that they don’t like him, or even can’t stand him.

    Most people are quick learners–they tire of being called racist at every turn. So, indifference about Obama is feigned,while disagreeing with his policies and agenda. The propaganda, too, becomes tiresome. The same gimmick was used at his inauguration, where Obama had a 62% approval rating (IIRC), except someone noted it was only 7th highest since such polling began.

    The approval rating nonsense, like most opinion polling, is just more fake news of the sort to which we’ve grown accustomed.

  131. @Anonymous
    The Vikings are the guys who left. The non-Vikings stayed home.

    https://s-media-cache-ak0.pinimg.com/originals/0d/06/0b/0d060b609480528c6e8e37f17698f673.jpg

    And that map skipped the Russian side.

  132. @Thomas
    There's something of a joke among world travelers and ex-pats that "hygge" is Danish for "hook up." When a Danish girl takes you to show you "hygge," it means you're getting laid. The Danes are remarkably sexually liberal once you're accepted but that's a steep climb. I've never been in a country with such a sharp dichotomy between stranger and friend, or one that was so coldly unfriendly to strangers.

    Well, scandinavians may be a bit standoffish but a further fault in our regional character is we don’t lure away and torture some poor victim for hours for a laugh and some facebook likes. That’s reserved for the happy, warm, friendly, entertaining people that everyone loves.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    Used to, though. Didn't ya?

    At first light the following morning, Einar and his men scoured the island.
    Eventually, the earl, who was renowned for the keenness of his single eye, spotted something moving by the shore. His men moved to intercept and captured a bedraggled Halfdan.
    Seeking revenge for the death of his father, Einar slaughtered Halfdan. The Orkneyinga saga recounts, with relish, that Einar carved the notorious blóðörn - blood-eagle - on his struggling captive:
     
    It wasn't done out of sadism, though. Only for whatever the pagan medieval equivalent of Facebook 'likes' was (scribal marginalia?).

    Though barbaric, Einar's revenge remains touching, for although Rognvald seems to have had no time for his bastard son, Einar's revenge at least hints that he held his father in some esteem.

    Earl Einar Rognvaldsson died peacefully in his bed, leaving three sons - Arnkel, Erlend and Thorfinn Skullsplitter.
     

    and

    .. the viking chieftain, Ivar the Boneless, had the Northumbrian king, Aella II, put to death:

    "They caused the bloody eagle to be carved on the back of Ælla, and they cut away all of the ribs from the spine, and then they ripped out his lungs."
     

    [note to self; do not interfere with a scandiwegian's parents]
  133. @Pericles
    Well, scandinavians may be a bit standoffish but a further fault in our regional character is we don't lure away and torture some poor victim for hours for a laugh and some facebook likes. That's reserved for the happy, warm, friendly, entertaining people that everyone loves.

    Used to, though. Didn’t ya?

    At first light the following morning, Einar and his men scoured the island.
    Eventually, the earl, who was renowned for the keenness of his single eye, spotted something moving by the shore. His men moved to intercept and captured a bedraggled Halfdan.
    Seeking revenge for the death of his father, Einar slaughtered Halfdan. The Orkneyinga saga recounts, with relish, that Einar carved the notorious blóðörn – blood-eagle – on his struggling captive:

    It wasn’t done out of sadism, though. Only for whatever the pagan medieval equivalent of Facebook ‘likes’ was (scribal marginalia?).

    Though barbaric, Einar’s revenge remains touching, for although Rognvald seems to have had no time for his bastard son, Einar’s revenge at least hints that he held his father in some esteem.

    Earl Einar Rognvaldsson died peacefully in his bed, leaving three sons – Arnkel, Erlend and Thorfinn Skullsplitter.

    and

    .. the viking chieftain, Ivar the Boneless, had the Northumbrian king, Aella II, put to death:

    “They caused the bloody eagle to be carved on the back of Ælla, and they cut away all of the ribs from the spine, and then they ripped out his lungs.”

    [note to self; do not interfere with a scandiwegian's parents]

    • Replies: @Pericles
    You try to be nice but eventually it all ends up in a lot of blood-eagles, doesn't it?
  134. @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, I ran into that too, Jim Don Bob. I was on the phone with the Canadian customs lady:

    After I gave her the names of those of us coming in to Victoria,
    CCL: "Do you have any alcohol?"
    Me: "Nope."
    CCL: "Do you have tobacco?"
    Me: "No."
    CCL: "Do you have any guns?"
    Me: "Yeah, I've got a lot of guns, but I won't bring em to Canada."

    15 minutes later:

    Me: "Listen I'm paying for my cell-minutes here; I don't have free nights!* Are we done?"

    Yeah, she searched the whole plane. I was finally all "listen, we have guns in America, cause we're a free country."** She's all "Well, Canada's a free country too." I'm all "yeah, whatever, we gotta get to dinner."

    * Circa 2002
    ** Circa back when we were a little bit like a free country still.

    Years ago me and a couple of my long hair friends crossed the border at Buffalo in my 63 Volvo. The Canadian Customs guy asked if we had any money. I replied, “Oh, we have lots of money!”. My tone must have been off because he told us to pull over. We took everything out of the car over the next half hour. The CC guy looked at it and told us we could go. Ever since that day, it has been Yes, sir.

  135. @Je Suis Charlie Martel
    OT, but I came across this on social media about Obama's Farewell speech from Dan Rather:

    "He spoke deeply about race, the undercurrent that coursed beneath his presidency as it has through all of American history. He spoke sympathetically of white Americans who feel worried and marginalized, but he then turned forcibly to a sense of all the racial progress left to be done and an inclusive outreach to immigrants. It was one America, perhaps without some of the naivete of his famed speech at the 2004 Democratic Convention. It seems to me that this will be his message going forward, combating what he called the "great sorting" of self-isolation according to cultural, region, religious, and ethnic lines."
     
    (my emphasis)

    I laughed so hard because: That's what different countries are for!!!!

    You’ve just recapitulated the globalist mindset, minus the final step, “Therefore, we must eliminate nationhood.”

  136. @Thomas
    As Season 2 of Fargo taught us.

    https://youtu.be/mo2oq0UktAs?t=30s

    That’s called courtesy. It doesn’t require you to actually be friendly in your heart of hearts. Funny how so many people miss that part.

    For Freud, politeness literally made you crazy. Minnesota is full of non-Freuds, though it had Coen Brothers.

    • Replies: @Pericles
    This reminds me of the strange Penelope Trunk, a literally autistic Jew on the prairie, who by now seems to be losing it a bit.


    I’m sick of Denmark. And Norway. And Sweden. I’m sick of all the research that says they are happy. People in those countries are always reporting how happy they are. Why can’t they be more like New Yorkers who are the most unhappy people in the world and wear that like a badge of honor?

     

    http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2016/10/12/my-forbidden-fantasy-voting-for-trump/

    I suppose she has a point in these unappealing times, namely that scandinavians should act less like good neighbours and more like New York Orthodox landlords or something.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    It's something we excel at, here on our disastrously overcrowded skerries. All five nations. The Scots are probably the least adept at it (Groundskeeper Willie f.ex. is an obsequious, silky-tongued courtier, in their scale of politesse), and the Welsh the best (although liable to chatter narkily away, in whatever it is they speak, behind one's back. Two-faced, the whole crew. Apart from the ones that hate us all the time, and burn our holiday cottages down. They're preferable, because predictable).
    Kinda works, nobody dies that often on the right-hand island. The other one is a different story.

    As you say, courtesy. It comes from one's breeding, as do noblesse oblige, chivalry, forbearance, charity, urbanity, liberality (= paying over the odds just 'cos you can; take note, jews and other exciting vibrancy, haggling is frightfully infra dig. and indicative of low breeding) and grace under pressure.
    One does not, under any circumstance, berate, gouge or oppress the staff, or the tenantry. We have people to do that for us. Frequently, aforementioned Scots. Simply dreadful people, irredeemable savages, and quite beyond the pale. Fortunately, they like money. A lot. Unlike their Irish brethren. Hence all the trouble over there.
    A very good day to you, sir.

  137. @Expletive Deleted
    Used to, though. Didn't ya?

    At first light the following morning, Einar and his men scoured the island.
    Eventually, the earl, who was renowned for the keenness of his single eye, spotted something moving by the shore. His men moved to intercept and captured a bedraggled Halfdan.
    Seeking revenge for the death of his father, Einar slaughtered Halfdan. The Orkneyinga saga recounts, with relish, that Einar carved the notorious blóðörn - blood-eagle - on his struggling captive:
     
    It wasn't done out of sadism, though. Only for whatever the pagan medieval equivalent of Facebook 'likes' was (scribal marginalia?).

    Though barbaric, Einar's revenge remains touching, for although Rognvald seems to have had no time for his bastard son, Einar's revenge at least hints that he held his father in some esteem.

    Earl Einar Rognvaldsson died peacefully in his bed, leaving three sons - Arnkel, Erlend and Thorfinn Skullsplitter.
     

    and

    .. the viking chieftain, Ivar the Boneless, had the Northumbrian king, Aella II, put to death:

    "They caused the bloody eagle to be carved on the back of Ælla, and they cut away all of the ribs from the spine, and then they ripped out his lungs."
     

    [note to self; do not interfere with a scandiwegian's parents]

    You try to be nice but eventually it all ends up in a lot of blood-eagles, doesn’t it?

  138. @guest
    That's called courtesy. It doesn't require you to actually be friendly in your heart of hearts. Funny how so many people miss that part.

    For Freud, politeness literally made you crazy. Minnesota is full of non-Freuds, though it had Coen Brothers.

    This reminds me of the strange Penelope Trunk, a literally autistic Jew on the prairie, who by now seems to be losing it a bit.

    I’m sick of Denmark. And Norway. And Sweden. I’m sick of all the research that says they are happy. People in those countries are always reporting how happy they are. Why can’t they be more like New Yorkers who are the most unhappy people in the world and wear that like a badge of honor?

    http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2016/10/12/my-forbidden-fantasy-voting-for-trump/

    I suppose she has a point in these unappealing times, namely that scandinavians should act less like good neighbours and more like New York Orthodox landlords or something.

    • Replies: @guest
    Politeness is about sustaining modern civil society, and furthering the civilizing process. It isn't of much help in overturning a political order. When all of polite society is against you, as it was with Trump, you have nothing to lose by being your brash, New Yorky self.

    Minnesota's (dark) political forces are well entrenched. We're not so homogenous and given to trust as before, thanks to our new friends from the four corners of the earth. But we do still have something of civility. An excess of it for many. If anyone wants to barge in and upset our political order (please do, if you're the right kind of barger), they probably wouldn't benefit from joining in our politeness, such as it is.

  139. @Eric Novak
    Steve lived in Chicago in the 1980s and '90s. He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in '85. During that week, which was in the winter of my sophomore year, a lit Camel froze to my lip from the condensation of my breath while waiting for the CTA bus. As it dangled from my lips, it burned my lower face, so I hit it with my giant oven-mitt-sized mitten just as the bus came to the stop. I unwittingly knocked the cherry of the cigarette into my coat and didn't notice it until I sat down on the bus and one of my friends said, "what the hell is that?" and pointed to my smoldering mid-section. I ran off the bus before it pulled away and pummeled myself with sidewalk snow. My chin was blistered, and my cool wool Ike jacket with band patches all over it now had a large hole. I have fond memories of those winters.
    The following January, Jan. of 1986, was the glorious victory of Super Bowl XX. The temp. during the victory parade a day or two later was -12F. Reports from friends who blew off school to go downtown for the parade were that beers were freezing in pockets, though they were stashed as close as possible to max core body temp.
    Standout memories of those brutal winters are that of frosted single-pane windows at my parents' house, like that of Dr. Zhivago's dacha.

    And that, boys and girls (and “theys”, too, we must be pan-gender inclusive!), is why you should never smoke.

    Seriously, though, anything below minus-20 and I wear a mask that covers my mouth and nose, otherwise the raw air stings when I breathe it.

    • Replies: @Expletive Deleted
    You need more nose-hairs. Damn that Victor Kiam.
    Also a yuuuge Polish-style mustache. Then a mountain-man beard, if it's actually cold cold, and not just "winter". It all works together.
    Seriously man, try it. Nobody's going to laugh at you. Mainly on account of they'll all be dead of hypothermia. Or covered in face-fungus themselves.
  140. @Pericles
    This reminds me of the strange Penelope Trunk, a literally autistic Jew on the prairie, who by now seems to be losing it a bit.


    I’m sick of Denmark. And Norway. And Sweden. I’m sick of all the research that says they are happy. People in those countries are always reporting how happy they are. Why can’t they be more like New Yorkers who are the most unhappy people in the world and wear that like a badge of honor?

     

    http://blog.penelopetrunk.com/2016/10/12/my-forbidden-fantasy-voting-for-trump/

    I suppose she has a point in these unappealing times, namely that scandinavians should act less like good neighbours and more like New York Orthodox landlords or something.

    Politeness is about sustaining modern civil society, and furthering the civilizing process. It isn’t of much help in overturning a political order. When all of polite society is against you, as it was with Trump, you have nothing to lose by being your brash, New Yorky self.

    Minnesota’s (dark) political forces are well entrenched. We’re not so homogenous and given to trust as before, thanks to our new friends from the four corners of the earth. But we do still have something of civility. An excess of it for many. If anyone wants to barge in and upset our political order (please do, if you’re the right kind of barger), they probably wouldn’t benefit from joining in our politeness, such as it is.

  141. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    “…so that word is pronounced “hewgely””

    Hum… ‘hug-ly’?

  142. @guest
    That's called courtesy. It doesn't require you to actually be friendly in your heart of hearts. Funny how so many people miss that part.

    For Freud, politeness literally made you crazy. Minnesota is full of non-Freuds, though it had Coen Brothers.

    It’s something we excel at, here on our disastrously overcrowded skerries. All five nations. The Scots are probably the least adept at it (Groundskeeper Willie f.ex. is an obsequious, silky-tongued courtier, in their scale of politesse), and the Welsh the best (although liable to chatter narkily away, in whatever it is they speak, behind one’s back. Two-faced, the whole crew. Apart from the ones that hate us all the time, and burn our holiday cottages down. They’re preferable, because predictable).
    Kinda works, nobody dies that often on the right-hand island. The other one is a different story.

    As you say, courtesy. It comes from one’s breeding, as do noblesse oblige, chivalry, forbearance, charity, urbanity, liberality (= paying over the odds just ‘cos you can; take note, jews and other exciting vibrancy, haggling is frightfully infra dig. and indicative of low breeding) and grace under pressure.
    One does not, under any circumstance, berate, gouge or oppress the staff, or the tenantry. We have people to do that for us. Frequently, aforementioned Scots. Simply dreadful people, irredeemable savages, and quite beyond the pale. Fortunately, they like money. A lot. Unlike their Irish brethren. Hence all the trouble over there.
    A very good day to you, sir.

  143. @Francis G.
    And that, boys and girls (and "theys", too, we must be pan-gender inclusive!), is why you should never smoke.

    Seriously, though, anything below minus-20 and I wear a mask that covers my mouth and nose, otherwise the raw air stings when I breathe it.

    You need more nose-hairs. Damn that Victor Kiam.
    Also a yuuuge Polish-style mustache. Then a mountain-man beard, if it’s actually cold cold, and not just “winter”. It all works together.
    Seriously man, try it. Nobody’s going to laugh at you. Mainly on account of they’ll all be dead of hypothermia. Or covered in face-fungus themselves.

  144. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    “One of the most fascinating anthropological facts is that the exact same celestial bodies* are associated with the same days of a 7-day week everywhere in Eurasia from Portugal to Japan.”

    Never underestimate the power of astrology.

    According to that ancient source of esoteric lore (a random wikipedia article),
    it seems everyone from the Romans to the Chinese and Japanese, adopted the names of the week from early Greek astrology, so-called Hellenistic Astrology.

    Names of the days of the week:

    “The names of the days of the week in many languages are derived from the names of the classical planets in Hellenistic astrology

    …Between the 1st and 3rd centuries the Roman Empire gradually replaced the eight-day Roman nundinal cycle with the seven-day week

    …The days were named after the planets of Hellenistic astrology…

    …The seven-day week spread throughout the Roman Empire in Late Antiquity. By the 4th century, it was in wide use throughout the Empire, and it had also reached India and China…”

    …The Germanic peoples adapted the system introduced by the Romans by substituting the Norse/Germanic deities for the Roman ones (with the exception of Saturday) in a process known as interpretatio germanica. The date of the introduction of this system is not known exactly, but it must have happened later than AD 200 but before the introduction of Christianity during the 6th to 7th centuries…

    South Asian tradition …The traditional Hindu mythologies and puranas do not mention the names of the days… Knowledge of Greek astrology existed since about the 2nd century BC…

    …The East Asian naming system of days of the week closely parallels that of the Latin system …The Chinese seem to have adopted the seven-day week from the Hellenistic system by the 4th century, although by which route is not entirely clear. It was again transmitted to China in the 8th century by Manichaeans, via the country of Kang (a Central Asian polity near Samarkand). The 4th-century date, according to the Cihai encyclopedia is due to a reference to Fan Ning (範寧/范宁), an astrologer of the Jin Dynasty…

    …The Chinese transliteration of the planetary system was soon brought to Japan by the Japanese monk Kobo Daishi; surviving diaries of the Japanese statesman Fujiwara Michinaga show the seven day system in use in Heian Period Japan as early as 1007. In Japan, the seven day system was kept in use (for astrological purposes) until its promotion to a full-fledged (Western-style) calendrical basis during the Meiji era…”

    Ancient Greek ideas sure got around and there is something about astrology that sure makes it resilient.

    Hellenistic astrology:

    “…a tradition of horoscopic astrology that was developed and practiced in the late Hellenistic period in and around the Mediterranean region, especially in Egypt. The texts and technical terminology of this tradition of astrology were largely written in Greek …originated sometime around the late 2nd or early 1st century BCE. …practiced until the 6th or 7th century CE…

    origins of much of the astrology …found among the ancient Babylonians and their system of celestial omens …compiled around the middle of the 2nd millennium BCE. This system later spread either directly or indirectly through the Babylonians to other areas such as China and Greece where it merged with preexisting indigenous forms of astrology…

    …after the Alexandrian conquests this Babylonian astrology was mixed with the Egyptian tradition of Decanic astrology to create horoscopic astrology

    …many of the same components of horoscopic astrology that were developed during the Hellenistic period are still in use by astrologers in modern times.”

    So, one of the few concrete results of Alexander’s empire, superimposed on a patina of earlier exchanges that had planted the seeds of a somewhat uniform astrology?

    It sounds like not only are the Ancient Greeks ancestors of Western civilization, they’re responsible for inflicting astrology on the whole world. But then astrology had a lot to do with making people collect enough data to invent astronomy… not to mention bad pick-up lines…

  145. Denmark had a trading Empire like most NW Europeans with a coastline. In fact, the British East India Company would have been evicted from Calcutta without Danish support.

    As well as ex Norwegian colonies like Greenland and Iceland, not to mention Norway itself, Denmark had sugar colonies in the Caribbean, eventually sold to the US, slaving forts in Ghana to supply the slaves and trading ports across India including Ceylon from where they smuggled tea into Britain. Sweden had a similar set up.

  146. @Eric Novak
    Steve lived in Chicago in the 1980s and '90s. He may even lived there for the all-time record low of -27F back in '85. During that week, which was in the winter of my sophomore year, a lit Camel froze to my lip from the condensation of my breath while waiting for the CTA bus. As it dangled from my lips, it burned my lower face, so I hit it with my giant oven-mitt-sized mitten just as the bus came to the stop. I unwittingly knocked the cherry of the cigarette into my coat and didn't notice it until I sat down on the bus and one of my friends said, "what the hell is that?" and pointed to my smoldering mid-section. I ran off the bus before it pulled away and pummeled myself with sidewalk snow. My chin was blistered, and my cool wool Ike jacket with band patches all over it now had a large hole. I have fond memories of those winters.
    The following January, Jan. of 1986, was the glorious victory of Super Bowl XX. The temp. during the victory parade a day or two later was -12F. Reports from friends who blew off school to go downtown for the parade were that beers were freezing in pockets, though they were stashed as close as possible to max core body temp.
    Standout memories of those brutal winters are that of frosted single-pane windows at my parents' house, like that of Dr. Zhivago's dacha.

    A liquor store owner in downtown Chicago told me a few years ago that the day of the Bears’ victory parade was easily the best day in the history of his store.

  147. I just want loose snow shoes, tight socks, and a warm place to sauna.

    • Replies: @Neither-Spiculus-Nor-Nero
    Actually let me rephrase my comment:

    All Norwegians care about are loose skis, tight muffs, and a warm place to sauna.
  148. @Neither-Spiculus-Nor-Nero
    I just want loose snow shoes, tight socks, and a warm place to sauna.

    Actually let me rephrase my comment:

    All Norwegians care about are loose skis, tight muffs, and a warm place to sauna.

  149. anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    “Denmark had sugar colonies in the Caribbean, eventually sold to the US…”

    Steve did mention the American Virgin Islands:

    “…The U.S. Virgin Islands consist of the main islands of Saint Croix, Saint John, and Saint Thomas …total land area of the territory is 133.73 square miles…

    …Previously the Danish West Indies of the Kingdom of Denmark–Norway, they were sold to the United States by Denmark in the Treaty of the Danish West Indies of 1916…”

  150. @Jenner Ickham Errican
    Warm socks are racist? Hygge, please.

    LOL!

    I seriously wonder if white liberals who write this stuff have even a hint of self awareness how ridiculous they sound… on the other hand… what we laugh at laughed at in the past has become taboo now… I predict lots of cold feet in denmark

Comments are closed.

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