The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 iSteve BlogTeasers
Slate: "President’s Top Adviser Is Literally a KKK-Level White Power Scumbag"

From Slate:

The President’s Top Adviser Is Literally a KKK-Level White Power Scumbag

By Ben Mathis-Lilley

There is no sense in complaining that this or that Trump administration story isn’t bigger news. There is simply so much garbage pouring out of 1600 Pennsylvania on any given day that it’s beyond the capacity of any human to properly comprehend and become outraged by all of it.

And yet, I would like to complain that it should be bigger news that the second-most-powerful person in the White House has in recent days been revealed to have repeatedly endorsed an extremely racist 1970s novel, The Camp of the Saints, that is “revered” in the foulest depths of the white-power movement. Newly infamous Iowa congressman/white nationalist Steve King just endorsed The Camp of the Saints in a radio interview; two days ago, white supremacist Jared Taylor—who organizes an annual conference attended by KKK figures and “white pride” advocates—celebrated its newfound prominence on Twitter. …

What the hell is going on? When will it end?

In contrast, from The Atlantic Monthly back in 1994:

December 1994
Must It Be the Rest Against the West?

Absent major changes in North-South relations, the wretched should inherit the earth by about 2025

by Matthew Connelly and Paul Kennedy

Connelly and Kennedy are professors of history.

“Now, stretching over that empty sea, aground some fifty yards out, [lay] the incredible fleet from the other side of the globe, the rusty, creaking fleet that the old professor had been eyeing since morning. . . . He pressed his eye to the glass, and the first things he saw were arms. . . . Then he started to count. Calm and unhurried. But it was like trying to count all the trees in the forest, those arms raised high in the air, waving and shaking together, all outstretched toward the nearby shore. Scraggy branches, brown and black, quickened by a breath of hope. All bare, those fleshless Gandhi-arms. . . . thirty thousand creatures on a single ship!”
–The Camp of the Saints

Welcome to the 300-page narrative of Jean Raspail’s disturbing, chilling, futuristic novel The Camp of the Saints, first published in Paris twenty-one years ago and translated into English a short while later. Set at some vague time–perhaps fifteen or twenty years–in the future, the novel describes the pilgrimage of a million desperate Indians who, forsaking the ghastly conditions of downtown Calcutta and surrounding villages, commandeer an armada of decrepit ships and set off for the French Riviera. The catalyst for this irruption is simple enough. Moved by accounts of widespread famine across an Indian subcontinent collapsing under the sheer weight of its fast-growing population, the Belgian government has decided to admit and adopt a number of young children; but the policy is reversed when tens of thousands of mothers begin to push their babies against the Belgian consul general’s gates in Calcutta. After mobbing the building in disgust at Belgium’s change of mind, the crowd is further inflamed by a messianic speech from one of their number, an untouchable, a gaunt, eye-catching “turd eater,” who calls for the poor and wretched of the world to advance upon the Western paradise: “The nations are rising from the four corners of the earth,” Raspail has the man say, “and their number is like the sand of the sea. They will march up over the broad earth and surround the camp of the saints and the beloved city. . . .” Storming on board every ship within range, the crowds force the crews to take them on a lengthy, horrific voyage, around Africa and through the Strait of Gibraltar to the southern shores of France.

But it is not the huddled mass of Indians, with their “fleshless Gandhi-arms,” that is the focus of Raspail’s attention so much as the varied responses of the French and the other privileged members of “the camp of the saints” as they debate how to deal with the inexorably advancing multitude. Raspail is particularly effective here in capturing the platitudes of official announcements, the voices of ordinary people, the tone of statements by concerned bishops, and so on. The book also seems realistic in its recounting of the crumbling away of resolve by French sailors and soldiers when they are given the order to repel physically–to shoot or torpedo–this armada of helpless yet menacing people. It would be much easier, clearly, to confront a military foe, such as a Warsaw Pact nation. The fifty-one (short) chapters are skillfully arranged so that the reader’s attention is switched back and forth, within a two-month time frame, between the anxious debates in Paris and events attending the slow and grisly voyage of the Calcutta masses. The denouement, with the French population fleeing their southern regions and army units deserting in droves, is especially dramatic.

Why revisit this controversial and nowadays hard-to-obtain novel? The recovery of this neglected work helps us to call attention to the key global problem of the final years of the twentieth century: unbalanced wealth and resources, unbalanced demographic trends, and the relationship between the two. Many members of the more prosperous economies are beginning to agree with Raspail’s vision: a world of two “camps,” North and South, separate and unequal, in which the rich will have to fight and the poor will have to die if mass migration is not to overwhelm us all. Migration is the third part of the problem. If we do not act now to counteract tendencies toward global apartheid, they will only hurry the day when we may indeed see Raspail’s vision made real.

 
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
[]
  1. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are only available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also only be used once per hour.
    Sharing Comment via Twitter
    http://www.unz.com/isteve/slate-presidents-top-adviser-is-literally-a-kkk-level-white-power-scumbag/#comment-1800256
    More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. Keep punching back Steve.
    You have the patience and perseverance of a saint. The sheer volume of bilge pouring out of progressive whites mouths and pens is exhausting, at least to me.
    Some days I genuinely just want to give up and walk away from all this madness, and then I’ll read Steve as he artfully defenestrates some foul little twerp and realize the fight must go on.

    Read More
    • Agree: MBlanc46, Old fogey
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    I did two years as co-blogger on another (Canadian) site. It was 24/7/365. No holidays. Indeed, your readership spikes on holidays!

    It was more work than the job from which I had just retired.

    Not only that, it was depressing. I had to read the news in detail every day.

    It seemed nothing was changing.

    So indeed I have great respect for those who can stay the course. I had to quit to save my sanity (I still contribute in a minor way at the other site.)

    Trump's election is a major change, but I'm a pessimist and get easily discouraged. I've found I can't even read NYT newsletters anymore, never mind the articles.
  3. We’re still not polarized enough.

    Double it!

    In the end, they will beg for Trump.

    Read More
  4. What is Slate hoping to accomplish by publishing this kind of thing? For a lunatic to attack Bannon?

    Read More
  5. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Just how sucky must one be to get fired by Buzzfeed?

    http://www.politico.com/media/story/2014/03/buzzfeed-fires-sports-editor-ben-mathis-lilley-001827

    He’s just another bottomfeeder. A proglodyte.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boomstick
    How sucky does Slate have to have become to pick up a Buzzfeed reject?

    It's obvious that their budget took a hit a few years ago, and as a result their stable of writers dropped several notches in quality. They're running on a shoestring and have been reduced to running clickbait and outrage-click articles by interns, or recapping John Oliver. Sadly, Mathis-Lilley probably isn't trying to write clickbait here--he really is that lacking in imagination.

    But, hey, Trump got elected, and it's usually a bonanza for a partisan media outlet when the opposition party enters office.
  6. horrific voyage, around Africa and through the Strait of Gibraltar to the southern shores of France

    Sorry for the nitpicking, but what was the reason he could not make them take the shorter route through the Suez canal ?

    Read More
    • Replies: @PV van der Byl
    The Egyptians fired warning shots at them when they approached the canal.

    The book was written in 1973.
    , @Jack ryan
    You have a good sense of geography - few Americans do.

    In Respaul s novel the flotilla does try to go through Suez - the Egyptian military smells the stench and pushes them back .

    The somewhat Whites do better in this than the all Whites.

    , @Frau Katze
    I read somewhere that Raspail knew the real danger came from North Africa and the Middle East. There were large numbers of guest workers even then.

    But he was afraid to use the MENAs as the invaders. He thought it would make the book too inflammatory. Hence the use of Indians.
  7. “I think the problem is we just didn’t shout ‘RACIST’ loud enough. If we say it loud enough, it will eventually work. I mean, it always did in the past, right?” — editors at Slate and The New Republic, probably

    Read More
    • Replies: @JohnnyD
    @Mr. Blank,
    He's not just a racist...he's a "A KKK-Level White Power Scumbag!"
    , @oddsbodkins
    They are wearing that button out, but they keep on pushing it. This is a good sign- they lack other buttons.
    , @Random Dude on the Internet
    The exponentially diminishing returns by calling things they don't like as racist is causing them to get into a panic. They've never encountered a situation where someone didn't instantly become ruined once a bunch of Manhattanite cultural taste makers decided someone is a badthinker. They're just using the playbook that once reliably worked for 50 years. Who knew that they had nothing besides screaming louder and louder. Think about the direction the country could have taken if the right wing just pushed a little harder than they did all these decades. We really live in interesting times. The Spirit of 68 may finally be able to be put to rest.
  8. They still don’t get it. The last two sentences of that Slate link are amazing:

    What the hell is going on? When will it end?

    Indeed, Ben, indeed. What *is* going on? When *will* it end?

    Read More
  9. The knee-jerk character of this article can be assessed in that the attack on Bannon comes down to basically two points:

    1. The Camp of the Saints has at least three excerpts in which the N-word is used: Never mind that it is clear that this is reported speech, or reported thought. Mathis-Lilley could have a field day if he applied the same approach to Mark Twain or Dick Gregory.

    2. Nazi this, Nazi that.

    Kind of odd that this squib — it’s not really an “article” — was even posted.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dumbo
    Mathis-Lilley could have a field day if he applied the same approach to Mark Twain

    Or Flannery O'Connor. Or Faulkner. Or, heck, Tarantino. Or any current rap song, for that matter.
    , @Alfa158
    Slate is little more than a click-bait trolling machine trying to generate revenue by posting the most inflammatory and outrageous articles possible to draw views. Think of it as Tiny Duck with his very own website.
    New Republic , Atlantic and The New York Times are fast closing in on Slate though, so they better grab the schmundo while they can.
  10. Wisely, the two professors, even as early as 1994, couch their warning in terms like “global apartheid” to buffer anti-racist seat sniffers. But “unbalanced wealth and resources, unbalanced demographic trends, and the relationship between the two” is the nut of Raspail’s novel. However, that is how it will be, regardless where we live.

    Read More
  11. ” [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel”

    Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Daniel H
    >>Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    As of this afternoon one cannot purchase Camp of the Saints on Amazon. Amazon says that something is wrong with the "format" of the Kindle title. I have purchased scores of titles on Amazon at this point, never has a title been withheld because of "formatting" problems. Could be an innocent explanation, but then, maybe it isn't. The day may come where this title will only be available through samizdat.
    , @b.t.o
    It appears to be hard to obtain because of demand issues. The cheapest used paperback is $140 right now on amazon. I wonder who holds the rights....
    , @Peter Akuleyev
    ” [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel”

    Some of you young folk might not remember 1994, but we didn't have Kindles or even Amazon (just founded that summer) back then. If you wanted an out-of-print book, you had to browse through the random used book stores in your town and hope to come across it, or maybe write a letter to large urban used book stores like Powell's or Strand to inquire whether they had a copy.
    , @AndrewR
    Your reading comprehension needs work.

    In 1994, the book was hard to obtain. Way before e-readers.

  12. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    Mathis-Tilley is another lightweight. There is no argumentation in the article. Hard to argue because Jean Raspail was outrageously correct.

    Under the dumb Mathis-Tilley definition of white power literature falls at least half of the works of the great writers. Thought criminals all: Shakespeare to present.

    Slate must organize a mass book burning to get this sh*t under control. And lots of films must go on the pile too.

    Read More
  13. Jean Raspail is actually one of France’s most illustrious writers and adventurers. He published a new novel roughly every other year from 1970 to 2005, most of them well received. The Academy of France gave one of them its award for novel of the year, and that is an organization with more legitimacy than any award group in the USA (founded by Cardinal Richelieu, refounded by Napoleon).

    You got to love this too:

    During the first twenty years of his career, he traveled the world to discover populations threatened by the confrontation with modernity. In 1950–52, he led the Tierra del Fuego–Alaska car trek and in 1954, the French research expedition to the land of the Incas.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Raspail

    Suggested photo for posts mentioning Ben Mathis-Lilley, whose Harvard education did not prepare him for the demands of being a BuzzFeed sportswriter, a job he was fired from.

    View post on imgur.com

    But what would a leading high-brow and bestselling French novelist who spent 20 years traveling and writing about the Third World know about the subject compared Ben Mathis-Lilley?

    Read More
    • Agree: BB753
    • Replies: @The True and Original David
    Ben might be one of God's chosen people, i.e., automatically a genius, an expert in his field, and a moral authority over mankind.
  14. I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line. (Unless somebody can give me a good reason why he should be a true believer, because at this stage I can’t see one.) I wouldn’t be surprised if half the most fervent racism screamers have said something outright genocidal about Palestinians at some stage, might be time to start digging.

    Read More
    • Disagree: Frau Katze
    • Replies: @MarcB.
    "I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line"

    Bannon and his fellow travelers would be banished to the margins of the Dissident Right and get nothing accomplished unless they choose their enemies carefully. He knows the score.
    , @Gabriel M

    I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line.
     
    Can someone even explain this logic?

    I wouldn’t be surprised if half the most fervent racism screamers have said something outright genocidal about Palestinians at some stage, might be time to start digging.
     
    Is there some sort of hypnosis course that commentators around can take where they learn that the Left is pro-Israel?
  15. Once again, iSteve is like batman. In a sane world where there is no SJW anti-white agit-prop like this Slate piece, there is no need for iSteve.

    What does Bruce Wayne do in a “normal world?”

    Read More
  16. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    The headline just kills me.

    It’s as outlandish as the headlines in Infostormer.

    Read More
  17. an extremely racist 1970s novel, The Camp of the Saints,

    I haven’t read the novel, but it seems to me that if it is “racist” at all, it is in the same sense that “The Last Days of Pompeii” is “volcanophobic”.

    Should Whites not even complain as they are replaced in their own countries?

    “Better Dead Than Racist” should be the West’s new motto.

    Read More
  18. Having turned their outrage up to 11, I didn’t think it possible that the prog-left could keep raising their game–of unrelenting despair. But they do. Must be all the dog-whistles driving them insane. Their act is slowly turning into slapstick–behavior so ridiculous and over-the-top that it starts to become entertaining. Pathetically so.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Eventually, they will need a hug. However, only with the approved non-cisheteropatriarchy et cetera participants.
  19. @SPMoore8
    The knee-jerk character of this article can be assessed in that the attack on Bannon comes down to basically two points:

    1. The Camp of the Saints has at least three excerpts in which the N-word is used: Never mind that it is clear that this is reported speech, or reported thought. Mathis-Lilley could have a field day if he applied the same approach to Mark Twain or Dick Gregory.

    2. Nazi this, Nazi that.

    Kind of odd that this squib -- it's not really an "article" -- was even posted.

    Mathis-Lilley could have a field day if he applied the same approach to Mark Twain

    Or Flannery O’Connor. Or Faulkner. Or, heck, Tarantino. Or any current rap song, for that matter.

    Read More
  20. Shanty town outside of Mendota, California

    http://ww4.hdnux.com/photos/42/53/35/9090903/13/920×1240.jpg

    134 driving miles from Palo Alto, CA, 230 driving miles to Hollywood. As far as I know Zuckerberg hasn’t created any programs to help the youth become coders, nor has Hollywood reached out to the aspiring actors and actresses from this local.

    Push out the middle class, all you have left is the very poor and the liberal very rich in gated communities. Apparently this is what Slate and NYTimes wants.

    Read More
    • Replies: @JW
    The only way to understand whats going on is to realize that the Rich and Powerful hate
    the middle class, undermining and subverting it by any means necessary,since the fall of the
    Soviet Union and the communist threat.
  21. an extremely racist 1970s novel, The Camp of the Saints

    The book itself is nothing special. What makes it truly evil is its popularity with the alt-right. It’s a friend-of-my-enemy-is-my-enemy situation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.
    , @JerryC
    I would say the book is considered evil because of how accurate it is in describing Europe's current refugee predicament. It's fictional but true, which scares right-thinkers like Ben Mathis-Lilley.
  22. Call me crazy, but I think making a big deal about this book is only going to get more people reading it. Then again, so few people read Slate that it might not make a difference. I can still visualize all the yummy food that the professor in the book had laid out in his house at the end.

    My copy of the book includes a quote from Reagan praising it. Maybe they should mention that too. Bannon is arm in arm with Reagan, the devil!

    Read More
  23. The Atlantic Monthly article is what caused me to read Camp of the Saints which is actually outstanding.

    Despite the subject matter, there are a lot of parts that are laugh-out-loud funny.

    What the hell happened to the Atlantic anyhow? It actually used to be worth reading.

    By the way, what’s with the double-barrel name Ben Mathis-Lilley?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous Nephew
    "what’s with the double-barrel name Ben Mathis-Lilley ?"

    In the UK, it now signifies that your parents aren't married, but that daddy was still around when the birth was registered.
    , @Anon87
    Agree. For such a depressing book, I did laugh quite a few times. Gallows humor I suppose.
  24. @International Jew

    an extremely racist 1970s novel, The Camp of the Saints
     
    The book itself is nothing special. What makes it truly evil is its popularity with the alt-right. It's a friend-of-my-enemy-is-my-enemy situation.

    We’ve got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That’s about it isn’t it? I’ve only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they’ll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve’s turn in the barrel.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous

    We’ve got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints.
     
    The majority of the classic works of Western Civ would probably qualify nowadays as being the province of the right.
    , @PenskeFile
    You can add Houellebecq's Submission to the canon.
    , @celt darnell
    Odd to think of the Camp of the Saints as alt-right. It predates the alt-right by decades and was well known long before the alt-right ever appeared.

    But, I take your point.

    I'd add Evelyn Waugh's Black Mischief to the reading list. That'll make the virtue signalers' heads explode.
    , @fnn
    Well, there all those novels by Tito Perdue and Andy Nowicki-not that I've read any of them. Some see Lovecraft as proto-Alt-Right:
    http://www.counter-currents.com/2015/11/the-counter-currents-h-p-lovecraft-prize-for-literature/
    , @fnn
    I just remembered the Harold Covington novels. I stopped reading novels some time ago, but at least a few smart people (Greg Johnson, Tom Sunic, Michael O'Meara) praise his work.
    , @oddsbodkins
    Submission by Houellebecq

    Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali


    And there must be more.
    , @Yak-15
    "A Troublesome Inheritance"
    "White Girl Bleed A Lot"
    "Parallel Lives"
    , @TheBoom
    I've noticed more alt-right friendly writing in traditionally male literature genres such as male-oriented and written mysteries and thrillers. Anything targeted to women (the primary consumers of lit) or written by a woman is not alt-right friendly.

    One of the more recent alt-right friendly novels is Kurt Schlichter's People's Republic.

    https://smile.amazon.com/Peoples-Republic-Kurt-Schlichter-ebook/dp/B01M0H7WQZ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1489545708&sr=8-1&keywords=people%27s+republic

    , @Lilith
    Remarkably small canon of literature?

    -Archeofuturism
    -Imperium
    -Against Democracy & Equality
    -Decline of the West
    -Growth of the Soil
    -The Cantos
    -The Perils of Diversity
    -Culture of Critique
    -The 10,000 year explosion
    -A Troublesome Inheritance
    -The Way of Men
    -The Wasp Question
    -Generation Identity
    -Race, Evolution & Behaviour
    -The Fate of Empires
    -The Israel Lobby

    etc.
    , @CK
    The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
    Starship Troopers
    The Man Who Sold the Moon
    Farnham's Freehold
    just to name a few of his works.
    , @hiding
    Don't forget the Northwest Trilogy by Covington.
    , @Oum Cid
    Tom Wolfe.

    Rudyard Kipling. (There's a poem attributed to him called "Wrath of the Awakened Saxon". You can find it online, but only on alt-right websites. I don't know if this means the Kipling attribution is false, or if it's a real Kipling that's been memory-holed by normies, but either way it's a very alt-right poem.)

    Thomas Carlyle.

    According to Mark Zuckerberg's sister: all of the Greco-Roman classics.

    According to Slate or The Atlantic or somesuch, from a while back: opera in general, idr which composer(s) in particular.

  25. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    We’ve got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints.

    The majority of the classic works of Western Civ would probably qualify nowadays as being the province of the right.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    No one else is using them.
    , @Almost Missouri
    Agree. C.f. the post a few months ago about Zuckerberg's sister trying to shoo the right away from the Classics, which she probably never really read anyway.

    Possibly the single most commented iSteve post.

  26. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    You can add Houellebecq’s Submission to the canon.

    Read More
  27. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    Odd to think of the Camp of the Saints as alt-right. It predates the alt-right by decades and was well known long before the alt-right ever appeared.

    But, I take your point.

    I’d add Evelyn Waugh’s Black Mischief to the reading list. That’ll make the virtue signalers’ heads explode.

    Read More
  28. it’s beyond the capacity of any human to properly comprehend and become outraged by all of it.

    Oh, I don’t know, Ben. For the past 40 or more years the postmodern literary theorists have been used to turn the simplest forms of common sense into the most esoteric and prolix nonsense.

    Maybe it also works the other way around if you run things through backwards!

    https://nyoobserver.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/3nyben-thumb-350×466-40647-e1339027908760.jpg?quality=80&w=200&h=267&crop=1

    The book he’s holding:

    http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/16939.Literary_Theory

    Or maybe, Ben, it’s simply that you don’t recognize sense when half the nation votes for it and some portion of the other half is rapidly awaking to just how crap-addled their thinking has been.

    And yours still is, if you think “KKK-level” is a thing.

    Host, do excise the following link if it’s overreach. My intent was simply to note that this appears to be someone who inhabits a small bubble indeed.

    http://www.leppertphotoblog.com/?p=17058

    That gathering looks far whiter than Trump voters.

    Still, one Feelz for people like Ben-Hyphenated-Scribbler. Our host has discussed how hard these kindern have had to work to earn a slot in the lucrative left/prog Marxist Chattering Class.

    Eight years of living, breathing, working men and women being in favor once again is going to rankle. “Damn, you mean I should have gone to trade school?”

    Read More
  29. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    Well, there all those novels by Tito Perdue and Andy Nowicki-not that I’ve read any of them. Some see Lovecraft as proto-Alt-Right:

    http://www.counter-currents.com/2015/11/the-counter-currents-h-p-lovecraft-prize-for-literature/

    Read More
  30. @Mr. Blank
    "I think the problem is we just didn't shout 'RACIST' loud enough. If we say it loud enough, it will eventually work. I mean, it always did in the past, right?" — editors at Slate and The New Republic, probably

    ,
    He’s not just a racist…he’s a “A KKK-Level White Power Scumbag!”

    Read More
  31. Slate, tell me how you really feel about Steve Bannon. I don’t think you all have made yourselves clear enough!

    Read More
  32. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    I just remembered the Harold Covington novels. I stopped reading novels some time ago, but at least a few smart people (Greg Johnson, Tom Sunic, Michael O’Meara) praise his work.

    Read More
  33. It’s Slate, so probably any attention is too much; but hyphenated surnames are one characteristic of the numale so extreme as to virtually be a tranny even while still wearing men’s clothes.

    Read More
  34. @International Jew

    an extremely racist 1970s novel, The Camp of the Saints
     
    The book itself is nothing special. What makes it truly evil is its popularity with the alt-right. It's a friend-of-my-enemy-is-my-enemy situation.

    I would say the book is considered evil because of how accurate it is in describing Europe’s current refugee predicament. It’s fictional but true, which scares right-thinkers like Ben Mathis-Lilley.

    Read More
  35. @Mr. Blank
    "I think the problem is we just didn't shout 'RACIST' loud enough. If we say it loud enough, it will eventually work. I mean, it always did in the past, right?" — editors at Slate and The New Republic, probably

    They are wearing that button out, but they keep on pushing it. This is a good sign- they lack other buttons.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NOTA
    It must be really uncomfortable for people whose only real weapon in political debates was accusing their opponent of racism/sexism/homophobia/etc., realizing that their tactic isn't really working anymore.
  36. Jean Raspail is still a respected writer in France. Totally mainstrean. According to Slate, you’d think Bannon was quoting “Mein Kampf”!

    Read More
  37. If this is what leftys are reading in Slate, Salon, and the rest of the left wing media, it’s gonna be a long, hot, summer and there after. I used to read Slate and Salon 15 years ago, but they got a serious case of BDS, and I quit.

    Even the ’60s weren’t this crazy….

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    You won't see Slate or Salon supporting a boycott of, divestment from, or sanctions against the Zionist entity.
  38. @SPMoore8
    The knee-jerk character of this article can be assessed in that the attack on Bannon comes down to basically two points:

    1. The Camp of the Saints has at least three excerpts in which the N-word is used: Never mind that it is clear that this is reported speech, or reported thought. Mathis-Lilley could have a field day if he applied the same approach to Mark Twain or Dick Gregory.

    2. Nazi this, Nazi that.

    Kind of odd that this squib -- it's not really an "article" -- was even posted.

    Slate is little more than a click-bait trolling machine trying to generate revenue by posting the most inflammatory and outrageous articles possible to draw views. Think of it as Tiny Duck with his very own website.
    New Republic , Atlantic and The New York Times are fast closing in on Slate though, so they better grab the schmundo while they can.

    Read More
    • Replies: @oddsbodkins
    It would explain a lot if Tiny was using this site to build a portfolio for a job.
    , @Frau Katze
    I notice Slate doesn't allow comments. I would never read them regularly for that reason alone.
  39. Liberals are aghast at this book because 1) Bannon likes it and 2) because it predicted the refugee crisis before it occurred, showing that it is the result of liberal ideology rather than the result of a civil war which happened to occur near Europe.

    It’s remarkable how accurate the book is. Europe welcomes all “unaccompanied minors”. The book talks about Belgium welcoming babies. The fact that europe welcomes unaccompanied minors, gives them welfare, refuses to send them back has invited hundreds of thousands more to pretend they are refugees and unaccompanied minors and it has created a human trafficking industry to keep bringing more. And soon we will see the rest of this book happen. There will be demands for family reunification. And then more reunification because it is cruel to “force people to choose between safety and their families.”

    At this point, we don’t even have to shoot at them. We just have to catch them coming off the coast of libya and drop them right back. Is that too hard for the troops to stomach as well?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Could happen in the United States, albeit on a smaller scale due to natural barriers.
  40. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    Submission by Houellebecq

    Infidel by Ayaan Hirsi Ali

    And there must be more.

    Read More
  41. @Alfa158
    Slate is little more than a click-bait trolling machine trying to generate revenue by posting the most inflammatory and outrageous articles possible to draw views. Think of it as Tiny Duck with his very own website.
    New Republic , Atlantic and The New York Times are fast closing in on Slate though, so they better grab the schmundo while they can.

    It would explain a lot if Tiny was using this site to build a portfolio for a job.

    Read More
  42. OT
    He/she/it/they/Them/ Gloria/ Maddow got a hold of DJT’s 2005 tax returns and released them tonite. A yawner with DJT paying 38 mill on 150 mill income. Now pissed off lefties are accusing Trump of being behind this leak…..hahhah. If true this will be Steve Bannon messing with their minds, such as they are.
    _________
    Steve Bannon and the Making of an Economic Nationalist
    The Wall Street Journal · 7 hours ago
    RICHMOND, Va.—On Oct. 7, 2008, in the cramped TV room of his modest home here, Marty Bannon watched with alarm as plunging stock markets dragged down his shares of AT&T, the nest egg he …..

    Read More
  43. Anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment

    France.

    Looks like Diversite, Stupidite, Insipdite, Imbecilite, & insanite are replacing Liberte, Egalite, Fraternite.

    Read More
  44. “The book also seems realistic in its recounting of the crumbling away of resolve by French sailors and soldiers when they are given the order to repel physically–to shoot or torpedo–this armada of helpless yet menacing people.”

    Raspail is only guilty of underestimating the West’s weakness and stupidity. The EU hasn’t simply refused to torpedo boats just miles off shore. They have literally gone virtually all the way to Africa to “rescue” boats full of “refugees” mere miles from Libyan shores.

    All Europe has to do is simply tow these people back to the shores from which they departed – mostly from Libya and Turkey. The Turks and Libyans would have zero power to stop them, and the “refugees” would stop coming.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    Won't work, initially at least one Italian coast guard vessel tried turning the ships back. The refugees responded by holding their own babies over the side of the ships and threatening to drop them into the ocean if the Europeans didn't rescue them. We're not dealing with people like us.
  45. Camp of the Saints is not great literature, definitely too modern for my taste. But it hit upon a premise of vital importance. World-historical importance, as they say. Maybe not Uncle Tom’s Cabin (which also wasn’t great literature, though it had one great character: Topsy)-level, but if the masses were ever made aware of it, it has the potential to blow up the Narrative.

    Something like Merkel’s Boner will happen again, and Camp of the Saints or anything like it cannot be allowed to be in the public’s consciousness at that time. Because it goes right to the heart of immigrant invasion insanity. Hence the outrage.

    No, scratch that. They’d be outraged over anything alt-righty. Could be completely harmless and unread by any but two guys in Alaska, so long as there’s something to point and shriek at. Just so happens in this case the target is rich, meaty, and delicious.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    But it hit upon a premise of vital importance. World-historical importance, as they say.

    That premise being...?
  46. I just went to look for this book on Amazon, and the page to buy a Kindle edition says “This title is not currently available for purchase.” The further boilerplate adds (an obvious lie): “This book is currently unavailable because there are significant quality issues with the source file supplied by the publisher. The publisher has been notified and we will make the book available as soon as we receive a corrected file. As always, we value customer feedback.”

    Evola’s Revolt Against The Modern World seems to have suffered the same fate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @German_reader
    English translation is apparently available on archive.org, if anyone's interested:
    https://archive.org/stream/CampOfTheSaints_201510/Camp_of_the_Saints%20#page/n0/mode/2up
    , @guest
    I bought Camp of the Saints on Amazon in 2015, I want to say for like ten bucks. Now I see it's only listed used from about $140. That's interesting.

    You can borrow my copy if you want.
    , @jim jones
    Just Google for "Camp of the Saints pdf"
    , @Randy the Auditor
    The paperback is listed for sale for $13.50 by the publisher:

    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/bookstore2/index.php?manufacturers_id=67
  47. I love the Forbidden Literature outrage on the left. They sound like Puritans railing against the work of the devil. Not an original comparison, I know. But apt. I remember my college bookstore always used to have a “banned books” section, as if to demonstrate their free thinking, though filled with PC-approved things.

    Real banning, through the shroud of silence, used to be saved for actual Nazi books, books defending Nazis, Holocaust-denial books (whether they actually defend the Nazis or not), or outright racist ones, like the Turner Diaries. Fashy stuff like Evola and Yockney, which the non-elect aren’t even supposed to know exist, are naturally suspect. (Ignorance is very important to our rulers.) But Raspail was a fairly well known and mainstream French writer, I believe. Seems strange not to be allowed to know of him.

    I’d like to know who else is on the list, but I’m not allowed to know what I can’t know, because then I’d know.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Rod1963

    I’d like to know who else is on the list, but I’m not allowed to know what I can’t know, because then I’d know.
     
    That's why it's so effective. It's banning by obscurity and misdirection. Once in a while you'll stumble onto a book that gives a you a peek behind the scenes but it's rare. You'll never find them on any popular book list or reviewed by major publications in the last 30 years.

    Here's a link to a pdf version of The Camp of Saints.

    http://www.jrbooksonline.com/pdfs/camp_of_the_saints.pdf

    The paperback version now goes for close to $200 on Amazon and other sites. I wouldn't put it beyond Amazon to nix the ebook version. I've seen them do it to others where they just simply aren't downloadable anymore.

    Another forbidden book though in French and a best seller in France is by Laurent Obertone
    "Guerilla"

    Here is a link to a review of via Gates of Vienna.

    http://gatesofvienna.net/2017/03/after-things-fell-apart/
    , @Clyde

    I love the Forbidden Literature outrage on the left. They sound like Puritans railing against the work of the devil. Not an original comparison, I know. But apt. I remember my college bookstore always used to have a “banned books” section, as if to demonstrate their free thinking, though filled with PC-approved things.
     
    The left bans Camp of the Saints because it predicted the future of leftist self hatred and treachery 44 years ago. Very impressive and it spooks them.
  48. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    “A Troublesome Inheritance”
    “White Girl Bleed A Lot”
    “Parallel Lives”

    Read More
  49. @Mr. Blank
    "I think the problem is we just didn't shout 'RACIST' loud enough. If we say it loud enough, it will eventually work. I mean, it always did in the past, right?" — editors at Slate and The New Republic, probably

    The exponentially diminishing returns by calling things they don’t like as racist is causing them to get into a panic. They’ve never encountered a situation where someone didn’t instantly become ruined once a bunch of Manhattanite cultural taste makers decided someone is a badthinker. They’re just using the playbook that once reliably worked for 50 years. Who knew that they had nothing besides screaming louder and louder. Think about the direction the country could have taken if the right wing just pushed a little harder than they did all these decades. We really live in interesting times. The Spirit of 68 may finally be able to be put to rest.

    Read More
  50. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    I’ve noticed more alt-right friendly writing in traditionally male literature genres such as male-oriented and written mysteries and thrillers. Anything targeted to women (the primary consumers of lit) or written by a woman is not alt-right friendly.

    One of the more recent alt-right friendly novels is Kurt Schlichter’s People’s Republic.

    https://smile.amazon.com/Peoples-Republic-Kurt-Schlichter-ebook/dp/B01M0H7WQZ/ref=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&qid=1489545708&sr=8-1&keywords=people%27s+republic

    Read More
  51. Anger is a tool. It’s a way to influence people in your favor. We’ve evolved to conserve energy, so our anger gets expanded where it will be efficient: combating ideas that are true. That’s why nobody gets really angry at flat-earthers.

    Read More
  52. So funny that in the last debate Chris Wallace asked Trump if he would accept the outcome of the election if he lost and Trump declined to promise to do so. “That’s horrifying!” Clinton interjected. “Every time he thinks things are not going in his direction he says things are rigged against him.”

    As we see now, the question should have been put to Hillary. Sure, if Trump lost, he would have bitched and moaned, but I think by this time he would have put it behind him; he wouldn’t be exhorting his voters to resist. Trump voters like myself would be disappointed, but would grimly accept it. We wouldn’t be setting fires, blocking city streets, and beating up political opponents.

    The difference between the Left and Right in this country is that the Left doesn’t accord us political legitimacy. We are not entitled to our views. The election of someone on the right who is going to try to change things–a Trump, not a Bush–is not acceptable. Only the left has the moral authority to rule, therefore a political victory by the right must be treated like a coup.

    Lawrence Auster expressed a striking insight on his blog post of November 19, 2011:

    The two parties are not playing the same game. They play different games, under different rules. What are these different rules? The Republicans more or less follow the laws and constitutional procedures, the Democrats deliberately and consciously break them. But the Republicans, while they complain incessantly about the Democrats, never identify this underlying fact. Why? Because that would show that the system is no longer legitimate. And the function of the Republicans, as “patriotic, conservative Americans,” is to uphold the goodness and legitimacy of the system, a legitimacy which rests on the belief that everyone in American politics shares the same basic principles and loyalties. So the Republicans, as defenders of the system and its presumed basic unity, cannot expose what the Democrats are. If they exposed it, politics would be replaced by open war between two radically incompatible parties and America as we know it would come to an end.

    Trump is a different kind of Republican, one that the Democrats are not used to dealing with. He’s not going to uphold the goodness and legitimacy of the system. He’s willing to expose what the Democrats really are. And as a result, politics-as-usual is being replaced by an (almost) open war.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    The Battle of Auster-lits. One side has Napoleon, the other doesn't. Or, if you prefer, one side has a train station, the other doesn't.
    , @Escher
    I don't know about that. So far he has been fairly cosy with Wall Street and the lobby that shall not be named.
  53. I’m calling this a salvo against the Obama Deep State Politicized Officer Corps:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/admiral-seven-others-charged-with-corruption-in-new-fat-leonard-indictment/2017/03/14/faf01600-08da-11e7-b77c-0047d15a24e0_story.html?utm_term=.8c44b45c7998

    30 Admirals? Out of 160 authorized by law? And likely the most corrupt are the most politicized and vice versa. That’s true of military leadership across all of human history.

    It is actually at the root of why military societies/castes typically place a higher premium on integrity and such than civilians. The slightest bits of corruption metastasizes in the environment of unaccountable authority necessary to military endeavours. The slightest breach and the entire organization is rapidly overcome, like a flesh-eating bacteria.

    Again, that’s why military societies are so picky about honor, etc, despite being in the most atavistically base of vocations, killing people who won’t do what you want them to.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Because you think they are typified by unaccountable authority?
  54. @skrewt
    I just went to look for this book on Amazon, and the page to buy a Kindle edition says "This title is not currently available for purchase." The further boilerplate adds (an obvious lie): "This book is currently unavailable because there are significant quality issues with the source file supplied by the publisher. The publisher has been notified and we will make the book available as soon as we receive a corrected file. As always, we value customer feedback."

    Evola's Revolt Against The Modern World seems to have suffered the same fate.

    English translation is apparently available on archive.org, if anyone’s interested:

    https://archive.org/stream/CampOfTheSaints_201510/Camp_of_the_Saints%20#page/n0/mode/2up

    Read More
  55. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    Remarkably small canon of literature?

    -Archeofuturism
    -Imperium
    -Against Democracy & Equality
    -Decline of the West
    -Growth of the Soil
    -The Cantos
    -The Perils of Diversity
    -Culture of Critique
    -The 10,000 year explosion
    -A Troublesome Inheritance
    -The Way of Men
    -The Wasp Question
    -Generation Identity
    -Race, Evolution & Behaviour
    -The Fate of Empires
    -The Israel Lobby

    etc.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    Why Cantos? Because Pound was fashy? That's thin.
  56. @Anonymous

    We’ve got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints.
     
    The majority of the classic works of Western Civ would probably qualify nowadays as being the province of the right.

    No one else is using them.

    Read More
  57. I had to stop reading Slate for two reasons. First, the tenor of their Trump coverage. Second, Dear Prudence left and was replaced by a 28-year-old lesbian.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    "I had to stop reading Slate for two reasons."

    I haven't read it since Michael Kinsley left. It went south fast after that.
    , @dr kill
    I stopped reading Slate for two reasons, both named Emily.
  58. What is the difference between Slate and Salon? I think of Salon as out and flaming homosexual leftism, and Slate as a kind of buttoned-down, not overtly but still pretty homosexual leftist type website.

    Like someone else here, I used to browse something like an eternity ago.

    Read More
  59. @White Guy In Japan
    " [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel"

    Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    >>Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    As of this afternoon one cannot purchase Camp of the Saints on Amazon. Amazon says that something is wrong with the “format” of the Kindle title. I have purchased scores of titles on Amazon at this point, never has a title been withheld because of “formatting” problems. Could be an innocent explanation, but then, maybe it isn’t. The day may come where this title will only be available through samizdat.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Now there's a cryptic note on Amazon,

    "This book is currently unavailable because there are significant quality issues with the source file supplied by the publisher. The publisher has been notified and we will make the book available as soon as we receive a corrected file. As always, we value customer feedback."
    , @NOTA
    Gee, maybe having one company in a near-monopoly position wrt books might have some kind of downsides....
    , @larry lurker
    There's a messy but readable PDF out there in the meantime. Just do some not-so-creative googling and make a solemn promise to yourself to purchase the Kindle version if and when it becomes available again.
  60. This is an old theme – cf. Disraeli’s The Two Nations and Wells’ The Time Machine.
    The rapes in Cologne and the attacks in France are what happens when Morlocks meet Eloi.

    Read More
  61. @Forbes
    Having turned their outrage up to 11, I didn't think it possible that the prog-left could keep raising their game--of unrelenting despair. But they do. Must be all the dog-whistles driving them insane. Their act is slowly turning into slapstick--behavior so ridiculous and over-the-top that it starts to become entertaining. Pathetically so.

    Eventually, they will need a hug. However, only with the approved non-cisheteropatriarchy et cetera participants.

    Read More
  62. @skrewt
    I just went to look for this book on Amazon, and the page to buy a Kindle edition says "This title is not currently available for purchase." The further boilerplate adds (an obvious lie): "This book is currently unavailable because there are significant quality issues with the source file supplied by the publisher. The publisher has been notified and we will make the book available as soon as we receive a corrected file. As always, we value customer feedback."

    Evola's Revolt Against The Modern World seems to have suffered the same fate.

    I bought Camp of the Saints on Amazon in 2015, I want to say for like ten bucks. Now I see it’s only listed used from about $140. That’s interesting.

    You can borrow my copy if you want.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ben tillman

    I bought Camp of the Saints on Amazon in 2015, I want to say for like ten bucks. Now I see it’s only listed used from about $140. That’s interesting.
     
    Used copies are available for $25.

    https://www.abebooks.com/9780684142401/Camp-Saints-Jean-Raspail-0684142406/plp
    , @David
    I did the same thing, same year, on abebooks.com for exactly (thanks to a gmail search) $6.93, shipping included. Fine vintage paperback, too.

    On Steve's advice, by the way.

  63. It’s been impossible for sometime to the take the Leftist controlled media machine seriously about Trump and company. Really they’re a clown car posse and don’t know it.

    The problem with the Left is they thought Hillary was a shoe-in and they went off the rails when Trump won. They just didn’t take it hard, they went plain ass nuts. Worse their agenda is so noxious and hostile it offers nothing but a dagger into heart of native white Westerners. So they had no counter-appeal. This left them with nothing in terms of weapons but their bullshit cannons called the MSM which no longer work against a very pissed off and pissed on lower class Whites who are Trump’s supporters. Of course the socially and economically isolated Left hasn’t learned this from almost a year of trying to demonize Trump and his associates.

    This his how you get Salon and the NYT staffers reduced to foaming at the mouth loons in a echo chamber generating what amounts to click bait aimed at true believers. That’s all they got.

    The next stage is they either hand out the cyanide laced Kool-Aid to their followers or guns. My money is on them getting violent as the DNC boss selection points to it. Two rabid race warriors equals trouble.

    Read More
  64. @Lilith
    Remarkably small canon of literature?

    -Archeofuturism
    -Imperium
    -Against Democracy & Equality
    -Decline of the West
    -Growth of the Soil
    -The Cantos
    -The Perils of Diversity
    -Culture of Critique
    -The 10,000 year explosion
    -A Troublesome Inheritance
    -The Way of Men
    -The Wasp Question
    -Generation Identity
    -Race, Evolution & Behaviour
    -The Fate of Empires
    -The Israel Lobby

    etc.

    Why Cantos? Because Pound was fashy? That’s thin.

    Read More
    • Replies: @bored identity
    This is Ezra reading personally his infamous Cantos XLV, with a "rasping, buzzing quality like the sound of a hornet stuck in a jar" :

    https://youtu.be/xn6r2Nm0ZMo



    Ezra Pound: Canto XLV

    With Usura

    With usura hath no man a house of good stone
    each block cut smooth and well fitting
    that design might cover their face,
    with usura
    hath no man a painted paradise on his church wall
    harpes et luz
    or where virgin receiveth message
    and halo projects from incision,
    with usura
    seeth no man Gonzaga his heirs and his concubines
    no picture is made to endure nor to live with
    but it is made to sell and sell quickly
    with usura, sin against nature,
    is thy bread ever more of stale rags
    is thy bread dry as paper,
    with no mountain wheat, no strong flour
    with usura the line grows thick
    with usura is no clear demarcation
    and no man can find site for his dwelling.
    Stonecutter is kept from his stone
    weaver is kept from his loom
    WITH USURA
    wool comes not to market
    sheep bringeth no gain with usura
    Usura is a murrain, usura
    blunteth the needle in the maid’s hand
    and stoppeth the spinner’s cunning. Pietro Lombardo
    came not by usura
    Duccio came not by usura
    nor Pier della Francesca; Zuan Bellin’ not by usura
    nor was ‘La Calunnia’ painted.
    Came not by usura Angelico; came not Ambrogio Praedis,
    Came no church of cut stone signed: Adamo me fecit.
    Not by usura St. Trophime
    Not by usura Saint Hilaire,
    Usura rusteth the chisel
    It rusteth the craft and the craftsman
    It gnaweth the thread in the loom
    None learneth to weave gold in her pattern;
    Azure hath a canker by usura; cramoisi is unbroidered
    Emerald findeth no Memling
    Usura slayeth the child in the womb
    It stayeth the young man’s courting
    It hath brought palsey to bed, lyeth
    between the young bride and her bridegroom
    CONTRA NATURAM
    They have brought whores for Eleusis
    Corpses are set to banquet
    at behest of usura.
    , @bored identity
    The most famous occupant of Morgenthau Hilton just couldn't refrain his polymathic brain from noticing bigly.

    Becoming an American Renaissance Mensch with "a stupid, suburban prejudice" was Ezra's choice made of personal tragedy; Pound's good friend Henri Gaudier-Brzeska was one among many young artists who perished in trenches during the WWI.

    Pound consequentially got obsessively interested in very speculative science called Monetary Ethnoconomy, and mystery of Zechino Ka-ching Mitosis had became focus of his research.

    That lead him to belief that the financial banking system of Democratic West has been long term compromised by some kind of usurapers cabal.

    He claimed that such a system nurtures inevitability of jubilee-cycled military conflicts among nations.

    Silly Poet.

    Many important people rejected his scientific zeal, as Pound was more than often accused of using fake scientific parameters to measure his results.

    To makes things even worse, it appears that all he was doing was ubiquitously following & counting piles of ex nihilo moolah.

    Pound basically passionately argued there was a reason why the Anglo onomatopoetic sound of the Little Green Frog is : ribbit! (ריבית)

    He also spent enormous time measuring volumes of the random piggy banks with his crooked ruler and whatnot *.

    * Pound measured volume by packing piggy banks with mustard seed or buckshot.

    Today, thanks to meticulous research efforts of Zer Experts of the Eternal Ethics Defense Studies,such as honorable Stephen Jaywalk Gould, we know that Naughty Imagist had packed non-gentile piggy banks extra-tight to make them look bad for America.

    Gould's message to all Pounds of past, present, and the future :



    Without a priori preferences, we would scarcely be human; and good science, as Darwin noted so often, collects data to test ideas.

    Science has long recognized the tyranny of prior preference, and has constructed safeguards in requirements of uniform procedure and replication of experiments.

    Gross flouting of procedure and conscious fraud may often be detected, but unconscious finagling by sincere seekers of objectivity may be refractory.

     

  65. @Harry Baldwin
    So funny that in the last debate Chris Wallace asked Trump if he would accept the outcome of the election if he lost and Trump declined to promise to do so. “That’s horrifying!” Clinton interjected. “Every time he thinks things are not going in his direction he says things are rigged against him.”

    As we see now, the question should have been put to Hillary. Sure, if Trump lost, he would have bitched and moaned, but I think by this time he would have put it behind him; he wouldn't be exhorting his voters to resist. Trump voters like myself would be disappointed, but would grimly accept it. We wouldn't be setting fires, blocking city streets, and beating up political opponents.

    The difference between the Left and Right in this country is that the Left doesn't accord us political legitimacy. We are not entitled to our views. The election of someone on the right who is going to try to change things--a Trump, not a Bush--is not acceptable. Only the left has the moral authority to rule, therefore a political victory by the right must be treated like a coup.

    Lawrence Auster expressed a striking insight on his blog post of November 19, 2011:


    The two parties are not playing the same game. They play different games, under different rules. What are these different rules? The Republicans more or less follow the laws and constitutional procedures, the Democrats deliberately and consciously break them. But the Republicans, while they complain incessantly about the Democrats, never identify this underlying fact. Why? Because that would show that the system is no longer legitimate. And the function of the Republicans, as “patriotic, conservative Americans,” is to uphold the goodness and legitimacy of the system, a legitimacy which rests on the belief that everyone in American politics shares the same basic principles and loyalties. So the Republicans, as defenders of the system and its presumed basic unity, cannot expose what the Democrats are. If they exposed it, politics would be replaced by open war between two radically incompatible parties and America as we know it would come to an end.
     
    Trump is a different kind of Republican, one that the Democrats are not used to dealing with. He's not going to uphold the goodness and legitimacy of the system. He's willing to expose what the Democrats really are. And as a result, politics-as-usual is being replaced by an (almost) open war.

    The Battle of Auster-lits. One side has Napoleon, the other doesn’t. Or, if you prefer, one side has a train station, the other doesn’t.

    Read More
  66. FYI, I am South Asian, and my mother immigrated from Calcutta. Yesterday a vocal and active SJW (white Jewish male) I work with told me about this camp of saints book and asked if I was outraged (because the book was about people like me, he pointed out). He told me that it portrayed these masses of brown people as savages and said the book described the ships as being packed with people covered and dripping in sperm, as if they were animals relieving themselves. I nodded my head without expression. I generally don’t argue with him, but I also don’t indicate that I am really motivated by what he says either.

    But internally, I was struck by the real world parallels. In Cologne last year, did we not see that the horde of migrants that jumped on leaky boats from Turkey to greece formed a mob to sexually attack 1000 women in the streets? They surrounded them in tight circles of dozens of men and groped them and stripped them. It could hardly be any closer to the fictional prophesy of a boatload of migrants so primitive and savage that they were all covered in sperm.

    In truth, I am not offended. I am not sure why. Perhaps because the only part of the prophesy that is wrong is that it chose Indians as the first of the horde of horribles to arrive? In the 50s, when Raspail was inspired, Indians looked liked the world’s worst off to many. They were considered the most malnourished and backward. And they have faced many famines, but none of them led to civil war or mass migrations. They maintained a democracy and managed to feed their populations without excessive reliance on the west. And in the end, we Indians mainly come to the west in controlled amounts as highly skilled workers when jobs are legally offered. So, I think I was not offended in part because my own kind beat the prophesy, despite still being poor overall. Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that’s about.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Those fishermen are using the wrong bait, happens often on the left. Then they escalate to dynamiting the fishing hole.
    , @Richard of Melbourne
    little spoon: Regarding Raspail's choice of Subcontinentals rather than North Africans/Middle Easterners for his book. He states in a comment piece (possibly one that is included in the printing of the book that I own) that he thought the real threat would come from France's "near abroad" but instead invented a threat from the Subcontinent because using the real threat would have been too provocative.
    , @black sea
    I think Raspail more or less acknowledged that he substituted a wave of Indian immigrants for the far more real -- and troubling -- North African influx into France, because he felt that fictionalizing the latter would draw too much fire onto what was already going to be a controversial novel.

    BTW, I; tried to read Camp of the Saints; I found it pretty unengaging, a nicer way of saying pretty boring.
    , @Opinionator
    Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Compelling, although perhaps we should not blame them overmuch for ISIS. They are under foreign attack, after all, and the men in ISIS are presumable risking their lives to defend their people and homelands.
    , @ben tillman

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that’s about.
     
    Perhaps your friends presume the Indians in Raspail's book are low-caste Indians of the sort they look down upon themselves. Not all Indians are the same.
  67. The Left keeps stammering that their 1996-2015 campaign of crimethink prohibition had fully stamped out the realizations of the Realtalk period of 1992-95.

    Why don’t you just get with the program that resistance to mass migration is unacceptable! Just accept that you are to be absorbed by the diversity waves of inevitable enrichment!

    Read More
  68. I, for one, refuse to read a vile KKK-level publication like the Atlantic Monthly.

    Read More
  69. @ScarletNumber
    I had to stop reading Slate for two reasons. First, the tenor of their Trump coverage. Second, Dear Prudence left and was replaced by a 28-year-old lesbian.

    “I had to stop reading Slate for two reasons.”

    I haven’t read it since Michael Kinsley left. It went south fast after that.

    Read More
  70. @little spoon
    FYI, I am South Asian, and my mother immigrated from Calcutta. Yesterday a vocal and active SJW (white Jewish male) I work with told me about this camp of saints book and asked if I was outraged (because the book was about people like me, he pointed out). He told me that it portrayed these masses of brown people as savages and said the book described the ships as being packed with people covered and dripping in sperm, as if they were animals relieving themselves. I nodded my head without expression. I generally don't argue with him, but I also don't indicate that I am really motivated by what he says either.

    But internally, I was struck by the real world parallels. In Cologne last year, did we not see that the horde of migrants that jumped on leaky boats from Turkey to greece formed a mob to sexually attack 1000 women in the streets? They surrounded them in tight circles of dozens of men and groped them and stripped them. It could hardly be any closer to the fictional prophesy of a boatload of migrants so primitive and savage that they were all covered in sperm.

    In truth, I am not offended. I am not sure why. Perhaps because the only part of the prophesy that is wrong is that it chose Indians as the first of the horde of horribles to arrive? In the 50s, when Raspail was inspired, Indians looked liked the world's worst off to many. They were considered the most malnourished and backward. And they have faced many famines, but none of them led to civil war or mass migrations. They maintained a democracy and managed to feed their populations without excessive reliance on the west. And in the end, we Indians mainly come to the west in controlled amounts as highly skilled workers when jobs are legally offered. So, I think I was not offended in part because my own kind beat the prophesy, despite still being poor overall. Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that's about.

    Those fishermen are using the wrong bait, happens often on the left. Then they escalate to dynamiting the fishing hole.

    Read More
  71. “Ben Mathis-Lilley”

    I wonder if he’s upset that his Dad is such a pussy that he agreed to hypenate his son’s name.

    Read More
  72. @little spoon
    FYI, I am South Asian, and my mother immigrated from Calcutta. Yesterday a vocal and active SJW (white Jewish male) I work with told me about this camp of saints book and asked if I was outraged (because the book was about people like me, he pointed out). He told me that it portrayed these masses of brown people as savages and said the book described the ships as being packed with people covered and dripping in sperm, as if they were animals relieving themselves. I nodded my head without expression. I generally don't argue with him, but I also don't indicate that I am really motivated by what he says either.

    But internally, I was struck by the real world parallels. In Cologne last year, did we not see that the horde of migrants that jumped on leaky boats from Turkey to greece formed a mob to sexually attack 1000 women in the streets? They surrounded them in tight circles of dozens of men and groped them and stripped them. It could hardly be any closer to the fictional prophesy of a boatload of migrants so primitive and savage that they were all covered in sperm.

    In truth, I am not offended. I am not sure why. Perhaps because the only part of the prophesy that is wrong is that it chose Indians as the first of the horde of horribles to arrive? In the 50s, when Raspail was inspired, Indians looked liked the world's worst off to many. They were considered the most malnourished and backward. And they have faced many famines, but none of them led to civil war or mass migrations. They maintained a democracy and managed to feed their populations without excessive reliance on the west. And in the end, we Indians mainly come to the west in controlled amounts as highly skilled workers when jobs are legally offered. So, I think I was not offended in part because my own kind beat the prophesy, despite still being poor overall. Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that's about.

    little spoon: Regarding Raspail’s choice of Subcontinentals rather than North Africans/Middle Easterners for his book. He states in a comment piece (possibly one that is included in the printing of the book that I own) that he thought the real threat would come from France’s “near abroad” but instead invented a threat from the Subcontinent because using the real threat would have been too provocative.

    Read More
  73. If Slate says Bannon is a “KKK-level white power scumbag”, doesn’t it really mean that Bannon is irrelevant and powerless, and no real threat to anyone except (in their delusions) the contributors to the $PLC?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    It means he's an FBI agent. Klan meetings are like the novel The Man Who Was Thursday: everyone's an undercover cop.
  74. @neutral

    horrific voyage, around Africa and through the Strait of Gibraltar to the southern shores of France
     
    Sorry for the nitpicking, but what was the reason he could not make them take the shorter route through the Suez canal ?

    The Egyptians fired warning shots at them when they approached the canal.

    The book was written in 1973.

    Read More
  75. I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line. (Unless somebody can give me a good reason why he should be a true believer, because at this stage I can’t see one.)

    It’s useful just as a way to be a western ethnopatriot. “I loooove Israel; I want our border policies to be more like theirs.” “I loooove Israel; we should encourage native birthrates the way they do – have you seen how fast Jews are pumping out babies?” “I loooove Israel; they know how to preserve a majority demographic.” Etc. This drives Zionists completely nuts (giving away the family jewels), and turns American affection for Israel toward American affection for America.

    I just remembered the Harold Covington novels. I stopped reading novels some time ago, but at least a few smart people (Greg Johnson, Tom Sunic, Michael O’Meara) praise his work.

    I was surprised at how good they are. Never would have expected that. Of course, low expectations always help. His main failing seems to be a misunderstanding of his villain groups, they don’t think, or quite act, the way he portrays them. Also, he had to ratchet up the anti-White nature of the regime, but now I’m just nitpicking. Of the three I read, I thought The Brigade was the best. He has a very good handle on 4th generation warfare, IMO.

    I would say that I don’t like most fiction, but that’s probably offset by my warmth toward the subject matter.

    Read More
  76. @little spoon
    FYI, I am South Asian, and my mother immigrated from Calcutta. Yesterday a vocal and active SJW (white Jewish male) I work with told me about this camp of saints book and asked if I was outraged (because the book was about people like me, he pointed out). He told me that it portrayed these masses of brown people as savages and said the book described the ships as being packed with people covered and dripping in sperm, as if they were animals relieving themselves. I nodded my head without expression. I generally don't argue with him, but I also don't indicate that I am really motivated by what he says either.

    But internally, I was struck by the real world parallels. In Cologne last year, did we not see that the horde of migrants that jumped on leaky boats from Turkey to greece formed a mob to sexually attack 1000 women in the streets? They surrounded them in tight circles of dozens of men and groped them and stripped them. It could hardly be any closer to the fictional prophesy of a boatload of migrants so primitive and savage that they were all covered in sperm.

    In truth, I am not offended. I am not sure why. Perhaps because the only part of the prophesy that is wrong is that it chose Indians as the first of the horde of horribles to arrive? In the 50s, when Raspail was inspired, Indians looked liked the world's worst off to many. They were considered the most malnourished and backward. And they have faced many famines, but none of them led to civil war or mass migrations. They maintained a democracy and managed to feed their populations without excessive reliance on the west. And in the end, we Indians mainly come to the west in controlled amounts as highly skilled workers when jobs are legally offered. So, I think I was not offended in part because my own kind beat the prophesy, despite still being poor overall. Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that's about.

    I think Raspail more or less acknowledged that he substituted a wave of Indian immigrants for the far more real — and troubling — North African influx into France, because he felt that fictionalizing the latter would draw too much fire onto what was already going to be a controversial novel.

    BTW, I; tried to read Camp of the Saints; I found it pretty unengaging, a nicer way of saying pretty boring.

    Read More
  77. @guest
    I love the Forbidden Literature outrage on the left. They sound like Puritans railing against the work of the devil. Not an original comparison, I know. But apt. I remember my college bookstore always used to have a "banned books" section, as if to demonstrate their free thinking, though filled with PC-approved things.

    Real banning, through the shroud of silence, used to be saved for actual Nazi books, books defending Nazis, Holocaust-denial books (whether they actually defend the Nazis or not), or outright racist ones, like the Turner Diaries. Fashy stuff like Evola and Yockney, which the non-elect aren't even supposed to know exist, are naturally suspect. (Ignorance is very important to our rulers.) But Raspail was a fairly well known and mainstream French writer, I believe. Seems strange not to be allowed to know of him.

    I'd like to know who else is on the list, but I'm not allowed to know what I can't know, because then I'd know.

    I’d like to know who else is on the list, but I’m not allowed to know what I can’t know, because then I’d know.

    That’s why it’s so effective. It’s banning by obscurity and misdirection. Once in a while you’ll stumble onto a book that gives a you a peek behind the scenes but it’s rare. You’ll never find them on any popular book list or reviewed by major publications in the last 30 years.

    Here’s a link to a pdf version of The Camp of Saints.

    http://www.jrbooksonline.com/pdfs/camp_of_the_saints.pdf

    The paperback version now goes for close to $200 on Amazon and other sites. I wouldn’t put it beyond Amazon to nix the ebook version. I’ve seen them do it to others where they just simply aren’t downloadable anymore.

    Another forbidden book though in French and a best seller in France is by Laurent Obertone
    “Guerilla”

    Here is a link to a review of via Gates of Vienna.

    http://gatesofvienna.net/2017/03/after-things-fell-apart/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stephen Paul Foster
    I bought a Kindle version from Amazon about a year ago.
  78. Slate has become amazingly stupid over the years, but this reflects a larger trend in liberalism as a whole. They’ve become bookless, and as a result their immediate reflex action is name-calling.

    Read More
  79. @Anon
    Just how sucky must one be to get fired by Buzzfeed?

    http://www.politico.com/media/story/2014/03/buzzfeed-fires-sports-editor-ben-mathis-lilley-001827

    He's just another bottomfeeder. A proglodyte.

    How sucky does Slate have to have become to pick up a Buzzfeed reject?

    It’s obvious that their budget took a hit a few years ago, and as a result their stable of writers dropped several notches in quality. They’re running on a shoestring and have been reduced to running clickbait and outrage-click articles by interns, or recapping John Oliver. Sadly, Mathis-Lilley probably isn’t trying to write clickbait here–he really is that lacking in imagination.

    But, hey, Trump got elected, and it’s usually a bonanza for a partisan media outlet when the opposition party enters office.

    Read More
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    But, hey, Trump got elected, and it’s usually a bonanza for a partisan media outlet when the opposition party enters office
     
    Hence the uptick in Colbert's ratings.
  80. @Richard of Melbourne
    If Slate says Bannon is a "KKK-level white power scumbag", doesn't it really mean that Bannon is irrelevant and powerless, and no real threat to anyone except (in their delusions) the contributors to the $PLC?

    It means he’s an FBI agent. Klan meetings are like the novel The Man Who Was Thursday: everyone’s an undercover cop.

    Read More
  81. @Lot
    Jean Raspail is actually one of France's most illustrious writers and adventurers. He published a new novel roughly every other year from 1970 to 2005, most of them well received. The Academy of France gave one of them its award for novel of the year, and that is an organization with more legitimacy than any award group in the USA (founded by Cardinal Richelieu, refounded by Napoleon).

    You got to love this too:

    During the first twenty years of his career, he traveled the world to discover populations threatened by the confrontation with modernity. In 1950–52, he led the Tierra del Fuego–Alaska car trek and in 1954, the French research expedition to the land of the Incas.
     
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Jean_Raspail

    Suggested photo for posts mentioning Ben Mathis-Lilley, whose Harvard education did not prepare him for the demands of being a BuzzFeed sportswriter, a job he was fired from.

    http://imgur.com/a/eJV8G

    But what would a leading high-brow and bestselling French novelist who spent 20 years traveling and writing about the Third World know about the subject compared Ben Mathis-Lilley?

    Ben might be one of God’s chosen people, i.e., automatically a genius, an expert in his field, and a moral authority over mankind.

    Read More
  82. @skrewt
    I just went to look for this book on Amazon, and the page to buy a Kindle edition says "This title is not currently available for purchase." The further boilerplate adds (an obvious lie): "This book is currently unavailable because there are significant quality issues with the source file supplied by the publisher. The publisher has been notified and we will make the book available as soon as we receive a corrected file. As always, we value customer feedback."

    Evola's Revolt Against The Modern World seems to have suffered the same fate.

    Just Google for “Camp of the Saints pdf”

    Read More
  83. In contrast, from The Atlantic Monthly back in 1994:

    Steve,
    Who cares? You’re asking for consistency, especially over time, which doesn’t matter. Here’s something that can shed some light on the changing standards:

    times 17.3.84 bb speech malreported africa rectify
    times 19.12.83 forecasts 3 yp 4th quarter 83 misprints verify current issue
    times 14.2.84 miniplenty malquoted chocolate rectify
    times 3.12.83 reporting bb dayorder doubleplusungood refs unpersons rewrite fullwise upsub antefiling

    Read More
  84. @neutral

    horrific voyage, around Africa and through the Strait of Gibraltar to the southern shores of France
     
    Sorry for the nitpicking, but what was the reason he could not make them take the shorter route through the Suez canal ?

    You have a good sense of geography – few Americans do.

    In Respaul s novel the flotilla does try to go through Suez – the Egyptian military smells the stench and pushes them back .

    The somewhat Whites do better in this than the all Whites.

    Read More
  85. @White Guy In Japan
    " [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel"

    Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    It appears to be hard to obtain because of demand issues. The cheapest used paperback is $140 right now on amazon. I wonder who holds the rights….

    Read More
  86. Steve,
    what’s with the American translator of the book, “Norman Shapiro”? In a debate at mondoweiss I jumped to the conclusion that this was “Norman R. Shapiro”, a Wesleyan university professor and the most distinguished living translator of French poetry in the U.S. (Being a Francophone he would look at the book as a great novel.)
    Could you or someone out there clarify this and get a statement of Prof. Shapiro about the book?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Stogumber,

    Some years ago the late David Brudnoy radio interviewed Prof Shapiro on his translation of "The Camp of the Saints".

    I recall that Shapiro was quite effusive in praise of Raspail, certainly as a writer and perhaps also as a moralist.
  87. @Dave
    Keep punching back Steve.
    You have the patience and perseverance of a saint. The sheer volume of bilge pouring out of progressive whites mouths and pens is exhausting, at least to me.
    Some days I genuinely just want to give up and walk away from all this madness, and then I'll read Steve as he artfully defenestrates some foul little twerp and realize the fight must go on.

    I did two years as co-blogger on another (Canadian) site. It was 24/7/365. No holidays. Indeed, your readership spikes on holidays!

    It was more work than the job from which I had just retired.

    Not only that, it was depressing. I had to read the news in detail every day.

    It seemed nothing was changing.

    So indeed I have great respect for those who can stay the course. I had to quit to save my sanity (I still contribute in a minor way at the other site.)

    Trump’s election is a major change, but I’m a pessimist and get easily discouraged. I’ve found I can’t even read NYT newsletters anymore, never mind the articles.

    Read More
  88. @neutral

    horrific voyage, around Africa and through the Strait of Gibraltar to the southern shores of France
     
    Sorry for the nitpicking, but what was the reason he could not make them take the shorter route through the Suez canal ?

    I read somewhere that Raspail knew the real danger came from North Africa and the Middle East. There were large numbers of guest workers even then.

    But he was afraid to use the MENAs as the invaders. He thought it would make the book too inflammatory. Hence the use of Indians.

    Read More
  89. @Harry Baldwin
    So funny that in the last debate Chris Wallace asked Trump if he would accept the outcome of the election if he lost and Trump declined to promise to do so. “That’s horrifying!” Clinton interjected. “Every time he thinks things are not going in his direction he says things are rigged against him.”

    As we see now, the question should have been put to Hillary. Sure, if Trump lost, he would have bitched and moaned, but I think by this time he would have put it behind him; he wouldn't be exhorting his voters to resist. Trump voters like myself would be disappointed, but would grimly accept it. We wouldn't be setting fires, blocking city streets, and beating up political opponents.

    The difference between the Left and Right in this country is that the Left doesn't accord us political legitimacy. We are not entitled to our views. The election of someone on the right who is going to try to change things--a Trump, not a Bush--is not acceptable. Only the left has the moral authority to rule, therefore a political victory by the right must be treated like a coup.

    Lawrence Auster expressed a striking insight on his blog post of November 19, 2011:


    The two parties are not playing the same game. They play different games, under different rules. What are these different rules? The Republicans more or less follow the laws and constitutional procedures, the Democrats deliberately and consciously break them. But the Republicans, while they complain incessantly about the Democrats, never identify this underlying fact. Why? Because that would show that the system is no longer legitimate. And the function of the Republicans, as “patriotic, conservative Americans,” is to uphold the goodness and legitimacy of the system, a legitimacy which rests on the belief that everyone in American politics shares the same basic principles and loyalties. So the Republicans, as defenders of the system and its presumed basic unity, cannot expose what the Democrats are. If they exposed it, politics would be replaced by open war between two radically incompatible parties and America as we know it would come to an end.
     
    Trump is a different kind of Republican, one that the Democrats are not used to dealing with. He's not going to uphold the goodness and legitimacy of the system. He's willing to expose what the Democrats really are. And as a result, politics-as-usual is being replaced by an (almost) open war.

    I don’t know about that. So far he has been fairly cosy with Wall Street and the lobby that shall not be named.

    Read More
  90. @guest
    I bought Camp of the Saints on Amazon in 2015, I want to say for like ten bucks. Now I see it's only listed used from about $140. That's interesting.

    You can borrow my copy if you want.

    I bought Camp of the Saints on Amazon in 2015, I want to say for like ten bucks. Now I see it’s only listed used from about $140. That’s interesting.

    Used copies are available for $25.

    https://www.abebooks.com/9780684142401/Camp-Saints-Jean-Raspail-0684142406/plp

    Read More
  91. @Alfa158
    Slate is little more than a click-bait trolling machine trying to generate revenue by posting the most inflammatory and outrageous articles possible to draw views. Think of it as Tiny Duck with his very own website.
    New Republic , Atlantic and The New York Times are fast closing in on Slate though, so they better grab the schmundo while they can.

    I notice Slate doesn’t allow comments. I would never read them regularly for that reason alone.

    Read More
    • Agree: lavoisier
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber
    Slate allows comments. For example, its article "Rachel Maddow Turned a Scoop on Donald Trump’s Taxes Into a Cynical, Self-Defeating Spectacle" has 621 at the moment.
  92. @Daniel H
    >>Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    As of this afternoon one cannot purchase Camp of the Saints on Amazon. Amazon says that something is wrong with the "format" of the Kindle title. I have purchased scores of titles on Amazon at this point, never has a title been withheld because of "formatting" problems. Could be an innocent explanation, but then, maybe it isn't. The day may come where this title will only be available through samizdat.

    Now there’s a cryptic note on Amazon,

    “This book is currently unavailable because there are significant quality issues with the source file supplied by the publisher. The publisher has been notified and we will make the book available as soon as we receive a corrected file. As always, we value customer feedback.”

    Read More
  93. @Space Ghost
    They still don't get it. The last two sentences of that Slate link are amazing:

    What the hell is going on? When will it end?

    Indeed, Ben, indeed. What *is* going on? When *will* it end?

    How will it end, Ben?

    Read More
  94. @guest
    I love the Forbidden Literature outrage on the left. They sound like Puritans railing against the work of the devil. Not an original comparison, I know. But apt. I remember my college bookstore always used to have a "banned books" section, as if to demonstrate their free thinking, though filled with PC-approved things.

    Real banning, through the shroud of silence, used to be saved for actual Nazi books, books defending Nazis, Holocaust-denial books (whether they actually defend the Nazis or not), or outright racist ones, like the Turner Diaries. Fashy stuff like Evola and Yockney, which the non-elect aren't even supposed to know exist, are naturally suspect. (Ignorance is very important to our rulers.) But Raspail was a fairly well known and mainstream French writer, I believe. Seems strange not to be allowed to know of him.

    I'd like to know who else is on the list, but I'm not allowed to know what I can't know, because then I'd know.

    I love the Forbidden Literature outrage on the left. They sound like Puritans railing against the work of the devil. Not an original comparison, I know. But apt. I remember my college bookstore always used to have a “banned books” section, as if to demonstrate their free thinking, though filled with PC-approved things.

    The left bans Camp of the Saints because it predicted the future of leftist self hatred and treachery 44 years ago. Very impressive and it spooks them.

    Read More
  95. @celt darnell
    The Atlantic Monthly article is what caused me to read Camp of the Saints which is actually outstanding.

    Despite the subject matter, there are a lot of parts that are laugh-out-loud funny.

    What the hell happened to the Atlantic anyhow? It actually used to be worth reading.

    By the way, what's with the double-barrel name Ben Mathis-Lilley?

    “what’s with the double-barrel name Ben Mathis-Lilley ?”

    In the UK, it now signifies that your parents aren’t married, but that daddy was still around when the birth was registered.

    Read More
  96. @Dee
    If this is what leftys are reading in Slate, Salon, and the rest of the left wing media, it's gonna be a long, hot, summer and there after. I used to read Slate and Salon 15 years ago, but they got a serious case of BDS, and I quit.

    Even the '60s weren't this crazy....

    You won’t see Slate or Salon supporting a boycott of, divestment from, or sanctions against the Zionist entity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Gabriel M
    Unlike you, I can google "Salon BDS". Maybe your cognitive faculties extend to clicking on a hyperlink, though, so I'm going to help you out. http://www.salon.com/topic/bds/
    , @Opinionator
    Most of these are news stories (that admittedly avoid the usual pro-Israel cant) and some are taking issue with anti-BDS measures due to concerns about constitutional violations.

    In any case though, they all refer to the exercise of BDS to end the occupation, which is designed to further the Jewish supremacist agenda in Palestine not to end it. That is not BDS as a challenge to the Zionist entity as such.
  97. @little spoon
    Liberals are aghast at this book because 1) Bannon likes it and 2) because it predicted the refugee crisis before it occurred, showing that it is the result of liberal ideology rather than the result of a civil war which happened to occur near Europe.

    It's remarkable how accurate the book is. Europe welcomes all "unaccompanied minors". The book talks about Belgium welcoming babies. The fact that europe welcomes unaccompanied minors, gives them welfare, refuses to send them back has invited hundreds of thousands more to pretend they are refugees and unaccompanied minors and it has created a human trafficking industry to keep bringing more. And soon we will see the rest of this book happen. There will be demands for family reunification. And then more reunification because it is cruel to "force people to choose between safety and their families."

    At this point, we don't even have to shoot at them. We just have to catch them coming off the coast of libya and drop them right back. Is that too hard for the troops to stomach as well?

    Could happen in the United States, albeit on a smaller scale due to natural barriers.

    Read More
  98. @guest
    Camp of the Saints is not great literature, definitely too modern for my taste. But it hit upon a premise of vital importance. World-historical importance, as they say. Maybe not Uncle Tom's Cabin (which also wasn't great literature, though it had one great character: Topsy)-level, but if the masses were ever made aware of it, it has the potential to blow up the Narrative.

    Something like Merkel's Boner will happen again, and Camp of the Saints or anything like it cannot be allowed to be in the public's consciousness at that time. Because it goes right to the heart of immigrant invasion insanity. Hence the outrage.

    No, scratch that. They'd be outraged over anything alt-righty. Could be completely harmless and unread by any but two guys in Alaska, so long as there's something to point and shriek at. Just so happens in this case the target is rich, meaty, and delicious.

    But it hit upon a premise of vital importance. World-historical importance, as they say.

    That premise being…?

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    A flotilla of Third Worlders attempts to forcibly settle in Europe; Europe is too weak or wicked to stop them. That's putting it in the simplest terms. It more or less anticipated the the refugee "crisis" and Merkel's Boner, except there are worse consequences.
  99. @anonguy
    I'm calling this a salvo against the Obama Deep State Politicized Officer Corps:

    https://www.washingtonpost.com/investigations/admiral-seven-others-charged-with-corruption-in-new-fat-leonard-indictment/2017/03/14/faf01600-08da-11e7-b77c-0047d15a24e0_story.html?utm_term=.8c44b45c7998

    30 Admirals? Out of 160 authorized by law? And likely the most corrupt are the most politicized and vice versa. That's true of military leadership across all of human history.

    It is actually at the root of why military societies/castes typically place a higher premium on integrity and such than civilians. The slightest bits of corruption metastasizes in the environment of unaccountable authority necessary to military endeavours. The slightest breach and the entire organization is rapidly overcome, like a flesh-eating bacteria.

    Again, that's why military societies are so picky about honor, etc, despite being in the most atavistically base of vocations, killing people who won't do what you want them to.

    Because you think they are typified by unaccountable authority?

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonguy

    Because you think they are typified by unaccountable authority?
     
    It isn't because of what I think.
  100. @little spoon
    FYI, I am South Asian, and my mother immigrated from Calcutta. Yesterday a vocal and active SJW (white Jewish male) I work with told me about this camp of saints book and asked if I was outraged (because the book was about people like me, he pointed out). He told me that it portrayed these masses of brown people as savages and said the book described the ships as being packed with people covered and dripping in sperm, as if they were animals relieving themselves. I nodded my head without expression. I generally don't argue with him, but I also don't indicate that I am really motivated by what he says either.

    But internally, I was struck by the real world parallels. In Cologne last year, did we not see that the horde of migrants that jumped on leaky boats from Turkey to greece formed a mob to sexually attack 1000 women in the streets? They surrounded them in tight circles of dozens of men and groped them and stripped them. It could hardly be any closer to the fictional prophesy of a boatload of migrants so primitive and savage that they were all covered in sperm.

    In truth, I am not offended. I am not sure why. Perhaps because the only part of the prophesy that is wrong is that it chose Indians as the first of the horde of horribles to arrive? In the 50s, when Raspail was inspired, Indians looked liked the world's worst off to many. They were considered the most malnourished and backward. And they have faced many famines, but none of them led to civil war or mass migrations. They maintained a democracy and managed to feed their populations without excessive reliance on the west. And in the end, we Indians mainly come to the west in controlled amounts as highly skilled workers when jobs are legally offered. So, I think I was not offended in part because my own kind beat the prophesy, despite still being poor overall. Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that's about.

    Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Compelling, although perhaps we should not blame them overmuch for ISIS. They are under foreign attack, after all, and the men in ISIS are presumable risking their lives to defend their people and homelands.

    Read More
  101. It’s quite remarkable the degree to which intellectual thought has declined in the USA within the past 20 years.

    The Internet seems to be both the culprit but also the answer to reverse the decline.

    Read More
  102. God save us from the self-loathing Whites. These people are truly a bigger cancer than any devout follower of the great warlord Mo. But then I am just a coon.

    - In all such cases, I am not interested in the supplier (the writer) but rather the readers (the consumers). Who willingly reads the trash put out by Slate, Salon, etc. and takes it seriously other than upper class White Progressives with too much money?

    Read More
  103. It must be terrifying for these neutered, Obama-worshiping elves at Slate to glimpse at the reality captured by Raspail in Camp of Saints. No one, absolutely no one mocks the Left with greater devastation.

    See: http://fosterspeak.blogspot.com/2015/12/two-racisms.html

    Read More
  104. @oddsbodkins
    They are wearing that button out, but they keep on pushing it. This is a good sign- they lack other buttons.

    It must be really uncomfortable for people whose only real weapon in political debates was accusing their opponent of racism/sexism/homophobia/etc., realizing that their tactic isn’t really working anymore.

    Read More
  105. @Rod1963

    I’d like to know who else is on the list, but I’m not allowed to know what I can’t know, because then I’d know.
     
    That's why it's so effective. It's banning by obscurity and misdirection. Once in a while you'll stumble onto a book that gives a you a peek behind the scenes but it's rare. You'll never find them on any popular book list or reviewed by major publications in the last 30 years.

    Here's a link to a pdf version of The Camp of Saints.

    http://www.jrbooksonline.com/pdfs/camp_of_the_saints.pdf

    The paperback version now goes for close to $200 on Amazon and other sites. I wouldn't put it beyond Amazon to nix the ebook version. I've seen them do it to others where they just simply aren't downloadable anymore.

    Another forbidden book though in French and a best seller in France is by Laurent Obertone
    "Guerilla"

    Here is a link to a review of via Gates of Vienna.

    http://gatesofvienna.net/2017/03/after-things-fell-apart/

    I bought a Kindle version from Amazon about a year ago.

    Read More
  106. @Daniel H
    >>Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    As of this afternoon one cannot purchase Camp of the Saints on Amazon. Amazon says that something is wrong with the "format" of the Kindle title. I have purchased scores of titles on Amazon at this point, never has a title been withheld because of "formatting" problems. Could be an innocent explanation, but then, maybe it isn't. The day may come where this title will only be available through samizdat.

    Gee, maybe having one company in a near-monopoly position wrt books might have some kind of downsides….

    Read More
  107. @Dumbo

    an extremely racist 1970s novel, The Camp of the Saints,
     
    I haven't read the novel, but it seems to me that if it is "racist" at all, it is in the same sense that "The Last Days of Pompeii" is "volcanophobic".

    Should Whites not even complain as they are replaced in their own countries?

    "Better Dead Than Racist" should be the West's new motto.

    “Better racist than dead” is preferable.

    Read More
  108. It is amazing that a prophetic book like this one can be so easily condemned by the left.

    Any idea, no matter how valid, has to be condemned if it is not consonant with egalitarianism.

    Let the masses of the Third World come to the West and destroy our civilization. Any effort to prevent this from happening is evil.

    Read More
  109. @Daniel H
    >>Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    As of this afternoon one cannot purchase Camp of the Saints on Amazon. Amazon says that something is wrong with the "format" of the Kindle title. I have purchased scores of titles on Amazon at this point, never has a title been withheld because of "formatting" problems. Could be an innocent explanation, but then, maybe it isn't. The day may come where this title will only be available through samizdat.

    There’s a messy but readable PDF out there in the meantime. Just do some not-so-creative googling and make a solemn promise to yourself to purchase the Kindle version if and when it becomes available again.

    Read More
  110. @Boomstick
    How sucky does Slate have to have become to pick up a Buzzfeed reject?

    It's obvious that their budget took a hit a few years ago, and as a result their stable of writers dropped several notches in quality. They're running on a shoestring and have been reduced to running clickbait and outrage-click articles by interns, or recapping John Oliver. Sadly, Mathis-Lilley probably isn't trying to write clickbait here--he really is that lacking in imagination.

    But, hey, Trump got elected, and it's usually a bonanza for a partisan media outlet when the opposition party enters office.

    But, hey, Trump got elected, and it’s usually a bonanza for a partisan media outlet when the opposition party enters office

    Hence the uptick in Colbert’s ratings.

    Read More
  111. @Frau Katze
    I notice Slate doesn't allow comments. I would never read them regularly for that reason alone.

    Slate allows comments. For example, its article “Rachel Maddow Turned a Scoop on Donald Trump’s Taxes Into a Cynical, Self-Defeating Spectacle” has 621 at the moment.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Ivy
    Maddow may be only the latest female journalist to provide support for Sailer's theory. Perhaps she was rattled by concern about competition from Megyn Kelly.
    , @Frau Katze
    Maybe it's because I'm using an iPad. I'll check tomorrow from the desktop.
  112. @Ed
    It's quite remarkable the degree to which intellectual thought has declined in the USA within the past 20 years.

    The Internet seems to be both the culprit but also the answer to reverse the decline.

    I agree with this wholeheartedly.

    Read More
  113. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
    Starship Troopers
    The Man Who Sold the Moon
    Farnham’s Freehold
    just to name a few of his works.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Boomstick
    I don't think the concept of alt-right is necessary to describe Heinlein, who seems to have been a pretty straightforward Libertarian.

    Nor is alt-right necessary to describe the Turner Diaries, which is straight-ahead Nazism.
  114. @Stogumber
    Steve,
    what's with the American translator of the book, "Norman Shapiro"? In a debate at mondoweiss I jumped to the conclusion that this was "Norman R. Shapiro", a Wesleyan university professor and the most distinguished living translator of French poetry in the U.S. (Being a Francophone he would look at the book as a great novel.)
    Could you or someone out there clarify this and get a statement of Prof. Shapiro about the book?

    Stogumber,

    Some years ago the late David Brudnoy radio interviewed Prof Shapiro on his translation of “The Camp of the Saints”.

    I recall that Shapiro was quite effusive in praise of Raspail, certainly as a writer and perhaps also as a moralist.

    Read More
    • Replies: @fnn
    Brudnoy was able to get away with a lot (He was Jewish, Ivy League, openly Gay and also HIV+ for many years.) IIRC, Jared Taylor and Sam Francis were semi-regular guests.
  115. @White Guy In Japan
    " [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel"

    Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    ” [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel”

    Some of you young folk might not remember 1994, but we didn’t have Kindles or even Amazon (just founded that summer) back then. If you wanted an out-of-print book, you had to browse through the random used book stores in your town and hope to come across it, or maybe write a letter to large urban used book stores like Powell’s or Strand to inquire whether they had a copy.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    Powell's was actually on the internet before Amazon. 1993 for some forms of access (and I think only the technical bookstore), 1994 for their website.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powell's_Books#20th_century
  116. @Wilkey
    "The book also seems realistic in its recounting of the crumbling away of resolve by French sailors and soldiers when they are given the order to repel physically–to shoot or torpedo–this armada of helpless yet menacing people."

    Raspail is only guilty of underestimating the West's weakness and stupidity. The EU hasn't simply refused to torpedo boats just miles off shore. They have literally gone virtually all the way to Africa to "rescue" boats full of "refugees" mere miles from Libyan shores.

    All Europe has to do is simply tow these people back to the shores from which they departed - mostly from Libya and Turkey. The Turks and Libyans would have zero power to stop them, and the "refugees" would stop coming.

    Won’t work, initially at least one Italian coast guard vessel tried turning the ships back. The refugees responded by holding their own babies over the side of the ships and threatening to drop them into the ocean if the Europeans didn’t rescue them. We’re not dealing with people like us.

    Read More
  117. Speaking of French literature, a great series of graphic novels are the three volumes called “The Arab of the Future” by Riad Sattouf. He is the son of a Syrian “intellectual” who married a Frenchwoman and then raised Riad in Libya and Syria until his mother finally had enough and took the kids back to France.

    It is particularly devastating because Sattouf is basically a man of the left. He is not trying to attack Islam, yet his honesty describing the cultural poverty, violence, repressiveness and general backwardness of Syria in the 1980s has to lead any honest person to ask themselves what the hell we are doing letting Syrians or Libyans immigrate to Europe. And then remember that Syrians are far more civilized than Afghans or Sub Saharans.

    Read More
  118. “Le Camp des Saints” is still available on Amazon.fr (i.e. in France). If you can read it in French, I suggest you do so, if only because when progressives come to attack you for reading it they will suffer cognitive dissonance from an apparent multi-lingual cosmopolitan reading “fascist” literature. Progressives assume that nationalists won’t learn foreign languages, and take great pride in the fact that they themselves can put together 5 sentences in bad Spanish.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randy the Auditor
    “Le Camp des Saints” is still available on Amazon.fr (i.e. in France). If you can read it in French, I suggest you do so, if only because when progressives come to attack you for reading it they will suffer cognitive dissonance from an apparent multi-lingual cosmopolitan reading “fascist” literature. Progressives assume that nationalists won’t learn foreign languages, and take great pride in the fact that they themselves can put together 5 sentences in bad Spanish.

    Jared Taylor is fluent in French and Japanese, but the SJWs usually give him the full treatment.
  119. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    Don’t forget the Northwest Trilogy by Covington.

    Read More
  120. @George Taylor
    Shanty town outside of Mendota, California

    http://ww4.hdnux.com/photos/42/53/35/9090903/13/920x1240.jpg

    134 driving miles from Palo Alto, CA, 230 driving miles to Hollywood. As far as I know Zuckerberg hasn't created any programs to help the youth become coders, nor has Hollywood reached out to the aspiring actors and actresses from this local.

    Push out the middle class, all you have left is the very poor and the liberal very rich in gated communities. Apparently this is what Slate and NYTimes wants.

    The only way to understand whats going on is to realize that the Rich and Powerful hate
    the middle class, undermining and subverting it by any means necessary,since the fall of the
    Soviet Union and the communist threat.

    Read More
  121. @Altai
    I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line. (Unless somebody can give me a good reason why he should be a true believer, because at this stage I can't see one.) I wouldn't be surprised if half the most fervent racism screamers have said something outright genocidal about Palestinians at some stage, might be time to start digging.

    “I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line”

    Bannon and his fellow travelers would be banished to the margins of the Dissident Right and get nothing accomplished unless they choose their enemies carefully. He knows the score.

    Read More
  122. @skrewt
    I just went to look for this book on Amazon, and the page to buy a Kindle edition says "This title is not currently available for purchase." The further boilerplate adds (an obvious lie): "This book is currently unavailable because there are significant quality issues with the source file supplied by the publisher. The publisher has been notified and we will make the book available as soon as we receive a corrected file. As always, we value customer feedback."

    Evola's Revolt Against The Modern World seems to have suffered the same fate.

    The paperback is listed for sale for $13.50 by the publisher:

    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/bookstore2/index.php?manufacturers_id=67

    Read More
  123. Why revisit this controversial and nowadays hard-to-obtain novel? The recovery of this neglected work helps us to call attention to the key global problem of the final years of the twentieth century: unbalanced wealth and resources, unbalanced demographic trends, and the relationship between the two.If we do not act now to counteract tendencies toward global apartheid, they will only hurry the day when we may indeed see Raspail’s vision made real.

    Although you included that bit, I think you may be giving yesteryear’s Atlantic too much credit for the Kennedy article, which was using Raspail novel to argue something that Raspail would never subscribe to . Allow me to elucidate with a further extract from the article:-

    Yet a closer look at this cornucopian literature reveals that its focus is overwhelmingly upon the world’s winners–the well-educated lawyers, management consultants, software engineers, and other “symbolic analysts” analyzed by Secretary of Labor Robert Reich–who sell their expertise at handsome prices to clients in other rich societies. To the extent that they consider the situation in the Third World, the cornucopian writers typically point to the model minority of global politics–the East Asians. The techno-liberals pay hardly any attention to the mounting human distress in Calcutta or Nicaragua or Liberia, and no wonder: were they to consider the desperate plight of the poorest two billion beings on our planet, their upbeat messages would sound less plausible.

    Nothing about the poor unnonwhite in the West. Kennedy wrote a book (Rise and Fall of the Great Powers)in which he warned of US military overstretch, and specifically denied that the USSR would collapse. He made something like the same error again with this article, whereby the maggots in the floursack messing up everything for Reich’s rich WEIRDos are the teeming foreign poor remaining poor. But Kennedy got it incredibly wrong yet again, because the dwindling non-affluent whites of the West (who he never mentioned, but would probably see as dog in the manger types) have become the real problem for Atlantic readers’ preferred New World Order.

    Read More
  124. @Opinionator
    But it hit upon a premise of vital importance. World-historical importance, as they say.

    That premise being...?

    A flotilla of Third Worlders attempts to forcibly settle in Europe; Europe is too weak or wicked to stop them. That’s putting it in the simplest terms. It more or less anticipated the the refugee “crisis” and Merkel’s Boner, except there are worse consequences.

    Read More
  125. I’m way late to this thread here – can’t keep up with this freakin’ guy! I haven’t read the comments yet, but I’ve got 2 things to say:

    A) I read this book about 6 months back, and believe me, it was a hell of a book. It’s a gripping story, considering it’s not action-packed at all. The chapters on what the politicians, media, and ordinary French people were doing in consideration of the impending million-people flood was just so well-written and one can see the stupidity and cowardice of the characters in the book in people today 40-odd years later. The translator did a great job too, as it’s got to be a hard job to get all the real meaning of the French writing into English.

    Get it at the library or anywhere. ***** FIVE STARS (click to buy used) (click here to hide name for fear of being called a NAZI) (click here to vote that Bezos is a Commie)

    B) Steve, I noted (though didn’t click on) the 5 links on your same post on VDare, on the 2nd paragraph of this dipshit Ben Lilley’s Slate article, all linked to the original articles, tweets or what-have-you (though you left the links out here). I am wondering if that’s part of the honest bloggers’ creed or something, keeping links to the original articles.

    Why not make all of those 5 links go to VDare articles/blog-post/letters that describe the same happenings or people that the original links do, but leaving out the fake-news? 2 of them on Slate link to Slate, 2 to the $PLC, and 1 to twitter. Why should VDare link to these same people, knowing that Slate wouldn’t directly link to VDare?

    Recommend this book, people, to anyone who may be close to seeing the truth. It’s a great read!

    Read More
  126. @Dan Hayes
    Stogumber,

    Some years ago the late David Brudnoy radio interviewed Prof Shapiro on his translation of "The Camp of the Saints".

    I recall that Shapiro was quite effusive in praise of Raspail, certainly as a writer and perhaps also as a moralist.

    Brudnoy was able to get away with a lot (He was Jewish, Ivy League, openly Gay and also HIV+ for many years.) IIRC, Jared Taylor and Sam Francis were semi-regular guests.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    fnn,

    Brudnoy's program was invariably interesting and easily available in New York City even though it originated from Boston.

    I remember Brudnoy's very friendly interviews of John McManus, the President of the John Birch Society. Also his effusive congratulations of Pat Buchanan on his New Hampshire primary victory.

    I never caught his interviews of Taylor and Francis. They would have had to be very, very interesting.
    , @Brutusale
    Listened to Brudnoy on a semi-regular basis; he was a eloquent and fair interviewer with a pretty eclectic guest list. However, he didn't come out until the mid-90's when he was already sick with HIV. He had a "beard" for a while.
  127. Ben Mathis-Lilley:

    ” … Literally a KKK … White Power Scumbag … [random split infinitive] … extremely racist … white-power … white nationalist … white supremacist … KKK … white pride … What the hell … “

    For this he went to Harvard?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Have you seen a Harvard syllabus in the last thirty years?
  128. The President’s Top Adviser Is Literally a KKK-Level White Power Scumbag

    By Ben Mathis-Lilley

    Steve, you spend so much time categorizing these people as the best, smartest, most-poised-for-tomorrow, etc, etc, ad nauseum, I look at headlines lik the one above and must presume (hope?) you’ve spent the last few years being bitterly ironic.

    How well-educated, etc, could a scuttling insect like this Mathis-Lilley be if he hasn’t realized that in societies ruled by ACTUAL red-eyed, bloodthirsty tyrants, pugnacious broadsides like this never ever appear in the press because would-be Guevaras like himself would be either languishing in dungeons or emerging from woodchippers as a fine red mist?

    No, let me go one further – as long-term strategies go, a propaganda policy of constant overkill and ever-mounting hysteria with no end in sight is not only not “smart” – it’s STUPID. As stupid as Russian hacks, attacking Trump’s family, campus riots to silence dissent; as stupid as blacks going mau-mau on Trump supporters on behalf of Mexican immigration. As stupid as Chris Cuomo’s one facial expression.

    Every time these human deer ticks threaten to spike my blood pressure – their destructive stupidity hailed as “really, really smart” – I close my eyes and think of the landslide 2020 Trump victory dwarfing even the Miracle of ’16. But what I’d much prefer is to see 2018 become the people’s referendum on every Republican currently pissing away a golden opportunity to right the ship of state by being too “smart” to stand with the President and pull the same rope in the same direction.

    Read More
  129. @Anonymous

    We’ve got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints.
     
    The majority of the classic works of Western Civ would probably qualify nowadays as being the province of the right.

    Agree. C.f. the post a few months ago about Zuckerberg’s sister trying to shoo the right away from the Classics, which she probably never really read anyway.

    Possibly the single most commented iSteve post.

    Read More
  130. @CK
    The Moon is a Harsh Mistress
    Starship Troopers
    The Man Who Sold the Moon
    Farnham's Freehold
    just to name a few of his works.

    I don’t think the concept of alt-right is necessary to describe Heinlein, who seems to have been a pretty straightforward Libertarian.

    Nor is alt-right necessary to describe the Turner Diaries, which is straight-ahead Nazism.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    The Starship Troopers Heinlein or the Stranger in a Strange Land Heinlein?
  131. @Peter Akuleyev
    "Le Camp des Saints" is still available on Amazon.fr (i.e. in France). If you can read it in French, I suggest you do so, if only because when progressives come to attack you for reading it they will suffer cognitive dissonance from an apparent multi-lingual cosmopolitan reading "fascist" literature. Progressives assume that nationalists won't learn foreign languages, and take great pride in the fact that they themselves can put together 5 sentences in bad Spanish.

    “Le Camp des Saints” is still available on Amazon.fr (i.e. in France). If you can read it in French, I suggest you do so, if only because when progressives come to attack you for reading it they will suffer cognitive dissonance from an apparent multi-lingual cosmopolitan reading “fascist” literature. Progressives assume that nationalists won’t learn foreign languages, and take great pride in the fact that they themselves can put together 5 sentences in bad Spanish.

    Jared Taylor is fluent in French and Japanese, but the SJWs usually give him the full treatment.

    Read More
  132. @ScarletNumber
    Slate allows comments. For example, its article "Rachel Maddow Turned a Scoop on Donald Trump’s Taxes Into a Cynical, Self-Defeating Spectacle" has 621 at the moment.

    Maddow may be only the latest female journalist to provide support for Sailer’s theory. Perhaps she was rattled by concern about competition from Megyn Kelly.

    Read More
  133. @White Guy In Japan
    " [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel"

    Really? I bought Camp of the Saints on Kindle last year.

    Your reading comprehension needs work.

    In 1994, the book was hard to obtain. Way before e-readers.

    Read More
  134. @guest
    Why Cantos? Because Pound was fashy? That's thin.

    This is Ezra reading personally his infamous Cantos XLV, with a “rasping, buzzing quality like the sound of a hornet stuck in a jar” :

    Ezra Pound: Canto XLV

    With Usura

    With usura hath no man a house of good stone
    each block cut smooth and well fitting
    that design might cover their face,
    with usura
    hath no man a painted paradise on his church wall
    harpes et luz
    or where virgin receiveth message
    and halo projects from incision,
    with usura
    seeth no man Gonzaga his heirs and his concubines
    no picture is made to endure nor to live with
    but it is made to sell and sell quickly
    with usura, sin against nature,
    is thy bread ever more of stale rags
    is thy bread dry as paper,
    with no mountain wheat, no strong flour
    with usura the line grows thick
    with usura is no clear demarcation
    and no man can find site for his dwelling.
    Stonecutter is kept from his stone
    weaver is kept from his loom
    WITH USURA
    wool comes not to market
    sheep bringeth no gain with usura
    Usura is a murrain, usura
    blunteth the needle in the maid’s hand
    and stoppeth the spinner’s cunning. Pietro Lombardo
    came not by usura
    Duccio came not by usura
    nor Pier della Francesca; Zuan Bellin’ not by usura
    nor was ‘La Calunnia’ painted.
    Came not by usura Angelico; came not Ambrogio Praedis,
    Came no church of cut stone signed: Adamo me fecit.
    Not by usura St. Trophime
    Not by usura Saint Hilaire,
    Usura rusteth the chisel
    It rusteth the craft and the craftsman
    It gnaweth the thread in the loom
    None learneth to weave gold in her pattern;
    Azure hath a canker by usura; cramoisi is unbroidered
    Emerald findeth no Memling
    Usura slayeth the child in the womb
    It stayeth the young man’s courting
    It hath brought palsey to bed, lyeth
    between the young bride and her bridegroom
    CONTRA NATURAM
    They have brought whores for Eleusis
    Corpses are set to banquet
    at behest of usura.

    Read More
  135. @guest
    Why Cantos? Because Pound was fashy? That's thin.

    The most famous occupant of Morgenthau Hilton just couldn’t refrain his polymathic brain from noticing bigly.

    Becoming an American Renaissance Mensch with “a stupid, suburban prejudice” was Ezra’s choice made of personal tragedy; Pound’s good friend Henri Gaudier-Brzeska was one among many young artists who perished in trenches during the WWI.

    Pound consequentially got obsessively interested in very speculative science called Monetary Ethnoconomy, and mystery of Zechino Ka-ching Mitosis had became focus of his research.

    That lead him to belief that the financial banking system of Democratic West has been long term compromised by some kind of usurapers cabal.

    He claimed that such a system nurtures inevitability of jubilee-cycled military conflicts among nations.

    Silly Poet.

    Many important people rejected his scientific zeal, as Pound was more than often accused of using fake scientific parameters to measure his results.

    To makes things even worse, it appears that all he was doing was ubiquitously following & counting piles of ex nihilo moolah.

    Pound basically passionately argued there was a reason why the Anglo onomatopoetic sound of the Little Green Frog is : ribbit! (ריבית)

    He also spent enormous time measuring volumes of the random piggy banks with his crooked ruler and whatnot *.

    * Pound measured volume by packing piggy banks with mustard seed or buckshot.

    Today, thanks to meticulous research efforts of Zer Experts of the Eternal Ethics Defense Studies,such as honorable Stephen Jaywalk Gould, we know that Naughty Imagist had packed non-gentile piggy banks extra-tight to make them look bad for America.

    Gould’s message to all Pounds of past, present, and the future :

    Without a priori preferences, we would scarcely be human; and good science, as Darwin noted so often, collects data to test ideas.

    Science has long recognized the tyranny of prior preference, and has constructed safeguards in requirements of uniform procedure and replication of experiments.

    Gross flouting of procedure and conscious fraud may often be detected, but unconscious finagling by sincere seekers of objectivity may be refractory.

    Read More
  136. @Peter Akuleyev
    ” [N]owadays hard-to-obtain novel”

    Some of you young folk might not remember 1994, but we didn't have Kindles or even Amazon (just founded that summer) back then. If you wanted an out-of-print book, you had to browse through the random used book stores in your town and hope to come across it, or maybe write a letter to large urban used book stores like Powell's or Strand to inquire whether they had a copy.

    Powell’s was actually on the internet before Amazon. 1993 for some forms of access (and I think only the technical bookstore), 1994 for their website.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Powell’s_Books#20th_century

    Read More
  137. @Opinionator
    You won't see Slate or Salon supporting a boycott of, divestment from, or sanctions against the Zionist entity.

    Unlike you, I can google “Salon BDS”. Maybe your cognitive faculties extend to clicking on a hyperlink, though, so I’m going to help you out. http://www.salon.com/topic/bds/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Most of these are news stories (that admittedly avoid the usual pro-Israel cant) and some are taking issue with anti-BDS measures due to concerns about constitutional violations.

    In any case though, they all refer to the exercise of BDS to end the occupation, an effort the aim of which is the furtherance the Jewish supremacist ("Zionist") agenda in Palestine not its cessation. That class of BDS is not a challenge to the Zionist entity as such.
  138. @Altai
    I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line. (Unless somebody can give me a good reason why he should be a true believer, because at this stage I can't see one.) I wouldn't be surprised if half the most fervent racism screamers have said something outright genocidal about Palestinians at some stage, might be time to start digging.

    I can only hope this constant barrage will finally push Bannon to end his pro-Israel line.

    Can someone even explain this logic?

    I wouldn’t be surprised if half the most fervent racism screamers have said something outright genocidal about Palestinians at some stage, might be time to start digging.

    Is there some sort of hypnosis course that commentators around can take where they learn that the Left is pro-Israel?

    Read More
  139. @ScarletNumber
    I had to stop reading Slate for two reasons. First, the tenor of their Trump coverage. Second, Dear Prudence left and was replaced by a 28-year-old lesbian.

    I stopped reading Slate for two reasons, both named Emily.

    Read More
  140. @Mr. Anon
    "Ben Mathis-Lilley"

    I wonder if he's upset that his Dad is such a pussy that he agreed to hypenate his son's name.

    Bingo.

    Read More
  141. @Lugash
    We've got a remarkably small canon of literature on the alt-right. The Bell Curve, The Turner Diaries and Camp of the Saints. That's about it isn't it? I've only skimmed the first one, and the only time they come up anymore is when the left pushes them out into the spotlight.

    Maybe they'll notice The Half Blood Prince and it will be Steve's turn in the barrel.

    Tom Wolfe.

    Rudyard Kipling. (There’s a poem attributed to him called “Wrath of the Awakened Saxon”. You can find it online, but only on alt-right websites. I don’t know if this means the Kipling attribution is false, or if it’s a real Kipling that’s been memory-holed by normies, but either way it’s a very alt-right poem.)

    Thomas Carlyle.

    According to Mark Zuckerberg’s sister: all of the Greco-Roman classics.

    According to Slate or The Atlantic or somesuch, from a while back: opera in general, idr which composer(s) in particular.

    Read More
  142. @Almost Missouri
    Ben Mathis-Lilley:

    " ... Literally a KKK ... White Power Scumbag ... [random split infinitive] ... extremely racist ... white-power ... white nationalist ... white supremacist ... KKK ... white pride ... What the hell ... "
     
    For this he went to Harvard?

    Have you seen a Harvard syllabus in the last thirty years?

    Read More
  143. @guest
    I bought Camp of the Saints on Amazon in 2015, I want to say for like ten bucks. Now I see it's only listed used from about $140. That's interesting.

    You can borrow my copy if you want.

    I did the same thing, same year, on abebooks.com for exactly (thanks to a gmail search) $6.93, shipping included. Fine vintage paperback, too.

    On Steve’s advice, by the way.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Maybe the price of a dead tree book has gone up due to demand, given that the e-version is full of mistakes and has been pulled.

    Or perhaps the demand has gone up because of the times. Or both.

    The author can't be very interested in selling more copies or he'd get after the publisher to fix the e-version.

    I'm sure I bought a used dead tree book a couple of years ago or so for a few bucks.

    But the book was too depressing to finish. I can't remember if I kept it when I downsized from a house to a condo.
  144. @Opinionator
    Because you think they are typified by unaccountable authority?

    Because you think they are typified by unaccountable authority?

    It isn’t because of what I think.

    Read More
  145. @ScarletNumber
    Slate allows comments. For example, its article "Rachel Maddow Turned a Scoop on Donald Trump’s Taxes Into a Cynical, Self-Defeating Spectacle" has 621 at the moment.

    Maybe it’s because I’m using an iPad. I’ll check tomorrow from the desktop.

    Read More
  146. @David
    I did the same thing, same year, on abebooks.com for exactly (thanks to a gmail search) $6.93, shipping included. Fine vintage paperback, too.

    On Steve's advice, by the way.

    Maybe the price of a dead tree book has gone up due to demand, given that the e-version is full of mistakes and has been pulled.

    Or perhaps the demand has gone up because of the times. Or both.

    The author can’t be very interested in selling more copies or he’d get after the publisher to fix the e-version.

    I’m sure I bought a used dead tree book a couple of years ago or so for a few bucks.

    But the book was too depressing to finish. I can’t remember if I kept it when I downsized from a house to a condo.

    Read More
  147. @fnn
    Brudnoy was able to get away with a lot (He was Jewish, Ivy League, openly Gay and also HIV+ for many years.) IIRC, Jared Taylor and Sam Francis were semi-regular guests.

    fnn,

    Brudnoy’s program was invariably interesting and easily available in New York City even though it originated from Boston.

    I remember Brudnoy’s very friendly interviews of John McManus, the President of the John Birch Society. Also his effusive congratulations of Pat Buchanan on his New Hampshire primary victory.

    I never caught his interviews of Taylor and Francis. They would have had to be very, very interesting.

    Read More
  148. @celt darnell
    The Atlantic Monthly article is what caused me to read Camp of the Saints which is actually outstanding.

    Despite the subject matter, there are a lot of parts that are laugh-out-loud funny.

    What the hell happened to the Atlantic anyhow? It actually used to be worth reading.

    By the way, what's with the double-barrel name Ben Mathis-Lilley?

    Agree. For such a depressing book, I did laugh quite a few times. Gallows humor I suppose.

    Read More
  149. @Opinionator
    You won't see Slate or Salon supporting a boycott of, divestment from, or sanctions against the Zionist entity.

    Most of these are news stories (that admittedly avoid the usual pro-Israel cant) and some are taking issue with anti-BDS measures due to concerns about constitutional violations.

    In any case though, they all refer to the exercise of BDS to end the occupation, which is designed to further the Jewish supremacist agenda in Palestine not to end it. That is not BDS as a challenge to the Zionist entity as such.

    Read More
  150. @Gabriel M
    Unlike you, I can google "Salon BDS". Maybe your cognitive faculties extend to clicking on a hyperlink, though, so I'm going to help you out. http://www.salon.com/topic/bds/

    Most of these are news stories (that admittedly avoid the usual pro-Israel cant) and some are taking issue with anti-BDS measures due to concerns about constitutional violations.

    In any case though, they all refer to the exercise of BDS to end the occupation, an effort the aim of which is the furtherance the Jewish supremacist (“Zionist”) agenda in Palestine not its cessation. That class of BDS is not a challenge to the Zionist entity as such.

    Read More
  151. @little spoon
    FYI, I am South Asian, and my mother immigrated from Calcutta. Yesterday a vocal and active SJW (white Jewish male) I work with told me about this camp of saints book and asked if I was outraged (because the book was about people like me, he pointed out). He told me that it portrayed these masses of brown people as savages and said the book described the ships as being packed with people covered and dripping in sperm, as if they were animals relieving themselves. I nodded my head without expression. I generally don't argue with him, but I also don't indicate that I am really motivated by what he says either.

    But internally, I was struck by the real world parallels. In Cologne last year, did we not see that the horde of migrants that jumped on leaky boats from Turkey to greece formed a mob to sexually attack 1000 women in the streets? They surrounded them in tight circles of dozens of men and groped them and stripped them. It could hardly be any closer to the fictional prophesy of a boatload of migrants so primitive and savage that they were all covered in sperm.

    In truth, I am not offended. I am not sure why. Perhaps because the only part of the prophesy that is wrong is that it chose Indians as the first of the horde of horribles to arrive? In the 50s, when Raspail was inspired, Indians looked liked the world's worst off to many. They were considered the most malnourished and backward. And they have faced many famines, but none of them led to civil war or mass migrations. They maintained a democracy and managed to feed their populations without excessive reliance on the west. And in the end, we Indians mainly come to the west in controlled amounts as highly skilled workers when jobs are legally offered. So, I think I was not offended in part because my own kind beat the prophesy, despite still being poor overall. Poor yes, but not the ones who created ISIS, then had military age men flee in spectacular show of opportunistic cowardice and then make demands of the German welfare state while assaulting their women on livestream.

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that's about.

    Anyways, yes, this white man at work was probing my outrage. Another white man at slate is outraged about Raspail, the literal white supremacist. I happened to scan facebook for postings by my hundreds of south asian friends and family, yet I did not find a single mention of this book. No outrage there either I guess. Wonder what that’s about.

    Perhaps your friends presume the Indians in Raspail’s book are low-caste Indians of the sort they look down upon themselves. Not all Indians are the same.

    Read More
  152. Those who would be quick to blame the Jew should note the surnames of these Atlantic auteurs, Connelly and Kennedy, hail from the Emerald Isle. Beware the Eternal Mick.

    Read More
  153. @fnn
    Brudnoy was able to get away with a lot (He was Jewish, Ivy League, openly Gay and also HIV+ for many years.) IIRC, Jared Taylor and Sam Francis were semi-regular guests.

    Listened to Brudnoy on a semi-regular basis; he was a eloquent and fair interviewer with a pretty eclectic guest list. However, he didn’t come out until the mid-90′s when he was already sick with HIV. He had a “beard” for a while.

    Read More
  154. @Boomstick
    I don't think the concept of alt-right is necessary to describe Heinlein, who seems to have been a pretty straightforward Libertarian.

    Nor is alt-right necessary to describe the Turner Diaries, which is straight-ahead Nazism.

    The Starship Troopers Heinlein or the Stranger in a Strange Land Heinlein?

    Read More
  155. @Timmy
    Here's a pdf version if anyone cares:

    http://www.jrbooksonline.com/pdfs/camp_of_the_saints.pdf

    I just wanted to post that as well. Miracles of the Internet!

    Read More

Comments are closed.

PastClassics
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.