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Sinister White Russians Infiltrating America Using Birthright Citizenship
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From NBC last winter:

Birth tourism brings Russian baby boom to Miami

by CYNTHIA MCFADDEN, SARAH FITZPATRICK, TRACY CONNOR and ANNA R. SCHECTER

MIAMI — Lured by the charm of little Havana or the glamour of South Beach, some 15 million tourists visit Miami every year.

But for a growing number of Russian women, the draw isn’t sunny beaches or pulsing nightclubs. It’s U.S. citizenship for their newborn children.

Thank goodness for Russian sleazeballs exploiting our immigration law loopholes: their whiteness allows the mass media to get worked up on the topic instead of still nervously shying away from, say, endemic Chinese birth tourism on the grounds that it might be racist to notice.

 
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  1. Careful man, there’s a beverage here.

  2. “Birth tourism brings Russian baby boom to Miami”

    It’s like another Cuban Missile Crisis.

    • Replies: @The Alarmist

    "“Birth tourism brings Russian baby boom to Miami”

    It’s like another Cuban Missile Crisis."
     
    Dude, the imagery of that statement is priceless ... Is that a rocket in that pocket?
  3. Problem is that ending birthright citizenship would discourage immigration, which brings diversity to countries. Having individuals from different backgrounds encourages unique perspectives and deepens debates and discussions, according to the Asia-Pacific Economic blog.

    2. In cases where only one parent is a citizen, the father is unknown, or adopted children arise, the result could lead to confusion, court cases, and the opening of Pandora’s Box.

    • Replies: @anon

    Problem is that ending birthright citizenship would discourage immigration, which brings diversity to countries. Having individuals from different backgrounds encourages unique perspectives and deepens debates and discussions, according to the Asia-Pacific Economic blog.
     
    imagine what you can learn from 80 IQ squatamalans and 65 IQ somalians
    , @Alec Leamas

    2. In cases where only one parent is a citizen, the father is unknown, or adopted children arise, the result could lead to confusion, court cases, and the opening of Pandora’s Box.
     
    Jus Sanguinis American citizenship was patrilineal only for a long time without leading to this apparent confusion. For example, Winston Churchill's mother Jennie Jerome was an American, but Winston was not during his life - after WWII some honorary form of citizenship was bestowed upon him by Congress when he visited the United States, but he was not considered an American citizen before.

    Of course, we now have the ability to determine paternity beyond all doubt. I suppose in our shameless age foreign birth tourists could claim that their baby daddy was an American citizen or legal resident whose identity was unknown at conception and after and then prosecute some kind of judicial process to have the baby's citizenship recognized, but they could already be doing that with babies born abroad but don't seem to be. The whole game is simply timing travel so that dumping their babies in an American hospital is assured, where citizenship is therefore assumed upon issue of the Birth Certificate.
    , @AnotherDad
    Trolling or just a fool?
  4. Thank goodness for Russian sleazeballs exploiting our immigration law loopholes: their whiteness allows the mass media to get worked up on the topic instead of still nervously shying away from, say, endemic Chinese birth tourism on the grounds that it might be racist to notice.

    After the tragic stabbing of three infants and two adults at a birthing center in Flushing, Queens a month ago, The New York Times actually provided some coverage on this practice. Granted, The New York Times was concerned over mental illness issues (which is certainly relevant) and the lack of government regulation. The New York Times desires that the birthing centers be regulated by New York State, but the paper has no objections to birth tourism apparently.

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/09/21/nyregion/queens-stabbing-day-care-birth-tourism.html

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/10/10/nyregion/queens-daycare-stabbing-nanny.html

  5. In brighter news, Jeff Bezos lost almost 20 billion over the weekend.

    • Replies: @International Jew
    Unfortunately, I didn't find any of it.
    , @Thin-Skinned Masta-Beta
    The bad news:

    All those billions were also drained from Muppets' 401Ks by canny banksters who were shorting the stock.
    , @J.Ross
    Does he even feel that or is that like Kurt Eichenwald reading his critics?
    , @El Dato
    > Jeff Bezos lost almost 20 billion over the weekend.

    *PAM* *PAM*

    Do I hear stockmarket implosion sounds!

    "She's reaching crush depth, captain!"

    https://twitter.com/TheRegister/status/1055667112616828928
  6. • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Back in the 1970s, Time ran an article asserting that the relatively low murder rate in El Paso is due to a lot of lithium in the drinking water.
    , @kimchilover
    There's a place out near Marfa, Texas (30 minutes through the difficult-but-gorgeous Pinto Canyon route...or, an hour and a half through the 'easy way' that puts you face to face with ICE...not that there's anything wrong with that, it's just 3x as long) that I try and visit at least once a year: The Chinati Hot Springs.

    The bubbling waters that come out of the earth there are at 110 degrees and are infused with minerals like lithium (especially lithium), arsenic and others and have been rumored to cure the aches and pains of life for hundreds of years.

    Been going there for over 10 years now and, Hand-to-Bible, there's really nothing like it...those late-night mineral baths (in your own private room) are more rejuvenating than anything I've ever experienced; it also doesn't hurt that you're more off the grid there than just about anywhere else within the continental United States. But, facts are facts (subjectively speaking).

    Anyhoo, if you find yourself visiting the Big Bend area (the National Park 'Big Bend' not the State Park 'Big Bend') and have a couple days to kill (and a vehicle with good tires), it can truly be a transcendent experience. Look it up.
    , @Buzz Mohawk
    It is important to protect our precious bodily fluids. Our purity of essence is at stake. It's not the white Russians we have to worry about, Mandrake, it's the red ones.
    , @El Dato
    But with Dilithium, people would probably rocket to sign up for the the Trump Space Force.
    , @Joe Stalin
    I guess when the soft drink "Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda" (guess what drink!) was
    created in 1929, they knew what they were doing when they added lithium citrate, a
    mood-stabilizing drug. It contained that until 1948.

    "Lithium citrate has been used for many decades for psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder and as a supposed cure for hangovers at the time. In 1871, William Hammond, professor of Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in New York, became the first physician to prescribe lithium for mania; in 1894, Danish psychiatrist Frederik Lange made explicit reference to lithium in the treatment of melancholic depression.

    "In a column published in The New York Times, Cornell University professor Anna Fels wrote: “Lithium drinks were in huge demand for their reputed health-giving properties, so much so that the element was added to commercial drinks. 7-Up was originally called Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda and contained lithium citrate right up until 1950. In fact, it’s been suggested that the 7 in 7-Up refers to the atomic mass of the lithium. (Maybe the “Up” referred to mood?).”

    https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/02/20/contained-lithium/
  7. Speaking of Russia…

    It seems that the flag of Perm Krai is the chromic mirror image of that of the Dominican Republic. And instead of an open Bible in the center, it features California’s bear balancing that Bible on his back:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Perm_Krai#/media/File:Flag_of_Perm_Krai.svg

  8. @Mike Krauthammer
    Problem is that ending birthright citizenship would discourage immigration, which brings diversity to countries. Having individuals from different backgrounds encourages unique perspectives and deepens debates and discussions, according to the Asia-Pacific Economic blog.

    2. In cases where only one parent is a citizen, the father is unknown, or adopted children arise, the result could lead to confusion, court cases, and the opening of Pandora’s Box.

    Problem is that ending birthright citizenship would discourage immigration, which brings diversity to countries. Having individuals from different backgrounds encourages unique perspectives and deepens debates and discussions, according to the Asia-Pacific Economic blog.

    imagine what you can learn from 80 IQ squatamalans and 65 IQ somalians

  9. @Hippopotamusdrome

    Back in the 1970s, Time ran an article asserting that the relatively low murder rate in El Paso is due to a lot of lithium in the drinking water.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Steve,

    In Ireland many people with mental issues have historically sought help at holy wells. Lately these wells have been reported to be lithium-loaded!
    , @Autochthon
    https://youtu.be/vUnbfTy28VM

    (Shhhh! Arkansas is backward; The Man told me so.)
    , @Clifford Brown
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pkcJEvMcnEg
  10. But somehow “comprehensive immigration reform” (aka amnesty) isn’t a “magnet” (see thread).

    • Replies: @L Woods
    End of birthright citizenship + amnesty > keeping birthright citizenship - amnesty. The government is never going to orchestrate a mass expulsion - if amnesty, the de facto state of affairs anyway, can be traded for something this valuable, it'd be well worth it.
  11. @Reg Cæsar
    In brighter news, Jeff Bezos lost almost 20 billion over the weekend.

    Unfortunately, I didn’t find any of it.

    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    That's the downside of schadenfreude.
  12. I have to hand it to Trump. He is really pushing hard for the GOP in the House. However, it is hard to take this tweet without rolling on the floor.

    I live across the state line from Yoder’s district. This guy is anything but good. I think most GOP in the area want to see Yoder gone.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    I'm in his district and think he is a cuck. But he has no serious opposition. I'm voting libty in that race just because.

    www.clemmonsforkansas.com

    Doesn't say squat about immigration on his web page but the only alternative is that Sharice Davids, the less about her one can say the better.

    , @Jenner Ickham Errican

    I think most GOP in the area want to see Yoder gone.
     
    What’s BenKenobi’s opinion on the matter?
  13. @Steve Sailer
    Back in the 1970s, Time ran an article asserting that the relatively low murder rate in El Paso is due to a lot of lithium in the drinking water.

    Steve,

    In Ireland many people with mental issues have historically sought help at holy wells. Lately these wells have been reported to be lithium-loaded!

  14. How about tax for parents of anchor babies. If they don’t pay tax the sending nations.

    Want to have a citizen pay up.

  15. @Hippopotamusdrome

    There’s a place out near Marfa, Texas (30 minutes through the difficult-but-gorgeous Pinto Canyon route…or, an hour and a half through the ‘easy way’ that puts you face to face with ICE…not that there’s anything wrong with that, it’s just 3x as long) that I try and visit at least once a year: The Chinati Hot Springs.

    The bubbling waters that come out of the earth there are at 110 degrees and are infused with minerals like lithium (especially lithium), arsenic and others and have been rumored to cure the aches and pains of life for hundreds of years.

    Been going there for over 10 years now and, Hand-to-Bible, there’s really nothing like it…those late-night mineral baths (in your own private room) are more rejuvenating than anything I’ve ever experienced; it also doesn’t hurt that you’re more off the grid there than just about anywhere else within the continental United States. But, facts are facts (subjectively speaking).

    Anyhoo, if you find yourself visiting the Big Bend area (the National Park ‘Big Bend’ not the State Park ‘Big Bend’) and have a couple days to kill (and a vehicle with good tires), it can truly be a transcendent experience. Look it up.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    kimchilover:

    Also probably plenty of airborne radon.
    , @anon

    The bubbling waters that come out of the earth there are at 110 degrees and are infused with minerals like lithium (especially lithium), arsenic and others and have been rumored to cure the aches and pains of life for hundreds of years.
     
    be sure to load up on that arsenic

    if you're lucky there might be some cyanide in there too
  16. • Replies: @WowJustWow
    My takeaway from the NYT article on the subject was this: Workplace affairs tend to end badly, and to end your marriage badly. And being at a company where the workplace is 95% of your life tends to lead to workplace affairs.

    I've heard tales from itinerant old minstrels that big companies used to have anti-fraternization rules, but that was back in the bad old days of, like, sexism, man. If we didn't allow seven-figure-salary hotshots to openly impregnate and engage in BDSM master-slave relationships with their subordinates so that we can bemoan the patriarchy when they sue each other a couple years later, we'd be living under a real patriarchy.

    , @El Dato
    > Roosh still not beaten up and thrown into a ditch by a male vigilante group
    > Roosh still not gawkered by one of the "ladies" he hoovered up
    > Instead females at confused nonevil liberal ultraden "Google" land the Golden Blowjob

    These times never cease to amaze.
  17. If Trump wanted to knock down the Putin-got-him-elected nonsense, he’d make some Russian birth tourists/spawn the face of this.

    But I don’t think Trump wants to stop that Russian Conspiracy Hoax. At this point, it’s helping him; anyone who believes in it is instantly disqualified as a ranting loon.

  18. @Hippopotamusdrome

    It is important to protect our precious bodily fluids. Our purity of essence is at stake. It’s not the white Russians we have to worry about, Mandrake, it’s the red ones.

  19. I would propose a new visa program specifically for hot foreign women who want to come to America to date and marry American men.

    It would be interesting to see how the feminists react when they are the ones getting replaced by foreign competition.

    • Agree: Stan d Mute
    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    It's not a problem we need fixed; what we need is to keep out all the male invaders.

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :

    https://youtu.be/Cq8nUyO-0SY
    , @Redneck farmer
    Allow the hot foreign babes to marry lesbians, that'll shut up the feminist harpies.
  20. @istevefan
    I have to hand it to Trump. He is really pushing hard for the GOP in the House. However, it is hard to take this tweet without rolling on the floor.

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1057325873312026624

    I live across the state line from Yoder's district. This guy is anything but good. I think most GOP in the area want to see Yoder gone.

    I’m in his district and think he is a cuck. But he has no serious opposition. I’m voting libty in that race just because.

    http://www.clemmonsforkansas.com

    Doesn’t say squat about immigration on his web page but the only alternative is that Sharice Davids, the less about her one can say the better.

    • Replies: @istevefan

    I’m in his district and think he is a cuck. But he has no serious opposition. I’m voting libty in that race just because.
     
    Are you sure? From what I have heard Yoder is trailing and will presumably lose. I think I heard the GOP pulled their ad support for him. I could be wrong, but I thought he was pretty much done.
  21. @Reg Cæsar
    In brighter news, Jeff Bezos lost almost 20 billion over the weekend.

    The bad news:

    All those billions were also drained from Muppets’ 401Ks by canny banksters who were shorting the stock.

  22. @istevefan
    I have to hand it to Trump. He is really pushing hard for the GOP in the House. However, it is hard to take this tweet without rolling on the floor.

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1057325873312026624

    I live across the state line from Yoder's district. This guy is anything but good. I think most GOP in the area want to see Yoder gone.

    I think most GOP in the area want to see Yoder gone.

    What’s BenKenobi’s opinion on the matter?

  23. @Anon
    https://twitter.com/rooshv/status/1057380575844225025

    My takeaway from the NYT article on the subject was this: Workplace affairs tend to end badly, and to end your marriage badly. And being at a company where the workplace is 95% of your life tends to lead to workplace affairs.

    I’ve heard tales from itinerant old minstrels that big companies used to have anti-fraternization rules, but that was back in the bad old days of, like, sexism, man. If we didn’t allow seven-figure-salary hotshots to openly impregnate and engage in BDSM master-slave relationships with their subordinates so that we can bemoan the patriarchy when they sue each other a couple years later, we’d be living under a real patriarchy.

    • Agree: ic1000
    • LOL: bomag
    • Replies: @Anon

    I’ve heard tales from itinerant old minstrels that big companies used to have anti-fraternization rules
     
    What's an example of an anti-fraternization rule?
  24. @Anonymous
    I'm in his district and think he is a cuck. But he has no serious opposition. I'm voting libty in that race just because.

    www.clemmonsforkansas.com

    Doesn't say squat about immigration on his web page but the only alternative is that Sharice Davids, the less about her one can say the better.

    I’m in his district and think he is a cuck. But he has no serious opposition. I’m voting libty in that race just because.

    Are you sure? From what I have heard Yoder is trailing and will presumably lose. I think I heard the GOP pulled their ad support for him. I could be wrong, but I thought he was pretty much done.

    • Agree: Dan Hayes
  25. @Steve Sailer
    Back in the 1970s, Time ran an article asserting that the relatively low murder rate in El Paso is due to a lot of lithium in the drinking water.

    (Shhhh! Arkansas is backward; The Man told me so.)

  26. @kimchilover
    There's a place out near Marfa, Texas (30 minutes through the difficult-but-gorgeous Pinto Canyon route...or, an hour and a half through the 'easy way' that puts you face to face with ICE...not that there's anything wrong with that, it's just 3x as long) that I try and visit at least once a year: The Chinati Hot Springs.

    The bubbling waters that come out of the earth there are at 110 degrees and are infused with minerals like lithium (especially lithium), arsenic and others and have been rumored to cure the aches and pains of life for hundreds of years.

    Been going there for over 10 years now and, Hand-to-Bible, there's really nothing like it...those late-night mineral baths (in your own private room) are more rejuvenating than anything I've ever experienced; it also doesn't hurt that you're more off the grid there than just about anywhere else within the continental United States. But, facts are facts (subjectively speaking).

    Anyhoo, if you find yourself visiting the Big Bend area (the National Park 'Big Bend' not the State Park 'Big Bend') and have a couple days to kill (and a vehicle with good tires), it can truly be a transcendent experience. Look it up.

    kimchilover:

    Also probably plenty of airborne radon.

  27. @Hypnotoad666
    I would propose a new visa program specifically for hot foreign women who want to come to America to date and marry American men.

    It would be interesting to see how the feminists react when they are the ones getting replaced by foreign competition.

    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    It’s not a problem we need fixed; what we need is to keep out all the male invaders.

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :

    • LOL: Redneck farmer
    • Replies: @anon
    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    Doesn't that introduce a risk that your offspring will have divided loyalties?
    , @TomSchmidt
    There's a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children. Unless she stays in contact with her home culture, your children will be aliens in the USA and also in the culture she comes from. If you marry and move to her culture you avoid this problem.
    , @L Woods

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :
     
    Other than living in a bunker impervious to radio waves and disconnected from telecommunications infrastructure far from the corrupting influence of one's fellow Americans, I'm pretty sure that's impossible.
  28. @Steve Sailer
    Back in the 1970s, Time ran an article asserting that the relatively low murder rate in El Paso is due to a lot of lithium in the drinking water.

  29. @WowJustWow
    My takeaway from the NYT article on the subject was this: Workplace affairs tend to end badly, and to end your marriage badly. And being at a company where the workplace is 95% of your life tends to lead to workplace affairs.

    I've heard tales from itinerant old minstrels that big companies used to have anti-fraternization rules, but that was back in the bad old days of, like, sexism, man. If we didn't allow seven-figure-salary hotshots to openly impregnate and engage in BDSM master-slave relationships with their subordinates so that we can bemoan the patriarchy when they sue each other a couple years later, we'd be living under a real patriarchy.

    I’ve heard tales from itinerant old minstrels that big companies used to have anti-fraternization rules

    What’s an example of an anti-fraternization rule?

    • Replies: @bomag
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZB62oaOeqR0
  30. anon[402] • Disclaimer says:
    @Autochthon
    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    It's not a problem we need fixed; what we need is to keep out all the male invaders.

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :

    https://youtu.be/Cq8nUyO-0SY

    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    Doesn’t that introduce a risk that your offspring will have divided loyalties?

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    I'm not remotely worried: my boy is American because he'll know his mom left her Homeland for a reason. As I say: choose wisely!
  31. Since the United States imposes federal income tax on the basis of citizenship – and renunciation takes 10 years – aren’t these anchor babies facing a significant IRS bill in the future?

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Exactly. Many without even knowing it. Those Chinese anchor babies of rich women? They're going to pay quite the price.
    , @Achmed E. Newman
    Who said renunciation takes 10 years? I'd never heard that. I know of a Canadian who took care of it with some paperwork, is all. Zerohedge often writes about the "big" increases in renunciation due to a tax policy unlike almost all other nation's as far as "the long arm of the law". However, though the ZH increase numbers were big percent-wise, they were very small in absolute numbers (a few thousand yearly?)
  32. The US government spends 40 million dollars a year in Russia, Iran and China to tell the Russians, Iranians and Chinese what a wonderful country America is and how horrible their countries are, of course Russians, Iranians and Chinese all want to go to America…. What do you expect?

  33. @Reg Cæsar
    In brighter news, Jeff Bezos lost almost 20 billion over the weekend.

    Does he even feel that or is that like Kurt Eichenwald reading his critics?

  34. @Hippopotamusdrome

    But with Dilithium, people would probably rocket to sign up for the the Trump Space Force.

  35. @Anon
    https://twitter.com/rooshv/status/1057380575844225025

    > Roosh still not beaten up and thrown into a ditch by a male vigilante group
    > Roosh still not gawkered by one of the “ladies” he hoovered up
    > Instead females at confused nonevil liberal ultraden “Google” land the Golden Blowjob

    These times never cease to amaze.

  36. @Reg Cæsar
    In brighter news, Jeff Bezos lost almost 20 billion over the weekend.

    > Jeff Bezos lost almost 20 billion over the weekend.

    *PAM* *PAM*

    Do I hear stockmarket implosion sounds!

    “She’s reaching crush depth, captain!”

  37. @MikeatMikedotMike
    "Birth tourism brings Russian baby boom to Miami"

    It's like another Cuban Missile Crisis.

    ““Birth tourism brings Russian baby boom to Miami”

    It’s like another Cuban Missile Crisis.”

    Dude, the imagery of that statement is priceless … Is that a rocket in that pocket?

  38. Steve, are you going to be so sanguine when they run out of cream, and we start getting Black Russians?

  39. @anon
    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    Doesn't that introduce a risk that your offspring will have divided loyalties?

    I’m not remotely worried: my boy is American because he’ll know his mom left her Homeland for a reason. As I say: choose wisely!

  40. @Hypnotoad666
    I would propose a new visa program specifically for hot foreign women who want to come to America to date and marry American men.

    It would be interesting to see how the feminists react when they are the ones getting replaced by foreign competition.

    Allow the hot foreign babes to marry lesbians, that’ll shut up the feminist harpies.

  41. Why not make it a 5-year felony to have a child in the US if not a US citizen or here on a green card? The proof at trial is so simple even Mueller could handle it.
    I have advocated this for about 20 years.
    The female felons serve time at the new Federal “Devil’s Island” in the Pacific and grow their own food!
    Also, the child is given up for adoption.
    But the child is a US citizen. So?
    I bet the new felony, if enforced, reduces “anchor babyism” 95%.

  42. Thank goodness for Russian sleazeballs exploiting our immigration law loopholes: their whiteness allows the mass media to get worked up on the topic instead of still nervously shying away from, say, endemic Chinese birth tourism on the grounds that it might be racist to notice.

    Would we be enjoying these levels of clown-world incompetence in governance without the Jews?

    No.

  43. “This is Russian interference with our Democracy(tm)!”

  44. @International Jew
    Unfortunately, I didn't find any of it.

    That’s the downside of schadenfreude.

  45. @Autochthon
    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    It's not a problem we need fixed; what we need is to keep out all the male invaders.

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :

    https://youtu.be/Cq8nUyO-0SY

    There’s a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children. Unless she stays in contact with her home culture, your children will be aliens in the USA and also in the culture she comes from. If you marry and move to her culture you avoid this problem.

    • Replies: @anon
    Yeah, just like Trump's children by Ivana and Melania.
    , @Anonymous

    There’s a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children.
     
    What do you mean "women acculturate children"?

    What does "acculturate" really mean?
    , @Autochthon
    And that's why to this day Donald Trump speaks only Scots Gaelic, has no affinity at all for America, does not identify as an American, and is equally bewildered and out of place any time he visits Britain. Winston Churchill had these kinds of problems too because of his foreign mother, and as a result his life was a disaster; the man never achieved anything of note.
  46. @SnakeEyes
    Since the United States imposes federal income tax on the basis of citizenship - and renunciation takes 10 years - aren't these anchor babies facing a significant IRS bill in the future?

    Exactly. Many without even knowing it. Those Chinese anchor babies of rich women? They’re going to pay quite the price.

  47. @Mike Krauthammer
    Problem is that ending birthright citizenship would discourage immigration, which brings diversity to countries. Having individuals from different backgrounds encourages unique perspectives and deepens debates and discussions, according to the Asia-Pacific Economic blog.

    2. In cases where only one parent is a citizen, the father is unknown, or adopted children arise, the result could lead to confusion, court cases, and the opening of Pandora’s Box.

    2. In cases where only one parent is a citizen, the father is unknown, or adopted children arise, the result could lead to confusion, court cases, and the opening of Pandora’s Box.

    Jus Sanguinis American citizenship was patrilineal only for a long time without leading to this apparent confusion. For example, Winston Churchill’s mother Jennie Jerome was an American, but Winston was not during his life – after WWII some honorary form of citizenship was bestowed upon him by Congress when he visited the United States, but he was not considered an American citizen before.

    Of course, we now have the ability to determine paternity beyond all doubt. I suppose in our shameless age foreign birth tourists could claim that their baby daddy was an American citizen or legal resident whose identity was unknown at conception and after and then prosecute some kind of judicial process to have the baby’s citizenship recognized, but they could already be doing that with babies born abroad but don’t seem to be. The whole game is simply timing travel so that dumping their babies in an American hospital is assured, where citizenship is therefore assumed upon issue of the Birth Certificate.

  48. Stats:

    ~300,000 births per year to non-US citizens in the US.

    ~40,000 of these accrue to birth tourism.

    Of this number, slightly more than 10,000 accrue to China and about 1,000 accrues to Russia.

    [my blog post on this]

    Not only Russian but even Chinese birth tourism (overwhelmingly practiced by rich Americanophiles) is completely irrelevant compared to the anchor baby problem.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The Pew numbers in your post are from 2014. Do you have more recent data?
    , @istevefan
    White liberals try to avoid criticizing nonwhites at all costs even if it is to the detriment of society. Since the Russians are white, the liberals can address this issue by attacking them, and they can feel good that they won't appear racist.

    I think this is similar to how white liberals in the UK can criticize immigration only if they direct that criticism at Poles and other Eastern Europeans. Though Pakistanis, Africans and other non-Europeans are the overwhelming majority of immigrants to the UK, they are off limits when it comes to criticisms. So the Poles have to take the brunt of it.

    , @Eagle Eye
    THREE CATEGORIES THAT SHOULD BE DISTINGUISHED:

    (1) BIRTH TOURISM refers to mothers who come to the U.S. legally (on a tourist visa) to give birth and then promptly return to China, Russia, etc.

    (2) BORN IN U.S.A. TO ILLEGALS. The numerically much bigger issue is illegal residents (mostly Hispanic mestizos) giving birth in the U.S. The parents are typically documented as citizens of Mexico or other countries in Central and South America and continue to use identity documents (e.g. carta matricular) from those countries, thus clearly remaining under those countries' "jurisdiction."

    (3) ANCHOR BABIES. This seams to be a recent trend - mother (barely) makes it only U.S. soil to give birth to "anchor baby," whole clan follows suit.

    TWO ISSUES:

    (1) CITIZENSHIP: Whatever the Fourteenth Amendment "actually" means, it has long been the PRACTICE to extend citizenship to all babies born on American soil. To the extent that this is only a PRACTICE not mandated by the 14th, it could be abolished by statute.

    THE PROBLEM WITH CHANGING CITIZENSHIP RULES: Since we are clearly unwilling to expel 25 million illegals who have NO right to remain here, is it really WISE to create an underclass of U.S.-born non-citizens who will resent their second-class status yet will never leave?

    (2) TAX AND SOCIAL SECURITY RULES: It would be easy, e.g. to adjust tax laws and social security/Medicare rules to withdraw benefits from those who have never paid into the system. There is no earthly reason why the parents of immigrants should be allowed to come here and claim Social Security and Medicare benefits that they have not paid for. Frequently, they blatantly lie about their personal wealth held back home in order to "qualify" for benefits at the expense of U.S. taxpayers.

  49. @SnakeEyes
    Since the United States imposes federal income tax on the basis of citizenship - and renunciation takes 10 years - aren't these anchor babies facing a significant IRS bill in the future?

    Who said renunciation takes 10 years? I’d never heard that. I know of a Canadian who took care of it with some paperwork, is all. Zerohedge often writes about the “big” increases in renunciation due to a tax policy unlike almost all other nation’s as far as “the long arm of the law”. However, though the ZH increase numbers were big percent-wise, they were very small in absolute numbers (a few thousand yearly?)

    • Replies: @Forbes
    If you wish to never return to the US, and have no US assets that could be confiscated, you're probably good to stop paying the income tax for those 10 years. Needless, if you ever have a reason to travel to the US, you could well be forbidden entry--or upon entry, be detained for failure to pay.

    I've no direct experience with this, but the IRS is pretty vigilant collecting taxes, enforcing their regulations, etc.

    And yes, ZH does often report on the couple thousand numbers who renounce per annum.
  50. @Anatoly Karlin
    Stats:

    ~300,000 births per year to non-US citizens in the US.

    ~40,000 of these accrue to birth tourism.

    Of this number, slightly more than 10,000 accrue to China and about 1,000 accrues to Russia.

    [my blog post on this]

    Not only Russian but even Chinese birth tourism (overwhelmingly practiced by rich Americanophiles) is completely irrelevant compared to the anchor baby problem.

    The Pew numbers in your post are from 2014. Do you have more recent data?

  51. The article actually does mention Chinese birth tourism, saying that some mothers from China falsely claim indigent status so they can get reduced hospital rates. And what are the chances of Congress passing an amendment doing away with birthright citizenship? Close to zero.

  52. @Anon

    I’ve heard tales from itinerant old minstrels that big companies used to have anti-fraternization rules
     
    What's an example of an anti-fraternization rule?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    LOL!

    Excellent choice, Bomag
  53. • Replies: @Forbes
    The annual toll of a few hundred dead blacks in Chicago couldn't be reached for comment...
  54. anonymous[319] • Disclaimer says:

    Although birth tourism is particularly scammy, being quite organized and planned out, versions of it have been going on forever. The low level illegals who come on foot or deliberately overstay their visas have been practicing this on the cheap for a long time. The vast majority have been of the browner hues though so there’s been no indignation expressed about that. The anti-Russian and anti-white rage really seems to be bubbling over these days.

  55. @eah
    But somehow "comprehensive immigration reform" (aka amnesty) isn't a "magnet" (see thread).

    https://twitter.com/LindseyGrahamSC/status/1057282345991106560

    End of birthright citizenship + amnesty > keeping birthright citizenship – amnesty. The government is never going to orchestrate a mass expulsion – if amnesty, the de facto state of affairs anyway, can be traded for something this valuable, it’d be well worth it.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    Don't cave so fast. The reason you think we cannot get a better deal is because the nation as a whole really doesn't understand the magnitude of the issue. Trump has done more in the past few days to get people talking about birthright citizenship than anyone in history. Wait until this issue marinates more into the general population.

    Then consider that since 1965 over 55 million people have come to the USA, which includes the 1986 amnesty. This is the largest number of immigrants to any country in history, period. In other words the other side has already gotten the deal of a lifetime. But the general population of the USA has no idea what has taken place because no one is really allowed to discuss it, unless of course it is in glowing terms.

    Today's Washington Times reports that we had a record 1.75 million immigrants, legal and illegal combined, in 2016.

    The media doesn't want to have these issues aired because the more they are discussed, the more people will come over to a more restrictionist position. So don't be willing to settle now. The more the facts are discussed in public the better our negotiating hand becomes. As I wrote above the other side will be fully satisfied even if immigration is ground to a halt because they have already altered the course of history with regards to the USA. They have transformed the USA from an overwhelmingly European nation into one where Europeans will be a minority in 25 years.

    Our side should not give another inch. And from my experience the more knowledge people have about what has already taken place, the more likely they will support our positions rather than the status quo. Let Trump continue to shape the battlefield before you make plans for an armistice. The more he talks about this the better. And the stupid media will do most of the work for him.
  56. @Autochthon
    I can attest first-hand this posited programme already exists: if you marry a foreign woman (hot or otherwise, though I went with a hot one and I recommend you do the same), it is a piece of cake to sponsor her for residency.*

    It's not a problem we need fixed; what we need is to keep out all the male invaders.

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :

    https://youtu.be/Cq8nUyO-0SY

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :

    Other than living in a bunker impervious to radio waves and disconnected from telecommunications infrastructure far from the corrupting influence of one’s fellow Americans, I’m pretty sure that’s impossible.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
    Susceptibility is not exposure.

    I take your point there are no guarantees, and all you can really trust at the end of the day is yourself, your sidearm, and any pets. Maybe in a year I'll be on the cover of The Unz Review grimacing in despair.

    As Kirkegaard pointed out, though, one must take some risks, and there are no right answers to many of the most weighty questions : "if you marry, you will regret it; if you don't marry, you will regret it." (He wrote it in Danish I believe, but I cannot read or write a lick of Danish, hence the English translation).
  57. Anon[311] • Disclaimer says:

    How many Russian anchor babies vs. non-Russian are there? Yesterday, these people were telling me the thousands of migrants south of the border were no big deal, it’s not like were going to live in Stephen Colbert’s neighborhood or anything. Now, we’ve got sinister Russians? I don’t understand. What’s the difference here? /s

    “Finally, a president willing to take on this absurd policy of birthright citizenship.”

    Wait. That came from Lindsey Graham? Seriously? Did Kavanaugh’s treatment reveal to Mr. Graham a little too early how guys like him are going to be treated in the new nation of the diverse?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    Did Kavanaugh’s treatment reveal to Mr. Graham a little too early how guys like him are going to be treated in the new nation of the diverse?
     
    That's what I was wondering too. Something tells me it was an act, but I'm always hopeful. (Part 2 and Part 3 on the "coming out of Miss Lindsey Grahamnesty".
  58. Trump just tweeted to Paul Ryan to basically STFU.

    This is great because it will make the media cover this issue for the remainder of the week. Trump is a genius for knowing how to flip the news cycle and keep it focused on what he wants to discuss.

    • Replies: @Forbes
    Typically, Trump has no need to "flip the news cycle." He's usually leading it with Twitter comments, as above. Trump says, "Jump!" The media replies, "How high?" is the usual dynamic.

    He's drives media nuts, and they've no idea how/why. It's as if the media are addicts, and Trump is the drug habit they can't kick...
  59. @Anatoly Karlin
    Stats:

    ~300,000 births per year to non-US citizens in the US.

    ~40,000 of these accrue to birth tourism.

    Of this number, slightly more than 10,000 accrue to China and about 1,000 accrues to Russia.

    [my blog post on this]

    Not only Russian but even Chinese birth tourism (overwhelmingly practiced by rich Americanophiles) is completely irrelevant compared to the anchor baby problem.

    White liberals try to avoid criticizing nonwhites at all costs even if it is to the detriment of society. Since the Russians are white, the liberals can address this issue by attacking them, and they can feel good that they won’t appear racist.

    I think this is similar to how white liberals in the UK can criticize immigration only if they direct that criticism at Poles and other Eastern Europeans. Though Pakistanis, Africans and other non-Europeans are the overwhelming majority of immigrants to the UK, they are off limits when it comes to criticisms. So the Poles have to take the brunt of it.

    • Replies: @g2k
    Not true at all. It might've been the case before eu expansion, but since 2004 the whole former eastern block has been given complete freedom of movement and work rights. Of course these countries have to reciprocate towards uk citizens, but, given that the massive wage differentials, its pretty much one way traffic. When you also consider the low cost of flights and established language networks, their numbers are extremely high and growing. Most pakistanis came decades earlier and continue to arrive in smaller numbers.
  60. @Hippopotamusdrome

    I guess when the soft drink “Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda” (guess what drink!) was
    created in 1929, they knew what they were doing when they added lithium citrate, a
    mood-stabilizing drug. It contained that until 1948.

    “Lithium citrate has been used for many decades for psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder and as a supposed cure for hangovers at the time. In 1871, William Hammond, professor of Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in New York, became the first physician to prescribe lithium for mania; in 1894, Danish psychiatrist Frederik Lange made explicit reference to lithium in the treatment of melancholic depression.

    “In a column published in The New York Times, Cornell University professor Anna Fels wrote: “Lithium drinks were in huge demand for their reputed health-giving properties, so much so that the element was added to commercial drinks. 7-Up was originally called Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda and contained lithium citrate right up until 1950. In fact, it’s been suggested that the 7 in 7-Up refers to the atomic mass of the lithium. (Maybe the “Up” referred to mood?).”

    https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/02/20/contained-lithium/

    • Replies: @anon
    sounds like it might go well with the Coca(ine) Cola
  61. The defense of Trump’s executive order when it inevitability goes before the Supreme Court will rest on the explicit meaning of the phrase “…and the jurisdiction thereof”, as unequivocally defined by the Senators who drafted the 14th Amendment, in the Congessional record of debate. For reference, the debate can be found in the Congressional Globe, 39th Congress, 1st Session, Pg. 2890, May 30, 1866, which is available online.

  62. @L Woods
    End of birthright citizenship + amnesty > keeping birthright citizenship - amnesty. The government is never going to orchestrate a mass expulsion - if amnesty, the de facto state of affairs anyway, can be traded for something this valuable, it'd be well worth it.

    Don’t cave so fast. The reason you think we cannot get a better deal is because the nation as a whole really doesn’t understand the magnitude of the issue. Trump has done more in the past few days to get people talking about birthright citizenship than anyone in history. Wait until this issue marinates more into the general population.

    Then consider that since 1965 over 55 million people have come to the USA, which includes the 1986 amnesty. This is the largest number of immigrants to any country in history, period. In other words the other side has already gotten the deal of a lifetime. But the general population of the USA has no idea what has taken place because no one is really allowed to discuss it, unless of course it is in glowing terms.

    Today’s Washington Times reports that we had a record 1.75 million immigrants, legal and illegal combined, in 2016.

    The media doesn’t want to have these issues aired because the more they are discussed, the more people will come over to a more restrictionist position. So don’t be willing to settle now. The more the facts are discussed in public the better our negotiating hand becomes. As I wrote above the other side will be fully satisfied even if immigration is ground to a halt because they have already altered the course of history with regards to the USA. They have transformed the USA from an overwhelmingly European nation into one where Europeans will be a minority in 25 years.

    Our side should not give another inch. And from my experience the more knowledge people have about what has already taken place, the more likely they will support our positions rather than the status quo. Let Trump continue to shape the battlefield before you make plans for an armistice. The more he talks about this the better. And the stupid media will do most of the work for him.

    • Replies: @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    You raise some good points. When asked, Americans often routinely grossly underestimate the number of immigrants moving into the United States annually, and haven't been made aware that the percentage of foreign born in the United States is near its historical high point.

    When they're talking about immigration, they're losing.
  63. @Achmed E. Newman
    Who said renunciation takes 10 years? I'd never heard that. I know of a Canadian who took care of it with some paperwork, is all. Zerohedge often writes about the "big" increases in renunciation due to a tax policy unlike almost all other nation's as far as "the long arm of the law". However, though the ZH increase numbers were big percent-wise, they were very small in absolute numbers (a few thousand yearly?)

    If you wish to never return to the US, and have no US assets that could be confiscated, you’re probably good to stop paying the income tax for those 10 years. Needless, if you ever have a reason to travel to the US, you could well be forbidden entry–or upon entry, be detained for failure to pay.

    I’ve no direct experience with this, but the IRS is pretty vigilant collecting taxes, enforcing their regulations, etc.

    And yes, ZH does often report on the couple thousand numbers who renounce per annum.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Aha! I get it then, Forbes. You may renunciate any time, with the proper paperwork, but the IRS still says you owe them taxes for the next 10 years, is that right?

    I'm gonna ask my friend about the Canadian case I know about. You've got me curious now. As you say, if you plan on never coming back, then it doesn't matter what the rules are (though the FATCA laws could affect your ability to do any banking if you are still officially American.)
  64. @Anon
    https://twitter.com/realsaavedra/status/1057467550869540864

    The annual toll of a few hundred dead blacks in Chicago couldn’t be reached for comment…

  65. @istevefan
    Trump just tweeted to Paul Ryan to basically STFU.

    https://twitter.com/realDonaldTrump/status/1057674390446448642

    This is great because it will make the media cover this issue for the remainder of the week. Trump is a genius for knowing how to flip the news cycle and keep it focused on what he wants to discuss.

    Typically, Trump has no need to “flip the news cycle.” He’s usually leading it with Twitter comments, as above. Trump says, “Jump!” The media replies, “How high?” is the usual dynamic.

    He’s drives media nuts, and they’ve no idea how/why. It’s as if the media are addicts, and Trump is the drug habit they can’t kick…

    • Replies: @anon

    It’s as if the media are addicts, and Trump is the drug habit they can’t kick…
     
    they're addicted to hating him of course
  66. @istevefan
    Don't cave so fast. The reason you think we cannot get a better deal is because the nation as a whole really doesn't understand the magnitude of the issue. Trump has done more in the past few days to get people talking about birthright citizenship than anyone in history. Wait until this issue marinates more into the general population.

    Then consider that since 1965 over 55 million people have come to the USA, which includes the 1986 amnesty. This is the largest number of immigrants to any country in history, period. In other words the other side has already gotten the deal of a lifetime. But the general population of the USA has no idea what has taken place because no one is really allowed to discuss it, unless of course it is in glowing terms.

    Today's Washington Times reports that we had a record 1.75 million immigrants, legal and illegal combined, in 2016.

    The media doesn't want to have these issues aired because the more they are discussed, the more people will come over to a more restrictionist position. So don't be willing to settle now. The more the facts are discussed in public the better our negotiating hand becomes. As I wrote above the other side will be fully satisfied even if immigration is ground to a halt because they have already altered the course of history with regards to the USA. They have transformed the USA from an overwhelmingly European nation into one where Europeans will be a minority in 25 years.

    Our side should not give another inch. And from my experience the more knowledge people have about what has already taken place, the more likely they will support our positions rather than the status quo. Let Trump continue to shape the battlefield before you make plans for an armistice. The more he talks about this the better. And the stupid media will do most of the work for him.

    You raise some good points. When asked, Americans often routinely grossly underestimate the number of immigrants moving into the United States annually, and haven’t been made aware that the percentage of foreign born in the United States is near its historical high point.

    When they’re talking about immigration, they’re losing.

  67. @istevefan
    White liberals try to avoid criticizing nonwhites at all costs even if it is to the detriment of society. Since the Russians are white, the liberals can address this issue by attacking them, and they can feel good that they won't appear racist.

    I think this is similar to how white liberals in the UK can criticize immigration only if they direct that criticism at Poles and other Eastern Europeans. Though Pakistanis, Africans and other non-Europeans are the overwhelming majority of immigrants to the UK, they are off limits when it comes to criticisms. So the Poles have to take the brunt of it.

    Not true at all. It might’ve been the case before eu expansion, but since 2004 the whole former eastern block has been given complete freedom of movement and work rights. Of course these countries have to reciprocate towards uk citizens, but, given that the massive wage differentials, its pretty much one way traffic. When you also consider the low cost of flights and established language networks, their numbers are extremely high and growing. Most pakistanis came decades earlier and continue to arrive in smaller numbers.

  68. anon[271] • Disclaimer says:
    @kimchilover
    There's a place out near Marfa, Texas (30 minutes through the difficult-but-gorgeous Pinto Canyon route...or, an hour and a half through the 'easy way' that puts you face to face with ICE...not that there's anything wrong with that, it's just 3x as long) that I try and visit at least once a year: The Chinati Hot Springs.

    The bubbling waters that come out of the earth there are at 110 degrees and are infused with minerals like lithium (especially lithium), arsenic and others and have been rumored to cure the aches and pains of life for hundreds of years.

    Been going there for over 10 years now and, Hand-to-Bible, there's really nothing like it...those late-night mineral baths (in your own private room) are more rejuvenating than anything I've ever experienced; it also doesn't hurt that you're more off the grid there than just about anywhere else within the continental United States. But, facts are facts (subjectively speaking).

    Anyhoo, if you find yourself visiting the Big Bend area (the National Park 'Big Bend' not the State Park 'Big Bend') and have a couple days to kill (and a vehicle with good tires), it can truly be a transcendent experience. Look it up.

    The bubbling waters that come out of the earth there are at 110 degrees and are infused with minerals like lithium (especially lithium), arsenic and others and have been rumored to cure the aches and pains of life for hundreds of years.

    be sure to load up on that arsenic

    if you’re lucky there might be some cyanide in there too

  69. @Joe Stalin
    I guess when the soft drink "Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda" (guess what drink!) was
    created in 1929, they knew what they were doing when they added lithium citrate, a
    mood-stabilizing drug. It contained that until 1948.

    "Lithium citrate has been used for many decades for psychiatric treatment of manic states and bipolar disorder and as a supposed cure for hangovers at the time. In 1871, William Hammond, professor of Diseases of the Mind and Nervous System at the Bellevue Hospital Medical College in New York, became the first physician to prescribe lithium for mania; in 1894, Danish psychiatrist Frederik Lange made explicit reference to lithium in the treatment of melancholic depression.

    "In a column published in The New York Times, Cornell University professor Anna Fels wrote: “Lithium drinks were in huge demand for their reputed health-giving properties, so much so that the element was added to commercial drinks. 7-Up was originally called Bib-Label Lithiated Lemon-Lime Soda and contained lithium citrate right up until 1950. In fact, it’s been suggested that the 7 in 7-Up refers to the atomic mass of the lithium. (Maybe the “Up” referred to mood?).”

    https://www.thevintagenews.com/2018/02/20/contained-lithium/

    sounds like it might go well with the Coca(ine) Cola

  70. @Mike Krauthammer
    Problem is that ending birthright citizenship would discourage immigration, which brings diversity to countries. Having individuals from different backgrounds encourages unique perspectives and deepens debates and discussions, according to the Asia-Pacific Economic blog.

    2. In cases where only one parent is a citizen, the father is unknown, or adopted children arise, the result could lead to confusion, court cases, and the opening of Pandora’s Box.

    Trolling or just a fool?

  71. @TomSchmidt
    There's a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children. Unless she stays in contact with her home culture, your children will be aliens in the USA and also in the culture she comes from. If you marry and move to her culture you avoid this problem.

    Yeah, just like Trump’s children by Ivana and Melania.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    Remind me again of how closely Don Jr., Ivanka, and Eric have stuck to the cultural milieu of their father? I don't think it's fair to comment on Melania's kid, as he's not an adult yet.

    Recall, also, that rich people have the ability to buy access to more of the culture. Trump's older kids went off to boarding schools where they would have picked up the culture of those places.
  72. @Anatoly Karlin
    Stats:

    ~300,000 births per year to non-US citizens in the US.

    ~40,000 of these accrue to birth tourism.

    Of this number, slightly more than 10,000 accrue to China and about 1,000 accrues to Russia.

    [my blog post on this]

    Not only Russian but even Chinese birth tourism (overwhelmingly practiced by rich Americanophiles) is completely irrelevant compared to the anchor baby problem.

    THREE CATEGORIES THAT SHOULD BE DISTINGUISHED:

    (1) BIRTH TOURISM refers to mothers who come to the U.S. legally (on a tourist visa) to give birth and then promptly return to China, Russia, etc.

    (2) BORN IN U.S.A. TO ILLEGALS. The numerically much bigger issue is illegal residents (mostly Hispanic mestizos) giving birth in the U.S. The parents are typically documented as citizens of Mexico or other countries in Central and South America and continue to use identity documents (e.g. carta matricular) from those countries, thus clearly remaining under those countries’ “jurisdiction.”

    (3) ANCHOR BABIES. This seams to be a recent trend – mother (barely) makes it only U.S. soil to give birth to “anchor baby,” whole clan follows suit.

    TWO ISSUES:

    (1) CITIZENSHIP: Whatever the Fourteenth Amendment “actually” means, it has long been the PRACTICE to extend citizenship to all babies born on American soil. To the extent that this is only a PRACTICE not mandated by the 14th, it could be abolished by statute.

    THE PROBLEM WITH CHANGING CITIZENSHIP RULES: Since we are clearly unwilling to expel 25 million illegals who have NO right to remain here, is it really WISE to create an underclass of U.S.-born non-citizens who will resent their second-class status yet will never leave?

    (2) TAX AND SOCIAL SECURITY RULES: It would be easy, e.g. to adjust tax laws and social security/Medicare rules to withdraw benefits from those who have never paid into the system. There is no earthly reason why the parents of immigrants should be allowed to come here and claim Social Security and Medicare benefits that they have not paid for. Frequently, they blatantly lie about their personal wealth held back home in order to “qualify” for benefits at the expense of U.S. taxpayers.

  73. The specter of national security comes into question with birthright citizenship. There are many jobs that require US citizenship in the defense industry and government. How can you say no to a Russian or Chinese born in the US but raised in the home countries? They’re US citizens, correct?

    • Replies: @anon
    Very good point.
  74. @TomSchmidt
    There's a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children. Unless she stays in contact with her home culture, your children will be aliens in the USA and also in the culture she comes from. If you marry and move to her culture you avoid this problem.

    There’s a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children.

    What do you mean “women acculturate children”?

    What does “acculturate” really mean?

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    I guess it's something like "the hand that rocks the cradle..."

    the largest influence on children, culturally, is their mother. If she is not steeped in the cultural virtues of the place she is living, she cannot pass those along to her children. I think of people like John Yoo and his utter disregard for Anglo-Saxon law.
  75. @Frank the Prof
    The specter of national security comes into question with birthright citizenship. There are many jobs that require US citizenship in the defense industry and government. How can you say no to a Russian or Chinese born in the US but raised in the home countries? They're US citizens, correct?

    Very good point.

  76. @Forbes
    Typically, Trump has no need to "flip the news cycle." He's usually leading it with Twitter comments, as above. Trump says, "Jump!" The media replies, "How high?" is the usual dynamic.

    He's drives media nuts, and they've no idea how/why. It's as if the media are addicts, and Trump is the drug habit they can't kick...

    It’s as if the media are addicts, and Trump is the drug habit they can’t kick…

    they’re addicted to hating him of course

  77. @bomag
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZB62oaOeqR0

    LOL!

    Excellent choice, Bomag

  78. @Forbes
    If you wish to never return to the US, and have no US assets that could be confiscated, you're probably good to stop paying the income tax for those 10 years. Needless, if you ever have a reason to travel to the US, you could well be forbidden entry--or upon entry, be detained for failure to pay.

    I've no direct experience with this, but the IRS is pretty vigilant collecting taxes, enforcing their regulations, etc.

    And yes, ZH does often report on the couple thousand numbers who renounce per annum.

    Aha! I get it then, Forbes. You may renunciate any time, with the proper paperwork, but the IRS still says you owe them taxes for the next 10 years, is that right?

    I’m gonna ask my friend about the Canadian case I know about. You’ve got me curious now. As you say, if you plan on never coming back, then it doesn’t matter what the rules are (though the FATCA laws could affect your ability to do any banking if you are still officially American.)

    • Replies: @Forbes
    That's pretty much it.
  79. @Anon
    How many Russian anchor babies vs. non-Russian are there? Yesterday, these people were telling me the thousands of migrants south of the border were no big deal, it's not like were going to live in Stephen Colbert's neighborhood or anything. Now, we've got sinister Russians? I don't understand. What's the difference here? /s

    "Finally, a president willing to take on this absurd policy of birthright citizenship."

    Wait. That came from Lindsey Graham? Seriously? Did Kavanaugh's treatment reveal to Mr. Graham a little too early how guys like him are going to be treated in the new nation of the diverse?

    Did Kavanaugh’s treatment reveal to Mr. Graham a little too early how guys like him are going to be treated in the new nation of the diverse?

    That’s what I was wondering too. Something tells me it was an act, but I’m always hopeful. (Part 2 and Part 3 on the “coming out of Miss Lindsey Grahamnesty”.

  80. @TomSchmidt
    There's a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children. Unless she stays in contact with her home culture, your children will be aliens in the USA and also in the culture she comes from. If you marry and move to her culture you avoid this problem.

    And that’s why to this day Donald Trump speaks only Scots Gaelic, has no affinity at all for America, does not identify as an American, and is equally bewildered and out of place any time he visits Britain. Winston Churchill had these kinds of problems too because of his foreign mother, and as a result his life was a disaster; the man never achieved anything of note.

    • Replies: @TomSchmidt
    I'd say that Churchill did suffer for being of American parentage, but recall that his mother was married for her money. That allowed him to buy access to accoutrements of British Upper Class life. I do not think he was ever at home in that milieu.

    DJT is as usual an interesting case. It would be absurd to think him speaking Gaelic at home, but one problem he has with the elite from the HPY Ivies is he is not of their class, and like Rodney Dangerfield in Caddyshack, is continually in conflict with them as a result. Like Clinton, he has a touch of the working class about him, unlike Hillary.
  81. @L Woods

    *Choose wisely: make sure she is not susceptible to the corruption of American culture :
     
    Other than living in a bunker impervious to radio waves and disconnected from telecommunications infrastructure far from the corrupting influence of one's fellow Americans, I'm pretty sure that's impossible.

    Susceptibility is not exposure.

    I take your point there are no guarantees, and all you can really trust at the end of the day is yourself, your sidearm, and any pets. Maybe in a year I’ll be on the cover of The Unz Review grimacing in despair.

    As Kirkegaard pointed out, though, one must take some risks, and there are no right answers to many of the most weighty questions : “if you marry, you will regret it; if you don’t marry, you will regret it.” (He wrote it in Danish I believe, but I cannot read or write a lick of Danish, hence the English translation).

  82. @Anonymous

    There’s a downside to bringing a foreign woman to the USA, since women acculturate children.
     
    What do you mean "women acculturate children"?

    What does "acculturate" really mean?

    I guess it’s something like “the hand that rocks the cradle…”

    the largest influence on children, culturally, is their mother. If she is not steeped in the cultural virtues of the place she is living, she cannot pass those along to her children. I think of people like John Yoo and his utter disregard for Anglo-Saxon law.

  83. @anon
    Yeah, just like Trump's children by Ivana and Melania.

    Remind me again of how closely Don Jr., Ivanka, and Eric have stuck to the cultural milieu of their father? I don’t think it’s fair to comment on Melania’s kid, as he’s not an adult yet.

    Recall, also, that rich people have the ability to buy access to more of the culture. Trump’s older kids went off to boarding schools where they would have picked up the culture of those places.

  84. @Autochthon
    And that's why to this day Donald Trump speaks only Scots Gaelic, has no affinity at all for America, does not identify as an American, and is equally bewildered and out of place any time he visits Britain. Winston Churchill had these kinds of problems too because of his foreign mother, and as a result his life was a disaster; the man never achieved anything of note.

    I’d say that Churchill did suffer for being of American parentage, but recall that his mother was married for her money. That allowed him to buy access to accoutrements of British Upper Class life. I do not think he was ever at home in that milieu.

    DJT is as usual an interesting case. It would be absurd to think him speaking Gaelic at home, but one problem he has with the elite from the HPY Ivies is he is not of their class, and like Rodney Dangerfield in Caddyshack, is continually in conflict with them as a result. Like Clinton, he has a touch of the working class about him, unlike Hillary.

    • Replies: @Desiderius
    Hillary does too, it's just from the bad part.

    Quite a few similarities like that between Churchill and Trump.
  85. @Achmed E. Newman
    Aha! I get it then, Forbes. You may renunciate any time, with the proper paperwork, but the IRS still says you owe them taxes for the next 10 years, is that right?

    I'm gonna ask my friend about the Canadian case I know about. You've got me curious now. As you say, if you plan on never coming back, then it doesn't matter what the rules are (though the FATCA laws could affect your ability to do any banking if you are still officially American.)

    That’s pretty much it.

  86. @TomSchmidt
    I'd say that Churchill did suffer for being of American parentage, but recall that his mother was married for her money. That allowed him to buy access to accoutrements of British Upper Class life. I do not think he was ever at home in that milieu.

    DJT is as usual an interesting case. It would be absurd to think him speaking Gaelic at home, but one problem he has with the elite from the HPY Ivies is he is not of their class, and like Rodney Dangerfield in Caddyshack, is continually in conflict with them as a result. Like Clinton, he has a touch of the working class about him, unlike Hillary.

    Hillary does too, it’s just from the bad part.

    Quite a few similarities like that between Churchill and Trump.

  87. anonymous[739] • Disclaimer says:

    Are President and Trump supporters…..

    IN BED WITH THE RUSSIANS?

    (I confess that I would most certainly like to be in bed with sexy Russian tennis players like Anna Kournikova and Maria Sharapova and so many others. Yeah I heard the rumors that Anna K was in the KGB, if so and she interrogates me in a negligee wearing Channel # 5 perfume…. I’d talk. I’d betray the US Constitution – I forswear ever even talking to some bitc* American woman like Hillary, Ruth Bader Ginzberg, Elena Kagin, or that bitter bitc* form Miss America Gretchen Carlson that took over the Miss America concerts, banned the swimsuit competition and bullied all the contestants to be PC Lib Leftists who hate Trump)

    Life’s a Bitch. Thank God we didn’t elect one

    We commissioned this Farstar comic to denote the insanity of allowing in the worst M13 Gang bangers, Islamic terrorists but getting all paranoid about the Russians)

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