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Senator Elizabeth Warren's DNA Test Is Back in the News
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It’s always fun to milk another post out of Senator Warren’s DNA test. From the New York Times:

Elizabeth Warren Stands by DNA Test. But Around Her, Worries Abound.

By Astead W. Herndon, Dec. 6, 2018

WASHINGTON — The plan was straightforward: After years of being challenged by President Trump and others about a decades-old claim of Native American ancestry, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts would take a DNA test to prove her stated family origins in the Cherokee and Delaware tribes.

But nearly two months after Ms. Warren released the test results and drew hostile reactions from prominent tribal leaders, the lingering cloud over her likely presidential campaign has only darkened. Conservatives have continued to ridicule her. More worrisome to supporters of Ms. Warren’s presidential ambitions, she has yet to allay criticism from grass-roots progressive groups, liberal political operatives and other potential 2020 allies who complain that she put too much emphasis on the controversial field of racial science — and, in doing so, played into Mr. Trump’s hands.

… The advisers say Ms. Warren will have to confront the issue again if she announces a presidential campaign, which is expected in the coming weeks, and several would like her to act soon. …

Ms. Warren’s allies also say she unintentionally made a bigger mistake in treading too far into the fraught area of racial science — a field that has, at times, been used to justify the subjugation of racial minorities and Native Americans.

Ms. Warren has also troubled advocates of racial equality and justice, who say her attempt to document ethnicity with a DNA test gave validity to the idea that race is determined by blood — a bedrock principle for white supremacists and others who believe in racial hierarchies. Native American critics, including Kim TallBear, a prominent scholar from the University of Alberta, said in October that Ms. Warren’s actions relied on “settler-colonial” definitions of who is an indigenous American and amounted to a haughty refusal to hear out her longstanding critics.

This line of criticism has particularly stung Ms. Warren, who has made a point to hold several private talks with Native leaders since taking the DNA test, emphasizing her respect for tribal sovereignty and making clear she does not claim tribal citizenship.

No casino check for you!

Three people close to senior members of Ms. Warren’s team, who were granted anonymity to speak freely on the issue, said they were “shocked” and “rattled” by the senator’s decision to take the DNA test, which they described as an unequivocal misstep that could have lasting consequences, even on 2020 staffing. One former adviser, who also asked not to be named, called it a “strategic failure” that was “depressing and unforgettable.”

… She received praise for lending her national platform to highlighting injustice against Native Americans recently and, in one high-profile incident, she impressed social justice activists when she refused to backtrack after calling the American criminal justice system “racist” from “front to back.”

Get ready for President Warren to preside over another rise in homicides.

In interviews, several left-leaning groups wondered if Ms. Warren’s decision to take the DNA test was indicative of a larger problem for several prospective presidential candidates: that their inner circles of advisers don’t reflect the racial diversity of the Democratic electorate.

As always, the solution is: Hire me and then I’ll hire my friends for you:

“Race is a true third rail in American politics, and you can make a lot of mistakes when we don’t have a diverse set of folks who are in the room and empowered to make decisions,” said Eric Lundy, program director of Inclusv, a group that pushes for more diversity in political campaign staffs.

… Ian Haney López, the law and racial justice professor at the University of California, Berkeley, said Ms. Warren made a “naïve” error by not seeming to grasp the attack strategy of conservatives.

Racial justice expert Ian Haney López, author of Dog Whistle Politics, looks like Neil Patrick Harris.

Just as Mr. Trump used his so-called “birther” campaign to depict former President Barack Obama as a foreign-born immigrant, Mr. Trump was not seeking to make a factual claim against Ms. Warren but to brand her as an outsider, Mr. López said.

Uh, no. You’re only off by 180 degrees, Senor Haney. Trump was making fun of Senator Suzie Creamcheese claiming to be Diverse for career advancement.

The point this article leaves out is that Democrats don’t benefit from talking about Affirmative Action. They especially don’t benefit from questions being raised about why some people benefit from racial preferences and other people don’t. That’s why you almost never read about affirmative action in the MSM unless it’s in front of the Supreme Court: it’s not good for the Democrats. Senator Warren was stupid to bring it up.

 
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  1. Polynikes says:

    She’s done. There’s no way for her to get enough of the middle back without forsaking the looney left and vice versa.

    I was never convinced she was a player on the national stage anyhow, but Trump must’ve been. His take down of her was as brutal as the one on Jeb.

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
  2. Gordo says:

    https://www.zerohedge.com/news/2018-12-05/chinese-government-may-have-left-fingerprints-indicating-they-were-behind-massive

    Looks like Peking hacked Starwood booking system.

    This covers mainly the Marriott.

    Not mentioned in the article is that it also covers another prestige hotel chain owned by a certain well known American politician……..

  3. @Polynikes

    Why wouldn’t an Aboriginal-American who looks like an Aryan not do well on the national stage?

  4. Ian Haney Lopez was the worst professor I had in law school.

    Instead of teaching Property, he conducted a semester-long seminar on his politics.

    He skipped over key property topics like the estate system and water rights.

    But, my goodness, we got to hear a lot about how laws were racist because the lawmakers were racist.

    When we were studying for the bar exam, we became FURIOUS at Haney Lopez when we realized how little he had taught us and how much property law we would have to cram.

    Oh, and he ran his class like a martinet, demanding we call him “Prof. Haney Lopez” and generally being a prick.

    A self-righteous ass.

  5. @Justice Duvall

    He skipped over key property topics like the estate system and water rights.

    Because no Berkeley-educated lawyer in California ever has to worry about water rights .

    That’s just malpractice on Haney Lopez’s part.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  6. anon[166] • Disclaimer says:

    >Senator Warren was stupid to bring it up.

    Is that your voice or a voicing the Dem establishment?

    I don’t think releasing the DNA results was a terrible move. The current fuss is transient. What she really needed to defend against is the allegation of lying or outright fabrication for affirmative action bennies. But now she can claim she has verifiable Native American ancestry (however distant it may be). It’s no longer black and white.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Forbes
    , @GermanReader2
  7. @Justice Duvall

    If I had it all to do over again, I would have either been a plumber or went to law school in order to specialize in property law. Even in a small town setting, you can make a great deal of money in that area, which I didn’t know until very recently. And best yet, you don’t have to greatly compromise your conscience the way defense or accident (traffic, workplace, supermarket slip and falls) lawyers do.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  8. @Justice Duvall

    Did Prof. Haney Lopez at least cover easements for tent camps and squatters’ rights?

    So, @Steve Sailer, Libby is still on the war path?

  9. @South Texas Guy

    A lot of law is similar to computer programming for contracts: it’s coming up with a lot of if-then-else statements for possible eventualities that the people agreeing to the contracts would be better off thinking about sooner rather than later. It’s a very useful profession.

  10. The line that leapt out at me was
    “the idea that race is determined by blood ”

    What planet does this clown live on where it’s an “idea” not a fact?

    • Agree: Colin Wright
    • Replies: @AndrewR
  11. Anon[416] • Disclaimer says:
    @Justice Duvall

    During my time at Boalt, class of 82, the 1L property course was just real property, and estates and trusts was a separate course. Water law I don’t remember, but perhaps it was an elective, along with immigration, which I took, from a practitioner professor, an extremely good course, on-the-ground, practical immigration law, no activism. She emphasized how much discretion was involved, so you had to stick to one immigration office and get to know the quirks of the staff who worked there in order to help your client to the fullest extent possible.

    I remember well the affirmative action admittees, Hispanics who all sat together. The professors still used the surprise Socratic method, and boy was it cringeworthy when one of the Hispanics was called on. They were seriously not qualified to be at Boalt. Now that I think about it, maybe Lopez was one of them … no, too young. :-) After the trauma of witnessing a professor skinning an unprepared student alive, you make sure you are prepared for every class for the rest of law school. But the AA guys just never seemed to be able to be prepared.

    Another memory just floated into my mind, the former college football athlete turned law professor who during a discussion of rape law (no trigger warnings in those days) raised the hypothetical of a couple who wanted to play “rape games,” with prior consent, but no consent during the “rape” itself. There was an uncomfortable silence in the class, but nobody reported the guy for anything.

  12. Anon[416] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Exactly. For example, nobody wants to think about what happens when the parties decide to dissolve a contractual relationship.

    Getting everything down in a paper draft often reveals completely different assumptions and expectations between the parties, that they can work through while negotiating changes to the draft.

    A contract is 90 percent for defining and managing expectations, and only 10 percent in anticipation of any litigation, which rarely happens.

    The funny thing is that most of the work needs to be done by the clients, who need to make big lists of bullet points of things specific to their business and to the transaction that need to be dealt with. Most of a contract concerns details that the attorney doesn’t know anything about. But the attorney still gets to charge a big fee.

    • Replies: @slumber_j
  13. Dave Pinsen says: • Website

    “Kim TallBear, a prominent scholar from the University of Alberta, said Senator StepsOnRake…”

    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
  14. “Race is a true third rail in American politics, and you can make a lot of mistakes when we don’t have a diverse set of folks who are in the room and empowered to make decisions,” said Eric Lundy, program director of Inclusv, a group that pushes for more diversity in political campaign staffs.

    Always be talking your book, and Always Be Closing!

    Mr. Trump was not seeking to make a factual claim against Ms. Warren but to brand her as an outsider, Mr. López said.

    Say Wha!? Being an “outsider” is Trump’s main selling point, why would he want to give that power to Warren? Lopez is even more ignorant than his body of work suggests.

    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
  15. The NYT‘s dog’s breakfast of obfuscation, misdirection and self-contradicting goodthink starts in the very first sentence.

    After years of being challenged by President Trump and others about a decades-old claim of Native American ancestry, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts would take a DNA test to prove her stated family origins in the Cherokee and Delaware tribes.

    The NYT uses “decades-old” to imply that her Indian claim is some kind of obsolete relic of no present significance, rather than what it actually is: the foundational lie upon which her Harvard career and thus her political career were built with the full backing of Harvard, the MSM and NYT.

    In Warren’s zombie-obeisance to the modern Nuremberg Laws of identity politics, she seeks to vindicate herself with a blood test. That identity politics is really the same thing as racialism is a fact that the Dem establishment has successfully camouflaged with the connivance of the MSM, but in her thirst for vindication, Warren can’t help but expose the racialist logic underlying identity politics that the rest of the Left would rather keep hidden.

    If her 1/1024 (possible) blood quantum of Indian DNA “proves” her “family origins in the Cherokee and Delaware tribes”, what does the other 1023/1024 prove? Chopped liver? American Indians, who know–as Ms. Warren should–that tribal membership rather than blood quantum determine Indian identity, won’t be happy with this, and neither will the people who are implicitly disparaged by being descended from the 1023/1024 of irrelevant DNA, i.e., 99% of the electorate. This was a publicity stunt with no political upside, which an actually experienced politician wouldn’t have bothered with. But Warren is not a seasoned pol, she’s just an academic climber who legged-up her career with false but fashionable ancestry claims.

    Dear NYT: when Canadian Indian Kim TallBear talks more sense than all of your fancy J-School grads combined, maybe it’s time to get off the warpath. Break camp and return to the reservation to pow-wow with your totems about how to tomahawk the palefaces.

    But anyway, what the article is really about is How Do We Beat Trump in 2020? Do we use the nice white lady masquerading as an Indian? Or should we revert to the bitter alcoholic retread? What about the discarded mistress of Brown Willie? Oh, the quandaries of identity politics!

  16. @Oleaginous Outrager

    “Race is a true third rail in American politics,”

    Uh yeah, I guess that’s why the Dems can’t stop touching it. They must be addicted to high voltage or something. And by hiring Mr. Lundy (darkest Scandinavian I’ve seen in a while) they can touch it even more.

    The NYT is now so self-refuting that it’s hardly worth the trouble of refuting it anymore.

    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
  17. @Redneck farmer

    Name me one of those — “an Aboriginal-American” anywhere on the 2020 presidential candidacy scene.

    Warren does indeed look like an Anglo-German-Swedish ethnic, but she has essentially zero Indian genetics according to her genotyping work. Her main advantage is her femininity. Her main disadvantage is that she appears to be not very smart in light of her mishandling of her genotyping work.

    And besides, in the 2020 presidential run the Coalition of the Ascendant (CoA) needs someone who looks like them — a Mexican or a black, not an American Indian. Running a white male (Biden, Gavin Newsome) isn’t going to cut it.

    Maybe a minority like Bernie might have a chance, but there are large cohorts within the CoA who really don’t care for his particular ethny.

    As much as I would love to see Hillary be the nominee — with a repeat of the debates with Bill’s rape victims in the front row — I don’t think that is likely.

    More likely Kamala Harris — black but not too black (like Obama) and female. She, like Warren, has the disadvantage that she is also not very smart.

    • Replies: @BB753
  18. @Almost Missouri

    The NYT uses “decades-old” to imply that her Indian claim is some kind of obsolete relic of no present significance, rather than what it actually is: the foundational lie upon which her Harvard career and thus her political career were built with the full backing of Harvard, the MSM and NYT.

    This, this is it. Honesty is usually the best policy, except in politics where admitting that you falsely claimed Native American heritage to get into Harvard Law School (and it worked!) is only slightly less damaging to your political career than emulating R. Budd Dwyer.

    Now, on the other hand, it could have been a fantastic springboard for a discussion on the topic of how discriminatory the elite college admission process is towards whites of more humble origins such as Warren, who have to compete against the far more impressive opportunities and accomplishments of their affluent peers but with nothing even remotely resembling affirmative action to mitigate the often massive disparity in pre-application academic polish (nor do they have the ability to bond with the admission committee by talking about their bar mitzvah or their birthright trip), and as such are perhaps the single most numerically underrepresented demographic in all of elite academia.

    Then again, I think it’s pretty obvious why nobody on the left would ever dare start THAT discussion…

  19. What’s mildly interesting is how there are all these people who take being of American Indian descent to be somehow a status symbol; they don’t seem to know any actual Indians.

    If they did, they might not be so eager to claim kinship. From what I’ve seen, unqualified admiration and sympathy for Indians seems to be inversely proportional to one’s familiarity with the groups in question.

    In other words, people who live around Indians don’t seem to be too thrilled by them. It varies, of course. Indians are no more a homogeneous group than Romanians, Albanians, Irishmen, and Danes are all one people.

  20. bomag says:
    @Justice Duvall

    Racial justice expert Ian Haney López

    I want to make fun of this title, but it just seems really sad.

  21. AndrewR says:
    @Bill Jones

    Well obviously race is partially socially constructed. Many leftists exaggerate the extent to which it is, but enough of race is so undeniably a social construct that it gives cover to the more extreme claims.

  22. slumber_j says:
    @Anon

    The funny thing is that most of the work needs to be done by the clients, who need to make big lists of bullet points of things specific to their business and to the transaction that need to be dealt with. Most of a contract concerns details that the attorney doesn’t know anything about. But the attorney still gets to charge a big fee.

    In my experience, most good lawyering is a combination of being smart enough to understand–really understand–both language and reality, and having a high tolerance for tedium.

    A lot of people have one or the other of those qualities, but not that many have both. I totally get why the good lawyers get to charge so much: they’re priests of mind-numbingness. You’re paying them to master stuff you can hardly even bear to read.

  23. @slumber_j

    I feel the same way about programming. To me, CS and contract law might as well be the intellectual equivalent of cleaning septic tanks for a living.

    Those guys earn their money, as far as I’m concerned.

    • Agree: slumber_j
  24. @Justice Duvall

    But isn’t the measure of a good law school how much they DON’T teach to the bar exam? Or at least that’s what I’ve heard.

    • Replies: @Anon
  25. Is there no one she could sleep with that might salvage her presidential hopes???

  26. Ms. Warren has also troubled advocates of racial equality and justice, who say her attempt to document ethnicity with a DNA test gave validity to the idea that race is determined by blood …

    Well, as Rachel Dolezal found, race is not determined by personal choice. Now, apparently, it is not determined by blood. Perhaps after all it is socially constructed, which means that the man with the Megaphone decides which race you are.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  27. TGGP says:

    I’m sure Rachel Dolezal is happy to hear that relying on DNA to determine race is just a pernicious “settler-colonial” idea.

    • Agree: GermanReader2
  28. Carol says:

    Reich says researchers can’t get US Indian DNA samples anyway, because the tribes won’t allow it.

    So proving Delaware or Cherokee ancestry was never going to happen anyway was it?

    • Replies: @Anon
  29. ic1000 says:
    @Almost Missouri

    Great points about the NYT‘s dog’s-breakfast lede:

    After years of being challenged by President Trump and others about a decades-old claim of Native American ancestry, Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts would take a DNA test to prove her stated family origins in the Cherokee and Delaware tribes.

    Get Me Rewrite!

    After years of being challenged about her decades-old assertion of ancestry from the Cherokee and Delaware tribes, which she used under Affirmative Action to apply for a faculty position at Harvard, Senator Elizabeth Warren released the results of a DNA test. The test showed that one of her eight great-great grandparents was likely one-quarter Native American by descent. About 6 million Americans who self-describe as “white” are Native American to the same extent, though no others are known to have used such a tenuous ancestral connection to support a quest for a job with the prestige and high pay of law school professor.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  30. Jack D says:

    Senator Warren was stupid to bring it up.

    Warren is not stupid, but Trump literally drives Leftists crazy. They hear his voice echoing inside their heads and it drives them nuts. This leads them to do stupid things to try to make the voices go away.

    It’s really hilarious to read a rejection of (racial) science in the NY Times. I thought that science was awesome and something that had to be respected. Or that only applies to certain kinds of science, such as climate “science”. Marxism itself was called “scientific” socialism as opposed to romantic or Utopian socialism.

    But suddenly the NY Times talks to Chief Tall Bear or something and we learn that being Indian is a mystical thing and has nothing to do with whether you have any of that DNA stuff in you – that’s a “settler colonial” notion and not part of Native American culture. Cars and phones and electricity are “settler colonial” notions too but I’ll bet the Chief uses them. Or did he talk to the NY Times reporter using smoke signals?

    The alternative I guess is that you don’t have to have ANY Indian DNA to be an Indian. So I guess Indians are on the “race is a social construct” side of the line. Or more realistically, on the “we get to decide who is in our club” side. Especially if club membership comes with big benefits. Or as Chief Goering did not say, “Wer Indian ist, bestimme ich “. The benefits of being an Indian are only meaningful if they are split up among a relatively small membership – most Indian tribes devote a lot of resources to EXPELLING people from their tribe. If you could just spit in a cup and come up 1/1,024th Indian then your tribe might have millions of members and that casino check would be real small. And maybe the tribal leaders don’t even have that 1/1,024th. Don’t want any “settler colonials” poking around the tribal rolls with their science and upsetting their sweet setup.

    • Replies: @MikeatMikedotMike
    , @ChrisZ
  31. Mr. Anon says:

    Racial justice expert Ian Haney López, author of Dog Whistle Politics, looks like Neil Patrick Harris.

    And nothing says authentic latino like “Ian” and “Haney”.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Desiderius
  32. Ah, that “controversial field of racial science.” Like that controversial field of Jewish Physics, relativity and quantum and all that crazy stuff. Or controversial evolution science, where God hardly makes an appearance.

  33. Mr. Anon says:
    @slumber_j

    A lot of people have one or the other of those qualities, but not that many have both. I totally get why the good lawyers get to charge so much: they’re priests of mind-numbingness. You’re paying them to master stuff you can hardly even bear to read.

    Or are legal documents something you can hardly bear to read because of the cumulative actions of lawyers.

  34. Thea says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Dems depend on black voters showing up. If Hilary didn’t convince them to turn out I doubt another shrill and elderly but less-famous white woman can.

  35. BB753 says:

    Warren will be over 70 if she runs in 2020. I just don’t see Democrats voting for another witchy granny to be humiliated by master troll Trump.

  36. Lurker says:
    @slumber_j

    having a high tolerance for tedium.

    That’s what killed it for me just at the most basic school level.

  37. Jack D says:
    @ic1000

    Well done. And yet if you speak to any Leftist, they will tell you that Fox News is biased but the NY Times only prints the pure and unalloyed gospel true news. They are like fish who are unaware that they are swimming in water.

    Now if Trump was claiming Indian ancestry, they would have no problem deconstructing the hell out of every word, but because it is one of their pets they print her campaign spin verbatim on the front page as if it was the real pravda and it sails completely over the heads of most of their readership that they are being spun like crazy.

    What is more hilarious is that to the extent she is being attacked in this article, she is being attacked from the left- she is just a white bitch and not REALLY multi-cultural enough to understand brown people.

    This is the future that awaits any Dem candidate (and which will hopefully keep them from the White House). If they take any position that is moderate enough to please white voters in swing states, the Dem “activists” (socialists) are going to be all over them, especially if they are white. Back in the day, Bill Clinton could get away with “triangulation” (and I don’t mean two gals and a guy) but Hillary did not dare make any noises that were pleasing to white people anymore (not that she was really so inclined anyway but she would have been willing to say and do ANYTHING if that’s what she thought it took to be elected). This dynamic is only going to increase in future elections.

    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    , @Forbes
  38. OT

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/12/05/world/europe/merkel-legacy-germany.html

    “She was a catastrophe,” said Mr. Varoufakis, the former Greek finance minister, “and she will be missed, because who comes next will certainly be worse.”

  39. Leonard says: • Website

    I’m sure Rachel Dolezal is happy to hear that relying on DNA to determine race is just a pernicious “settler-colonial” idea.

    There you go again with your settler-colonial so-called “logic”.

  40. Jack D says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Most lesser ranked law schools teach the laws of the state in which they are located and the vast majority of their graduates stay in that state. So they “teach to the test” to some extent – they gear their classes to teaching the material you will need to pass the bar exam of that particular state, which is not necessarily a bad thing, especially if 90+% of your grads are going to stay in state. If you view law school as a trade school it makes sense to actually teach the trade – to train people on HOW to cut hair rather than on the philosophy of hair cutting.

    But top national law schools like Berkeley pride themselves on the fact that they attract students from all over and that they are training future policy makers so they teach general principles of law rather than specific state laws. Specifics are viewed as being beneath their dignity. Rather than having their students memorize that the California period for adverse possession of land is 5 years (BTW much shorter than most states), which is likely to be asked on a bar exam question, they discuss the policy reasons why we have adverse possession laws, which is not. Nitty gritty little memorization details like the exact # of years required you are supposed to pick up in your bar review course. So the result is that a surprising # of graduates of top law schools (especially now in the age of AA) fail the bar exam of their state even if they stay in the state where they attended law school.

    Now the truth is that most Berkeley grads are going to practice in California, while OTOH, most Yale grads are not going to stay in Connecticut, so there is really no point in teaching Yale law students a lot of the specifics of Connecticut law. But in order to have national pretensions, Berkeley has to teach the same way that Yale does.

    • Agree: Trevor H.
    • Replies: @Prester John
  41. @Jack D

    “Warren is not stupid…”

    Citation needed.

  42. Jack D says:
    @anon

    Well that was the plan – the articles that came out the 1st day (before the Leftist backlash) were along the lines of “Trump accusation is false – DNA tests prove that Elizabeth Warren has American Indian ancestry!” (and slickly glossing over the 1/1,024th part). In the old days, this would have been good enough. Trump is a proven liar, once again and let all good people and nice suburban white ladies rally around fellow goodperson Warren! But now every Democrat candidate has to contend with being attacked from the left when they are aiming that the right, so they sometimes get blindsided like Warren.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  43. Jack D says:
    @slumber_j

    and having a high tolerance for tedium.

    People ask me how I can bear the tedium. I tell them that I grew up on an egg farm. That was REAL tedium, 365 days a year. Once you have walked knee deep in chicken shit, legal work is a joy by comparison (not to mention that it pays a lot better).

    But, an ability to bear tedium is only one aspect of the job. A really good lawyer adds value – you are a 2nd set of eyeballs that sees the risks that entrepreneurs (who are optimistic by nature) tend to gloss over. Now a bad lawyer will tell you that the sky is falling every day and everywhere and so gets ignored like the boy who cried wolf, but someone good is able to sort the wheat from the chaff, the routine and low risks from the things that have a high expected value in a particular context, either because of their large magnitude or high probability and sound the alarm when it really needs to be sounded. Sure you try to cover all the contingencies in a contract (which is how you end up with really long documents) but the art is zeroing in on the ones that really matter and horsetrading away the ones that don’t. If the other side’s lawyer doesn’t have a good sense of expected value he or she will trade away the wrong things, just like someone who doesn’t understand the value of the pieces (and not just according to a rigid mechanical point system but in the context of a particular game) will sacrifice the wrong pieces in a chess match.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
    , @slumber_j
  44. @Steve Sailer

    Another area where lawyers are genuinely useful is estate planning. Lawyers who help clients decide who gets what and when, coupled with a plan to pay the minimum amount of estate and inheritance taxes, perform a valuable societal service.

  45. pyrrhus says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Indeed, as a long time business lawyer, the essence of contracts is (1) getting the technical details right with respect to the subject matter, and (2)foreseeing everything that can go wrong and providing ways to resolve such matters that are acceptable to your client…Your average boiler plate contract is deficient on both fronts, but that doesn’t matter if everything goes well.

  46. BenKenobi says:
    @Jack D

    I’ve triangulated a few times in my day. I highly recommend it.

  47. @Almost Missouri

    Can’t say that tribal membership determines identity rather than blood quantum itself is a requirement for tribal membership, or the clearest path to tribal enrollment, in many cases.

    Tribes often require 1/16, 1/8, or 1/4 blood quantum for enrollment by blood, although I think they do it by documenting recent ancestors (parents or grandparents or at most greatgrandparents) who were “known” to be Indian and of that tribe.

    One can also enroll in some tribes if one can prove direct descent from a tribal membership, independent of actual” blood quantum estimation.

    • Replies: @RadicalCenter
  48. Cheekbones Woman Lizzie Borden Warren voted for the Obama/Rubio Illegal Alien Amnesty — Mass Immigration Surge bill(S 744) of June of 2013.

    The nation-wrecking immigration bill(S 744) that Warren pushed and voted for would have doubled or tripled legal immigration and it would have given amnesty to upwards of 30 million illegal alien invaders.

    Elizabeth Warren’s horrible immigration bill(S 744) passed in the US Senate but was killed in the US House by then-Speaker Boehner in order to avoid a bloody civil war over immigration policy in the GOP.

    Mass immigration lowers wages, increases housing costs, swamps schools, overwhelms hospitals, increases income inequality, harms the environment and causes habitat-destroying sprawl.

    Mass immigration destroys cultural cohesion and brings crime and Islamic Terrorism to the United States.

    Tweets from 2014:

  49. @RadicalCenter

    Apologies for the typos. Kids woke up and the morning regimen took over suddenly!

  50. @Jack D

    From farming to the law: from chicken shit to bullshit.

    Just kidding, “some of my best friends are lawyers” (true ;)

  51. Svigor says:

    The plan was straightforward: after years of being mocked for her risible and fraudulent claims of Indian ancestry, Warren would take a DNA test proving she had negligible Indian ancestry, then dishonest, leftist-controlled Big Media would pretend it was significant Indian ancestry and hope people were fooled.

    Ms. Warren has also troubled advocates of racial equality and justice, who say her attempt to document ethnicity with a DNA test gave validity to the idea that race is determined by blood — a bedrock principle for white supremacists and others who believe in racial hierarchies.

    Know who really believes in racial hierarchies? Observant people living in multiracial societies like the USA, where we have an unmistakable racial hierarchy with Jews quietly at the top, blacks loudly just beneath them, and whites all the way down at the bottom.

    Guess who doesn’t care about racial hierarchy? People living in monoracial societies.

  52. Thea says:

    The Indian Tribe can have their own definition but it doesn’t affect much. At least they have the decency to provide a fixed meaning.

    Harvard classifying someone as not white has farther reaching consequences. Yet, If you asked Harvard how they define not white, they would wet their index finger and point up into the wind as the definition changes to whatever someone feels is best that day.

    Probably a few SJWs at Harvard share the WN definition of white.

  53. Corvinus says:

    “It’s always fun to milk another post out of Senator Warren’s DNA test. From the New York Times”

    As opposed to dipping your toes and getting neck deep with yet another insightful post about the Mueller investigation. As if the unfolding events do not even exist on your radar screen.

    Keep being cagey!

  54. Anon[320] • Disclaimer says:

    This is the second time the NYT has raised the DNA issue. They can’t keep harping on this without leaving the suspicion that the NYT has picked its candidate already–and it’s not Warren. They’re trying to sandbag Warren in her weak spot. It looks to me like NYT has decided to back Hillary, and the effort to backstab Warren is coming from Team Hillary.

    It’s not an accident that this article popped up right after Hillary and Bill had to cancel their speaking tour for lack of ticket sales and when a whistle-blower is telling the Feds about the Clinton Foundation.

    https://thehill.com/opinion/white-house/420131-feds-received-whistleblower-evidence-in-2017-alleging-clinton-foundation

    Hillary has realized her support among Dems is weak, which means she has to backstab the other candidates to keep them out of her way, and she’s pulled strings among her supporters at the NYT.

    The NYT is probably thinking that since Hillary won the popular vote last time, and being an echo chamber of ‘I didn’t know anyone who voted for Trump,’ figures she’s the strongest candidate to beat Trump that they’ve got. They’re probably right about this. I’m sure the NYT has done its own polling, and it’s told them Warren would lose against Trump, but Hillary has a fighting chance.

    • Replies: @Neil Templeton
  55. Forbes says:
    @anon

    What she really needed to defend against is the allegation of lying or outright fabrication for affirmative action bennies. But now she can claim she has verifiable Native American ancestry (however distant it may be).

    Nice effort. Now try keeping up with the story. Her family lore was that her parents had to elope because her mother was part-Indian. With Liz at ~1,023/1,024 not-Indian leaves her mother with a pretty small part.

    Charming family lore, but an outright fabrication for Affirmative Action hiring benefits.

    How many Rutgers Law School-Newark graduates teach at Ivy law schools…

    • Replies: @anon
  56. Forbes says:
    @Jack D

    The last paragraph is a gem–describing the Dems fix in a nutshell, as a result of their coalition of the fringes. Everyone must be satisfied, which is inherently contradictory and conflict-ridden.

    That doesn’t mean Dems can’t win the WH–it just means its not obvious. Obama wasn’t obvious, except after the fact. Trump wasn’t obvious–and the Dems still don’t understand how it happened. In fairness to the Dems, I’m not certain Reps learned anything from Obama’s wins.

  57. El Dato says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Aryans patriarchically riding the steppe with bare chest and painted faces, doing some genociding, then talking about the balance that must be maintained between Man and Nature are a Nazi Philosopher’s dream.

    Three people close to senior members of Ms. Warren’s team, who were granted anonymity to speak freely on the issue, said they were “shocked” and “rattled” by the senator’s decision to take the DNA test

    It is practically summoning THE GOAT WITH A THOUSAND YOUNG just for the LULZ. Irresponsible!

  58. Anon[312] • Disclaimer says:

    • Replies: @anon
  59. Anon[312] • Disclaimer says:

    But who was behind this Imported ‘Antisemitism’? Bring over immigrant-invaders to do Antisemitism that white people won’t do. The very people behind Imported Antisemitism are now bitching about it.

    https://www.timesofisrael.com/europe-is-finished-leading-lawyer-says-as-he-leaves-uk-for-israel/

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  60. Marty says:
    @Justice Duvall

    I recall the faculty diversity protests at Boalt in the spring of 1990. There was a 12-foot long banner that read, “Redefine Merit.” Out on the grass, there was a gathering where a latino guy went to the microphone and introduced himself as the “Minister of Propaganda.” Maybe he turned out to be your professor.

  61. ChrisZ says:
    @Jack D

    I thought that science was awesome and something that had to be respected. Or that only applies to certain kinds of science, such as climate “science”. Marxism itself was called “scientific” socialism as opposed to romantic or Utopian socialism.

    A favorite scene in the great “Jeeves & Wooster” series* has Sir Roderick Spode pontificating over breakfast that, under his administration, Yorkshire would be dedicated to raising only potatoes, and Lincolnshire only parsnips (or something like that). When Bertie raises a quizzical eyebrow at the plan, Spode waves away the objection with a smug smile. “All scientifically determined, I assure you!” he says, to close debate.

    I think of that whenever I encounter an uncritical appeal to “Science!” in the news.

    *I know the series and the stories have fans among the commenters here. Heck, we’ve even got our own Roderick Spode!

    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  62. Anon[231] • Disclaimer says:

    “Get ready for President Warren to preside over another rise in homicides.”

    I wonder what that does for Stephen Pinker’s thinking process. For years he has implied that the future was bright based on contemporary trends. Nevermind the possibility of a sudden reversal (see Russia’s homicide rate from ~1992 – 2010).

  63. If DNA tests are so controversial, why do these shows that trace celebrities ancestry use them? Like the one with Henry Louis Gates?

  64. @Dave Pinsen

    Dave, That is too funny. Years ago while sitting in my local union’s hiring hall the Business Agent opened the job window and asked…” Is John Standing Wolf in the hall?” A another ironworker yelled back, “No he’s not, but Jimmy Sitting on His Ass Waiting For You to Give Me a Job is!”

    • LOL: Dave Pinsen
  65. @Jack D

    Which reminds me that when she was still Hillary Rodham, she flunked the DC bar exam notwithstanding the Yale Law pedigree.

  66. @anon

    The problem is, that she didn’t say, that she has some native American ancestry, but that she checked the native American box on her employment forms and was even touted as a “woman of color” by the Harvard law school. If the democrats accept her behavior, then they say, that people, who are 0.1% non-white are entitled to affirmative action. I have already read about a man, who bid for minority contracts, because his DNA test showed he was 0.5% black.

    • Replies: @anon
  67. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Anon

    But what reason would Zionists have to incentivize aliyah?

  68. slumber_j says:
    @Jack D

    Once you have walked knee deep in chicken shit, legal work is a joy by comparison (not to mention that it pays a lot better).

    Then there’s the chickens themselves:

  69. Anon[320] • Disclaimer says:
    @Carol

    I’ll be law enforcement has plenty of DNA samples from Indians already and have for years.

  70. BB753 says:
    @Steve in Greensboro

    Kamala has too many skeletons in her closet. She slept her way to the top. Trump would destroy her.

  71. anon[109] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Actually this is what progressives believe. All personality traits are social constructs unaffected by biology.
    They also believe sex is a social construct unaffected by biology, so you need to put a red magic dot where the biological sex organs go.

  72. @ChrisZ

    Jeeves & Wooster was the best thing Frye and Laurie have ever done. I introduced the show to my kids when they were early teens; they thought it was a riot.

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  73. @Jim Don Bob

    People had been trying to make Jeeves & Wooster movies or TV shows for a couple of generations, then Laurie and Frye did it once and for all.

    Hugh Laurie as Bertie Wooster is exactly the opposite of Hugh Laurie as Dr. House.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  74. @Anon

    Wrong. If Hillary, or Joe Biden, is supported at all by the NYT, WaPo, et al, it will be to create the opportunity to sacrifice the Old Party in order to usher in the Resurrection of Moral Authority incarnate Beto, or whomever is chosen.

    • Replies: @Oleaginous Outrager
  75. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Hapalong Cassidy

    Law schools are rated on percentage of grads who pass the Bar.

  76. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Mr. Anon

    >demands to be addressed a certain way
    This is authetic Chicano.

  77. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer

    One of the great pillars of television, except that the later seasons are ruined by constantly having to ressure people that Nazism is bad. This probably followed Wodehouse being doghoused for attempting to tell little satirical jokes about having lived (unintentionally) in Nazi-occupied France (not his fault, the Nazis hadn’t been present when he first got there).
    There is also a brief, bizarre little awkwardness (in I forget which episode), which was clearly intended as a crudely inserted race-harmony message, but comes off as meaningless and gay. J&W meet a black elevator operator, smile at him, them smile at each other. It avoids the historical reality that even the “black jobs” in Bertie Wooster’s world would have been performed by white people.

    • Replies: @ChrisZ
  78. anon[355] • Disclaimer says:

    Anybody who thinks this woman is an Indian needs laser eye surgery.

  79. anon[166] • Disclaimer says:
    @Forbes

    lol, I’m no Warren supporter. I side with the majority of the commentariat here on most political positions and am a longtime iSteve reader.

    I’m just saying, objectively and as a matter of strategy analysis, I don’t think what she did was a tactical error.

    There’s presumably all kinds of backroom maneuvering going on. It seems some faction of the Dem. elites is putting out stories trying to tarnish Warren on some cockamamie theory that releasing her DNA results was some permanent disaster. In reality most of the public doesn’t know or care.

    It’s the same ol’ mass-coordinated effort on the part of the media to marshal nothingburger into a supposedly disqualifying faux paus that they routinely used with success to disqualify contenders prior to ’16.

  80. anon[166] • Disclaimer says:
    @GermanReader2

    But are these issues created by the release of her DNA results or are they preexisting circumstances?

    I can agree her DNA results didn’t absolve her of the preexisting controversy, but at the same time releasing the results wasn’t “scandalous”.

  81. @Neil Templeton

    Apparently losing to the wholly unlikable Ted Cruz has given Beto a huge amount of momentum that’s going to carry him straight into the White House. And who can argue; it’s not like Obama actually achieved anything as a Senator, so why not skip that step altogether?

    • Replies: @J.Ross
    , @Ibound1
  82. @Mr. Anon

    What you gonna do about it, punk?

  83. ChrisZ says:
    @J.Ross

    With respect, J., is there another show where the lead character spends an episode in blackface and sings “Lady of Spain” in front of a banjo-playing minstrel band?

    Any residue of PC in a given program might be easily forgiven, Sir (as Jeeves might put it).

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  84. J.Ross says: • Website
    @ChrisZ

    You almost say that like your idea of heaven isn’t forty-seven ginger-headed sailors.

  85. J.Ross says: • Website
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    It’s pretty clear that voters are an afterthought in the process. They find their guy or gal, they zhoozh him, they set up a frame, they amass a war chest undreamt-of by previous generations of politicians, and then if voters fail to respond it’s the fault of backwardness and division.
    In fact this is exactly what you see in the must-watch documentary Our Brand Is Crisis (avoid the feature film of the same title).

  86. Ibound1 says:
    @Oleaginous Outrager

    Beto is the Democrat George W. Bush – family money, lack of substance, supposed appeal to Hispanics, loved by his party for reasons that are utterly inexplicable to me. He would be exactly as disastrous as W was, in his own way of course. Voting for Beto in Texas was a vote by suburban women in the big city areas. Zero thought to how his policies would have affected their own or their husbands’ companies and for that matter their own Christmas vacations and bonuses. I saw that at my own company. They do not care what a lower corporate tax rate does for available cash or how increased regulation diverts cash to law firms and away from their own pockets or how illegals drain the state’s resources.

    “Cruz and Trump were gross.” That’s it.

    Seriously this was the level of thought by college educated women. Unreal.

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