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From Science:

In decision certain to draw fire, journal will publish heavily criticized paper on gender differences in physics

By Dalmeet Singh Chawla Nov. 1, 2019 , 4:00 PM

In a move likely to attract criticism, a peer-reviewed journal has agreed to publish an Italian physicist’s highly contested analysis of publications, which concludes that female physicists don’t face more career obstacles than their male colleagues. The journal says it will also simultaneously publish critiques of the paper, which one member of the journal’s editorial board says is “flawed” and contains “unsubstantiated claims.”

Last year, physicist Alessandro Strumia received widespread criticism after presenting a talk at CERN, the European particle physics laboratory near Geneva, Switzerland, where he was a guest professor. During the presentation, he asserted that physics was built and invented by men, and stated on a slide that “Physics is not sexist against women.” Thousands of physicists signed a letter voicing concerns about Strumia’s views and some researchers published detailed critiques of his findings and methods, which focused on published papers in the field of “fundamental physics” that includes theoretical and experimental studies of fundamental particles, cosmology, and astrophysics. Some of Strumia’s critics have argued that such literature analyses are not sufficient to support his claims. Both CERN and Strumia’s employer, the University of Pisa in Italy, launched investigations. Earlier this year, CERN cut all ties with Strumia and the university released a statement condemning his comments.

The upcoming paper, which Strumia has posted on his website, has been accepted for publication by Quantitative Science Studies (QSS), which publishes “theoretical and empirical research on science and the scientific workforce.”

Strumia’s paper is 45 pages long and contains 72 graphs.

Strumia’s study examines 1.3 million fundamental physics papers, published from 1970 to this year, which are indexed by CERN’s INSPIRE database. After identifying authors as men or women based on their names, the study confirms what Strumia calls a “well known” gender skew in fundamental physics: For every four new male Ph.D.s who publish, there is just one new female Ph.D. Strumia also concludes that male and female physicists have similar opinions about which papers deserve to be cited, and that authors of both genders cite their own studies at similar rates. (That finding diverges from a 2016 analysis, which Strumia cites, that concluded male authors cite their own work on average 56% more than female authors.) Strumia also finds that the publication records, which show institutional affiliations, reveal no statistically significant difference in how quickly men and women are hired after receiving their Ph.D.s, or the rate at which they stop publishing in the field, which Strumia uses as an indicator for when a researcher has left academic research. Strumia notes this finding contradicts other studies that have found that a higher proportion of women drop out of academia than men.

The primary takeaway from his study, Strumia tells ScienceInsider, is that men and women have equal opportunities in fundamental physics, and women don’t necessarily face a more hostile work environment. “This is what comes out from the data,” he says. “I believe [this] because I see this in the data.”

Strumia’s paper is likely, once again, to attract fierce pushback.

It’s almost as if the women physicists pushing the conventional wisdom tend to have a vested financial interest in silencing dissenting science.

Occam’s butterknife is used to butter one’s bread.

Also, as I’ve mentioned a few times:

High IQ women tend to prefer the Life Sciences, like biology, more than they prefer the Death Sciences, like physics. Very few women have ever felt that “I am become Death, destroyer of worlds” sounded awesome. But more than a few men have.

Update: Dr. Strumia clarifies in the iSteve comments about the Science story:

Alessandro Strumia says:

November 5, 2019 at 7:43 pm GMT • 100 Words

Just to clarify: CERN adopted a single formal act: the opening of an investigation to check if my talk might have violated rules such as “obligation to exercise reserve and tact“, “reserve in expressing personal opinions“, “communications to the public“. In this case a procedure would have been opened such that I would have had the opportunity to officially explain my reasons. Instead, after 6 months, CERN closed the issue concluding: “CERN will not pursue disciplinary proceedings”. I thank colleagues who later invited me to work on physics at CERN, but I also had to write a scientific paper about gender, so free speech was important and I cannot accept flexible rules that subjectively restrict it.

 
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  1. BenKenobi says:

    “We have no butter, but I ask you: would you rather have butter or guns? Shall we import lard or steel? Let me tell you: preparedness makes us powerful. Butter merely makes us fat.”

    • Replies: @Herald
  2. Medvedev says:

    Thousands of physicists signed a letter voicing concerns about Strumia’s views
    Both CERN and Strumia’s employer, the University of Pisa in Italy, launched investigations
    CERN cut all ties with Strumia and the university released a statement condemning his comments

    Had nothing to do with science or finding the truth, having a debate or even civil discussion … all comes down to rule of mob and crucifixion of the heretic.

  3. El Dato says:

    “men and women have equal opportunities in fundamental physics”

    Heads exploding like a Higgs Boson, dumping Twitter shrieks into the calorimeters!

    Who will be the first female researchers to feel physically ill and barf into an electric panel, shutting down the LHC?

  4. Anonymous[161] • Disclaimer says:

    Steve, any thoughts on the Richard Spencer leak?

    • Replies: @anon
  5. men and women have equal opportunities

    What a horrible thing to say. It’s almost as bad as saying that racism isn’t actually as ubiquitous as some would have it, or that the Nazis didn’t actually kill as many Jews as some claim.

    See where this kind of thinking leads? Straight to the Holocaust. I rest my case.

  6. The journalist, Dalmeet Singh Chawla, has a respectable bachelor’s degree in biochemistry from University College London, but after unsuccessfully trying for the part of Gimli the Dwarf in the Lord of the Rings movies, he got a master’s degree in journalism instead and settled on a career as a science writer.

    https://www.clippings.me/blog/becoming-a-science-journalist-dalmeet-singh-chawla/

    • LOL: Rosie
  7. Lot says:

    I’ve seen so many corporate woman-scrutinizing-test-tube stock photos in my life, the idea they aren’t dominating physical sciences seems crazy.

    I think Zionists are at fault.

  8. @Lot

    Your Jewish pride is excessive, bro. Everyone knows it’s a Freemason plot!

    • Replies: @Lot
  9. Lot says:
    @El Dato

    The Higgs boson decays, not explodes. It does so on average in 0.000000000000000000016 seconds.

  10. bomag says:
    @Lot

    I googled “lab chemist”; first four images were of women.

    • Replies: @Don't Look at Me
  11. Thousands of physicists signed a letter voicing concerns…

    “Concerns.”

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
  12. eah says:

    Dalmeet Singh Chawla

    “Immigrant. Socialist. Global Citizen. Science Journalist.” — in roughly that order it seems — he’s in London; I wonder if he knows Angela Saini?

    He retweets Jeremy Corbyn:

    • Replies: @Nodwink
    , @Harry Baldwin
  13. Jesse says:

    The problem, from your perspective, is that the trend has already been set by racial matters. No one would dare publish a paper talking about how blacks aren’t evolved for physics. Larry Summers wouldn’t have dared suggest blacks are innately less able at maths. That idiot at Google knew full well to avoid all talk of race.

    Feminists quite reasonably want what the race hustlers have. If you want to dismantle that, you have to start at the bottom and go for innate racial differences. Which no one has the stones to do. So feminists will drive that truck through the massive hole on mainstream reasoning. And why the hell not?

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @jpp
  14. El Dato says:
    @Lot

    In any case, you have to admit it’s getting triggered pretty damn fast.

  15. @Change that Matters

    In “The Irishman,” the phrase “I’m a little concerned” signals you are in severe danger of getting get rubbed out.

    • Replies: @SFG
  16. SFG says:
    @Steve Sailer

    Is that movie worth the running time?

    • Replies: @SFG
    , @Steve Sailer
  17. Rosie says:
    @Jesse

    Feminists quite reasonably want what the race hustlers have. If you want to dismantle that, you have to start at the bottom and go for innate racial differences. Which no one has the stones to do. So feminists will drive that truck through the massive hole on mainstream reasoning. And why the hell not?

    Especially since race differences in intelligence absolutely dwarf sex differences. The funny thing is that this double standard is on display here at unz. Civnat cucks will clutch their pearls at the idea of revoking the citizenship of recent immigrants, then say nothing about suggestions that women be disenfrancised, denied the right to earn a living, etc.

  18. Realist says:

    During the presentation, he asserted that physics was built and invented by men,…

    So was chemistry and math.

    • Replies: @jsm
    , @guest
  19. then say nothing about suggestions that women be disenfrancised, denied the right to earn a living, etc.

    But no one very seriously advocates such things. Or to be more precise, those ideas have no serious constituency to speak of.

    Even in the early and mid 20th century, without female workers in textiles, garment manufacture, radio assembly, nursing, and education the whole economy would have been crippled. As far as disenfranchisement, it would be politically impossible to implement since there are more female than male voters even if all males voted for it. And it would be a strange dictator indeed who would try to implement it, since real dictators don’t allow anyone to meaningfully vote.

    • Agree: Just Saying
    • Replies: @guest
  20. Anon[331] • Disclaimer says:

    At the time of the original incident I tracked down the paper and read it, and I also read voraciously various physics forums and #femalephysicist Twitter.

    His original paper was very thorough and made a lot of points, using hard data, and triangulating in various ways on the same conclusion. You can refute it, but it would take a lot of work. However he didn’t do himself any favors by being sarcastic and jokey here and there in the paper, and he also came across as sour-grapey, writing about his own personal experience in applaying for physics jobs and losing to women with lower credentials. This was exacerbated by non-native English. Pro tip: Do not joke in any language but your own native language. I have learned that lesson myself. He needed an edit to clean that stuff up.

    The women physicists were shocking to me. They absolutely, positively, to a woman, could not see even a single atom of merit in his paper. All comments were along the lines of “these ideas have been completely debunked already,” maybe mentioning a weakness or two in his approaches, but not engaging in his arguments in a substantive way. They sounded a lot like transgenders responding to a serious observation about problems with transgender theory. Very angry, very no-platformy. If you remember the mathematician who wrote up something on the “greater male variability hypothesis” and had it disappeared from a journal after female mathematicians went nuclear, that was the basic vibe.

    Women physicists seem to believe that women are, proportionally to their representation in the population, i.e. one-to-one, just as good at STEM as men at every single level up to and including Einstein and Newton and Van Neumann, that their genius is currently represented in currently working women physicists, and that any disproporionality in any job at any level, and in publications, and in prizes, is due solely to current bigotry against women by the patriarchy. This was what I came away with from reading reactions to this guy’s presentation.

    I pay attention to women in various major STEM jobs, and I see a lot of, how to put it?, the same thing you see with blacks where women are probably more qualified for top science management jobs than for actual science jobs, which puts them in authority over smarter men, and gives them higher salaries to boot (and free time to do lectures on diversity and write op-eds). Sort of the Neil DeGrasse Tyson phenonmenon, if Tyson worked at a real science institution. By the nature of how the Nobels are awarded, I expect a lot of these management types to be getting Nobel prizes in the next few decades.

  21. eugyppius says:

    I am completely baffled by this uproar. Did we not all just read, in no less august a source than the “Race Explainer” of Birney, Raff, Rutherford and Scally, that there is no “political correctness” in science?

    I could hardly believe my eyes, so I gave Birney’s blog another hit and clipped this instructive passage:

    It is often suggested that geneticists who emphasise the biological invalidity of race are under the thumb of political correctness …. Such accusations are unfounded and betray a lack of understanding of what motivates science. Discoveries, particularly in biology, have often been challenging or difficult for society to accept, and scientists throughout history are celebrated for establishing them in the face of contemporary objections…. If the evidence is sound, scientific integrity demands that it is published. The charge that thousands of scientists across the world are covering up a real discovery for fear of personal or wider social consequences is absurd.

    So the problem is that Strumia’s work is simply wrong, right? This is how scientists react to work that is simply wrong. They demand that journals not print things that are Wrong, even if they have passed peer review (although that would seem to mean they meet some sort of threshold for being Not Wrong, but no matter); and failing that, they print rebuttals alongside the Wrong article. This happens all the time which is why journals never ever publish anything that is Wrong and we have been spared horrible things like for example a crisis of replication, which would have happened if their standards were lower and they were not allergic to things that are Wrong.

    But how is Strumia Wrong? Here things become very unclear:

    The study is “methodologically flawed” and “fails to meet the standards of the bibliometric community,” says Cassidy Sugimoto, an information scientist at Indiana University in Bloomington.

    Well then, I am convinced.

    The study contains “several unsubstantiated claims,” she says, and doesn’t properly cite or discuss papers that come to conflicting conclusions. “Overall,” Sugimoto says, “the manuscript does not provide a convincing understanding of the literature or the methods, lessening the credibility of the results.”

    What happened to the methodological flaws? She just kind of left those hanging while she leapt to complain about his citations and his “discussion.” That is a little bit strange. Also I am very sorry that Sugimoto is not convinced Strumia understands “the literature” or “the methods”. I once heard that a great tell in academia is when people say that something is unconvincing and then proceed to fulminate in this manner rather than providing specifics, but I’m sure that’s out of order here. Sugimoto sounds like a scientist of tremendous integrity.

    Here is another scientist of integrity:

    Rachel Oliver, a materials scientist … says … Strumia “certainly hasn’t attempted any analysis of the relevant systemic problems” that might influence gender differences in physics, such as implicit bias or outright harassment.

    Right of course, Oliver has explanations but Strumia has other explanations and the problem is that Strumia’s explanations are not Oliver’s explanations, which Oliver prefers. Whenever this happens Oliver is correct, it is a philosophical principle going back to William of Occam.

    So everything is happy again now. At first this looked like a case of political bias in science, contrary to the doctrine that Birney and his friends propounded last week. But, on closer examination, this is a completely ordinary case of the scientific process at work and the problem is absolutely not that Strumia’s conclusions are politically incorrect, but rather that he is Wrong, because of things he does not discuss, and explanations he does not entertain, or because of his methodology, or something.

    • Agree: El Dato
    • Replies: @animalogic
    , @Hypnotoad666
  22. SFG says:
    @SFG

    P.S. If you tell me seeing it will support pre-woke white male culture, I will see it.

  23. @El Dato

    At the very least, the patriarchy needs to turn down the air conditioning in laboratories, harrumph.

    Tangentially related to this issue, from Sarcasm King David Cole over at Taki’s today:
    https://www.takimag.com/article/tyranny-triumphant-part-i-transmenstrual-cyclists/
    Tranny Planet is merely a nucleus for a cult to grow around. Those seeking power always need a boogeyman, a kernel, to crystallize public opinion around, like an irritating grain of sand that makes an oyster grow a buffering pearl. In this case, the devil is normalcy itself – and the pearl isn’t pretty, no matter how much lipstick is painted onto the freaks. Crimethink Gestapo knock in 3, 2, 1 . . .

    • Replies: @El Dato
  24. eugyppius says:

    And also, just briefly to this point from Birney and friends:

    The charge that thousands of scientists across the world are covering up a real discovery for fear of personal or wider social consequences is absurd.

    Clearly it is ridiculous to think that scientists fear that they might face personal or professional consequences for publishing the wrong thing. CERN and the University of Pisa, for example, have not at all bothered to investigate Strumia on the basis of his academic conclusions about women in physics. Pisa hasn’t at all condemned him, he’s totally fine there. And above all CERN didn’t “cut all ties with Strumia”, and in fact I don’t even know why I put quotation marks about that, because nobody wrote it because it didn’t happen.

    • Agree: European-American
    • Replies: @res
  25. @Lot

    It’s a tube of mercury. I can tell by her intense focus that she is checking out her glasses. “Do these make me look too geeky?” They’ve got to be geeky enough though, or HR will send her back to the steno pool … or maybe get her a part in the next Thomas Dolby video.

    • LOL: jim jones
    • Replies: @Don't Look at Me
  26. @SFG

    Scorsese’s “The Irishman” is the best talent of the 1970s getting together in 2019 for one last hurrah … and not disappointing.

    I sat through the whole thing quite interested, but it runs from 7:00 pm to 10:40 pm, so most people will wait until it comes out on Netflix the night before Thanksgiving.

    Everybody over 40 is going to watch it over that long weekend.

  27. Anon[280] • Disclaimer says:

    Citing implicit bias really shows that Rachel Oliver is a ditz. The implicit association test is not holding up very well these days. For a scientist to mention it is embarassing.

    There are difficulties in the data that can be criticized. This is true in any big data data science work. There’s a chicken and egg problem in some of his ideas, which he to his credit addresses and tries to minimize and work around. Are women’s citations low because their work is weak, not the first to publication, or more peripheral to central issues? Because of an old boys network? Because the great papers that would have been written weren’t because of time spent dealing with harassment?

    By the way, there is a movement now to make a point of citing women’s papers, of doing a final run through your paper and digging up some stuff written by women to throw in. This is not unlike the movement to have half women on stage for all conference discussions. If women’s citations eventually reach parity, will it have been from recognition of their qualilty work, or because they were affirmative-actioned into the citations? It will be impossible to know. Which is the point, I guess.

  28. @Rosie

    Rosie, revoking citizenship is a far greater matter for an individual then being disenfranchised. And “denied the right to earn a living”? How’s that work? I’ve thought about making $500 a night CASH at a strip club, but the bouncer not only denied my right to earn a living, but wouldn’t let me in without a collared shirt. “WTF?!” we told him, “look at those girls, we don’t see any shirts, much less collars.”

    • Replies: @Redneck farmer
    , @TWS
    , @Jesse
    , @Rosie
  29. @Anon

    I was shocked by similar resentful “tribalism” in the James Damore affair, expressed by women roughly in my field whom I otherwise respect. And yeah, some were more in the softer managerial or communications areas.

  30. @Lot

    My great-great-great-great-grandfather shot a Higg’s Bison with a .375 rifle. It took longer than 1.6 x 10^-20 seconds to decay, I guarantee you. The teepee reeked for about a week and a half.

    • Replies: @Bill Jones
  31. @Lot

    Lot wrote:

    The Higgs boson decays, not explodes.

    Well… the Higgs tends to decay into b quarks, which are much lighter than the Higgs; therefore, almost all of the Higgs mass goes into kinetic energy of the b quarks. The “decay products” should end up moving at a good fraction of the speed of light, usual for “decays” of elementary particles.

    So, if you were small enough, it would indeed seem like an explosion. A very small explosion.

  32. @eugyppius

    Women’s Studies 101.
    Question 1.
    Multiple choice.
    The author of this study is an arrant sexist because;
    (a) His premises & conclusions are largely correct.
    (b) His premises & conclusions are largely incorrect.
    (c) He is a man.
    (d) All of the above are correct.

    • Replies: @Mr. Anon
    , @eugyppius
    , @El Dato
  33. I ran across Alessandro on another blog: he seemed, I’ll put this diplomatically, not to be primarily focused on developing his social skills. (As opposed to all the rest of us physicists, who are of course known for being the most suave dudes on campus.) Of course the way CERN treated him was shameful.

    Seriously, I have known a lot of very, very bright women in STEM subjects. But the truly brilliant people were generally males. The truly brilliant people also tended to be very, very weird. I suspect the correlation of brilliance, maleness, and weirdness is not an accident.

    The one major exception, as I have mentioned before, was Luis Alvarez, who struck me as a genuinely warm, pleasant (and brilliant) human being. No doubt even he would have struck most people as pretty nerdy, but I think they would still have been happy with him as their uncle or next-door neighbor.

    • Replies: @European-American
    , @JMcG
  34. eah says:

    OT

    Sound familiar?

  35. Herald says:
    @BenKenobi

    Grass fed butter is a good source of Vitamin A, conjugated linoleic acid and is not especially fattening.

  36. Look, apparently Strumia just published 45 pages amounting to “it’s OK to be male” in physics.

    The point is not the truth of such a silly statement, it’s that it’s provocative and upsetting to a lot of people who are trying really hard to right injustices, defend victims, and make the world a better place.

    In the 70s, a popular book was titled “I’m OK, You’re OK”. It was a call for people to engage in mature adult to adult discussion.

    Now we have “It’s OK Is Not OK”. It’s a call for everyone to shut the *** up unless they’re complaining about something important.

    • Agree: Ash Williams
    • Replies: @El Dato
  37. @Steve Sailer

    Steve: “the best talent of the 1970s getting together…”

    A trifle OT, but recently the “director’s cut” of Apocalypse Now has been in rotation on cable, a movie I care deeply about (Bergman’s “Persona”, Apocalypse Now, and Disney’s “Frozen” are all really the same movie from different angles), so I’ve been re-watching it and studying it again. Two things struck me.

    1. Most of the re-included footage is pretty good and artistically sound, especially the stuff on the French plantation, which originally I thought was out of place but now see as integral, and especially the Marlon Brando bits that show Kurtz as almost sort of sane, like the bit where he’s reading clips from Time and Newsweek. People forget that Brando made the interestingly weird choice to play Kurtz as arguably the sanest guy in the movie. The one thing that ruins it is including the extra Robert Duvall footage, when he already had the greatest exit in movie history: “You know, someday this war’s gonna end.”

    2. Apparently Coppola originally cast Harvey Keitel (more great 70s talent) as Capt. Willard, but then dropped him after seeing a week of dailies and replaced him with Martin Sheen. I can see why — much as I admire Harvey, his overt masculinity, instead of Sheen’s weird catlike neutrality, would have ruined the whole movie.

    It’s odd thinking of great 70s Movie Talent with respect to their obligatory Big Vietnam Movies: Coppola’s is a masterpiece that isn’t even really about Vietnam at all, Kubrick’s is ridiculous, DePalma and Stone are just plain silly, and Spielberg and Lucas had the good sense to not even try. Altman does a great job with a few wry asides in Nashville.

  38. @PhysicistDave

    Right. James Damore was also probably not socially suave.

    Another explanation for the fuss is that in these uncertain and highly connected times, trolls, like spam, are a growing nuisance, requiring strict policing.

    So troll-like behavior will be shut down, hard. If the consensus is, we need to do more for women, then a publication that, no, women are fine… can be objectively characterized as trolling and eliminated by all means necessary.

    • Agree: Liza
    • Replies: @BenKenobi
    , @Jesse
  39. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Re Altman, well I guess you also have to call MASH a Vietnam movie in its way, but like Apocalypse Now it’s really about other things.

    • Replies: @Autochthon
  40. Off topic:

    The US Military is illegally occupying the SOVERIGN Nation of Syria….and stealing Syria’s oil….This is Donald Trump’s MAGA Jobs Program for WORKING CLASS NATIVE BORN WHITE AMERICAN CHRISTIAN YOUTH…..General Smedley Butler was right:WAR IS A RACKET!!!!

  41. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    What about Cimino? I watched Deer Hunter and Apocalypse Now back to back at a repertory theater in 1981.

  42. Anonymous[114] • Disclaimer says:

    In unison, the physicists admonished Mr. Chawla, “NO, we ARE sexist pigs!”

  43. El Dato says:
    @Bard of Bumperstickers

    Wokeist Twitter Observer RT reports that people are not yet ready to accept Desmond is Amazing as the new normal. Maybe this trial balloon for the next mindbreak will be shelved till after the elections.

    Internet unites in disgust at tweet promoting 12yo drag queen ‘Desmond is Amazing’ as the FUTURE

    “Desmond Is Amazing is the future and we’re here for it,” declared media news site Mashable on Sunday, tweeting a video featuring Desmond describing visiting drag clubs at five years of age, and telling “haters” to “just go away.”

    However, nobody else was “here for it.” Comments poured in, almost universally negative.

    “This child is being exploited while his life is being destroyed,” one commenter wrote. “Itis incredibly sad to see.”

    “Good to know you love child abuse”tweeted conservative pundit Sara Gonzalez, while fellow right-wing commentator Mark Dice simply replied“vomit.” Even former fans of Mashable saw the video as a step too far.

  44. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    FMJ up to the final recruit training scene (aka Then Everybody died; The End) is actually very well done. So well in fact I think Kubrick had very little to do with it. R. Lee Ermey basically wrote the dialogue, and choreographed himself. Gunnery Sergeant Hartman’s instant cult hero status was exactly 180 degrees opposite of what Kubrick intended. The rest of the movie is like you said, ridiculous.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
  45. @Steve Sailer

    I forgot about Cimino — weird for me, when I consider that personally, The Deer Hunter was by far the most traumatic Big Vietnam Statement Movie for me when I was a kid. (And it also had an awesome amount of Great 70s Movie Talent.). It’s a very interesting film, rare in the sense that it is serious in being about America’s involvement in Vietnam in a highly perceptive class-based way, and also it’s about other things, too. Sort of like how “Good Vibrations” is not really about what it says it’s about.

    I was young enough to not be threatened by the Vietnam draft, but old enough (and as a working-class White kid) to feel threatened by the perpetually culturally-reinforced concept that I was ideal cannon fodder for the insane machine of Endless Inexplicable Purposeless Wars On the Other Side of The Planet.

    The Deer Hunter was for me a very real horror movie: as a kid I could perfectly understand how inchoate, unexplained notions of class, ethnicity and honor could somehow turn overnight into being transported, without any good explanation, into a weird torture chamber on the opposite side of the world, and your only explanation was the flag and the national anthem.

  46. ‘During the presentation, he asserted that physics was built and invented by men, and stated on a slide that “Physics is not sexist against women.”’

    Point + Sputter initiated.

  47. @Medvedev

    Conformity is in some cases not merely a prudent middling course but offers those bereft of vitality the prospect of comeuppance against an independent spirit.

  48. JMcG says:
    @PhysicistDave

    Wasn’t Fermi supposed to be a great human being?

  49. Ano says:

    …Thousands of physicists signed a letter…and some researchers published detailed critiques…

    Meanwhile in other science news…
    …scientists in China have discovered and patented a cure for all virus-caused diseases (common cold etc) and for all known cancers; found all the previously unknown subatomic particles of the Standard Model, plus the gene(s) which code for human intelligence; and finished construction of the world’s first Helium-3 fusion reactor.

    In economic news, China is now the owner of CERN, paying the Europeans an undisclosed sum in shiny beads and blankets.

    Speaking from the New Beijing Moonbase, President Xi said he’s planning to reopen it (renamed ChinaERN) for scientific research purposes.*

    *Readers will recall CERN was shuttered by Western scientists on the grounds that physics was sexist.

  50. Mr. Anon says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Coppola’s is a masterpiece that isn’t even really about Vietnam at all, Kubrick’s is ridiculous,

    Ridiculous? Full Metal Jacket is a great movie.

  51. Mr. Anon says:
    @animalogic

    Don’t forget option e.)

    e.) Because. Just because.

  52. @Steve Sailer

    Scorsese’s The Irishman is the best talent of the 1970s getting together in 2019 for one last hurrah….

    Stanley Kubrick, Clint Eastwood, and John Boorman made a movie about an Irish guy? Why did they involve Scorsese and give him top billing? Wouldn’t he have just turned it into another cheesy gangster picture, everyone chewing the scenery with menacing monologues and essentially the same plot for the umpteenth time? Are they using a planchette to involve Kubrick? So many questions….

  53. El Dato says:
    @European-American

    Look, apparently Strumia just published 45 pages amounting to “it’s OK to be male” in physics.

    No, he says there is no oppression in physics.

    The point is not the truth of such a silly statement, it’s that it’s provocative and upsetting to a lot of people who are trying really hard to right injustices, defend victims, and make the world a better place.

    Theose “lots of people” have the privilege of pursuing research in a domain that is of no interest to 99% of the World’s population. They then get an emotional spasm in the groin region while drinking an espresso in the Cafetria as they learn that someone has found that, in fact, oppression of the fair sex is pretty mild at best.

    They are not running Ebola clinics in Congo w/o armed protection, where they are then sat upon by angry subhumans wielding AKM.

    They are the heroes that maybe no-one really wanted.

    Now we have “It’s OK Is Not OK”. It’s a call for everyone to shut the *** up unless they’re complaining about something important.

    I don’t get this.

    Here is the take from the mathematics departement on the liberative effort in Chile btw:

    A Movement to Close the Gender Gap in Mathematics

    It seems to not so much be oppression as the negative feelings that come from working in a male-dominated environment (you can only complain about the troubles of childrearing so much after all; why not complain about no having a larger short-term memory of 1024 items, which could improve things markedly?)

    Then I started to understand, little by little, by talking to students and to other female mathematicians, that for many of them the environment is more than unfriendly, it’s hostile and aggressive. There’s wild competition, harassment, implicit and explicit bias, and we have to prove ourselves all the time.

    This seems to be a matter of perception.

    • Replies: @European-American
  54. eugyppius says:
    @animalogic

    The author of this study is an arrant sexist because;
    (a) His premises & conclusions are largely correct.

    The greatest sin obviously is being right about the sort of things Strumia has ventured to publish on. If there really were “methodological problems” with his work we would not even be hearing about it; and the fact that people have kicked up such a hullabaloo tells you all you need to know.

  55. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    What?! M*A*S*H is set during the Korean War. Are Bridge on the River Kwai, Lawrence of Arabia, and Gone with the Wind “Viet Nam movies,” too? How far back does this concept extrapolate? Is any movie set against a war about the Viet Nam War? (Sorry, “police action.”) Is this another weird, self-absorption of boomers thing?

    • Replies: @Lurker
  56. @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Last night, I watched Stanley Kubrick’s The Shining for the first time, and that too, in a movie theater. I guess there’s a sequel in the works and the original is in limited re-runs in theatres, with a fresh/digitally restored “print.”

    I’d held off watching it all these years on the small screen, because it was the only Kubrick movie I hadn’t seen in a theater when it came out.

    A few random observations, for what it is worth. The experience of watching a like-new copy of a 1980 movie is a bit unsettling. In many ways, other than visually, it’s like watching a movie from today. Kubrick was way ahead of his time in attention to small details, such as title typography, and that makes it feel like a new movie, set in the late 1970s. It is unnerving watching a forty-something Jack Nicholson at the height of his powers onscreen, when one’s mental image of him now, is of him as an older man. Nicholson’s performance is terrific, and only very slightly dated in its affect and style, much less so than, say, Laurence Olivier’s old performances, which are mostly a bit more dated in acting style.

    Shelley Duval’s performance is simply terrific, and I daresay, at the time, must have gotten overlooked because of her performances in Popeye. With the benefit of time, it’s possible to focus on her performance, and not on her unique big-eyed face.

    As with watching Once Upon a Time in Hollywood, for a 1958 baby like me, the movie was a nostalgia trip into a very comprehensible and modern feeling world, but one without computers or the internet or cell phones. Even so, it feels (to me) a time that is connected to the present day. I guess, in a way, there’s been less change in the look of things and technological progress in the last forty years, than in the forty years before 1980.

    It’s not a great Kubrick movie, nor a great conventional horror thriller, but it is really well put together, like all his movies, and, like all his movies, gives you a lot to reflect on, after the lights go on.

    • Replies: @Jack Henson
  57. jsm says:
    @Realist

    During the presentation, he asserted that physics was built and invented by men,…

    This is weird. Physics — and math, and chemistry, and geology and biology, etc., etc., etc., are *discovered*, not “invented” nor “built.” Is Dalmeet that dumb, that he thinks physics was “invented”?

    • Replies: @Realist
  58. anon[251] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    I just googled this based on your comment. Pretty embarrassing for him, but I have to ask; who is this guy anyway? I have never heard of him outside of newspapers telling me what a bad and dangerous guy he is. Do some people like him? Does he have followers that were black shorts? Where does one even find out about the latest doings of Richard Spencer, and what are those doings anyway?

    • Replies: @Anon
  59. jpp says:
    @Jesse

    I think you’re getting this one wrong, Jesse. I have for some time maintained the thesis, and sometimes commented on it here at Unz, that race hustling has always been distinctly less succesul than feminist hustling in the science academy. Of course, this seems evident to me, having once been in the science academy myself. The trope of “women in stem” is simply more popular than the trope of “Mestizos in STEM” or “blacks in STEM” as a matter of simple observation. Nobody is advocating for statistically commenssurate proportion of black scientists the way they are for women scientists. And there are well grounded reasons for this. For one, there simply aren’t enough semi talented blacks, for instance, to make racial equality anything close to a reality and I think at at a latent level everyone knows that trying to implement this would only embarrass the cause. To boot, I’ve long argued that women activate a symptathy instinct from males that, for instance, blacks don’t, which they have succesfully manipulated to their advantage in soliciting male allies to their cause.

    As well, I simply reject your proposition that it is morally passe to discuss race and IQ in a way that it isn’t for sex and IQ. What about Richard Lynn? Charles Murray? Why do you think Angela Saini felt compelled to release her book if she hasn’t feared that certain race realist attitudes are coalescing into a conventional wisdom in certain quarters? Anecdotally, I generally hear grumbling about affirmative action for unqualified color people at least as much and probably more than I do in the case of women. I also might add that I think Larry Summers discussed sex diferences because he is aware that sex based affirmative action has been more succesful and poses a greater threat to the integrity of science institutions.

    • Replies: @Jesse
  60. @Achmed E. Newman

    Maybe we could get together and have Jack D represent us in a class action suit?

  61. Escher says:

    he asserted that physics was built and invented by men

    But who gave birth to those men?

  62. GU says:

    Academia’s response: “Oh, that’s so cute, you thought we were gonna stop the affirmative action (for women in physics) gravy train just because you have some data? LOL, you really don’t get it, do you?”

  63. TWS says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Damn, I feel for you. I saw a documentary on the subject. Flash Dance or something.

  64. @Rosie

    Civic nationalism is something that most of us wish was true. But even civic nationalism would require immigrants to assimilate, which current deep state policy discourages in favor of creating divisions that divide, degrade, and destroy society. That’s as true in the UK, France, and Germany as it is in the US. And universal suffrage has proven itself to be an extinction-level event for civilization.

    We must face facts. We cannot “Make America Great Again” because America has already been destroyed by embedded fifth columnists and their imported Hessian armies of barbarians. We must rebuild what we can, separate or expel the barbarians, and call the traitors to account for their crimes. European nations must do the same if they are to survive in any recognizable form.

    We wish it were not so. It need not have come to this, but it has. Our only choice now is whether we acknowledge the truth or cling to reassuring fantasies.

  65. slumber_j says:
    @Anon

    All of what you say is good, rings true etc. Except:

    Pro tip: Do not joke in any language but your own native language.

    It may be dangerous to do that in a work context, and maybe that’s what you mean here. But I had two Spaniards over for dinner last night who don’t speak a whole lot of English, and it would have been a pretty boring evening had I not been joking in their language. And I know plenty of non-native English speakers who are shockingly funny in our language. I wouldn’t want to discourage any of it.

  66. @Anon

    I found it prudent in higher education to cite my professors when writing a paper. It helps to let people know that you know that they are in charge.

  67. Anon[902] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    According to Inside Higher Ed, Governor Newsom signed an education bill banning the phrase “at risk” in favor of, I kid you not, “at promise.”

    Is that even grammatical?

  68. Anonymous[379] • Disclaimer says:

    Strumia’s paper is 45 pages long and contains 72 graphs.

    Why is this significant?

  69. Anonymous[379] • Disclaimer says:
    @eah

    OT

    Sound familiar?

    No, actually it does not. What are you referring to?

  70. BenKenobi says:
    @European-American

    The most definitive part of a “troll” is that he does not believe what he is typing, he is doing it for the reaction. But the term seems to have mutated.

    To modify Steve a bit, “troll is the new controversial.”

    • Replies: @European-American
  71. Jesse says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Proving my point, Billy Big Bollicks. You’d never dare joke about colored people like that. Certainly not in public. You only go after girls. How manly.

    This doesn’t even make sense on its own terms. At some point you’re going to have to convince women, rather than blaming them for everything, even (especially?) things that men do. And, strangely enough, all this cowardly sexism has sent women scurrying to the other side. How about girding your loins, supporting your fellow whites and daring to be actually brave on racial matters?

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  72. @Herald

    Due to some now-apparently-erroneous conclusions by the medical establishment 3 or 4 decades ago, butter has been severely margarinalized. I’ve tried to produce some of the grass fed stuff, but my butter wouldn’t eat the grass.

  73. Thousands of physicists signed a letter voicing concerns about Strumia’s views …

    There are thousands of physicists?

  74. Jesse says:
    @European-American

    Damore was plenty suave enough to know that you do NOT talk about racial differences the way he talked about sex differences.

  75. techanon says:

    a peer-reviewed journal has agreed to publish an Italian physicist’s highly contested analysis of publications, which concludes that female physicists don’t face more career obstacles than their male colleagues

    I knew it was controversial to publish null results but I didn’t expect this much backlash

  76. guest says:
    @Realist

    So was virtually everything.

    • Agree: Realist
  77. guest says:
    @donvonburg

    “Denied the right to earn a living” probably means do any job they feel like doing, even if they could be doing something else to earn a living of they do chose. Except for certain occupations that would be too ridiculous. NFL linewoman, for instance.

    If you advocate for prostitution to remain criminal, no doubt female “sex workers” would argue you want to deprive them of the right to earn a living.

  78. res says:
    @eugyppius

    Thanks for the laughs. This seems like a good time to mention this discussion of the recent paper by Noah Carl and Michael Woodley over in Anatoly Karlin’s blog:
    http://www.unz.com/akarlin/persecution-of-iq-researchers/

  79. guest says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    Brando could have tried a little harder to make himself appear sane. Even if what he’s doing makes sense, does he have to sit alone in shadows hunched over stroking himself?

    In the novella, there’s a clear, one-to-one connection between Mr. Kurtz’s tactics and the purpose he imagines himself serving for the company. They need more ivory? Okay, I’ll go kill other people and steal theirs. Col. Kurtz is in a different position. War strategy is way above his rank, and going rogue killing the enemy willy-nilly with natives in the bush isn’t going to win it. There’s nothing especially rational about what he’s doing.

    • Replies: @Lurker
    , @Daniel H
  80. @Herald

    Grass fed butter is a good source of Vitamin A, conjugated linoleic acid and is not especially fattening.

    How do you feed grass to butter?

    Oh, wait… That would be “grass-fed butter”. You said “grass fed butter”.

    How do you feed butter to grass? And why would we want to eat it? Bear liver is a more productive source of vitamin A, and tastier.

  81. Anonymous[354] • Disclaimer says:

    Technoglobohomo feminizes apace

  82. Keypusher says:
    @Steve Sailer

    How stupid does a director have to be to have a character who plays Russian roulette successfully for years? Dumb enough to follow up with Heaven’s Gate, it turned out. Deer Hunter is a thoroughly wretched film.

    • Agree: JMcG, YetAnotherAnon
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
  83. anon[188] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    It looks more like a pharmacy tech, preparing to fill a Boomer’s Medicare Cialis order.

  84. J.Ross says:

    Awful sexism (which I hate) from 4chan:
    anon1: the new all-girl Terminator sequel is bombing, it’s lost one hundred million dollars.
    anon2: so it made $0.70 for every dollar a male movie makes?

  85. Anon[184] • Disclaimer says:

    I worked with pakis. Singh whorno is all you need to know. They are the sneakiest, most corrupt & racially conscious race. Spent most of time tryna get relatives employed, but were very quick to spot Whites who were less than PC.

    Absolute scum, horrible atmosphere, always watching back. As bad as blax, just passive aggressive beaches, not upfront. Everything is race-baiting to them. Never take em literally.

    • Replies: @LoutishAngloQuebecker
  86. @Anon

    Women physicists seem to believe that women are, proportionally to their representation in the population, i.e. one-to-one, just as good at STEM as men at every single level

    Then the real reason more women STEMming a tide into the profession is (mostly male) H-1b competition. Thus, that avenue should be closed!

  87. Anonymous[381] • Disclaimer says:

    MIT physics department latest faculty addition


    Kerstin Perez
    Class of 1948 Career Development Assistant Professor of Physics
    https://web.mit.edu/physics/people/faculty/perez_kerstin.html

  88. BB753 says:
    @El Dato

    Let’s hope estrogen-fueled (or deprived) female scientists don’t blow the place up! What can possibly go wrong with having CERN run 50 % by (anatomically and chromosomally correct) women scientists, technicians, maintenance crews, etc?

  89. BenKenobi says:
    @eah

    I was walking in the Bentall Centre in Vancouver the other day and one of the cleaning staff was this 4ft tall humpbacked brown woman with a terrible shuffling gait from what seemed like one short leg. She was hobbling about with a dust mop.

    It was as if she were a domesticated Morlock in the Eloi financial district.

  90. OT:

    Game of Thrones prequel ‘Bloodmoon’ cancelled by HBO, allegedly because it is too woke. (There are black White Walkers, some of whom lesbian, and Ned Stark has a mixed-population group ancestor, some thought this could alienate the fan base)

    A plausible alternative explanation could be Brexit, because Bloodmoon was shot in Northern Ireland, and production costs could soar if NI is not in the EU anymore…

    https://www.thesun.co.uk/tvandshowbiz/10254771/game-of-thrones-prequel-axed/

    Sorry if this was already posted.

  91. @eugyppius

    The playbook is always the same when it comes to dismissing evidence of politically incorrect empirical conclusions: (a) You put the burden of proving the negative (i.e., that an invisible force field of “systemic discrimination” is not holding women back) on your opponent; (b) You create an impossible standard of proof that requires him to preemptively negate every conceivable counter-argument and to do so beyond any metaphysical doubt (e.g., “he didn’t test and disprove the hypothesis that men impose subjective psychological intimidation on women”); (c) You declare that your opponent’s entire hypothesis is thereby “debunked,” while ignoring that it is still infinitely better supported and more likely than your alternative “invisible force field” hypothesis.

    It’s like saying that “Bigfoot Denial” has been “debunked” because the creatures could be so smart at hiding that we just can’t find them.

  92. @Lot

    I see you have the averaged pinned.
    What’s the standard deviation?

  93. @Anon

    However

    > At the time of the original incident I … read voraciously
    > various physics forums and #femalephysicist Twitter.
    > …
    > They absolutely, positively, to a woman,
    > could not see even a single atom of merit in his paper.

    it’s important to remember that twitter and forums do not represent the totality of female opinions in physics or in any field.

    I’m pleasantly surprised when I encounter women who quietly curse the whole PC narrative. There are many women who are proud of their accomplishments and feel no need for victim discourse, indeed they feel contempt for it.

    Twitter and forums naturally bring forth the whiniest, most indoctrinated, most submissive people. Others who have neither time nor patience for such nonsense, you won’t hear from in those venues.

  94. @Achmed E. Newman

    I asked him about the Standard deviation, given he knows the mean and your Gdaddy^n has one at a few weeks, there must be a bunch that vanish in no time at all.

  95. Dtbb says:

    OT: Trump is a once in lifetime phenomenon.

    • LOL: Achmed E. Newman
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  96. Gee, I guess my reasearch paper, Queers and Quarks: A Strange World with no Charm, Only Spin, will get published in a New York Minute.

    • Replies: @Dissident
  97. @eah

    The Law of Unintended Consequences at work: Diversity actually increases inequality and reinforces “uncomfortable” feelings of white superiority. This triggers white guilt, which triggers demands for more diversity to make amends for “white privilege.” And so the cycle continues until everyone is angry, resentful, or self-loathing.

    All hail Diversity! There’s nothing it can’t ruin.

  98. @Anon

    If women’s citations eventually reach parity, will it have been from recognition of their qualilty work, or because they were affirmative-actioned into the citations? It will be impossible to know. Which is the point, I guess.

    That of course is one of the problems with Affirmative Action. If everyone knows it’s going on, it just acts as an automatic discount on the paper achievements of the group members. It is supposed to redistribute status from white to black and from male to female. But in reality, it just ends up redistributing status from the deserving blacks/women to the black/female AA recipients.

    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
  99. The latest Project Veritas release is a good one. ABC reporter is saying she was told to sit on the Epstein story.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  100. @PiltdownMan

    Doctor Sleep was a very weak book despite having a few things going for it. King hasn’t delivered in over a decade, so I didn’t go in with high hopes but was still let down.

    Johnny’s experiences at the hotel and his continually being haunted turned him into an alcoholic drifter. There’s a plot involving a fellow psychic and a group of nomadic psychic vampires who eat other psychics to recharge.

    The antagonists are never presented as a real challenge and the climax is shoehorned in simply to have a The Shining tie in.

    If I hadn’t thought King lost it with Song of Susannah and onwards I’d have thought so now. Makes me hope he stays away from a sequel to Talisman/Black House – Parkus as an insufferable sinless black and a Trump caricature in the Territories for Jack to battle? No, thank you.

  101. Make the conclusion first, the reasons in support thereof can come later.

    The fix is in.

  102. Lurker says:
    @guest

    But the movie makes it clear he’s been highly successful in suppressing the VC in his territory. If that were applied everywhere then – no more VC. Presumably war strategy in this case can be inferred to be letting the VC win?

  103. @eah

    Yes. This is generally true at alot of places.

    I no longer shop at places with too many aliens employed. In fact, I have a mental list of all the places with white employees, and shop there. I sometimes call and tell the owner that I have no interest in supporting a business that exploits cheap alien labour.

    You should do the same.

    • Replies: @eah
  104. @Anon

    Yup.

    As we deal with them more and more, we need to become more aware of their Modus Operandi.

    Hint: things like “honour”, “decency”, “respect” are part of whitey’s vocabulary, but not theirs. They are all liars, about almost everything. Adjust accordingly.

  105. @Hypnotoad666

    I never realized how attractive white people are until I started hanging around racial aliens.
    I never realized how intelligent white people are until I started hanging around racial aliens.
    I never realized how honest white people are until I started hanging around racial aliens.
    I never realized how humorous white people are until I started hanging around racial aliens.

    You think the aliens don’t notice this, and feel an acute sense of inferiority? You bet they do, and hence they must destroy us since they cannot match us.

    As an aside: I’m as rude as possible to all Indian people – regardless of their “assimilation” level. 3rd and newer generation Indians are saying that they are starting to get treated badly, because everyone just assumes they are like 1st generations.

    • Replies: @JMcG
  106. Just to clarify: CERN adopted a single formal act: the opening of an investigation to check if my talk might have violated rules such as “obligation to exercise reserve and tact“, “reserve in expressing personal opinions“, “communications to the public“. In this case a procedure would have been opened such that I would have had the opportunity to officially explain my reasons. Instead, after 6 months, CERN closed the issue concluding: “CERN will not pursue disciplinary proceedings”. I thank colleagues who later invited me to work on physics at CERN, but I also had to write a scientific paper about gender, so free speech was important and I cannot accept flexible rules that subjectively restrict it.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @anonimo11
  107. Lot says:
    @Alessandro Strumia

    Thank you for your bravery.

    You aren’t the first Italian physicist to face an “investigation.”

  108. Lot says:
    @Redneck farmer

    In 1850 Freemason conspiracies weren’t quite so crazy.

    But now they are mostly 75+ year old middle American white guys who do fundraisers for the local charity hospitals.

  109. Jesse says:
    @jpp

    You’re missing the point.

    (1) No one on the right would dare talk about racial differences in the way they talk about sex differences, but they still want respect for being brave freethinkers. The cowardice and hypocrisy is blatant and infuriating. Charles Murray was never a strong believer to begin with and has completely backed off in recent years, only popping up occasionally to offer conservative bromides about “culture!” and “marriage!”

    (2) The reason normies are more open to women’s rights than race hustling is that normal men and women like each other . They like their siblings, spouses, parents, children, and friends. Just like normal women reject the more vicious parts of feminism, normal men reject pathetic, “patriarchy with none of the responsibilities” anti feminism. Which means that all the “WIMMIN ROON EVREETHING” verbiage you see here is not only cowardly, it puts off normal people.

    (3) At some point, the HBD/Alt Right people will actually have to try to win something. Anything. And the non stop carping about how the real problem is white women (christ, at least the monomaniacal Jew haters don’t publicize their mommy issues) is putting off most white women and a fair hunk of white men.

    It’s cowardly and it’s stopping you winning. Do you like carping from the sidelines, feeling like a beleaguered minority? Or do you want to win?

    • Replies: @jpp
  110. Jesse says:

    O/T:

    How Harvard is getting around anti affirmative action sentiment:

    https://www.nationalreview.com/corner/is-harvard-leading-on-black-applicants/

    It’s a high IQ workaround, I’ll give them that.

  111. Realist says:
    @jsm

    This is weird. Physics — and math, and chemistry, and geology and biology, etc., etc., etc., are *discovered*, not “invented” nor “built.” Is Dalmeet that dumb, that he thinks physics was “invented”?

    The terms physics, chemistry, math and all other sciences refer to the study of such…which was indeed invented/built by men. In the course of these studies the laws of each discipline were discovered…always subject to revision.

  112. Psr says:

    Science is Hate! Kill the (real) scientists.

    • Troll: Realist
  113. Daniel H says:
    @The Germ Theory of Disease

    >> Movies: Coppola’s is a masterpiece

    Couldn’t Coppola at least have made an effort to comport the story with what most of us who have a clue know about Vietnam? What am I talking about? The river of no return, the setting of the drama, presumably the Mekong river (The Mekong is the only east-west navigable river of any note in South Vietnam). Coppola has spear wielding, grass hut aboded , stone age jungle dwellers, along with feral Tigers, habitating the banks of what is now, and has been for hundreds of years, a very densely populated, thoroughly settled rural environment. Talk about Orientalism.

  114. Daniel H says:
    @guest

    >>Brando could have tried a little harder to make himself appear sane. Even if what he’s doing makes sense, does he have to sit alone in shadows hunched over stroking himself?

    Brando is in the shadows so much because he was extremely overweight. Putting him in the light would have made it obvious that Coppola made a huge casting mistake. Brando must have weighed 250-300 pounds at that point. No way would a very fat, 55 year old Marlon Brando make a credible representation of a strong, fit, in-the-field, lieutenant colonel. Not in Vietnam, not in any war.

    Additionally, Brando effects an odd, faggy accent in the movie. Apocalypse now was a disappointment.

  115. Anonymous[154] • Disclaimer says:

    I earned an undergraduate physics degree from a top tier program. In the beginning of the first lecture of the first physics class (all students were prospective physics majors) the head of the department, who was a woman, dropped by and announced that because of the historical discrimination that women faced in the field, any allegation of anti-female bias from a female student would result in the summary expulsion from the department of the accused male. My immediate reaction was that I should have as little contact with the girls as possible (this was not hard as they were maybe 5% of the students in the department). I’m sure I was not the only one who thought this. Years later the girls were still mostly socializing only with each other.

    Road to hell paved with good intentions indeed.

  116. @Dtbb

    Man, that must have taken a lot of work! That Talking Heads video was perhaps the 1st video I’d ever seen.

    Thanks, Dtbb.

  117. @Lot

    She could examine my test tube, doncha know.

  118. @Anon

    The women physicists were shocking to me. They absolutely, positively, to a woman, could not see even a single atom of merit in his paper.

    Social media (and forums and comment threads) are an extremely poor way to get a representative sample. Twitter, especially so.

    Twitter is a grievance amplifier, and is highly ‘curated’ to ensure controversy; all the ‘Twitter ban’ deplatforming bullshit is clearly a corporate policy to generate outrage, because outrage generates traffic.

    But even in forums and comment threads, dissenters will self-censor if they expect to encounter hostile reactions from the WorldImprovers. If the forum or comment area is moderated (and especially if it has a ‘report this’ function), there will be pressure brought to bear by the WorldImprovers to get rid of anything that risks undermining what they see as a justified attempt to make everyone think like them.

    So the moderators – seeing outrage that outweighs support for free expression by an order of magnitude – have the same biased-sample problem: if the site’s a for-profit venture and the mods are innumerate, they will tilt the field towards the WorldImprovers.

    And eventually, a phenomenon similar to Gresham’s Law happens: you wind up with a ‘correct line’ ideology in that particular corner of the world, which is almost certainly based on a bad idea. Dissenters tire of making comments that get banhammered, and they go elsewhere (this is why shadowbanning became a thing: site owners wanted to retain the traffic).

    I know the following sentence sounds naïve, but it’s actually a very good guess.

    Correct views are an emergent property of discourse: all that is required for correct ideas to win, is that the marketplace of ideas is not subject to artificial constraints.

    This is why censorship of ideas is one of the first things on the agenda when religions (including secular religions[1]) feel like they’ve got the upper hand. This can work for a time, but not permanently.

    I’m old enough to have witnessed the (eventual) demise of bad ideas whose dominance seemed insurmountable at the time.

    The best example of this is the historicity of key religious figures (Moses, especially). In the early 70s, Thomas L Thompson – who outright rejected the hypothesis that Moses was a mythical figure – was (almost) hounded out of his profession; now his view is mainstream (and has now extended to the whole of the Old Nonsense). Now “Is Jesus a Myth?” is taken seriously – as evidenced by talking points like “No credible biblical scholar believes that“.

    Anyhow… biased samples give biased estimates. Twitter is not representative; comment sections are not representative.
    .
    .
    Although it’s silly for a man my age to be a ‘fan’ of a dead physicist, one of my monthly routines is to re-read key chapters of “What Do You Care What Other People Think?“. It saddens me that it wasn’t made available in Feynman’s voice – the audiobook is a damp squib compared to what it would be like if Feynman had voiced it. Feynman’s voice is the opposite of gravitas, which is what made him so compelling.

    I cannot imagine a better rejection of “the science is settled” tropes, than an excerpt from “Feynman on the Scientific Method” ->

    If we have a definite theory, a real guess, from which we can conveniently compute consequences which can be compared with experiment, then in principle we can get rid of any theory. There is always the possibility of proving any definite theory wrong; but notice that we can never prove it right. Suppose that you invent a good guess, calculate the consequences, and discover every time that the consequences you have calculated agree with experiment. The theory is then right? No, it is simply not proved wrong. In the future you could compute a wider range of consequences, there could be a wider range of experiments, and you might then discover that the thing is wrong. – emphasis mine.

    An as to why stifling dissent is a juvenile and stupid thing to, again he nails it…

    “We are at the very beginning of time for the human race. It is not unreasonable that we grapple with problems. But there are tens of thousands of years in the future. Our responsibility is to do what we can, learn what we can, improve the solutions, and pass them on. It is our responsibility to leave the people of the future a free hand. In the impetuous youth of humanity, we can make grave errors that can stunt our growth for a long time. This we will do if we say we have the answers now, so young and ignorant as we are. If we suppress all discussion, all criticism, proclaiming ‘This is the answer, my friends; man is saved!’ we will doom humanity for a long time to the chains of authority, confined to the limits of our present imagination. It has been done so many times before.” – emphasis mine

    [1] The key things that characterise secular religions:
    ① there’s a clique of intermediaries between the laity and the core doctrines;
    ② the laity generally has no fucking idea, but are told that the intermediaries have done all the science; that anyone who says otherwise is a heretic; and that failure to listen to the intermediaries will cause some catastrophe;
    ③ the core doctrines do not withstand dispassionate scrutiny;
    ④ there’s money and power in play.

    Climate ‘science’, psych, sociology, and much of general medicine fits this bill. And, of course, politics.

  119. @Jesse

    Of course I’ve made jokes about black people in public. I lighten ’em up a bit around black people, at least for the occasional easily-offended guy, just as I would lighten up a joke about women depending on who the women listening are. What the hell do you know about what I say in pubic, Jesse? You’d be surprised at the people that CAN take a joke. (At work, you’ve gotta be careful.)

    As far the point you missed, that no one is denying women the ability to make a living, that was written on this blog. You saw it here, just as you’ve seen plenty of jokes about racial matters in my comments too. If you can’t take a joke (that proves a point, BTW), on behalf of someone else no less, then ignore my comments.

    BTW, I don’t have to convince women of ANYTHING (I’m married already). When the SHTF, and it will, they’ll find it easy to be kind. Bob Seger has got this one:

    “When that black night falls upon you,
    you’ll find it easy to be kind.”

  120. @Keypusher

    Yeah. I saw both of them years after all the fuss and was not impressed.

  121. @eah

    Have to differ with Mr. Corbyn. By their actions, it’s clear that what the elites are really afraid of is border control and an end to pointless (but profitable!) wars.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  122. “Obligation to exercise reserve and tact,” “reserve in expressing personal opinions,” “communications to the public.”

    Such rules are antithetical to science.

    And if anything, females enjoy tremendous political advantages over men in the sciences.

  123. jpp says:
    @Jesse

    Jesse, on point 1. I still disagree. Yes, I understand that there is a major social proscription on broaching the notion that certain races might have lower IQs, but I think you underestimate the extent to which non-engagement with this topic from would be engagers stems from them not being threatened by the prospect of excessive affirmative-action-induced black inundation of higher institutions. If science graduate departments or tech companies were to mandate that 20% of their admissions / hiring classes were to consist of colored students and if they were to gloat about the necessity and justice of this reparations measure, then I would certainly bet that some prominent race focused analogs of Damore or Summers would step forward. Indeed, with some of the recent Asians vs blacks school admissions type conflicts (NY public schools polemics, Harvard admissions, the Seattle r88 which is being voted upon today), I have noticed AA opponents flirting with the acknowledgement of lower black / hispanic IQ more than I have noticed previously. Commentators react most vociferously to the most imminent threat, and at current, that role is generally constituted by gender based AA, not race based AA.

    As for your points 2 and 3, which admit little substance, I would agree with you that “normal men and women like each other” which is indeed an implicit tenet of my original post. I like women too, and am married to one. I also oppose the moral panic ongoing over supposed tyrannical patriarchy in the sciences; I oppose the manner of treatment described by anonymous[154] in post 120 of this forum, to which I feel I have been subjected in the past; I oppose Oxford University’s decision to give female students more time than men on math tests as part of a women in stem directive; I oppose the Eindhoven University of Technology’s moratorium on the hiring of male STEM professors. These oppositions by no means inherently qualify me in the caricature of a woman hating, basement dwelling troglodyte as you seem to crudely allege. I also, for the record, oppose sexual harassment of women, dismissal of female talent, etc. when these phenomena do manifest and I welcome the participation of talented women in science. A civil and social demeanor is by no means at contradiction with a rejection of female boosterism which obliterates considerations of individual dessert in how people are treated.

  124. eah says:
    @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    You should do the same.

    You are indeed a bit of a lout sir — “LOL” — but no, I would generally not go that far, depending.

    Actually what I was thinking of was growing up in northern California in the early-/mid-70s — back then, when CA was still 85+% white, fast food jobs were coveted by normal white HS kids — I remember a new McDonalds was built in the little corner mall nearby, and they lined up to apply even before it opened — min wage was < $3/hr, and generally McDonalds didn’t pay much more than that — guys who worked there would tell you about their 10c/hr raise (!) — when you get 20 hrs/week PT, that’s $2/wk, which bought a few gallons of gas.

    After that there was heavy immigration, and maybe 15 or so years later it was uncommon to see a young white kid working in fast food — I never ate fast food often; when I did, I didn’t like seeing the obvious brown underclass employees.

    But if you travel the ‘Blue Highways’ of America, you find many areas have not been decimated by immigration the way CA has been — and there normal white people, including HS kids, are doing these service jobs that have gone to immigrants elsewhere.

    • Replies: @LoutishAngloQuebecker
  125. Rosie says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Rosie, revoking citizenship is a far greater matter for an individual then being disenfranchised.

    Actually, disenfranchisement is precisely a revocation of citizenship.

    And “denied the right to earn a living”? How’s that work?

    Mr. Newman, since it’s not your rights that are under discussion, you fail to read between the lines of some of the posts on this site.

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  126. @Rosie

    Actually, disenfranchisement is precisely a revocation of citizenship.

    Actually, it most certainly is not. Jack D, paging Jack D….

    There is NO RIGHT for anyone to make a living, and this is EXACTLY why women should not be enfranchised, as they don’t care about basic principles. There is NO natural right to “make a living”, as opposed to a right of self-defense, or a right to keep one’s property. Most of this is stuff kids get the hang of in Kindergarten, but they just don’t know the words yet.

    • Replies: @Rosie
    , @J.Ross
  127. Rosie says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    There is NO natural right to “make a living”,

    There most certainly is. Don’t you libertarians call it “freedom of contract” or something?

  128. J.Ross says:
    @Achmed E. Newman

    Jack can’t save you now, no one can, this is why the winning move is to not reply …

  129. J.Ross says:
    @Harry Baldwin

    Corbyn stands ready to defend you from capitalists of a type who were dead before he was born.

  130. No. Nobody owes you a living. Good Dads say that to their boys when they are about 15 y/o and start bitching about stuff like “I got a right to …”

    Here’s what you brought up: From Wikipedia: Freedom of contract is the freedom of private or public individuals and groups to form nonviolent contracts without government restrictions.. I’M FOR IT!

  131. Anonymous[209] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous Guest

    NBC News execs Andy Lack and Noah Oppenheim bury the Wienstein story.

    ABC News head James Goldston buries the Epstein story.

    There must be a connection in here somewhere.

  132. @Daniel H

    The movie is only about Vietnam in a secondary sense (maybe I’ll return to that idea in another comment, if people are not utterly bored by the prospect).

    Apocalypse Now, like Bergman’s “Persona” and Disney/Lasseter’s “Frozen”, is about a very primal conflict between absolute truth/reality, and mere human ideas about truth/reality, or human attempts to know something about truth/reality, which may upon investigation turn out to be wrong.

    In each movie, a “normal” ordinary person is sent on a mission to confront an enchanted, “extra-ordinary” person. The enchanted person is under the delusion that, due to their enchanted status, they have some special perception about truth and reality which puts them above the non-enchanted.

    What enchanted people (and they are real, you almost certainly know one or two yourself; maybe you yourself at this very moment are enchanted and you don’t know it yet) nearly always fail to realize is…

    They do not and cannot dictate the conditions or limitations of their enchantment. It is not up to them to decide for how long, or how intensely, they are to be enchanted. Something else makes those decisions, and frankly we don’t know what that something is.

    Col. Kurtz, Queen Elsa, and Liv Ullman are all enchanted. They did not ask to be enchanted, it just happens sometimes. It grants special insights. But they are deluded when or if they think that their enchantment somehow elevates them above normal humanity. The mission of the “normal” person in these stories is to bring them back down to Earth: Willard has to kill Kurtz, Anna has to convince the self-hating Queen Elsa that somebody actually loves her, Nurse Alma has to convince Liv Ullman that she’s a human being, and not just a smug, supercilious robot. She literally has to do this by threatening to throw a pot of boiling water at her.

  133. anonimo11 says:
    @Alessandro Strumia

    congratulazioni per la pubblicazione Alessandro. Hai fatto bella figura (you managed to look good).

  134. @MikeatMikedotMike

    Uh, Kubrick brought in Ermey and then he changed entirely the first half of the movie for him using a lot of his screen test rants to inform his characters dialogue. The guy who played the helicopter gunner was originally going to be drill sergeant for the movie, Ermey was brought in just to coach him, like he did with Louis Gosset in An Officer and a Gentlemen.

    Kubrick replaced him with Ermey because how impressive Ermey’s screen test was, but as far as I know the Vietnam sequences were all Kubrick’s ideas. He basically recreated the City of Hue and battle there entirely on location in South London. Kubrick was the one who elevated Ermey from technical advisor to major supporting character in the film and basically rewrote the first part of the film for him.

  135. Lurker says:
    @Autochthon

    I always assumed that M*A*S*H while set in Korea was really trying to say something about Viet Nam.

    And similarly Catch 22 (the book) was set in WW2 but was probably supposed to be saying something about Korea.

    • Disagree: Autochthon
    • Replies: @Anonymous
  136. Lurker says:
    @Daniel H

    Bonus movie mistake: the PBR is lifted out of the water by a Huey – way beyond the capacity of this type of helicopter.

    Also we’re told that Willard is travelling by PBR because it’s supposed to be inconspicuous, but the lifting of the boat into this new stretch of waterway implies that PBRs would not be seen there otherwise. However later the crew meet another PBR coming the other way (fire on the boat scene). How is this second PBR going to get downriver or will Kilgore’s helicopters fortuitously be there to lift them too?

  137. @eah

    Great… so because California was white in the 1970s it’s perfectly fine to keep supporting establishments that hire racial aliens – essentially funding your own replacement. Let the good times roll, my Boomer friend!

    • Replies: @eah
  138. Anon[159] • Disclaimer says:
    @anon

    Spencer is a smart guy, legitimate PhD, and 99 percent of the stuff against him is the typical unfair slime. But by this point he’s probably irredeemable from his few hyperbolic slip ups. Shame.

    • Replies: @Anonymous
  139. eah says:
    @LoutishAngloQuebecker

    Not to prolong this, but: so because California was white in the 1970s it’s perfectly fine to keep supporting establishments that hire racial aliens — that’s a total non sequitur, and not at all what I said; so not only are you ‘loutish’, you are also stupid and rhetorically dishonest.

    As said/implied in my original comment/borrowed tweet: penetration of ‘visible minorities’ in service and eg low-paying retail jobs is quite high in many places, certainly in CA — to avoid patronizing such businesses, you’d practically have to become a Luddite non-consumer, which isn’t practical.

    …essentially funding your own replacement.

    In your view, I guess anyone who buys anything from AMZN is “essentially funding your own replacement” — because I guarantee you the majority of employees in AMZN fulfillment centers are ‘visible minorities’.

    Since the 3rd worlders who take these jobs are not net taxpayers, anyone who pays the income tax does far more to ‘fund their own replacement’ than some schmuck who buys a Big Mac; but you are too dumb to see that — do you pay the income tax?

    H1-Bs are a direct threat to me personally, not min wage burger flippers or low wage retail grunts; although I do see the harm that kind of immigration does — as a WN I oppose all of it in any case.

    So re all of that, I think I make reasonable choices — continue to do the same on your end.

    • Replies: @Brown boi
  140. @BenKenobi

    > The most definitive part of a “troll” is that he does not believe what he is typing

    Except, there’s also the version of trolling that’s just off-topic, derailing a desired topic. It can be something that the troll does passionately believe, but that’s considered by the majority as out of place and deliberately distracting from the main topic.

    For example, in a discussion of the 49ers vs the Seahawks, piping in to say Tom Brady is the greatest.

  141. @bomag

    I googled “coal miner” and everyone was black.

  142. @El Dato

    Good comment.

    > he says there is no oppression in physics

    He says there’s no gender-based oppression in physics, which I translate as “it’s OK to be male in physics”, meaning, no need to be guilty about being male in physics, there’s not some kind of privilege because of maleness.

    To be fair, I’m not sure his study can account for voluntary departures from physics by otherwise accomplished women who just don’t feel comfortable there. I gather that’s the point made by the female Brazilian mathematician you cited, though I don’t know if that should count as oppression.

    > Now we have “It’s OK Is Not OK”

    Maybe it’s a dumb line. What I meant is that the current consensus is: don’t say anything is OK. It may seem OK to you, but it’s not. It needs to be changed.

    That’s what I understand the female Brazilian mathematician is arguing. Honestly, I don’t blame her for preferring the company of women in her field. As a male, I sometimes prefer the company of men, and I notice that women often prefer the company of women.

    And so I do have some sympathy with the arguments of sensible outsiders who request a change in established fields to accommodate their recent arrival.

    But I’m not sure how possible or desirable these requested changes are. And of course the hysteria and censorship and canceling associated with the requests is regrettable and disastrous.

  143. @Achmed E. Newman

    Looks more like water with red food coloring. Isn’t mercury silver colored? Hence the term “quick silver.”

    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
  144. @Don't Look at Me

    Yes, mercury is silver colored. That was just to make the joke work, DLaM. With the test tube being round, one’s reflection would be off a convex surface and not worth much, but I only have so much material to work with here!

    ;-}

  145. @Unladen Swallow

    Thanks for that trip down IMDB lane. It doesn’t disprove my statement and further most of what you said supports what I said concerning Ermey. He improvised most of his dialogue with Kubrick’s blessing as well as his sequencing based on exactly what you said.

    The second half of the movie is ridiculous, the historical period aside. It is pretty much what a dope smoking NY Jew would imagine US troops to be: Clownish and incompetent leadership bumbling about murderous, psychopathic, and of course, racist redneck enlisted men who end up getting their asses kicked by a girl.

    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
  146. Dissident says:
    @The Alarmist

    Gee, I guess my reasearch paper, Queers and Quarks: A Strange World with no Charm, Only Spin, will get published in a New York Minute.

    Maybe you can figure-out a way to sneak it in through the back door.

    • LOL: The Alarmist
  147. Brown boi says:
    @eah

    You have to understand his entire purpose/goal is to make white advocates look as parochial and unappealing as possible.

    I won’t say he’s a fed agent because no gov agency could do such good a job. 🙂

  148. @MikeatMikedotMike

    I don’t think the troops are portrayed as incompetent at all, the guys working for Stars and Stripes are green, but that is to be expected since they are basically military reporters and it is strongly implied that until Tet most of them never had to fire a weapon in actual combat. The Marines they fight with in Hue seemed to be tough professionals, just not all of them are cut out to be commanding a unit, like Joker’s friend Cowboy, who was only in charge because a bunch of his superiors got killed, In addition the fighting in Hue was tough, probably the highest casualties the US military suffered in any engagement of the Vietnam War. Apocalypse Now portrayed plenty of guys as doing drugs, as did Platoon, there isn’t any of that in Full Metal Jacket at all.

  149. Anonymous[255] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lurker

    Yes, Catch-22 was set in one war, was a veiled satire of another war, and achieved mass popularity due to a third war.

  150. Anonymous[140] • Disclaimer says:
    @Unladen Swallow

    I haven’t read the original book or its sequel but understand there was a pro-Confederate subtext to the story that Kubrick excised completely from the movie. (The main protagonist is a Southron who is not sure whether Yankees or Viets are the greater danger to his life. The books apparently make much comedy with this.)

    The writer also hated R. Lee Ermey and wanted a personal friend of his cast in the role, but was overruled by Kubrick. Ermey was apparently the kind of guy the books were written against.

  151. Anonymous[156] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Spencer is a smart guy, legitimate PhD, and 99 percent of the stuff against him is the typical unfair slime. But by this point he’s probably irredeemable from his few hyperbolic slip ups. Shame.

    Spencer does not have a PhD. His slip ups say something about his IQ.

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