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"Sanctuary City" Sign Pranks Malibu

Joke’s on Malibu.

MALIBU (CBSLA) — A sign posted along the Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu was drawing a great deal of attention and controversy Tuesday.

It reads: “OFFICIAL SANCTUARY CITY ‘Cheap Nannies and Gardeners Make Malibu Great!’ (Boyle Heights Not So Much)” …

“The sign was not put up by the city. It will be removed,” City Manager Reva Feldman said in an email to CBS2.

 
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  1. Troll level = master.

    Amusing to think about who might’ve been behind this. Somebody who wanted to make a point and who had the time and tools to come up with a pretty realistic-looking sign. They even got the town and county logos right. (I’d worry about getting caught and hit with a copyright violation or some other collateral charge for misuse of a public seal).

    Maybe the city will start asking Malibuians to report their neighbors’ suspicious nighttime garage projects.

    Read More
    • Replies: @MC
    Sabo?
    , @Clark Westwood

    Troll level = master.
     
    It's delicious.
    , @Prof. Woland
    Even if it was only up for 10 minutes and one person saw it, the pic was destined to go viral.
    , @Clifford Brown
    Even better troll would be to make a serious push to build low income migrant housing in Malibu, preferably next to the Malibu Farmers Market or the Self-Realization Fellowship Lake Shrine Temple.

    Have the project funded by some disgruntled celeb, like The Edge from U2, whose eco-friendly hill side mega mansions (there were more than one) were rejected by the Malibu City Fathers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
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    Sharing Comment via Twitter
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  2. “…not so much”

    Did this enter common usage via Seinfeld? I have a suspicion it did. I don’t remember it being used pre-1990s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @slumber_j
    I've wondered about this too--a lot. It strikes me as a very Yiddish-ish construction, anyway...are you implying Larry David is behind this?

    That would make a lot of sense actually. Anyway, I moved back to the US in late 1999 and suddenly everyone was saying "not so much," and I was baffled.
    , @Elsewhere
    Google n-gram bears this out. There has been a sharp increase in "not so much ." starting in 2000 (the period in the search string is meant to count the phrase only at a sentence end).

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=not+so+much+.&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cnot%20so%20much%20.%3B%2Cc0

    , @Black Agnes
    It seems to me the usage really exploded after it was notably used in Sacha Baron Cohen's movie "Borat" in 2006.
  3. @Thomas
    Troll level = master.

    Amusing to think about who might've been behind this. Somebody who wanted to make a point and who had the time and tools to come up with a pretty realistic-looking sign. They even got the town and county logos right. (I'd worry about getting caught and hit with a copyright violation or some other collateral charge for misuse of a public seal).

    Maybe the city will start asking Malibuians to report their neighbors' suspicious nighttime garage projects.

    Sabo?

    Read More
  4. Hopefully enough illegals take the sign’s word up for it. Time for rich liberals to taste some of the horror they inflict on the country.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Maj. Kong
    Liberals are nothing if not masochists. We are talking about people that after all are OK with:

    -repeat abortions
    -HIV poz intercourse
    -Violent felons not being deported
    -Consolidation of the banks as long as they give three cheers for the poz
    -Chelsea Clinton as a serious candidate for the White House
    -Enraging the far right, and thinking that they are all neckbeards that will never seek violence
    -Mass Importing Muslims that won't accept Jewish or female leadership
    -Gender integrated prisons
  5. I think the city manager meant to say “It will be removed once one of our undocumented immigrants shows up for work.”

    Read More
  6. @Chrisnonymous
    "...not so much"

    Did this enter common usage via Seinfeld? I have a suspicion it did. I don't remember it being used pre-1990s.

    I’ve wondered about this too–a lot. It strikes me as a very Yiddish-ish construction, anyway…are you implying Larry David is behind this?

    That would make a lot of sense actually. Anyway, I moved back to the US in late 1999 and suddenly everyone was saying “not so much,” and I was baffled.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Chrisnonymous
    It would be great if it were David, but I doubt it.
    , @Gary in Gramercy
    You're right: it is a "Yiddish-ish construction." My bubbe, z"l, said it, not all the time, but enough so that it was a "thing." (She was the first generation born here.) The first time I ever heard anyone outside of my family use it was when I saw comic Gilbert Gottfried live, sometime in the early 1980's.
    , @Gary in Gramercy
    You're right: it is a "Yiddish-ish construction." My bubbe, z"l, said it, not all the time, but enough so that it was a "thing." (She was the first generation born here.) The first time I ever heard anyone outside of my family use it was when I saw comic Gilbert Gottfried live, sometime in the early 1980's.
    , @Anonymous
    And also "It's all good." Suddenly it seemed as though everyone was saying this awhile back.
    , @Olorin
    No Yids Chez Olorin, but we do have one resident*** who studied Yiddish to the level of being able to read Forverts.

    Ergo I don't see why this hilarity-satori-inducing-level troll couldn't be done by, say, a North Sea ancestry guy with genuine Finnish troll genes.

    http://www.santaclausforever.fi/images/tonttu_varis.jpg

    The sign is, by the way, one of the few most beautiful things I've seen in the moral coil so far.

    Inspiring also as we prepare to troll the local "March for Science."


    City Manager Riva Feldman
     
    Now that's comedy.

    ***In re Residents:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hr-I6-gxecg

  7. Hmm… Steve lives nearby… is up late at night… creative…

    (He should have toilet-papered Rob Reiner’s house while he was there.)

    Read More
  8. @slumber_j
    I've wondered about this too--a lot. It strikes me as a very Yiddish-ish construction, anyway...are you implying Larry David is behind this?

    That would make a lot of sense actually. Anyway, I moved back to the US in late 1999 and suddenly everyone was saying "not so much," and I was baffled.

    It would be great if it were David, but I doubt it.

    Read More
  9. Nice. A better verbiage suggested, free of charge: “Cheap nannies and gardeners make Malibu great! (So long as they don’t actually live here.)”

    Read More
  10. Brilliant, as the Brits would say.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde

    Brilliant, as the Brits would say.
     
    I detest that usage, especially coming from a UK luvvie type.
  11. @Parsifal
    Hopefully enough illegals take the sign's word up for it. Time for rich liberals to taste some of the horror they inflict on the country.

    Liberals are nothing if not masochists. We are talking about people that after all are OK with:

    -repeat abortions
    -HIV poz intercourse
    -Violent felons not being deported
    -Consolidation of the banks as long as they give three cheers for the poz
    -Chelsea Clinton as a serious candidate for the White House
    -Enraging the far right, and thinking that they are all neckbeards that will never seek violence
    -Mass Importing Muslims that won’t accept Jewish or female leadership
    -Gender integrated prisons

    Read More
  12. @slumber_j
    I've wondered about this too--a lot. It strikes me as a very Yiddish-ish construction, anyway...are you implying Larry David is behind this?

    That would make a lot of sense actually. Anyway, I moved back to the US in late 1999 and suddenly everyone was saying "not so much," and I was baffled.

    You’re right: it is a “Yiddish-ish construction.” My bubbe, z”l, said it, not all the time, but enough so that it was a “thing.” (She was the first generation born here.) The first time I ever heard anyone outside of my family use it was when I saw comic Gilbert Gottfried live, sometime in the early 1980′s.

    Read More
  13. @slumber_j
    I've wondered about this too--a lot. It strikes me as a very Yiddish-ish construction, anyway...are you implying Larry David is behind this?

    That would make a lot of sense actually. Anyway, I moved back to the US in late 1999 and suddenly everyone was saying "not so much," and I was baffled.

    You’re right: it is a “Yiddish-ish construction.” My bubbe, z”l, said it, not all the time, but enough so that it was a “thing.” (She was the first generation born here.) The first time I ever heard anyone outside of my family use it was when I saw comic Gilbert Gottfried live, sometime in the early 1980′s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @slumber_j
    I'm reminded of an order a friend of mine once heard while standing in line somewhere in Manhattan or maybe Eastern LI: "I'd like an everything bagel with not too much butter."
  14. How about a Climate Change inspired hack? Elevation 16 (crossed out) 15 (crossed out), 13 . . .

    Read More
  15. @Chrisnonymous
    "...not so much"

    Did this enter common usage via Seinfeld? I have a suspicion it did. I don't remember it being used pre-1990s.

    Google n-gram bears this out. There has been a sharp increase in “not so much .” starting in 2000 (the period in the search string is meant to count the phrase only at a sentence end).

    https://books.google.com/ngrams/graph?content=not+so+much+.&year_start=1800&year_end=2008&corpus=15&smoothing=3&share=&direct_url=t1%3B%2Cnot%20so%20much%20.%3B%2Cc0

    Read More
  16. Share this far and wide. It’s a perfect viral story but a disaster for The Narrative so national media is frantic to smother it. They know that when the mass of deplorables learns to frame the issue this way, they lose, bad. The CBSLA affiliate story is the ONLY citation I can find in Google News.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Fiddlesticks
    Update: AP ran a very terse dispatch, engineered to sound as bland as possible. No viral possibilities here, move along folks...!

    https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/california/articles/2017-04-05/sanctuary-city-sign-in-malibu-called-prank-removed

  17. @Thomas
    Troll level = master.

    Amusing to think about who might've been behind this. Somebody who wanted to make a point and who had the time and tools to come up with a pretty realistic-looking sign. They even got the town and county logos right. (I'd worry about getting caught and hit with a copyright violation or some other collateral charge for misuse of a public seal).

    Maybe the city will start asking Malibuians to report their neighbors' suspicious nighttime garage projects.

    Troll level = master.

    It’s delicious.

    Read More
  18. A couple of city officials said that the city did not put up the sign. No shit. Another said it was a prank. But no one from the city explained how the message behind the sign is wrong.

    According to the news story, “The big question is who put up the sign and why.” That’s the “big question” only because they won’t discuss the actual big question. If they covered the Emperor’s New Clothes, the “big question” would be the child’s name and not the fact that the emperor is walking around naked and that the entire society is insane.

    Read More
  19. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @slumber_j
    I've wondered about this too--a lot. It strikes me as a very Yiddish-ish construction, anyway...are you implying Larry David is behind this?

    That would make a lot of sense actually. Anyway, I moved back to the US in late 1999 and suddenly everyone was saying "not so much," and I was baffled.

    And also “It’s all good.” Suddenly it seemed as though everyone was saying this awhile back.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Stan Adams
    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day
    , @kihowi
    I remember when "ig'nant" was something only C.O.P.S.-level black people said to mean "racist". I thought "heh at least white people know what that word really means". As usual, I overestimated everybody.
  20. It’s too bad that almost all the really rich people are on the left. If I had George Soros money I would be re-settling Somali refugees in Malibu. There are rental and motel properties in Malibu, so I would start booking every vacancy as it comes open and transferring goat-herders to Malibu. I wouldn’t expect you would have any trouble getting the refugees to volunteer to move from Brainerd Minnesota to sunny SoCal. It would be worth every dime to see how many you could get wandering around the private beaches on any nice afternoon.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Travis
    great idea....If I had Soros money I would infest the Upper East Side and Brooklyn with thousands of Somali refugees , in addition to re-locating inner-city Blacks from Newark , Chicago, Baltimore and Philadelphia to Santa Monica and other elite "sanctuary" cities
    , @Kevin O'Keeffe
    "...re-settling Somali refugees in Malibu...It would be worth every dime to see how many you could get wandering around the private beaches on any nice afternoon."

    There are no private beaches in California.
    , @Barnard
    If I had George Soros money, I would buy off enough politicians to end refugee resettlement and start sending them back to Somalia.
  21. Yeah, the city will take it down…right after they investigate this “hate crime.”

    Read More
  22. @Chrisnonymous
    "...not so much"

    Did this enter common usage via Seinfeld? I have a suspicion it did. I don't remember it being used pre-1990s.

    It seems to me the usage really exploded after it was notably used in Sacha Baron Cohen’s movie “Borat” in 2006.

    Read More
    • Replies: @NotSoMuch
    I think you are confusing "not so much" with the emphatic "NOT" joke at the end of a seemingly serious assertion, which was revitalized in Borat, but came to great popularity and usage during the Wayne's World era from SNL.
    , @marty
    Yeah, I was a Seinfeld fanatic and I don't remember that line at all. Recently I saw a 2016 book titled Seinfeldia. Lots of background about how the show developed, but not a single reference to Lloyd Braun. Strange.
  23. The “Not so much” bit comes from Borat, not Seinfeld, although you are right, it is Yiddish-y.

    Read More
  24. @Chrisnonymous
    It would be great if it were David, but I doubt it.

    I think Mike Judge lives in the ‘Bu…

    Read More
  25. @Alfa158
    It's too bad that almost all the really rich people are on the left. If I had George Soros money I would be re-settling Somali refugees in Malibu. There are rental and motel properties in Malibu, so I would start booking every vacancy as it comes open and transferring goat-herders to Malibu. I wouldn't expect you would have any trouble getting the refugees to volunteer to move from Brainerd Minnesota to sunny SoCal. It would be worth every dime to see how many you could get wandering around the private beaches on any nice afternoon.

    great idea….If I had Soros money I would infest the Upper East Side and Brooklyn with thousands of Somali refugees , in addition to re-locating inner-city Blacks from Newark , Chicago, Baltimore and Philadelphia to Santa Monica and other elite “sanctuary” cities

    Read More
    • Replies: @ATBOTL
    As nationalists become stronger, we can trigger internal migration of this sort. That could be the knockout punch to the establishment. Imagine if local governments across "Red" America become controlled by hardcore ideological nationalists. Such a scenario is not far fetched as America Balkanizes. Measures can be taken to encourage diversity to leave those areas. As that happens, diversity will seek shelter in liberal white enclaves. This can create a dominos falling effect as areas under pressure from internal diversity migrations may flip to nationalism, further increasing pressure on the remaining liberal white enclaves.

    We can imagine a kind of Camp of the Saints scenario inside white liberal enclaves that are being flooded by Somalian and Salvadoran internal refugees.
  26. @Gary in Gramercy
    You're right: it is a "Yiddish-ish construction." My bubbe, z"l, said it, not all the time, but enough so that it was a "thing." (She was the first generation born here.) The first time I ever heard anyone outside of my family use it was when I saw comic Gilbert Gottfried live, sometime in the early 1980's.

    I’m reminded of an order a friend of mine once heard while standing in line somewhere in Manhattan or maybe Eastern LI: “I’d like an everything bagel with not too much butter.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @ScarletNumber

    I’d like an everything bagel with not too much butter
     
    In North Jersey this is a perfectly cromulent construction
  27. @Anonymous
    And also "It's all good." Suddenly it seemed as though everyone was saying this awhile back.

    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    I knew an Australian guy who would say "no worries" back in 2000. That's the first time I heard it. That "at the end of the day" crap is just corporate-speak and very annoying. I thought only mid-level managers like to say that and "yank my chain", the blog "space", "24/7", "ping me on that", "day one", and lastly "I ... want ... my red stapler back... or I'll, ... I'll set the building on fire".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqxjRzzGn8k
    , @Anonymous
    I hate Anglicisms. So pretentious. I love the way Trump and Pat Buchanan talk. Or the way Steve Sailer writes. A good point made in a lowfaultin and funny way is triply good.
    , @Daniel H
    Add, "My bad" to the list. Only started hearing that about 10 years ago. I believe that it is British in origin.

    You know, I could take all these new fangled turns of phrase and Britishisms, but the one thing that sets me off immediately is the uptalk phenomenon, especially when the speaker is a man. I can't take a man seriously after I hear him uptalk.
    , @Clark Westwood

    * At the end of the day
     
    That one really is an invasive species. I work with some guys who can't say more than 200 words without using "at the end of the day" at least once.
    , @Anonymous
    Hyndeification?
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    I associate 'No worries' very strongly with Australians, but it has spread to both Brits and Americans.

    'At the end of the day' seems to have peaked and may now be pockmarking spoken English slightly less frequently, but I agree it has been a particularly pernicious and annoying infestation.

    Another one that has plagued international English in recent years is 'in a nutshell'. That cliche no doubt goes way back, but it suddenly burst out in virulent overuse about five or so years ago. It's awful, awful, awful.

    But nothing -- no word, no phrase, no cliche -- is responsible for even a fraction of the damage the simple word 'like' is inflicting on spoken English. I hope English can recover from its ongoing 'like' epidemic.

  28. @Fiddlesticks
    Share this far and wide. It's a perfect viral story but a disaster for The Narrative so national media is frantic to smother it. They know that when the mass of deplorables learns to frame the issue this way, they lose, bad. The CBSLA affiliate story is the ONLY citation I can find in Google News.

    Update: AP ran a very terse dispatch, engineered to sound as bland as possible. No viral possibilities here, move along folks…!

    https://www.usnews.com/news/best-states/california/articles/2017-04-05/sanctuary-city-sign-in-malibu-called-prank-removed

    Read More
  29. @Alfa158
    It's too bad that almost all the really rich people are on the left. If I had George Soros money I would be re-settling Somali refugees in Malibu. There are rental and motel properties in Malibu, so I would start booking every vacancy as it comes open and transferring goat-herders to Malibu. I wouldn't expect you would have any trouble getting the refugees to volunteer to move from Brainerd Minnesota to sunny SoCal. It would be worth every dime to see how many you could get wandering around the private beaches on any nice afternoon.

    “…re-settling Somali refugees in Malibu…It would be worth every dime to see how many you could get wandering around the private beaches on any nice afternoon.”

    There are no private beaches in California.

    Read More
  30. Boyle Heights used to have a Jewish community, until they all left.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
    Tipo:

    Correction: replace "until they all left" with "until they all fled".

    The same thing happened in NYC where affluent Bronx Jews fled the Grand Concourse to seek refuge in CoOp City only in turn to be driven out by the same people they pledged eternal solidarity with!
  31. @Alfa158
    It's too bad that almost all the really rich people are on the left. If I had George Soros money I would be re-settling Somali refugees in Malibu. There are rental and motel properties in Malibu, so I would start booking every vacancy as it comes open and transferring goat-herders to Malibu. I wouldn't expect you would have any trouble getting the refugees to volunteer to move from Brainerd Minnesota to sunny SoCal. It would be worth every dime to see how many you could get wandering around the private beaches on any nice afternoon.

    If I had George Soros money, I would buy off enough politicians to end refugee resettlement and start sending them back to Somalia.

    Read More
  32. @Stan Adams
    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day

    I knew an Australian guy who would say “no worries” back in 2000. That’s the first time I heard it. That “at the end of the day” crap is just corporate-speak and very annoying. I thought only mid-level managers like to say that and “yank my chain”, the blog “space”, “24/7″, “ping me on that”, “day one”, and lastly “I … want … my red stapler back… or I’ll, … I’ll set the building on fire”.

    Read More
    • Replies: @cthulhu


    I knew an Australian guy who would say “no worries” back in 2000. That’s the first time I heard it.

     

    "No worries" was endemic in coastal SoCal in the mid-'90s.
  33. @Anonymous
    And also "It's all good." Suddenly it seemed as though everyone was saying this awhile back.

    I remember when “ig’nant” was something only C.O.P.S.-level black people said to mean “racist”. I thought “heh at least white people know what that word really means”. As usual, I overestimated everybody.

    Read More
  34. Off-topic,

    POC vs UK:

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    what actually happened was lots of rapes and lots of elderly people beaten to a pulp in street robberies

    but the media covered it all up and so the original population were slowly cleansed one neighborhood at a time

    same thing has happened in almost every western city for 50 years

    one neighborhood at a time
  35. @slumber_j
    I've wondered about this too--a lot. It strikes me as a very Yiddish-ish construction, anyway...are you implying Larry David is behind this?

    That would make a lot of sense actually. Anyway, I moved back to the US in late 1999 and suddenly everyone was saying "not so much," and I was baffled.

    No Yids Chez Olorin, but we do have one resident*** who studied Yiddish to the level of being able to read Forverts.

    Ergo I don’t see why this hilarity-satori-inducing-level troll couldn’t be done by, say, a North Sea ancestry guy with genuine Finnish troll genes.

    http://www.santaclausforever.fi/images/tonttu_varis.jpg

    The sign is, by the way, one of the few most beautiful things I’ve seen in the moral coil so far.

    Inspiring also as we prepare to troll the local “March for Science.”

    City Manager Riva Feldman

    Now that’s comedy.

    ***In re Residents:

    Read More
  36. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Stan Adams
    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day

    I hate Anglicisms. So pretentious. I love the way Trump and Pat Buchanan talk. Or the way Steve Sailer writes. A good point made in a lowfaultin and funny way is triply good.

    Read More
  37. anon says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    POC vs UK:



    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M1-tP_3dDrc

    what actually happened was lots of rapes and lots of elderly people beaten to a pulp in street robberies

    but the media covered it all up and so the original population were slowly cleansed one neighborhood at a time

    same thing has happened in almost every western city for 50 years

    one neighborhood at a time

    Read More
  38. @Travis
    great idea....If I had Soros money I would infest the Upper East Side and Brooklyn with thousands of Somali refugees , in addition to re-locating inner-city Blacks from Newark , Chicago, Baltimore and Philadelphia to Santa Monica and other elite "sanctuary" cities

    As nationalists become stronger, we can trigger internal migration of this sort. That could be the knockout punch to the establishment. Imagine if local governments across “Red” America become controlled by hardcore ideological nationalists. Such a scenario is not far fetched as America Balkanizes. Measures can be taken to encourage diversity to leave those areas. As that happens, diversity will seek shelter in liberal white enclaves. This can create a dominos falling effect as areas under pressure from internal diversity migrations may flip to nationalism, further increasing pressure on the remaining liberal white enclaves.

    We can imagine a kind of Camp of the Saints scenario inside white liberal enclaves that are being flooded by Somalian and Salvadoran internal refugees.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Travis
    very True, and this administration can certainly send all the recent Refugees to California and Seattle. Even the liberals in these areas will fight against it.
  39. @Black Agnes
    It seems to me the usage really exploded after it was notably used in Sacha Baron Cohen's movie "Borat" in 2006.

    I think you are confusing “not so much” with the emphatic “NOT” joke at the end of a seemingly serious assertion, which was revitalized in Borat, but came to great popularity and usage during the Wayne’s World era from SNL.

    Read More
  40. @Stan Adams
    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day

    Add, “My bad” to the list. Only started hearing that about 10 years ago. I believe that it is British in origin.

    You know, I could take all these new fangled turns of phrase and Britishisms, but the one thing that sets me off immediately is the uptalk phenomenon, especially when the speaker is a man. I can’t take a man seriously after I hear him uptalk.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Matra
    No, "my bad" was unheard of in the UK last time I lived there but already common in American pop culture.
    , @The Last Real Calvinist
    'My bad' comes from pickup basketball, i.e. when a player blunders and then takes responsibility for the error by shouting 'my bad', meaning e.g. my pass was errant, I should have switched on that pick and roll, etc.
  41. @Stan Adams
    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day

    * At the end of the day

    That one really is an invasive species. I work with some guys who can’t say more than 200 words without using “at the end of the day” at least once.

    Read More
    • Replies: @CJ
    'At the end of the day" was a cliche of British sportwriting in the 1970s. A heavily overused cliche, that is. It's weird that it's suddenly appeared on this side of the Atlantic.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    I very much dislike "No problem" as a response to "Thank you". How about "You're welcome"?

    If I wanted to hear surfers talk, I'd have gone to the beach instead of a restaurant. Morons.
  42. They should do something similar for Chicago: WELCOME TO CHICAGO “Black Lives Matter. Except those who are shot.”

    Read More
  43. Anonymous says:     Show CommentNext New Comment
    @Stan Adams
    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day

    Hyndeification?

    Read More
  44. @Black Agnes
    It seems to me the usage really exploded after it was notably used in Sacha Baron Cohen's movie "Borat" in 2006.

    Yeah, I was a Seinfeld fanatic and I don’t remember that line at all. Recently I saw a 2016 book titled Seinfeldia. Lots of background about how the show developed, but not a single reference to Lloyd Braun. Strange.

    Read More
  45. More POC vs UK:

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  46. It is merely an undocumented sign. It hasn’t committed any crimes, and it is doing a job that american signs don’t do. Why is the Malibu government so xenophobic? Some sanctuary city!

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  47. ***** The merry pranksters have been duly denounced by our Malibu Komrades!

    Malibu officials denounce prank ‘sanctuary city’ placard bolted to roadside sign
    Los Angeles Times · 20 minutes ago
    The sign sure looked official. It was posted on a shoulder of Pacific Coast Highway in Malibu and declared: “OFFICIAL SANCTUARY CITY ‘Cheap Nannies and Gardeners Make Malibu Great!’ (Boyle Heights Not So Much).”
    The blue and white marker even carried official seals of the city and the state of California.

    The sign was first reported around 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, after someone bolted it to an existing marker at the city’s northern limit. Anyone speeding past might have thought officials were simply taking pride in their recent decision to declare Malibu a haven for immigrants who may face deportation for crossing the border illegally — a defiant repudiation of the Trump administration’s expanded immigration enforcement priorities.

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  48. Perhaps City Manager Reva Feldman will also explain what, exactly, is inaccurate about the sign?

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  49. Nice trolling. Not sure what material the sign is made out of, but it seems pretty well done. However, I’d have had the parenthetical text read “As Long As They Leave By Sundown.”

    Signs are a pretty big deal. The black on yellow signs that appeared at rallies about fifteen years ago and are still widely used today were pioneered by a guy I know. They worked.

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  50. That made my day. Satire from the right can be wickedly funny.

    Here’s one for a future prank. “Sanctuary City, because no one wants to mow their own lawn”

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  51. @Flip
    Brilliant, as the Brits would say.

    Brilliant, as the Brits would say.

    I detest that usage, especially coming from a UK luvvie type.

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  52. @Daniel H
    Add, "My bad" to the list. Only started hearing that about 10 years ago. I believe that it is British in origin.

    You know, I could take all these new fangled turns of phrase and Britishisms, but the one thing that sets me off immediately is the uptalk phenomenon, especially when the speaker is a man. I can't take a man seriously after I hear him uptalk.

    No, “my bad” was unheard of in the UK last time I lived there but already common in American pop culture.

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  53. @slumber_j
    I'm reminded of an order a friend of mine once heard while standing in line somewhere in Manhattan or maybe Eastern LI: "I'd like an everything bagel with not too much butter."

    I’d like an everything bagel with not too much butter

    In North Jersey this is a perfectly cromulent construction

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  54. @Clark Westwood

    * At the end of the day
     
    That one really is an invasive species. I work with some guys who can't say more than 200 words without using "at the end of the day" at least once.

    ‘At the end of the day” was a cliche of British sportwriting in the 1970s. A heavily overused cliche, that is. It’s weird that it’s suddenly appeared on this side of the Atlantic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Formerly CARealist
    I know people who can only use two adjectives: amazing and awesome.

    I swear whenever I hear either of those words I want to retch.
  55. @Tipo 61
    Boyle Heights used to have a Jewish community, until they all left.

    Tipo:

    Correction: replace “until they all left” with “until they all fled”.

    The same thing happened in NYC where affluent Bronx Jews fled the Grand Concourse to seek refuge in CoOp City only in turn to be driven out by the same people they pledged eternal solidarity with!

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  56. @Thomas
    Troll level = master.

    Amusing to think about who might've been behind this. Somebody who wanted to make a point and who had the time and tools to come up with a pretty realistic-looking sign. They even got the town and county logos right. (I'd worry about getting caught and hit with a copyright violation or some other collateral charge for misuse of a public seal).

    Maybe the city will start asking Malibuians to report their neighbors' suspicious nighttime garage projects.

    Even if it was only up for 10 minutes and one person saw it, the pic was destined to go viral.

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  57. @Stan Adams
    A number of British expressions have entered American usage over the last ten years or so:

    * Gone missing
    * No worries
    * At the end of the day

    I associate ‘No worries’ very strongly with Australians, but it has spread to both Brits and Americans.

    ‘At the end of the day’ seems to have peaked and may now be pockmarking spoken English slightly less frequently, but I agree it has been a particularly pernicious and annoying infestation.

    Another one that has plagued international English in recent years is ‘in a nutshell’. That cliche no doubt goes way back, but it suddenly burst out in virulent overuse about five or so years ago. It’s awful, awful, awful.

    But nothing — no word, no phrase, no cliche — is responsible for even a fraction of the damage the simple word ‘like’ is inflicting on spoken English. I hope English can recover from its ongoing ‘like’ epidemic.

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    • Replies: @Escher
    That's like, hate speech against the single most important contribution of Malibu teenage girls to like, the English language and stuff?
  58. @Daniel H
    Add, "My bad" to the list. Only started hearing that about 10 years ago. I believe that it is British in origin.

    You know, I could take all these new fangled turns of phrase and Britishisms, but the one thing that sets me off immediately is the uptalk phenomenon, especially when the speaker is a man. I can't take a man seriously after I hear him uptalk.

    ‘My bad’ comes from pickup basketball, i.e. when a player blunders and then takes responsibility for the error by shouting ‘my bad’, meaning e.g. my pass was errant, I should have switched on that pick and roll, etc.

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  59. @Thomas
    Troll level = master.

    Amusing to think about who might've been behind this. Somebody who wanted to make a point and who had the time and tools to come up with a pretty realistic-looking sign. They even got the town and county logos right. (I'd worry about getting caught and hit with a copyright violation or some other collateral charge for misuse of a public seal).

    Maybe the city will start asking Malibuians to report their neighbors' suspicious nighttime garage projects.

    Even better troll would be to make a serious push to build low income migrant housing in Malibu, preferably next to the Malibu Farmers Market or the Self-Realization Fellowship Lake Shrine Temple.

    Have the project funded by some disgruntled celeb, like The Edge from U2, whose eco-friendly hill side mega mansions (there were more than one) were rejected by the Malibu City Fathers.

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  60. @CJ
    'At the end of the day" was a cliche of British sportwriting in the 1970s. A heavily overused cliche, that is. It's weird that it's suddenly appeared on this side of the Atlantic.

    I know people who can only use two adjectives: amazing and awesome.

    I swear whenever I hear either of those words I want to retch.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    The degradation of 'amazing' is so advanced I'm finding it hard to sing the famous hymn.

    The overuse of 'awesome' seems, mercifully, to have abated in recent years -- 'amazing' has eaten up quite a bit of its market share!
  61. @Achmed E. Newman
    I knew an Australian guy who would say "no worries" back in 2000. That's the first time I heard it. That "at the end of the day" crap is just corporate-speak and very annoying. I thought only mid-level managers like to say that and "yank my chain", the blog "space", "24/7", "ping me on that", "day one", and lastly "I ... want ... my red stapler back... or I'll, ... I'll set the building on fire".

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KqxjRzzGn8k

    I knew an Australian guy who would say “no worries” back in 2000. That’s the first time I heard it.

    “No worries” was endemic in coastal SoCal in the mid-’90s.

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    • Replies: @Brutusale
    "No worries" was endemic in Crocodile Dundee, circa 1986.
  62. @The Last Real Calvinist
    I associate 'No worries' very strongly with Australians, but it has spread to both Brits and Americans.

    'At the end of the day' seems to have peaked and may now be pockmarking spoken English slightly less frequently, but I agree it has been a particularly pernicious and annoying infestation.

    Another one that has plagued international English in recent years is 'in a nutshell'. That cliche no doubt goes way back, but it suddenly burst out in virulent overuse about five or so years ago. It's awful, awful, awful.

    But nothing -- no word, no phrase, no cliche -- is responsible for even a fraction of the damage the simple word 'like' is inflicting on spoken English. I hope English can recover from its ongoing 'like' epidemic.

    That’s like, hate speech against the single most important contribution of Malibu teenage girls to like, the English language and stuff?

    Read More
  63. @Formerly CARealist
    I know people who can only use two adjectives: amazing and awesome.

    I swear whenever I hear either of those words I want to retch.

    The degradation of ‘amazing’ is so advanced I’m finding it hard to sing the famous hymn.

    The overuse of ‘awesome’ seems, mercifully, to have abated in recent years — ‘amazing’ has eaten up quite a bit of its market share!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Amazing" is gayer than "awesome," which is metalheaded.
  64. @The Last Real Calvinist
    The degradation of 'amazing' is so advanced I'm finding it hard to sing the famous hymn.

    The overuse of 'awesome' seems, mercifully, to have abated in recent years -- 'amazing' has eaten up quite a bit of its market share!

    “Amazing” is gayer than “awesome,” which is metalheaded.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist

    “Amazing” is gayer than “awesome,” which is metalheaded.

     

    True. It's certainly more feminine. This fits in with the broad trend of pop culture standard-setters increasingly being girls or gay, with young straight males either keeping their heads down and their mouths shut, or being ignored (at best) or vilified by the media/academia/TPTB in general.
  65. @Steve Sailer
    "Amazing" is gayer than "awesome," which is metalheaded.

    “Amazing” is gayer than “awesome,” which is metalheaded.

    True. It’s certainly more feminine. This fits in with the broad trend of pop culture standard-setters increasingly being girls or gay, with young straight males either keeping their heads down and their mouths shut, or being ignored (at best) or vilified by the media/academia/TPTB in general.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    We used to do this at work: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buzzword_bingo.

    My BS radar goes off on phrases like these:
    "have a conversation"
    "questions or concerns"
    "I'm so busy"
    "facilitate"
    and that's even before we get to the newer BS such as "intersectionality" wtf that means.
  66. @ATBOTL
    As nationalists become stronger, we can trigger internal migration of this sort. That could be the knockout punch to the establishment. Imagine if local governments across "Red" America become controlled by hardcore ideological nationalists. Such a scenario is not far fetched as America Balkanizes. Measures can be taken to encourage diversity to leave those areas. As that happens, diversity will seek shelter in liberal white enclaves. This can create a dominos falling effect as areas under pressure from internal diversity migrations may flip to nationalism, further increasing pressure on the remaining liberal white enclaves.

    We can imagine a kind of Camp of the Saints scenario inside white liberal enclaves that are being flooded by Somalian and Salvadoran internal refugees.

    very True, and this administration can certainly send all the recent Refugees to California and Seattle. Even the liberals in these areas will fight against it.

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  67. @Clark Westwood

    * At the end of the day
     
    That one really is an invasive species. I work with some guys who can't say more than 200 words without using "at the end of the day" at least once.

    I very much dislike “No problem” as a response to “Thank you”. How about “You’re welcome”?

    If I wanted to hear surfers talk, I’d have gone to the beach instead of a restaurant. Morons.

    Read More
  68. @The Last Real Calvinist

    “Amazing” is gayer than “awesome,” which is metalheaded.

     

    True. It's certainly more feminine. This fits in with the broad trend of pop culture standard-setters increasingly being girls or gay, with young straight males either keeping their heads down and their mouths shut, or being ignored (at best) or vilified by the media/academia/TPTB in general.

    We used to do this at work: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Buzzword_bingo.

    My BS radar goes off on phrases like these:
    “have a conversation”
    “questions or concerns”
    “I’m so busy”
    “facilitate”
    and that’s even before we get to the newer BS such as “intersectionality” wtf that means.

    Read More
  69. @cthulhu


    I knew an Australian guy who would say “no worries” back in 2000. That’s the first time I heard it.

     

    "No worries" was endemic in coastal SoCal in the mid-'90s.

    “No worries” was endemic in Crocodile Dundee, circa 1986.

    Read More
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