The Unz Review - Mobile
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Sailer in Taki's: "The Tiger Mother's Son"
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New Reply
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

My new column in Taki’s Magazine is a book review of the tell-all biography Tiger Woods by Jeff Benedict and Armen Keteyian:

The Tiger Mother’s Son
by Steve Sailer

May 23, 2018

… Tiger Woods being part black via his blowhard father was usually thought of as the most important element of his story, an angle assiduously pushed by Earl Woods. The elder Woods told a sports agent when Tiger was a 5-year-old sensation, “I believe that the first black man who’s a really good golfer is going to make a hell of a lot of money.” …

Instead, Tiger Woods raises the question of whether we’ve largely overlooked the more important East Asian side of his heritage.

A Sapir-Whorf excuse is that, after all, we lacked a term in English to characterize Tiger’s highly focused mother until Amy Chua’s 2011 comic memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.

If Earl Woods, with his worsening drinking and whoring, was a dismaying character, Kultida Woods was perhaps the scarier of Tiger’s tiger parents. For instance, she once offered in her broken English her opinion of her retired Green Beret husband:

“Old Man is soft. He cry. He forgive people. Not me. I don’t forgive anybody.”

Instead of revolutionizing the number of blacks in golf, the social impact of Tiger’s example turned out to be far greater on Asians.

Read the whole thing there.

 
Hide 117 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Sports.
    Golf.
    Race.

    Mr. Sailer does have a handful of hobby horses… but how he manages to recombine them into new and remarkably creative views of things we take for granted is pretty impressive.

    People have been arguing about the heritability of intelligence and race (or else completely avoiding the topic while denying there is anything to see or discuss)

    I really wish there were a better test for conscientiousness. While there is no doubt that intelligence is very important for an individual successfully navigating the world, we can all probably point to genius we’ve known that has failed to amount to anything, lacking adequate conscientiousness & future time orientation. I suspect that conscientiousness, grit or whatever we want to call it is similarly heritable and difficult to change with much training. Whatever the blessings of having a mercilessly demanding & unforgiving Tiger Mother, there are probably also benefits to having Tiger Blood that makes one receptive to be formed by such hard drilling.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc.
    AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
    These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
    Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
    More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  2. By the way, because this book’s manuscript was no doubt vetted line-by-line by libel lawyers, it’s depressing that nobody noticed that the authors’ repeated employment of the phrase “begs the question” to mean “raises the question” is wrong.

    ‘Raises the question’ has gone the way of ‘uninterested’ and ‘all right’ — it’s a lost cause.

    Fantastic review, though.

    Read More
    • Replies: @International Jew
    What's the deal with "all right"?

    Yeah, misuse of "begging the question" is now just one minor irritant for me, among many.
    , @Harry Baldwin
    I'm one of those people who notes the misuse of words, though I generally keep it to myself to avoid being too annoying. Nevertheless, the degree of precision with which someone uses words gives you some sense of his intelligence, or at least his education. The renowned intellectual Barack Obama was guilty of misusing certain words, though in several cases their misuse has become common. Some examples for my fellow pedants:

    In the foreign policy debate with Romney, he said Al Qaeda had been "decimated." Presumably he meant devastated.

    He frequently said "enormity" when he meant "enormousness," as in his inaugural address.

    He said his daughters were "nonplussed" by the attention of the press when he meant unfazed.

    He said “Let me recant” when he meant “Let me reiterate.”

    He said "fulsome accounting" when he meant full accounting.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  3. Jon says:

    What’s up with the comment policy over on Taki’s?

    Read More
    • Replies: @AndrewR
    They didn't like people criticizing the Jews so they shut the comments down.
    , @(((They))) Live
    Its a real pity IMO, plenty of BS in the Taki comments but some gold too, I noticed the Spectator have also stopped allowing comments, not a good trend
    , @Sam
    I normally enjoy a good comments section but Taki's had one of the worst I have ever seen. It would often descend into nonsense. Good riddance.

    They don't necessarily need to close it down. Most trolls with nothing to say will go away if you put some obstacles in their way. They're persistent but it would significantly alter the ratio of nonsense to insightful.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  4. “That was the end of his nine-year run from the second half of 1999 through the first half of 2008 in which he won 56 tournaments, including thirteen majors.

    We shall never see the like again.”

    Never say never, ’cause “Never is a long time.”–Shane

    Actually, there is always one to emerge about every generation or so. Perhaps after Nicklaus won his 18th (still the record, by the way), PGA aficionados said the same thing.

    No, the greatest of the greats don’t come along every season. And it may indeed be long time in between comings, but they do come.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Yo, I think the tour prize money and the hefty endorsement money takes some of the drive out of golfers after early success.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  5. Anonymous[998] • Disclaimer says:

    When he joined the tour out of Stanford in 1996, Woods carried only 158 pounds on his 6 foot, 2-inch frame. Today, he weighs between 182 and 185 — a gain of nearly 30 pounds. In 1996, his waist measured 29 inches; today, it’s 31.

    185 at 6’2″ and a 31 inch waist is nothing though. I’m 6’2″ and around 185 to 190 normally, and back when I weightlifted a lot I got up to 205 to 210 easily just by lifting regularly and eating more. I probably could’ve gotten to 215 to 220 pretty easily if I didn’t get injured and lose interest.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anon
    Woods is a remarkably short 6' 2".
    , @Arclight
    I agree - although he is pretty ripped, over the same time frame as Tiger my weight changed by 25-30 lbs as I transitioned from relying primarily on running in my younger years to stay in shape to lifting with interval training. I didn't need any 'help' to put on the extra muscle, it just came after years of consistent effort and getting enough protein and sadly as my body fat went from an effortless 10% in my 20s to the 16-18% I fluctuate around now. Tiger has his own trainers and cooks/nutritionists to keep him in peak condition, so given that a non-elite athlete like myself can stay in decent shape while working a sedentary job, I don't find his physical condition surprising.
    , @MikeatMikedotMike
    Yes, 6'2" and 185 is not really damning evidence of PED use. When I was 18, I was 6'4" and about 180lbs and looked like a stick., Now at 42, I'm 6' 3 (and a half) and 240, but I've been up to 265, eating 4000 calories a day. Learning how to eat correctly to support a weightlifting program can take one pretty far before steroids become a factor.

    What is interesting is that Tiger Woods had his eyesight corrected to 20/15, which certainly falls into the "performance enhancing" category, and was probably a more relevant factor to Woods' success than steroids, comparably.
    , @Rod1963
    185lbs isn't that big if he eats right and lifts weights.

    Still golf cannot even be remotely considered a sport when children to geriatric geezers with a heart condition can play it.

    Now if they made the players lug their own clubs and not use a cart then I 'd say it's closer to a sport. But then you'd have a lot of the horribly dressed older players stroking out, blowing their backs, before their 3rd hole. Could rename it Sudden Death Golf. It would have all the makings of a great reality TV show.

    Oh I'd put gators in the ponds to keep it exciting.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  6. The more you have time to care about golf, the less you have in relation to people who can’t devote time to golf.

    Imagine your local golf club had final say over your yard.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  7. AndrewR says:
    @Jon
    What's up with the comment policy over on Taki's?

    They didn’t like people criticizing the Jews so they shut the comments down.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Taki is no philosemite. The comments needed to be really beyond the pale to offend his sensibilities.
    , @Dan Hayes
    AndrewR:

    If that's the case (shutting down the comments section for criticizing Jews) then they should have shut down its proprietor Taki!

    , @Saxon
    Well in general it's just a trend of this and a commenter blowing out an article's premise which is causing comments sections to shutter. The funny part of this is that it actually causes people to be less interested in using their site so they lose traffic when they do it.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  8. “More broadly, as the most famous athlete in the world, Tiger Woods was seen by Asians as validating their tendency toward Tiger Parenting….”

    The most famous athlete in the world these last years would be Lionel Messi, I think, although at his peak, it might indeed have been Tiger Woods.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    1990s Jordan to 2000s Woods to 2010s Messi would be my guess.

    Forbes says the highest earning athletes in 2017, salary, winnings, endorsements were Ronaldo, LeBron, Messi.

    Tiger dominated this list for quite a few years, often with Mickelson in second or third place.

    , @Steve Sailer
    Here's the 2017 Forbes list:

    https://www.forbes.com/athletes/list/#tab:overall

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s.

    Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It's good to be a golf champion.

    , @Paleo Liberal
    I must be too American. I had to look up Lionel Messi. I assumed that if I hadn't heard of him, he was most likely either a soccer player or a Formula One racer. Looks like my first guess was correct.

    I'm so old I can remember when the world's most famous athlete was Secretariat.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  9. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @AndrewR
    They didn't like people criticizing the Jews so they shut the comments down.

    Taki is no philosemite. The comments needed to be really beyond the pale to offend his sensibilities.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
    No, it was probably his daughter's decision. And while some comments were certainly antisemitic (and boring), they constituted less than 5% of the stuff published in the comments section on unz.

    As I see, Taki's has also deleted older comments, so it's kind of damnatio memoriae ...
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  10. Dan Hayes says:
    @AndrewR
    They didn't like people criticizing the Jews so they shut the comments down.

    AndrewR:

    If that’s the case (shutting down the comments section for criticizing Jews) then they should have shut down its proprietor Taki!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  11. @Narrenspeise
    "More broadly, as the most famous athlete in the world, Tiger Woods was seen by Asians as validating their tendency toward Tiger Parenting...."

    The most famous athlete in the world these last years would be Lionel Messi, I think, although at his peak, it might indeed have been Tiger Woods.

    1990s Jordan to 2000s Woods to 2010s Messi would be my guess.

    Forbes says the highest earning athletes in 2017, salary, winnings, endorsements were Ronaldo, LeBron, Messi.

    Tiger dominated this list for quite a few years, often with Mickelson in second or third place.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Ronaldo might be more famous: he played for the most famous team in the English league before going to Real Madrid; he played in the Euro championship as well as the World Cup in the last four years (winning the Euros); he’s playing in the champions league final this weekend; he’s in lots of ads; and he has 72 million Twitter followers.
    , @dearieme
    Who the hell is "Jordan"?
    , @Clyde
    I am not a soccer fan but have seen some European games being played on TV. There are no interruptions for advertising. My question is where does the money come from to lavish tens of millions on the top soccer players. They get paid as much as top baseball-football-basketball players with all their advertisements during games
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  12. @Narrenspeise
    "More broadly, as the most famous athlete in the world, Tiger Woods was seen by Asians as validating their tendency toward Tiger Parenting...."

    The most famous athlete in the world these last years would be Lionel Messi, I think, although at his peak, it might indeed have been Tiger Woods.

    Here’s the 2017 Forbes list:

    https://www.forbes.com/athletes/list/#tab:overall

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s.

    Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Narrenspeise
    Money is only part of the story, and not the most important one. Every (male) kid in Africa, Latin America and Europe as well as much of Asia knows Lionel Messi (and Cristiano Ronaldo). Far fewer will have heard of LeBron James or Roger Federer, fewer even of Mickelson.

    Soccer is way more popular than golf worldwide and I would bet there are many millions in Africa who know everything about Messi while having little idea what golf is about.

    , @Polynikes
    Golfers tend to rank high because of the market they reach--rich to middle-class. But I agree about Tiger being the most popular. Soccer has limited reach in N. America and Asia. Basketball has a lesser but limited reach in Europe and S. America. Golf tends to hit N. America, Europe and Asia...especially the top guys like Tiger.
    , @peterike

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

     

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don't care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn't care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?
    , @anonymous
    Until only recently I had no clue that Arnold was, uh, something of a "ladies man."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  13. @Dave Pinsen
    Taki is no philosemite. The comments needed to be really beyond the pale to offend his sensibilities.

    No, it was probably his daughter’s decision. And while some comments were certainly antisemitic (and boring), they constituted less than 5% of the stuff published in the comments section on unz.

    As I see, Taki’s has also deleted older comments, so it’s kind of damnatio memoriae …

    Read More
    • Replies: @TheBoom
    My guess is she wants to go for advertising and figures she is are better without people in the comments talking about the Jews. Too bad because the articles yielded some interesting comments.
    , @Svigor
    Yeah philosemitism is like the Fourth of July and Mardi Gras rolled into one.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  14. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Steve Sailer
    1990s Jordan to 2000s Woods to 2010s Messi would be my guess.

    Forbes says the highest earning athletes in 2017, salary, winnings, endorsements were Ronaldo, LeBron, Messi.

    Tiger dominated this list for quite a few years, often with Mickelson in second or third place.

    Ronaldo might be more famous: he played for the most famous team in the English league before going to Real Madrid; he played in the Euro championship as well as the World Cup in the last four years (winning the Euros); he’s playing in the champions league final this weekend; he’s in lots of ads; and he has 72 million Twitter followers.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jon

    he has 72 million Twitter followers
     
    That seems like an insane number. Is that near the Twitter record?
    , @prosa123
    Not many people in the United States know who Ronaldo is.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  15. OT – Oxford not lowering entry standards shock horror

    https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/may/23/oxford-faces-anger-over-failure-to-improve-diversity-among-students

    The funny thing is, most black students at Oxford are doing medicine, law or PPE – the three most competitive subjects and the hardest to get into. These are “Uk-domiciled” students and I’d bet most are African rather than Afro-Caribbean.

    Read More
    • Replies: @res
    See related discussion on James Thompson's blog: http://www.unz.com/jthompson/oxbridge-entrance-and-genetic-privilege/
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  16. @Steve Sailer
    Here's the 2017 Forbes list:

    https://www.forbes.com/athletes/list/#tab:overall

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s.

    Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It's good to be a golf champion.

    Money is only part of the story, and not the most important one. Every (male) kid in Africa, Latin America and Europe as well as much of Asia knows Lionel Messi (and Cristiano Ronaldo). Far fewer will have heard of LeBron James or Roger Federer, fewer even of Mickelson.

    Soccer is way more popular than golf worldwide and I would bet there are many millions in Africa who know everything about Messi while having little idea what golf is about.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  17. Tiny Duck says:

    BOOM

    A Wonan of Color is about to be one governor of Georgia

    This is why immigration is so important

    Demographics means more Peole of Color to vote in good candidates in formerly solid republican states

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  18. What I read on Wood’s upbringing was that it was the dad who pushed and instilled the single minded drive to excel in Golf. The dad was a helicopter parent.

    Same sort of deal with Lewis Hamilton; the black father got him into motor racing and nurtured his drive and talent.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  19. Jon says:
    @Dave Pinsen
    Ronaldo might be more famous: he played for the most famous team in the English league before going to Real Madrid; he played in the Euro championship as well as the World Cup in the last four years (winning the Euros); he’s playing in the champions league final this weekend; he’s in lots of ads; and he has 72 million Twitter followers.

    he has 72 million Twitter followers

    That seems like an insane number. Is that near the Twitter record?

    Read More
    • Replies: @njguy73

    That seems like an insane number. Is that near the Twitter record?

     

    He's Number 8. As of this post, Katy Perry reigns supreme.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most-followed_Twitter_accounts
    , @Dave Pinsen
    By way of comparison, Trump has about 52 million followers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  20. Ronaldo, arguably the highest value male combination of looks, fame and wealth in the world right now, is dating a solid 6. And I do mean solid. WUWT?

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    Ronaldo, it is rumored, is a closeted gay.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  21. dearieme says:
    @Steve Sailer
    1990s Jordan to 2000s Woods to 2010s Messi would be my guess.

    Forbes says the highest earning athletes in 2017, salary, winnings, endorsements were Ronaldo, LeBron, Messi.

    Tiger dominated this list for quite a few years, often with Mickelson in second or third place.

    Who the hell is “Jordan”?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    deari, he invented sneakers and then started a middle eastern airline, "Air Jordan."
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  22. Gordo says:

    Taki.

    Don’t read it no more.

    Read More
    • Agree: jim jones
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  23. @Jon
    What's up with the comment policy over on Taki's?

    Its a real pity IMO, plenty of BS in the Taki comments but some gold too, I noticed the Spectator have also stopped allowing comments, not a good trend

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anonymous
    The Economist has also recently disabled comments.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    I loved Boris Badinov. But all good things must pass.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  24. TheBoom says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    No, it was probably his daughter's decision. And while some comments were certainly antisemitic (and boring), they constituted less than 5% of the stuff published in the comments section on unz.

    As I see, Taki's has also deleted older comments, so it's kind of damnatio memoriae ...

    My guess is she wants to go for advertising and figures she is are better without people in the comments talking about the Jews. Too bad because the articles yielded some interesting comments.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Redman
    Why all the illing on Taki here? It’s still a great go to site IMO.

    Never really read the comments, since I didn’t view it as a blog like iSteve. But it has some very strong contributors.

    Anyone here have thoughts on other good sites? UNZ and Lew Rockwell are my go to. With Taki a distant third. Still read Raimondo a lot since he always seems to nail foreign policy and the DC swamp.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  25. üeljang says:

    “A Sapir-Whorf excuse is that, after all, we lacked a term in English to characterize Tiger’s highly focused mother until Amy Chua’s 2011 comic memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother.”

    We already had a term to describe domineering Asian women in English: “dragon lady.” It is appropriate because it references the Dragon, various forms of which are associated both with the East and with China (which the Chinese themselves and several other Asian groups call the “central country”) according to Asian astrology/mythology. The Dragon also represents the ESE secondary-intercardinal direction, which is precisely the direction from which these women originate (according to a Eurasian perspective). It hints at these women’s fantastic and incorrigible conceit. It is also imagined to be reptilian in form, making it a suitable symbol for Asian people.

    “Tiger Mother” is a poorly conceived term because it references the Tiger, which Asians associate with the West (and with the color white, the element metal/gold/money, the Yin/Passive/Feminine/Dark cosmogonic principle, etc.). It would only be symbolically appropriate when used in reference to an Asian woman who lives in the West from the point of view of someone who considers this woman to have pledged heart and soul to Team West. Even then, it would more accurately be something like “Dragon Mother who Strives to Position her Descendants to become Tigers.”

    I would much prefer “Dragon Mother.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    We already had a term to describe domineering Asian women in English: “dragon lady.”
     
    http://www.stylebyfire.ca/wp-content/uploads/2015/01/Caniff_DragonLady_print.jpg
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  26. Svigor says:

    OT, libertarian rage over Bloomberg’s tax disincentives argument:

    https://www.atr.org/left-wing-billionaire-michael-bloomberg-raising-taxes-poor-people-good-thing?amp

    Call me crazy, but in the case of the soda tax I think Bloomberg’s right. If there’s a libertarian argument to be made against it, I think it’s more along the lines of “people should have the right to kill themselves with soda if they want to.” The libertarians are making the economic argument, as if poor people can’t just choose to stop spending their money on soda like idiots, but they can.

    People who switch to water are healthier AND have more money left in their wallets.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  27. Svigor says:
    @Bardon Kaldian
    No, it was probably his daughter's decision. And while some comments were certainly antisemitic (and boring), they constituted less than 5% of the stuff published in the comments section on unz.

    As I see, Taki's has also deleted older comments, so it's kind of damnatio memoriae ...

    Yeah philosemitism is like the Fourth of July and Mardi Gras rolled into one.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  28. Clyde says:
    @Steve Sailer
    1990s Jordan to 2000s Woods to 2010s Messi would be my guess.

    Forbes says the highest earning athletes in 2017, salary, winnings, endorsements were Ronaldo, LeBron, Messi.

    Tiger dominated this list for quite a few years, often with Mickelson in second or third place.

    I am not a soccer fan but have seen some European games being played on TV. There are no interruptions for advertising. My question is where does the money come from to lavish tens of millions on the top soccer players. They get paid as much as top baseball-football-basketball players with all their advertisements during games

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    My question is where does the money come from to lavish tens of millions on the top soccer players. They get paid as much as top baseball-football-basketball players with all their advertisements during games
     
    Cable and subscription TV channels pay billions for the Barclay's Premier League, sponsors pay clubs huge amount, and gate receipts bring in a lot of money, too.

    For example the 2-leg match between France and Ireland in 2009 was watched by more than 150, 000 people paying top dollar (Euro) and that was only a World Cup qualifying match, not part of the finals.
    , @sb
    I would guess that the English Premier League would be the world's biggest sports league by interest .Outside North America few follow American sports ( although of course North America itself is both populous and rich )

    Maybe I should add that I don't follow soccer outside World Cups
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  29. Wilkey says:

    OT: NPR on yesterday’s primaries: “In Georgia, a state that has quickly become very demographically diverse, Democrats decided to lean in and pick a candidate who unabashedly believes the Democratic Party has made a mistake in Georgia of continuously trying to win over Republicans, when she believes they need to turn out more minority voters. Democrats haven’t won the governorship in Georgia in 20 years. Back then, the state was two-thirds white. Today, it’s just over half, and the Democratic primary electorate is overwhelmingly nonwhite.”

    That’s how the Democrats are responding to massive demographic change. OTOH, how dare racist Republicans think that demographic change will have any effect on Who We Are? Don’t Republicans know that race doesn’t matter? That race is just a social construct? That you’re not supposed to appeal to people based on the color of their skin?

    In 1990 Georgia was 71% white and had almost no Hispanics. By 2010 (nearly a decade ago) barely 40% of Georgia newborns were non-Hispanic white and Georgia was home to 500,000 illegal immigrants.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Travis
    We are seeing the results of the collapse of white fertility which started 50 years ago.
    we have less white women of childbearing age today than in 1970…

    US population under the age of 50
    1970 – 162 million whites – 19 million Blacks
    2010 – 159 million whites – 37 million Blacks

    The actually number of white people under the age of 50 has fallen due to the collapse of fertility which began 55 years-ago. When Baby-boomers were at the same age as millennials 80% were married while just 30% of millennials are married today. A 30 year-old millennial is more likely to live with his parents than with a spouse or partner…We are seeing the results across America today of low white fertility combined with amnesty for millions of Latinos starting in 1986 , followed by the immigration Act of 1990 which increased Legal immigration by 100%. These policies have continued under Democrats and Republican leadership.
    , @DCThrowback
    i believe it was blog 28 Sherman (RIP) who mentioning, during the great unwinding, giving African-Americans Georgia as their own "homeland".
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  30. sondjata says:

    “The book asserts that Tiger has been a net winner at the casinos, in contravention of the laws of probability.”

    Depends on what game(s) he played. There are beatable games in casinos.

    Furthermore “probability” and “odds” are different animals.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    There are beatable games in casinos.
     
    Oh do tell. What are they? And did you beat then yourself? If so, how did you do it?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  31. DWright says:

    My 18 year old niece had seen Tiger first hand while working in a restaurant in Dublin, OH (Nicklaus’ home). No tip and she said he talked like a girl, which is her way of saying he was very effeminate.

    To the ex-Taki commenters like me who keep wondering why they shut down comments. My take is they did so because of an attempt to better monetize the site with ads such as the pop ups now being used. Just a guess that it might offend advertisers sensibilities.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  32. Extremely iSteve article in NYT today:

    https://www.nytimes.com/2018/05/22/business/china-baby-money-hospital.html

    Want to See Your Baby? In China, It Can Cost You

    This story contains a bunch of “how x will be remembered”. Liberian illegal immigrants to China try to do the old “dine and dash” trick after getting a c-section at a hospital, learn the chinaman don’t play that game. The hospital keeps the baby till Juliana, the Liberian, pays up. Some highlights:

    —–

    “I want to get my kids discharged because I need to breast-feed them,” said Ms. Logbo, a 28-year-old Liberian living in Guangzhou. “I gave birth to my babies, and I can’t even see my babies. Which type of country am I in?”

    Rebecca Taylor, an Australian breast-feeding counselor in Beijing, called Ms. Logbo’s case “a ginormous violation of human rights.” She added that separating Ms. Logbo from her babies could be “almost catastrophic” in terms of breast-milk production.

    Ms. Logbo acknowledged that her situation complicated matters. Her boyfriend, also a Liberian and the father of her twins, has been detained in China since September, she said, accused of lending his Chinese bank account to a friend for a money transfer.

    Ms. Logbo and her twins were discharged on May 13 after she paid nearly $3,500 in total, money raised through donations. She named her girls Grace Annabelle and Gracious Anna. (“Because I’m grateful to God for everything.”)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  33. anon[262] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anonymous

    When he joined the tour out of Stanford in 1996, Woods carried only 158 pounds on his 6 foot, 2-inch frame. Today, he weighs between 182 and 185 -- a gain of nearly 30 pounds. In 1996, his waist measured 29 inches; today, it's 31.
     
    185 at 6'2" and a 31 inch waist is nothing though. I'm 6'2" and around 185 to 190 normally, and back when I weightlifted a lot I got up to 205 to 210 easily just by lifting regularly and eating more. I probably could've gotten to 215 to 220 pretty easily if I didn't get injured and lose interest.

    Woods is a remarkably short 6′ 2″.

    Read More
    • LOL: E. Rekshun
    • Replies: @Unladen Swallow
    Saw a photo of him with Federer at a golf tournament who is listed at 6'1" and Federer not only looked to have a bigger build, but looked taller as well. I'd guess 6 ft even, maybe a fraction of an inch above is his actual height.

    I have seen him up close at his favorite tournament, he seems a lot shorter than say Ernie Els, who is listed at 6' 3". Els certainly has a bigger build than Woods, but he seems a lot more than a one inch taller as well.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  34. Travis says:
    @Wilkey
    OT: NPR on yesterday's primaries: "In Georgia, a state that has quickly become very demographically diverse, Democrats decided to lean in and pick a candidate who unabashedly believes the Democratic Party has made a mistake in Georgia of continuously trying to win over Republicans, when she believes they need to turn out more minority voters. Democrats haven't won the governorship in Georgia in 20 years. Back then, the state was two-thirds white. Today, it's just over half, and the Democratic primary electorate is overwhelmingly nonwhite."

    That's how the Democrats are responding to massive demographic change. OTOH, how dare racist Republicans think that demographic change will have any effect on Who We Are? Don't Republicans know that race doesn't matter? That race is just a social construct? That you're not supposed to appeal to people based on the color of their skin?

    In 1990 Georgia was 71% white and had almost no Hispanics. By 2010 (nearly a decade ago) barely 40% of Georgia newborns were non-Hispanic white and Georgia was home to 500,000 illegal immigrants.

    We are seeing the results of the collapse of white fertility which started 50 years ago.
    we have less white women of childbearing age today than in 1970…

    US population under the age of 50
    1970 – 162 million whites – 19 million Blacks
    2010 – 159 million whites – 37 million Blacks

    The actually number of white people under the age of 50 has fallen due to the collapse of fertility which began 55 years-ago. When Baby-boomers were at the same age as millennials 80% were married while just 30% of millennials are married today. A 30 year-old millennial is more likely to live with his parents than with a spouse or partner…We are seeing the results across America today of low white fertility combined with amnesty for millions of Latinos starting in 1986 , followed by the immigration Act of 1990 which increased Legal immigration by 100%. These policies have continued under Democrats and Republican leadership.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    We are seeing the results of the collapse of white fertility which started 50 years ago.
     
    True, but the reversal is inevitable. White fertility will increase, because the self-centered, selfish, and hedonistic whites will have no progeny. And the selfish bastards will die with no family to comfort them, or to mourn their deaths.

    The future belongs to those who show up.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  35. prosa123 says: • Website

    If Woods does reasonably well in a tournament, top 25 or thereabouts, the lead article on most sports sites will be about him. The actual winner will be relegated to the second article.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  36. prosa123 says: • Website
    @Dave Pinsen
    Ronaldo might be more famous: he played for the most famous team in the English league before going to Real Madrid; he played in the Euro championship as well as the World Cup in the last four years (winning the Euros); he’s playing in the champions league final this weekend; he’s in lots of ads; and he has 72 million Twitter followers.

    Not many people in the United States know who Ronaldo is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Female soccer fans could tell you who Messi is; females, period, could tell you who Ronaldo is.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  37. Polynikes says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Here's the 2017 Forbes list:

    https://www.forbes.com/athletes/list/#tab:overall

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s.

    Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It's good to be a golf champion.

    Golfers tend to rank high because of the market they reach–rich to middle-class. But I agree about Tiger being the most popular. Soccer has limited reach in N. America and Asia. Basketball has a lesser but limited reach in Europe and S. America. Golf tends to hit N. America, Europe and Asia…especially the top guys like Tiger.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  38. Arclight says:
    @Anonymous

    When he joined the tour out of Stanford in 1996, Woods carried only 158 pounds on his 6 foot, 2-inch frame. Today, he weighs between 182 and 185 -- a gain of nearly 30 pounds. In 1996, his waist measured 29 inches; today, it's 31.
     
    185 at 6'2" and a 31 inch waist is nothing though. I'm 6'2" and around 185 to 190 normally, and back when I weightlifted a lot I got up to 205 to 210 easily just by lifting regularly and eating more. I probably could've gotten to 215 to 220 pretty easily if I didn't get injured and lose interest.

    I agree – although he is pretty ripped, over the same time frame as Tiger my weight changed by 25-30 lbs as I transitioned from relying primarily on running in my younger years to stay in shape to lifting with interval training. I didn’t need any ‘help’ to put on the extra muscle, it just came after years of consistent effort and getting enough protein and sadly as my body fat went from an effortless 10% in my 20s to the 16-18% I fluctuate around now. Tiger has his own trainers and cooks/nutritionists to keep him in peak condition, so given that a non-elite athlete like myself can stay in decent shape while working a sedentary job, I don’t find his physical condition surprising.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  39. peterike says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Here's the 2017 Forbes list:

    https://www.forbes.com/athletes/list/#tab:overall

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s.

    Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It's good to be a golf champion.

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don’t care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn’t care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Polynikes
    I think for the sporting equipment side of things, there's a rationale argument for using the best stuff and that the pros use the best. Therfore, you'd want to use what they use.

    I'm not sure how that rolls over to cars and watches, though.
    , @Paleo Liberal
    Check the works of Robert Cialdini. This is the guy Scott Adams refers to as THE biggest person in the field of influence. (I think Scott Adams calls him Godzilla).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Cialdini

    Check out principal #4. Yes, athletes are considered authority figures.
    , @Anonymous
    A big part of it is simple visibility for marketing and advertising products.

    A company wants the public to know about its product. The public already knows some famous person and recognizes him immediately. The famous person "endorses" the product and becomes attached to it, and now when people see and recognize the famous person, they also see the product prominently attached to him.

    At the most basic level, it's simply about getting the product in front of as many eyeballs as possible via spatial attachment or association with a famous person.
    , @Milo Minderbinder
    But would you buy a video game endorsed by George Plimpton?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aYLly625cXE
    , @Thomm

    Why do people care about endorsements?
     
    Women like groupthink, and like to be told what to buy by an 'approved' authority (even if the athlete in question has no subject matter knowledge).
    , @Mishra
    "Fame is proof that people are gullible."

    (Emerson)

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  40. Marty says:

    Barkley, Jordan, Antonio Cromartie need to get with some asian girls so we can find out which genes cause bad tipping.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    In some things Woods is Asian, in some he's black. He tips like a black.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  41. Fredrik says:

    The root of this is the American obsession with Blacks. Woods is mostly non-Black so why would it be so obvious he’s Black? Because how American define Blacks…

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  42. DCThrowback says: • Website
    @Wilkey
    OT: NPR on yesterday's primaries: "In Georgia, a state that has quickly become very demographically diverse, Democrats decided to lean in and pick a candidate who unabashedly believes the Democratic Party has made a mistake in Georgia of continuously trying to win over Republicans, when she believes they need to turn out more minority voters. Democrats haven't won the governorship in Georgia in 20 years. Back then, the state was two-thirds white. Today, it's just over half, and the Democratic primary electorate is overwhelmingly nonwhite."

    That's how the Democrats are responding to massive demographic change. OTOH, how dare racist Republicans think that demographic change will have any effect on Who We Are? Don't Republicans know that race doesn't matter? That race is just a social construct? That you're not supposed to appeal to people based on the color of their skin?

    In 1990 Georgia was 71% white and had almost no Hispanics. By 2010 (nearly a decade ago) barely 40% of Georgia newborns were non-Hispanic white and Georgia was home to 500,000 illegal immigrants.

    i believe it was blog 28 Sherman (RIP) who mentioning, during the great unwinding, giving African-Americans Georgia as their own “homeland”.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  43. Barnard says:

    It is interesting that while there has been an increase in Asian golfers on the PGA Tour, very few have been able to play at a high level consistently. Y.E. Yang, who was the first player to beat Tiger when Tiger held the lead going into the final round of a major, dropped off very quickly after that win in the 2009 PGA. K.J. Choi seems to be one of the few who was able to win tournaments on the PGA Tour over several years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @GW
    Hideki Matsuyama has been Top 10 worldwide recently and will most likely win a major. There have also been other decent Korean players who’ve picked up wins recently (although you’d have to follow golf pretty closely to know their names).
    , @Joe Joe
    South Korean Si Woo Kim won The Players Championship, golf's unofficial 5th major, last year and was he youngest to ever win that tournament.
    , @Marko1
    Ignore the Korean ethnonationalists here trying to tout their own; I agree with you that they are streaky rather than sustained dominance
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  44. nor Tiger being all that handsome (his jaw and lower lip aren’t very masculine)

    Isn’t it bro-code that guys don’t rag on the looks of other guys?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  45. Lot says:

    200 of the caravan migrants are likely to be released into the USA.

    http://www.breitbart.com/big-government/2018/05/22/catch-and-release-200-caravan-migrants-likely-to-be-set-free-in-u-s/

    Some will just disappear after release. Others will persue their BS asylum claims and get welfare, or get work permits and work legally here for a few years. Then, when their claim is rejected, they can go underground, or perhaps will have an anchor baby or three by then, or benefit from TPS, or President Kamala’s 2021 executive amnesty.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  46. anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:

    “We may never see the like of him.” Good riddance. When this zambo came along, the USA went nuts over him. I recall some kerfuffle at the Augusta golf club because it didn’t allow blacks or women. They let him first. What a bunch of cucks. But the times are changing. Obummer couldn’t join a WASP golf country club. He joined a Jewish one.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  47. Sam says:
    @Jon
    What's up with the comment policy over on Taki's?

    I normally enjoy a good comments section but Taki’s had one of the worst I have ever seen. It would often descend into nonsense. Good riddance.

    They don’t necessarily need to close it down. Most trolls with nothing to say will go away if you put some obstacles in their way. They’re persistent but it would significantly alter the ratio of nonsense to insightful.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    Takimag totally cucked by closing its comments. I think though that it's because so many commentators can't handle the truth, the comments section was shut down. From my experience, most commentators are gentile/Jewish males involved with Asian women, trad RCCers who accept anything the pope states, homos who don't like being told they have no place in society, and nutty anti-Semites. When someone points out that they are wrong or that their bizarre ideas cannot save the West, they go insane with name-calling and ad hominim attacks.
    , @International Jew
    I agree with you, on the quality of the comments at Taki's. It's still uncharacteristic of them to have eliminated their comments section; that's a left-wing thing to do. Maybe it was Disqus' decision, that is, maybe Disqus decided Taki's was too toxic?

    I stopped reading The Atlantic after it eliminated comments; the comments were its only redeeming feature. Taki, on the other hand, is good even comment-less.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  48. anonymous[144] • Disclaimer says:

    Notwithstanding his downfall, at least athletically, the local sports talk station here in the NYC area goes ga-ga every time Woodie steps on the links. The man can hardly make the cut anymore, if at all. It’s to the point that it has descended to the level of farce and may be indicative of the state of pro golf at this point. His run has stopped at 14. Case closed.

    And to think that he could have–indeed SHOULD have– long since passed Nicklaus by now. A pity.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Tom Neumann
    Rapturous love for Tiger Woods is found in all sports media in every media market, whether local or national. No matter what their age, all sports media guys are boomers.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  49. anonymous[144] • Disclaimer says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Here's the 2017 Forbes list:

    https://www.forbes.com/athletes/list/#tab:overall

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s.

    Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It's good to be a golf champion.

    Until only recently I had no clue that Arnold was, uh, something of a “ladies man.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  50. Polynikes says:
    @peterike

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

     

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don't care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn't care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    I think for the sporting equipment side of things, there’s a rationale argument for using the best stuff and that the pros use the best. Therfore, you’d want to use what they use.

    I’m not sure how that rolls over to cars and watches, though.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  51. Brutusale says:
    @prosa123
    Not many people in the United States know who Ronaldo is.

    Female soccer fans could tell you who Messi is; females, period, could tell you who Ronaldo is.

    Read More
    • Replies: @(((They))) Live
    Any yet Ronaldo plays for the pink team
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  52. Brutusale says:
    @Marty
    Barkley, Jordan, Antonio Cromartie need to get with some asian girls so we can find out which genes cause bad tipping.

    In some things Woods is Asian, in some he’s black. He tips like a black.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  53. fitzGetty says:

    … Taki no longer allows comments on anything … Drudge no longer offers a link to Taki … Drudge no longer gives a link to Steyn … ? ? ? .

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  54. anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:
    @Sam
    I normally enjoy a good comments section but Taki's had one of the worst I have ever seen. It would often descend into nonsense. Good riddance.

    They don't necessarily need to close it down. Most trolls with nothing to say will go away if you put some obstacles in their way. They're persistent but it would significantly alter the ratio of nonsense to insightful.

    Takimag totally cucked by closing its comments. I think though that it’s because so many commentators can’t handle the truth, the comments section was shut down. From my experience, most commentators are gentile/Jewish males involved with Asian women, trad RCCers who accept anything the pope states, homos who don’t like being told they have no place in society, and nutty anti-Semites. When someone points out that they are wrong or that their bizarre ideas cannot save the West, they go insane with name-calling and ad hominim attacks.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dissident
    "trad RCCers who accept anything the pope states"

    Traditionalist Roman Catholics who accept anything this Pope states? Isn't that an oxymoron?

    "homos who don’t like being told they have no place in society"

    No place at all for any homosexuals? No matter how discreet and unimplicated in either inordinately disease-promoting, rankly disgusting behavior or the poisoning of the culture with propaganda and promotion of policy that are no less pernicious than any physical infection? How many commenters at Taki Mag actually advocated such a position? I wonder.
    , @Boko Fittleworth
    TrdCaths don't accept everything this pope states. You have no idea what you're talking about.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  55. bjondo says:

    Would have left comment at TAki’s but like TAC my comments get deleted.

    T Woods will pass Sam Sneed’s 82 wins within 2 years. Will get at least 2 more majors – IF healthy to play golf.

    My creds: I was right about Trump winning election. I was/am right about Trump beating the usurpers/deep, now shallow, state.

    Missed on Pence. Predicted he would have already fallen out of Air Force 2 from 45000 ft.

    Still possible.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  56. @Narrenspeise
    "More broadly, as the most famous athlete in the world, Tiger Woods was seen by Asians as validating their tendency toward Tiger Parenting...."

    The most famous athlete in the world these last years would be Lionel Messi, I think, although at his peak, it might indeed have been Tiger Woods.

    I must be too American. I had to look up Lionel Messi. I assumed that if I hadn’t heard of him, he was most likely either a soccer player or a Formula One racer. Looks like my first guess was correct.

    I’m so old I can remember when the world’s most famous athlete was Secretariat.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  57. @peterike

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

     

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don't care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn't care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    Check the works of Robert Cialdini. This is the guy Scott Adams refers to as THE biggest person in the field of influence. (I think Scott Adams calls him Godzilla).

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Robert_Cialdini

    Check out principal #4. Yes, athletes are considered authority figures.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  58. @Anonymous

    When he joined the tour out of Stanford in 1996, Woods carried only 158 pounds on his 6 foot, 2-inch frame. Today, he weighs between 182 and 185 -- a gain of nearly 30 pounds. In 1996, his waist measured 29 inches; today, it's 31.
     
    185 at 6'2" and a 31 inch waist is nothing though. I'm 6'2" and around 185 to 190 normally, and back when I weightlifted a lot I got up to 205 to 210 easily just by lifting regularly and eating more. I probably could've gotten to 215 to 220 pretty easily if I didn't get injured and lose interest.

    Yes, 6’2″ and 185 is not really damning evidence of PED use. When I was 18, I was 6’4″ and about 180lbs and looked like a stick., Now at 42, I’m 6′ 3 (and a half) and 240, but I’ve been up to 265, eating 4000 calories a day. Learning how to eat correctly to support a weightlifting program can take one pretty far before steroids become a factor.

    What is interesting is that Tiger Woods had his eyesight corrected to 20/15, which certainly falls into the “performance enhancing” category, and was probably a more relevant factor to Woods’ success than steroids, comparably.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  59. @The Last Real Calvinist

    By the way, because this book’s manuscript was no doubt vetted line-by-line by libel lawyers, it’s depressing that nobody noticed that the authors’ repeated employment of the phrase “begs the question” to mean “raises the question” is wrong.

     

    'Raises the question' has gone the way of 'uninterested' and 'all right' -- it's a lost cause.

    Fantastic review, though.

    What’s the deal with “all right”?

    Yeah, misuse of “begging the question” is now just one minor irritant for me, among many.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    'All right' is now 'alright', and that's not all right with me.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  60. @Sam
    I normally enjoy a good comments section but Taki's had one of the worst I have ever seen. It would often descend into nonsense. Good riddance.

    They don't necessarily need to close it down. Most trolls with nothing to say will go away if you put some obstacles in their way. They're persistent but it would significantly alter the ratio of nonsense to insightful.

    I agree with you, on the quality of the comments at Taki’s. It’s still uncharacteristic of them to have eliminated their comments section; that’s a left-wing thing to do. Maybe it was Disqus’ decision, that is, maybe Disqus decided Taki’s was too toxic?

    I stopped reading The Atlantic after it eliminated comments; the comments were its only redeeming feature. Taki, on the other hand, is good even comment-less.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  61. Anonymous[400] • Disclaimer says:
    @peterike

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

     

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don't care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn't care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    A big part of it is simple visibility for marketing and advertising products.

    A company wants the public to know about its product. The public already knows some famous person and recognizes him immediately. The famous person “endorses” the product and becomes attached to it, and now when people see and recognize the famous person, they also see the product prominently attached to him.

    At the most basic level, it’s simply about getting the product in front of as many eyeballs as possible via spatial attachment or association with a famous person.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  62. GW says:
    @Barnard
    It is interesting that while there has been an increase in Asian golfers on the PGA Tour, very few have been able to play at a high level consistently. Y.E. Yang, who was the first player to beat Tiger when Tiger held the lead going into the final round of a major, dropped off very quickly after that win in the 2009 PGA. K.J. Choi seems to be one of the few who was able to win tournaments on the PGA Tour over several years.

    Hideki Matsuyama has been Top 10 worldwide recently and will most likely win a major. There have also been other decent Korean players who’ve picked up wins recently (although you’d have to follow golf pretty closely to know their names).

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    I follow golf and usually can't remember their names until I see them on TV again. It seems like since Tiger's rise, most Asian players on the PGA Tour have had short stretches of success, usually less than two years, and then faded back considerably. It is like that for a lot of American and European players too though. I had forgotten about Lucas Glover until his wife made headlines recently. You are right about Matsuyama, he has the best shot at winning a major out of any of them.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  63. El Dato says:

    OT: Wormism!

    Alien invasion: French territory under siege from giant predatory worms

    The French researchers warn that the worms pose a serious threat in their new surroundings. Similar flatworm invasions in Scotland and Ireland reduced yields of agricultural grass by six percent.

    “Recently, a tendency to deny the risks posed by non-native species has emerged; in opposition to this ‘denialism,’ we strongly believe that invasive flatworms, as active predators, constitute a danger to native fauna wherever they are introduced,” the team concluded.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dissident

    “Recently, a tendency to deny the risks posed by non-native species has emerged; in opposition to this ‘denialism,’ we strongly believe that invasive flatworms, as active predators, constitute a danger to native fauna wherever they are introduced,” the team concluded.
     
    Some of them, I would assume, must be good worms. No?
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  64. Anonymous[185] • Disclaimer says:
    @(((They))) Live
    Its a real pity IMO, plenty of BS in the Taki comments but some gold too, I noticed the Spectator have also stopped allowing comments, not a good trend

    The Economist has also recently disabled comments.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  65. @peterike

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

     

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don't care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn't care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    But would you buy a video game endorsed by George Plimpton?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  66. Barnard says:
    @GW
    Hideki Matsuyama has been Top 10 worldwide recently and will most likely win a major. There have also been other decent Korean players who’ve picked up wins recently (although you’d have to follow golf pretty closely to know their names).

    I follow golf and usually can’t remember their names until I see them on TV again. It seems like since Tiger’s rise, most Asian players on the PGA Tour have had short stretches of success, usually less than two years, and then faded back considerably. It is like that for a lot of American and European players too though. I had forgotten about Lucas Glover until his wife made headlines recently. You are right about Matsuyama, he has the best shot at winning a major out of any of them.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Anthony Kim, who as a Tiger Cub hit tens of thousands of golf balls at the driving range down the street from me, made the US Ryder Cup at age 22 and was seen as the Next Tiger Woods, but hasn't played golf in years.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  67. @Barnard
    I follow golf and usually can't remember their names until I see them on TV again. It seems like since Tiger's rise, most Asian players on the PGA Tour have had short stretches of success, usually less than two years, and then faded back considerably. It is like that for a lot of American and European players too though. I had forgotten about Lucas Glover until his wife made headlines recently. You are right about Matsuyama, he has the best shot at winning a major out of any of them.

    Anthony Kim, who as a Tiger Cub hit tens of thousands of golf balls at the driving range down the street from me, made the US Ryder Cup at age 22 and was seen as the Next Tiger Woods, but hasn’t played golf in years.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Barnard
    There have been rumors Anthony Kim took a huge disability settlement for an injury. Even if he comes back for one tournament and decides he can't play anymore the policy is void.

    https://www.golfdigest.com/story/report-anthony-kim-might-not-p
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  68. syonredux says:
    @üeljang
    "A Sapir-Whorf excuse is that, after all, we lacked a term in English to characterize Tiger’s highly focused mother until Amy Chua’s 2011 comic memoir, Battle Hymn of the Tiger Mother."

    We already had a term to describe domineering Asian women in English: "dragon lady." It is appropriate because it references the Dragon, various forms of which are associated both with the East and with China (which the Chinese themselves and several other Asian groups call the "central country") according to Asian astrology/mythology. The Dragon also represents the ESE secondary-intercardinal direction, which is precisely the direction from which these women originate (according to a Eurasian perspective). It hints at these women's fantastic and incorrigible conceit. It is also imagined to be reptilian in form, making it a suitable symbol for Asian people.

    "Tiger Mother" is a poorly conceived term because it references the Tiger, which Asians associate with the West (and with the color white, the element metal/gold/money, the Yin/Passive/Feminine/Dark cosmogonic principle, etc.). It would only be symbolically appropriate when used in reference to an Asian woman who lives in the West from the point of view of someone who considers this woman to have pledged heart and soul to Team West. Even then, it would more accurately be something like "Dragon Mother who Strives to Position her Descendants to become Tigers."

    I would much prefer "Dragon Mother."

    We already had a term to describe domineering Asian women in English: “dragon lady.”

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  69. syonredux says:

    While success in women’s golf is almost wholly socially constructed by fads—in the stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald and P.G. Wodehouse, for instance, girl golfers represent upscale glamour—men’s golf has been less demographically malleable because some boys are always just going to love hitting a ball with a stick. Still, part-Asian guys such as Jason Day and Rickie Fowler are among the best golfers today.

    Never knew that Rickie Fowler was 25% Japanese.Even my Dad,a golf fanatic, didn’t know that…..Which points to how SJWs are uninterested in Whites who are part East Asian. If Fowler were 25% Black, we would never hear the end of it. Cf how no one cared that Lois and Clark:The New Adventures of Superman star Dean Cain was 37.5% Japanese…..

    Read More
    • Agree: bomag
    • Replies: @prosa123
    "Never knew that Rickie Fowler was 25% Japanese.Even my Dad,a golf fanatic, didn’t know that…..Which points to how SJWs are uninterested in Whites who are part East Asian. If Fowler were 25% Black, we would never hear the end of it."

    Fowler is actually one-quarter Japanese and one-quarter Navajo. He definitely appears mixed, I doubt anyone would take him for fully white.
    As a general rule, though, the One Drop Rule does not apply to people with part Asian (or Native American) ancestry.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  70. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    "That was the end of his nine-year run from the second half of 1999 through the first half of 2008 in which he won 56 tournaments, including thirteen majors.

    We shall never see the like again."

    Never say never, 'cause "Never is a long time."--Shane

    Actually, there is always one to emerge about every generation or so. Perhaps after Nicklaus won his 18th (still the record, by the way), PGA aficionados said the same thing.

    No, the greatest of the greats don't come along every season. And it may indeed be long time in between comings, but they do come.

    Yo, I think the tour prize money and the hefty endorsement money takes some of the drive out of golfers after early success.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Dan Jenkins has been saying that for 25 years. The old guys had to strap it on every week to make a living. The guy in 100th place on the money list this year has made $766K. Why go for the pin and jeopardize that?

    Young Jordan Spieth has earned $32 million in prize money during his 6-year PGA career, $10 million more than Fred Couples and $25 million more than Jack Nicklaus.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  71. @dearieme
    Who the hell is "Jordan"?

    deari, he invented sneakers and then started a middle eastern airline, “Air Jordan.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    LOL.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  72. @Brutusale
    Female soccer fans could tell you who Messi is; females, period, could tell you who Ronaldo is.

    Any yet Ronaldo plays for the pink team

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  73. Dissident says:
    @anonymous
    Takimag totally cucked by closing its comments. I think though that it's because so many commentators can't handle the truth, the comments section was shut down. From my experience, most commentators are gentile/Jewish males involved with Asian women, trad RCCers who accept anything the pope states, homos who don't like being told they have no place in society, and nutty anti-Semites. When someone points out that they are wrong or that their bizarre ideas cannot save the West, they go insane with name-calling and ad hominim attacks.

    “trad RCCers who accept anything the pope states”

    Traditionalist Roman Catholics who accept anything this Pope states? Isn’t that an oxymoron?

    “homos who don’t like being told they have no place in society”

    No place at all for any homosexuals? No matter how discreet and unimplicated in either inordinately disease-promoting, rankly disgusting behavior or the poisoning of the culture with propaganda and promotion of policy that are no less pernicious than any physical infection? How many commenters at Taki Mag actually advocated such a position? I wonder.

    Read More
    • Replies: @anonymous
    You must be a homo. This was the only part that got to you.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  74. Dissident says:
    @El Dato
    OT: Wormism!

    Alien invasion: French territory under siege from giant predatory worms


    The French researchers warn that the worms pose a serious threat in their new surroundings. Similar flatworm invasions in Scotland and Ireland reduced yields of agricultural grass by six percent.

    "Recently, a tendency to deny the risks posed by non-native species has emerged; in opposition to this ‘denialism,’ we strongly believe that invasive flatworms, as active predators, constitute a danger to native fauna wherever they are introduced," the team concluded.
     

    “Recently, a tendency to deny the risks posed by non-native species has emerged; in opposition to this ‘denialism,’ we strongly believe that invasive flatworms, as active predators, constitute a danger to native fauna wherever they are introduced,” the team concluded.

    Some of them, I would assume, must be good worms. No?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  75. Joe Joe says:
    @Barnard
    It is interesting that while there has been an increase in Asian golfers on the PGA Tour, very few have been able to play at a high level consistently. Y.E. Yang, who was the first player to beat Tiger when Tiger held the lead going into the final round of a major, dropped off very quickly after that win in the 2009 PGA. K.J. Choi seems to be one of the few who was able to win tournaments on the PGA Tour over several years.

    South Korean Si Woo Kim won The Players Championship, golf’s unofficial 5th major, last year and was he youngest to ever win that tournament.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  76. Redman says:
    @TheBoom
    My guess is she wants to go for advertising and figures she is are better without people in the comments talking about the Jews. Too bad because the articles yielded some interesting comments.

    Why all the illing on Taki here? It’s still a great go to site IMO.

    Never really read the comments, since I didn’t view it as a blog like iSteve. But it has some very strong contributors.

    Anyone here have thoughts on other good sites? UNZ and Lew Rockwell are my go to. With Taki a distant third. Still read Raimondo a lot since he always seems to nail foreign policy and the DC swamp.

    Read More
    • Replies: @TheBoom
    I haven't seen people hating on Taki just frustrated that they have done away with the comments. It is still one of my go to sites but had slipped since the ban on comments.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  77. Hey Steve,

    I *think* you meant to say “sacrosanct” not “sanctimonious?”

    Outstanding column, as always.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  78. Saxon says:
    @AndrewR
    They didn't like people criticizing the Jews so they shut the comments down.

    Well in general it’s just a trend of this and a commenter blowing out an article’s premise which is causing comments sections to shutter. The funny part of this is that it actually causes people to be less interested in using their site so they lose traffic when they do it.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  79. anonymous[359] • Disclaimer says:
    @Dissident
    "trad RCCers who accept anything the pope states"

    Traditionalist Roman Catholics who accept anything this Pope states? Isn't that an oxymoron?

    "homos who don’t like being told they have no place in society"

    No place at all for any homosexuals? No matter how discreet and unimplicated in either inordinately disease-promoting, rankly disgusting behavior or the poisoning of the culture with propaganda and promotion of policy that are no less pernicious than any physical infection? How many commenters at Taki Mag actually advocated such a position? I wonder.

    You must be a homo. This was the only part that got to you.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  80. Thomm says:
    @peterike

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

     

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don't care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn't care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    Women like groupthink, and like to be told what to buy by an ‘approved’ authority (even if the athlete in question has no subject matter knowledge).

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  81. Marko1 says:
    @Barnard
    It is interesting that while there has been an increase in Asian golfers on the PGA Tour, very few have been able to play at a high level consistently. Y.E. Yang, who was the first player to beat Tiger when Tiger held the lead going into the final round of a major, dropped off very quickly after that win in the 2009 PGA. K.J. Choi seems to be one of the few who was able to win tournaments on the PGA Tour over several years.

    Ignore the Korean ethnonationalists here trying to tout their own; I agree with you that they are streaky rather than sustained dominance

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  82. BB753 says:
    @Jack Highlands
    Ronaldo, arguably the highest value male combination of looks, fame and wealth in the world right now, is dating a solid 6. And I do mean solid. WUWT?

    Ronaldo, it is rumored, is a closeted gay.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  83. @anonymous
    Takimag totally cucked by closing its comments. I think though that it's because so many commentators can't handle the truth, the comments section was shut down. From my experience, most commentators are gentile/Jewish males involved with Asian women, trad RCCers who accept anything the pope states, homos who don't like being told they have no place in society, and nutty anti-Semites. When someone points out that they are wrong or that their bizarre ideas cannot save the West, they go insane with name-calling and ad hominim attacks.

    TrdCaths don’t accept everything this pope states. You have no idea what you’re talking about.

    Read More
    • Replies: @attilathehen
    Then you're in a schism. The pope is the ultimate authority in the RCC. I know because I was a cradle Catholic. The pope will be a moot issue soon. There are many othe factors destroying the RCC.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  84. @Buffalo Joe
    deari, he invented sneakers and then started a middle eastern airline, "Air Jordan."

    LOL.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  85. @(((They))) Live
    Its a real pity IMO, plenty of BS in the Taki comments but some gold too, I noticed the Spectator have also stopped allowing comments, not a good trend

    I loved Boris Badinov. But all good things must pass.

    Read More
    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  86. @International Jew
    What's the deal with "all right"?

    Yeah, misuse of "begging the question" is now just one minor irritant for me, among many.

    ‘All right’ is now ‘alright’, and that’s not all right with me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Agree.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  87. @sondjata
    "The book asserts that Tiger has been a net winner at the casinos, in contravention of the laws of probability."

    Depends on what game(s) he played. There are beatable games in casinos.

    Furthermore "probability" and "odds" are different animals.

    There are beatable games in casinos.

    Oh do tell. What are they? And did you beat then yourself? If so, how did you do it?

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  88. @Travis
    We are seeing the results of the collapse of white fertility which started 50 years ago.
    we have less white women of childbearing age today than in 1970…

    US population under the age of 50
    1970 – 162 million whites – 19 million Blacks
    2010 – 159 million whites – 37 million Blacks

    The actually number of white people under the age of 50 has fallen due to the collapse of fertility which began 55 years-ago. When Baby-boomers were at the same age as millennials 80% were married while just 30% of millennials are married today. A 30 year-old millennial is more likely to live with his parents than with a spouse or partner…We are seeing the results across America today of low white fertility combined with amnesty for millions of Latinos starting in 1986 , followed by the immigration Act of 1990 which increased Legal immigration by 100%. These policies have continued under Democrats and Republican leadership.

    We are seeing the results of the collapse of white fertility which started 50 years ago.

    True, but the reversal is inevitable. White fertility will increase, because the self-centered, selfish, and hedonistic whites will have no progeny. And the selfish bastards will die with no family to comfort them, or to mourn their deaths.

    The future belongs to those who show up.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  89. @The Last Real Calvinist
    'All right' is now 'alright', and that's not all right with me.

    Agree.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  90. njguy73 says:
    @Jon

    he has 72 million Twitter followers
     
    That seems like an insane number. Is that near the Twitter record?

    That seems like an insane number. Is that near the Twitter record?

    He’s Number 8. As of this post, Katy Perry reigns supreme.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_most-followed_Twitter_accounts

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  91. Rod1963 says:
    @Anonymous

    When he joined the tour out of Stanford in 1996, Woods carried only 158 pounds on his 6 foot, 2-inch frame. Today, he weighs between 182 and 185 -- a gain of nearly 30 pounds. In 1996, his waist measured 29 inches; today, it's 31.
     
    185 at 6'2" and a 31 inch waist is nothing though. I'm 6'2" and around 185 to 190 normally, and back when I weightlifted a lot I got up to 205 to 210 easily just by lifting regularly and eating more. I probably could've gotten to 215 to 220 pretty easily if I didn't get injured and lose interest.

    185lbs isn’t that big if he eats right and lifts weights.

    Still golf cannot even be remotely considered a sport when children to geriatric geezers with a heart condition can play it.

    Now if they made the players lug their own clubs and not use a cart then I ‘d say it’s closer to a sport. But then you’d have a lot of the horribly dressed older players stroking out, blowing their backs, before their 3rd hole. Could rename it Sudden Death Golf. It would have all the makings of a great reality TV show.

    Oh I’d put gators in the ponds to keep it exciting.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  92. @The Last Real Calvinist

    By the way, because this book’s manuscript was no doubt vetted line-by-line by libel lawyers, it’s depressing that nobody noticed that the authors’ repeated employment of the phrase “begs the question” to mean “raises the question” is wrong.

     

    'Raises the question' has gone the way of 'uninterested' and 'all right' -- it's a lost cause.

    Fantastic review, though.

    I’m one of those people who notes the misuse of words, though I generally keep it to myself to avoid being too annoying. Nevertheless, the degree of precision with which someone uses words gives you some sense of his intelligence, or at least his education. The renowned intellectual Barack Obama was guilty of misusing certain words, though in several cases their misuse has become common. Some examples for my fellow pedants:

    In the foreign policy debate with Romney, he said Al Qaeda had been “decimated.” Presumably he meant devastated.

    He frequently said “enormity” when he meant “enormousness,” as in his inaugural address.

    He said his daughters were “nonplussed” by the attention of the press when he meant unfazed.

    He said “Let me recant” when he meant “Let me reiterate.”

    He said “fulsome accounting” when he meant full accounting.

    Read More
    • Replies: @The Last Real Calvinist
    If only Obama had actually recanted a few times!
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Not to mention "57 states", corpsman pronounced corpse-man, Austrians speaking Austrian, etc. The media ruined Dan Qualye's career over the spelling of potato, but let this fool slide forever.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  93. @Harry Baldwin
    I'm one of those people who notes the misuse of words, though I generally keep it to myself to avoid being too annoying. Nevertheless, the degree of precision with which someone uses words gives you some sense of his intelligence, or at least his education. The renowned intellectual Barack Obama was guilty of misusing certain words, though in several cases their misuse has become common. Some examples for my fellow pedants:

    In the foreign policy debate with Romney, he said Al Qaeda had been "decimated." Presumably he meant devastated.

    He frequently said "enormity" when he meant "enormousness," as in his inaugural address.

    He said his daughters were "nonplussed" by the attention of the press when he meant unfazed.

    He said “Let me recant” when he meant “Let me reiterate.”

    He said "fulsome accounting" when he meant full accounting.

    If only Obama had actually recanted a few times!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  94. @Clyde
    I am not a soccer fan but have seen some European games being played on TV. There are no interruptions for advertising. My question is where does the money come from to lavish tens of millions on the top soccer players. They get paid as much as top baseball-football-basketball players with all their advertisements during games

    My question is where does the money come from to lavish tens of millions on the top soccer players. They get paid as much as top baseball-football-basketball players with all their advertisements during games

    Cable and subscription TV channels pay billions for the Barclay’s Premier League, sponsors pay clubs huge amount, and gate receipts bring in a lot of money, too.

    For example the 2-leg match between France and Ireland in 2009 was watched by more than 150, 000 people paying top dollar (Euro) and that was only a World Cup qualifying match, not part of the finals.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Clyde
    Maybe you live in England. All US professional sports are very dependent on outlandish payments from cable TV companies and all these games will have tons of advertisements. So many that people complain how long baseball games are now. I am amazed that soccer games are televised with no disruptive advertising. Though I suppose there is some pre and post game advertising. What is the incentive for the cable TV company to carry them and at the same time pay huge amounts to professional leagues?

    Our major baseball, football, basketball teams are always building new stadiums (often at taxpayer expense) to maximize revenue. Ticket prices are sky high but attendance is good. Plus teams are eager to build tax deductible "corporate boxes" for large businesses to entertain their employees and clients.

    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  95. prosa123 says: • Website
    @syonredux

    While success in women’s golf is almost wholly socially constructed by fads—in the stories of F. Scott Fitzgerald and P.G. Wodehouse, for instance, girl golfers represent upscale glamour—men’s golf has been less demographically malleable because some boys are always just going to love hitting a ball with a stick. Still, part-Asian guys such as Jason Day and Rickie Fowler are among the best golfers today.

     

    Never knew that Rickie Fowler was 25% Japanese.Even my Dad,a golf fanatic, didn't know that.....Which points to how SJWs are uninterested in Whites who are part East Asian. If Fowler were 25% Black, we would never hear the end of it. Cf how no one cared that Lois and Clark:The New Adventures of Superman star Dean Cain was 37.5% Japanese.....

    “Never knew that Rickie Fowler was 25% Japanese.Even my Dad,a golf fanatic, didn’t know that…..Which points to how SJWs are uninterested in Whites who are part East Asian. If Fowler were 25% Black, we would never hear the end of it.”

    Fowler is actually one-quarter Japanese and one-quarter Navajo. He definitely appears mixed, I doubt anyone would take him for fully white.
    As a general rule, though, the One Drop Rule does not apply to people with part Asian (or Native American) ancestry.

    Read More
    • Replies: @syonredux

    . He definitely appears mixed, I doubt anyone would take him for fully white.

     

    Dunno. In some shots, he looks pretty White-ish:


    http://cdn.inquisitr.com/wp-content/uploads/2015/05/Rickie-Fowler.jpg

    , @Steve Sailer
    Tiger Woods' Stanford teammate Notah Begay III appears to be 100% Navajo. After a good start on the pro tour, winning a few tournaments, he had drinking problems and washed out. But now he appears to have gotten his act together and successfully switched to designing golf courses for Indian casino resorts.
    , @Joe Joe
    Yes, his mom is Japanese/Navajo and is absolutely gorgeous!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  96. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Jon

    he has 72 million Twitter followers
     
    That seems like an insane number. Is that near the Twitter record?

    By way of comparison, Trump has about 52 million followers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  97. TheBoom says:
    @Redman
    Why all the illing on Taki here? It’s still a great go to site IMO.

    Never really read the comments, since I didn’t view it as a blog like iSteve. But it has some very strong contributors.

    Anyone here have thoughts on other good sites? UNZ and Lew Rockwell are my go to. With Taki a distant third. Still read Raimondo a lot since he always seems to nail foreign policy and the DC swamp.

    I haven’t seen people hating on Taki just frustrated that they have done away with the comments. It is still one of my go to sites but had slipped since the ban on comments.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  98. @Boko Fittleworth
    TrdCaths don't accept everything this pope states. You have no idea what you're talking about.

    Then you’re in a schism. The pope is the ultimate authority in the RCC. I know because I was a cradle Catholic. The pope will be a moot issue soon. There are many othe factors destroying the RCC.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  99. sb says:
    @Clyde
    I am not a soccer fan but have seen some European games being played on TV. There are no interruptions for advertising. My question is where does the money come from to lavish tens of millions on the top soccer players. They get paid as much as top baseball-football-basketball players with all their advertisements during games

    I would guess that the English Premier League would be the world’s biggest sports league by interest .Outside North America few follow American sports ( although of course North America itself is both populous and rich )

    Maybe I should add that I don’t follow soccer outside World Cups

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  100. @anon
    Woods is a remarkably short 6' 2".

    Saw a photo of him with Federer at a golf tournament who is listed at 6’1″ and Federer not only looked to have a bigger build, but looked taller as well. I’d guess 6 ft even, maybe a fraction of an inch above is his actual height.

    I have seen him up close at his favorite tournament, he seems a lot shorter than say Ernie Els, who is listed at 6′ 3″. Els certainly has a bigger build than Woods, but he seems a lot more than a one inch taller as well.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  101. syonredux says:
    @prosa123
    "Never knew that Rickie Fowler was 25% Japanese.Even my Dad,a golf fanatic, didn’t know that…..Which points to how SJWs are uninterested in Whites who are part East Asian. If Fowler were 25% Black, we would never hear the end of it."

    Fowler is actually one-quarter Japanese and one-quarter Navajo. He definitely appears mixed, I doubt anyone would take him for fully white.
    As a general rule, though, the One Drop Rule does not apply to people with part Asian (or Native American) ancestry.

    . He definitely appears mixed, I doubt anyone would take him for fully white.

    Dunno. In some shots, he looks pretty White-ish:

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  102. @prosa123
    "Never knew that Rickie Fowler was 25% Japanese.Even my Dad,a golf fanatic, didn’t know that…..Which points to how SJWs are uninterested in Whites who are part East Asian. If Fowler were 25% Black, we would never hear the end of it."

    Fowler is actually one-quarter Japanese and one-quarter Navajo. He definitely appears mixed, I doubt anyone would take him for fully white.
    As a general rule, though, the One Drop Rule does not apply to people with part Asian (or Native American) ancestry.

    Tiger Woods’ Stanford teammate Notah Begay III appears to be 100% Navajo. After a good start on the pro tour, winning a few tournaments, he had drinking problems and washed out. But now he appears to have gotten his act together and successfully switched to designing golf courses for Indian casino resorts.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  103. Bliss says:

    Tiger Woods is a good example of hybrid vigor: best or second-best golfer of all time in a sport which is overwhelmingly white.

    Another good example of hybrid vigor is Lewis Hamilton: best or second best race car driver of all time in a sport with hardly any non-whites:

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jack D
    If hybrids are so vigorous, why aren't these sports dominated by them and why are Hamilton and Woods almost the only ones in their respective sports?

    When plant breeders hybridize plants they do thousands and thousands of crosses and 99% of them they discard as undesirable. Maybe you have one type of tomato that is tough to withstand handling but doesn't have great flavor and another that is soft but flavorful. When you cross them, you are just as likely to end up with a tomato that is soft and yet flavorless as the opposite.
    , @res

    Lewis Hamilton: best or second best race car driver of all time
     
    That seems difficult to justify at the moment. This article presents a future tense case (which a number of the comments argue against): http://www.thedrive.com/accelerator/4356/lewis-hamilton-will-be-the-greatest-f1-driver-of-all-time
    A great driver regardless.

    It is interesting how much we hear about "hybrid vigor" and how little about "outbreeding depression."
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outbreeding_depression
    This part intrigued me:

    Hybrid vigor in the first generation can, in some circumstances, be strong enough to mask the effects of outbreeding depression. An example of this is that plant breeders will make F1 hybrids from purebred strains, which will improve the uniformity and vigor of the offspring, however the F1 generation are not used for further breeding because of unpredictable phenotypes in their offspring. Unless there is strong selective pressure, outbreeding depression can increase in further generations as co-adapted gene complexes are broken apart without the forging of new co-adapted gene complexes to take their place.
     
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  104. Mishra says:
    @peterike

    Mickelson is still #3 in endorsements in the world behind Federer and LeBron in his later 40s. Arnold Palmer ranked high in endorsements into his 80s. It’s good to be a golf champion.

     

    I have never understood endorsements. Why should I care that somebody is getting paid to recommend a car, a watch, a set of golf clubs?

    I don't care much about sports, but I care a lot about literature. And while I loved Tom Wolfe as a writer, if he tried to sell me a Rolex or anything else I simply couldn't care less. It means nothing to me.

    Why do people care about endorsements?

    “Fame is proof that people are gullible.”

    (Emerson)

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  105. Joe Joe says:
    @prosa123
    "Never knew that Rickie Fowler was 25% Japanese.Even my Dad,a golf fanatic, didn’t know that…..Which points to how SJWs are uninterested in Whites who are part East Asian. If Fowler were 25% Black, we would never hear the end of it."

    Fowler is actually one-quarter Japanese and one-quarter Navajo. He definitely appears mixed, I doubt anyone would take him for fully white.
    As a general rule, though, the One Drop Rule does not apply to people with part Asian (or Native American) ancestry.

    Yes, his mom is Japanese/Navajo and is absolutely gorgeous!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  106. @Harry Baldwin
    I'm one of those people who notes the misuse of words, though I generally keep it to myself to avoid being too annoying. Nevertheless, the degree of precision with which someone uses words gives you some sense of his intelligence, or at least his education. The renowned intellectual Barack Obama was guilty of misusing certain words, though in several cases their misuse has become common. Some examples for my fellow pedants:

    In the foreign policy debate with Romney, he said Al Qaeda had been "decimated." Presumably he meant devastated.

    He frequently said "enormity" when he meant "enormousness," as in his inaugural address.

    He said his daughters were "nonplussed" by the attention of the press when he meant unfazed.

    He said “Let me recant” when he meant “Let me reiterate.”

    He said "fulsome accounting" when he meant full accounting.

    Not to mention “57 states”, corpsman pronounced corpse-man, Austrians speaking Austrian, etc. The media ruined Dan Qualye’s career over the spelling of potato, but let this fool slide forever.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  107. Jack D says:
    @Bliss
    Tiger Woods is a good example of hybrid vigor: best or second-best golfer of all time in a sport which is overwhelmingly white.

    Another good example of hybrid vigor is Lewis Hamilton: best or second best race car driver of all time in a sport with hardly any non-whites:

    http://static4.uk.businessinsider.com/image/58aee78f3080e61b008b4bc8-480/lewis-hamilton.jpg

    If hybrids are so vigorous, why aren’t these sports dominated by them and why are Hamilton and Woods almost the only ones in their respective sports?

    When plant breeders hybridize plants they do thousands and thousands of crosses and 99% of them they discard as undesirable. Maybe you have one type of tomato that is tough to withstand handling but doesn’t have great flavor and another that is soft but flavorful. When you cross them, you are just as likely to end up with a tomato that is soft and yet flavorless as the opposite.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  108. Barnard says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Anthony Kim, who as a Tiger Cub hit tens of thousands of golf balls at the driving range down the street from me, made the US Ryder Cup at age 22 and was seen as the Next Tiger Woods, but hasn't played golf in years.

    There have been rumors Anthony Kim took a huge disability settlement for an injury. Even if he comes back for one tournament and decides he can’t play anymore the policy is void.

    https://www.golfdigest.com/story/report-anthony-kim-might-not-p

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  109. @anonymous
    Notwithstanding his downfall, at least athletically, the local sports talk station here in the NYC area goes ga-ga every time Woodie steps on the links. The man can hardly make the cut anymore, if at all. It's to the point that it has descended to the level of farce and may be indicative of the state of pro golf at this point. His run has stopped at 14. Case closed.

    And to think that he could have--indeed SHOULD have-- long since passed Nicklaus by now. A pity.

    Rapturous love for Tiger Woods is found in all sports media in every media market, whether local or national. No matter what their age, all sports media guys are boomers.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  110. Brutusale says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Yo, I think the tour prize money and the hefty endorsement money takes some of the drive out of golfers after early success.

    Dan Jenkins has been saying that for 25 years. The old guys had to strap it on every week to make a living. The guy in 100th place on the money list this year has made $766K. Why go for the pin and jeopardize that?

    Young Jordan Spieth has earned $32 million in prize money during his 6-year PGA career, $10 million more than Fred Couples and $25 million more than Jack Nicklaus.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    Brute, many athletes, especially football players, grab the brass ring and tank. Buffalo had Mario Williams and Marcel Darius as examples. Got to root for the Cavs against your Celtics and Yanks against your Sox, otherwise we're good.
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Patrick Reed won almost $2 million at the Masters and Rickie Fowler won $1.2 million for being second. You could see Johnny Miller sitting in the booth thinking, "Shit, I remember when first place was $40k!"

    The money is so good that a just ok golfer like Matt Kuchar can make a nice living doing what he likes even though he rarely wins. I had a roommate who worked some position at one of the majors and he said you would not believe the golf babes!
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  111. res says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    OT - Oxford not lowering entry standards shock horror

    https://www.theguardian.com/education/2018/may/23/oxford-faces-anger-over-failure-to-improve-diversity-among-students

    The funny thing is, most black students at Oxford are doing medicine, law or PPE - the three most competitive subjects and the hardest to get into. These are "Uk-domiciled" students and I'd bet most are African rather than Afro-Caribbean.

    See related discussion on James Thompson’s blog: http://www.unz.com/jthompson/oxbridge-entrance-and-genetic-privilege/

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  112. res says:
    @Bliss
    Tiger Woods is a good example of hybrid vigor: best or second-best golfer of all time in a sport which is overwhelmingly white.

    Another good example of hybrid vigor is Lewis Hamilton: best or second best race car driver of all time in a sport with hardly any non-whites:

    http://static4.uk.businessinsider.com/image/58aee78f3080e61b008b4bc8-480/lewis-hamilton.jpg

    Lewis Hamilton: best or second best race car driver of all time

    That seems difficult to justify at the moment. This article presents a future tense case (which a number of the comments argue against): http://www.thedrive.com/accelerator/4356/lewis-hamilton-will-be-the-greatest-f1-driver-of-all-time
    A great driver regardless.

    It is interesting how much we hear about “hybrid vigor” and how little about “outbreeding depression.”

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Outbreeding_depression

    This part intrigued me:

    Hybrid vigor in the first generation can, in some circumstances, be strong enough to mask the effects of outbreeding depression. An example of this is that plant breeders will make F1 hybrids from purebred strains, which will improve the uniformity and vigor of the offspring, however the F1 generation are not used for further breeding because of unpredictable phenotypes in their offspring. Unless there is strong selective pressure, outbreeding depression can increase in further generations as co-adapted gene complexes are broken apart without the forging of new co-adapted gene complexes to take their place.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  113. @Brutusale
    Dan Jenkins has been saying that for 25 years. The old guys had to strap it on every week to make a living. The guy in 100th place on the money list this year has made $766K. Why go for the pin and jeopardize that?

    Young Jordan Spieth has earned $32 million in prize money during his 6-year PGA career, $10 million more than Fred Couples and $25 million more than Jack Nicklaus.

    Brute, many athletes, especially football players, grab the brass ring and tank. Buffalo had Mario Williams and Marcel Darius as examples. Got to root for the Cavs against your Celtics and Yanks against your Sox, otherwise we’re good.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Brutusale
    Buff, they're not "my" anything anymore. The only two sporting events I've watched in the past two years were the Super Bowls, and that was more for the party as the game.
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  114. @Brutusale
    Dan Jenkins has been saying that for 25 years. The old guys had to strap it on every week to make a living. The guy in 100th place on the money list this year has made $766K. Why go for the pin and jeopardize that?

    Young Jordan Spieth has earned $32 million in prize money during his 6-year PGA career, $10 million more than Fred Couples and $25 million more than Jack Nicklaus.

    Patrick Reed won almost $2 million at the Masters and Rickie Fowler won $1.2 million for being second. You could see Johnny Miller sitting in the booth thinking, “Shit, I remember when first place was $40k!”

    The money is so good that a just ok golfer like Matt Kuchar can make a nice living doing what he likes even though he rarely wins. I had a roommate who worked some position at one of the majors and he said you would not believe the golf babes!

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  115. Brutusale says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    Brute, many athletes, especially football players, grab the brass ring and tank. Buffalo had Mario Williams and Marcel Darius as examples. Got to root for the Cavs against your Celtics and Yanks against your Sox, otherwise we're good.

    Buff, they’re not “my” anything anymore. The only two sporting events I’ve watched in the past two years were the Super Bowls, and that was more for the party as the game.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
  116. Brute, three kids near Cleveland is my only tie to the Cavs and lifetime fan of the Yanks, so Sox are arch rivals. I actually rooted for the Patriots in all their Super Bowl appearances, got to admire a well run franchise.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter Display All Comments
  117. Clyde says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    My question is where does the money come from to lavish tens of millions on the top soccer players. They get paid as much as top baseball-football-basketball players with all their advertisements during games
     
    Cable and subscription TV channels pay billions for the Barclay's Premier League, sponsors pay clubs huge amount, and gate receipts bring in a lot of money, too.

    For example the 2-leg match between France and Ireland in 2009 was watched by more than 150, 000 people paying top dollar (Euro) and that was only a World Cup qualifying match, not part of the finals.

    Maybe you live in England. All US professional sports are very dependent on outlandish payments from cable TV companies and all these games will have tons of advertisements. So many that people complain how long baseball games are now. I am amazed that soccer games are televised with no disruptive advertising. Though I suppose there is some pre and post game advertising. What is the incentive for the cable TV company to carry them and at the same time pay huge amounts to professional leagues?

    Our major baseball, football, basketball teams are always building new stadiums (often at taxpayer expense) to maximize revenue. Ticket prices are sky high but attendance is good. Plus teams are eager to build tax deductible “corporate boxes” for large businesses to entertain their employees and clients.

    Read More
    ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments

Comments are closed.

Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
The evidence is clear — but often ignored
Talk TV sensationalists and axe-grinding ideologues have fallen for a myth of immigrant lawlessness.
The major media overlooked Communist spies and Madoff’s fraud. What are they missing today?