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From my column in Taki’s Magazine:

The Mess Before Maria
by Steve Sailer
October 04, 2017

Puerto Rico is a test case of whether nationalism is as dispensable as the heightening conventional wisdom assumes.

Puerto Rico possesses many of the attributes assumed to represent the utopian post-national future, such as open borders with the United States, diversity, and a lack of national sovereignty.

Yet, as demonstrated once again by the current post-hurricane crisis of electricity outages, in part caused by the power company failing to trim trees, Puerto Rico is instead a pit of corruption and fecklessness.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    World becomes colonized by American Imperial elites, and America becomes colonized by the world as part of the globalist empire.

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  2. When Texas was hit, thousands of Texans jumped in an volunteered to help authorities. I helped at a local charity and the generous Texans that kept coming by with donations and to volunteer were so encouraging. You saw them on TV too. Even teenage boys were going around in boats to rescue neighbors and strangers. I did not see this kind of outpouring from the Puerto Ricans. Maybe I just missed those scenes but what I saw was locals expecting to be rescued by the government. If you are going to wait for the government to rescue you, I bet you will be disappointed.

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  3. Puerto Rico is a fairly typical Caribbean Island nation that just happens to be the Schrodinger’s State of the U.S. due to a quirk of history.

    There is a lot to like about living in a Caribbean Island nation – the pace of life, ease of living, lots of free time to go to the park/beach with the family, pig roasts and oceanside fish fries, generally warm and sunny weather, etc.

    But in most Caribbean Island nations the tradeoff is accepted – things just won’t run efficiently and your generally low-stress life will probably end with your first significant illness or serious injury. And if a series of large storms come through things are going to be awful (other than the weather) for a long time.

    It’s just that being sort of part of America allows Puerto Ricans to expect the best of both worlds.

    And perhaps I’m not the only one who thinks there is some sinister media intent here – Anna Navarro is reported to have encouraged Puerto Ricans to flee for swing states and register to vote on CNN. I believe she named Pennsylvania and Florida explicitly. Part of me thinks that the failure of Puerto Rico has been engineered to a degree from the Obama White House to preview its unstoppable political hegemony knowing Puerto Ricans will settle in Philadelphia/Suburbs and the Orlando area.

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    • Replies: @Reg Cæsar

    ...and register to vote on CNN.
     
    When was CNN deputized to accept voter registrations?
    , @Logan
    I've done a fair amount of consulting work on various Caribbean islands. As you say, there is a lot that is charming about the islands and their people.

    But it is incredibly frustrating to actually try and get anything done.
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  4. Gunner says:

    The plight of Puerto Rico has become the Left’s pet cause all of a sudden in a ridiculous attempt to make this Trump’s Katrina moment. The only reason we even have the silly place is because of the Spanish American War, which I assume most Lefties think was evil and 100% our fault to begin with.

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  5. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Why this need for Replacism against the native folks?

    They are the last holdout.

    Globalists got all the media, academia, entertainment, finance, whore-politicians, deep state, and etc.

    The one holdout is 50% of the population that resiliently remains conservative. They cannot be persuaded even if their leaders are cucky-wucked.

    So, the only way is to replace them.

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    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Yep, and the Globalists are on track.

    But, thankfully, history isn't linear. Things change, often in unexpected ways.
    , @Flip
    That's why they want to take away our guns. I am thankful for Trump and Gorsuch.
    , @Corvinus
    "Globalists got all the media, academia, entertainment, finance, whore-politicians, deep state, and etc."

    In a nutshell, we are dealing with a Fake News Story here.
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  6. But Steve has pointed out in other posts the strategic indispensability of Puerto Rico in guarding the Panama Canal from Kaiser Wilhelm’s Dreadnought battleships and the junks of the Chinese Dowager Empress.

    This legacy of the Spanish-American War should have been given its independence many years ago, whether the PRs wanted it or not.

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    • Replies: @Clyde

    This legacy of the Spanish-American War should have been given its independence many years ago, whether the PRs wanted it or not.
     
    I wish they had voted for Independence years ago. Whatever happened to the great Puerto Rican Independence movement? Now we are stuck with these leeches, exemplified by that demented mayor of San Juan. Even worse, enough PRs will vamoose to Florida to tilt that state permanent Democrat.
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  7. OT Mr Steve, but knowing your interest in Country Clubs, Jewish or otherwise, here’s how they do it in Israel. Kochav Ya’ir doesn’t have a golf course, but it does have a swimming pool. Looks like they’re scared of Arabs peeing in the pool.

    https://www.sott.net/article/363596-Separate-and-unequal-Israel-uses-legal-tricks-to-segregate-its-own-citizens-inside-the-Green-Line

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    • Replies: @AnotherDad
    There's nothing wrong with what these folks are doing. They want to, want their kids to, socialize with other Jews, not Arabs. Because of behavioral differences, or simply to more effectively propagate their tribe. There was, of course, absolutely nothing wrong with Gentile clubs here excluding Jews, or for that matter--as Steve pointed out--the established German-Jewish clubs excluding these obnoxious Russian country-bumpkin arrivistes.

    ~

    BTW, if a nation is stuck with "multicultralism"--as the US was to a limited extent before the Jewish ascension, 1965, amnesty and the deluge--the reasonable/pleasant way to handle it is to leave people/groups alone in their private affairs. Let them have their separate neighborhoods, country clubs, churches, schools, bars, restaurants, businesses as much or as little as they like. People who can/are-happy-to share a culture will integrate, those who can't/don't-want-to, won't.

    Instead what the left has given us is the most obnoxious way to handle it, with the state micromanaging every fricking thing anyone does. And each group in town mau-mauing for the right to enlist state power to bop all its enemies on the head. Peachy.
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  8. All PR represents is Latin American culture enabled to the nth degree by a US welfare system.

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  9. nobody treats Puerto Rico like it’s his or her own country

    What about the American taxpayer?

    Anyhow, it’s true that PR is a pit of corruption etc, but that’s just all the more reason why we need to bring them all here and give them civil service jobs or affirmative action sinecures in academic or private sector diversity bureaucracies, where they can tell everybody else how to run things.

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  10. Steve Sailer says:

    For instance, the island has unbelievably ineffective public schools. Puerto Rican students in the United States are not terribly high-scoring, of course, but Puerto Rican public-school test scores are abysmal. On the federal 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress test (in Spanish and specifically designed for Puerto Rico), zero percent of island public-school eighth graders scored at either the Advanced or Proficient levels. Six percent scored Basic, and a staggering 94 percent performed Below Basic, the lowest tier.

    I say: The problem with Puerto Rican schools is the preponderance of Puerto Rican students.

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    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Feel like I read that huge numbers of PR kids go to private school, not posh private schools, more like old-school Catholic schools. That could explain those numbers.

    Welcome to our future.
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  11. AM says:

    If we “evacuate” Puerto Rico from the supposed hell of being themselves, can close all the borders and put a stop to all immigration? It seems fair.

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  12. Steve Sailer says good students in Puerto Rican schools are thin on the ground. Sailer said in 2015 that Human Bio-Diversity can’t completely explain how lousy Puerto Rican school test scores are.

    Sailer Puerto Rico school test score article from 2015 here:

    I say the American Empire should cut all ties to Puerto Rico and then deport all Puerto Ricans currently in the United States. Luis Gutierrez should be deported first. Investors who loaned Puerto Rico 70 billion dollars should be wiped out — NO BAILOUT.

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    • Agree: Negrolphin Pool
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  13. Currahee says:

    earlier today Lucianne.com linked to this article; then, the link disappeared. wonder why?

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    • Replies: @Eagle Eye

    earlier today Lucianne.com linked to this article; then, the link disappeared. wonder why?
     
    Lucianne got a call from her son Jonah Goldberg begging mom not to embarrass him again.
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  14. Puerto Rico is instead a pit of corruption and fecklessness.

    You say that like it’s a bad thing.

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  15. AndrewR says:

    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?

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    • Replies: @27 year old
    We should try to pay them to take it back from us, to make up for the loss of Catalonia
    , @Lurker
    Perhaps PR could be given to Cuba? The left would happy with that surely? The more I think about it, the more obvious a solution it appears.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    The Spanish-American War increasingly appears as one of the most disastrous geostrategic moves on the part of the United States. Not only was the casus belli a highly improbable mine attack on the Maine in Havana harbor (the Spanish mined their own harbor??) but it left us with Puerto Rico, the leech that just keeps on sucking blood from the continental United States. And the occupation of the Phillipines resulted in a very vicious war to suppress its independence movement, and also put the U.S. on a collision course with Japan in the western Pacific. McKinley, T.R. Roosevelt and Hearst have a lot to answer for.
    , @AnotherDad

    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?
     
    The whole US imperial period that followed the war was the worst period for the US's foreign policy. Prior to that we'd mostly run with the founders wisdom, looked after our own interests and resisted becoming too involved in other folks' business. Roosevelt's sleazy war against the Filipinos to make them a colony stands to this day as the worst, most morally depraved use of US power.

    Taking the side of the Cuban and Philippine rebels and helping them toss the Spanish out--ok, fine, whatever. If we'd stuck to that policy generally and just been allies of "independence" and "republics" generally--peachy. But assembling a tiny empire of our own was both vile and stupid. And now more of the blowback is helping us becoming even dumber.

    Though I will point out, that all the human blowback from our imperial adventures is small potatoes compared to the human avalanche caused by dismantling the idea of the nation with David Brooks style "we are the world" ism.
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  16. FKA Max says: • Website

    Excellent piece.

    This Norcross guy is a force of nature

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/hemispheric-open-borders-trial-run-puerto-rico/#comment-1621647

    Hemispheric Open Borders Trial Run: Puerto Rico

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/hemispheric-open-borders-trial-run-puerto-rico/

    The Brazilification of America would already be complete.http://www.unz.com/isteve/hemispheric-open-borders-trial-run-puerto-rico/#comment-1622226

    The Curley Effect Versus the Kennedy Effect

    We call this strategy—increasing the relative size of one’s political base through distortionary, wealth-reducing policies—the Curley effect. But it is hardly unique to Curley. Other American mayors, but also politicians around the world, have pursued policies that encouraged emigration of their political enemies, raising poverty but gaining political advantage.

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/the-curley-effect-versus-the-kennedy-effect/

    The Slim Effect: http://www.unz.com/article/the-killing-of-history/#comment-2022987 and http://www.vdare.com/articles/how-carlos-slim-worlds-richest-monopolist-provokes-and-profits-from-the-mexodus

    Mexico Is a Libertarian Paradise

    http://www.unz.com/isteve/mexico-is-a-libertarian-paradise/#comment-2028063

    The roots of this run deep, as we explain in our story. Driven by corruption, social divisions, and party politics

    DISUNITING OF AMERICA

    This set of circumstances has set the stage for the fragmentation and anarchy that we already see in our inner cities today.

    http://www.population-security.org/24-CH16.html#12

    As Professor Abernathy recently reminded us, every nation has the sovereign right to pursue a course leading to its own survival. Each American is morally obligated to act for, and avoid acting against, the best interests of our country and fellow citizens. As she said: “This is patriotism.” Members of the population leadership in the U.S., as well as members of the media who have censored, even self-censored, this vitally important story, have acted in an unpatriotic manner.

    http://www.population-security.org/25-CH17.html#5

    Puerto Rican origin population growth has been powered mainly by an increase in those born in the 50 states or the District of Columbia, rather than by the increasing influx of migrants from the island.

    Source: http://www.pewhispanic.org/2014/08/11/chapter-1-puerto-ricans-on-the-u-s-mainland/

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  17. Off/on topic:

    Jason Richwine seems to have found employment again, writing at NRO:

    More Immigration Would Mean More Democrats


    by Jason Richwine
    October 3, 2017 4:00 AM
    Republicans need to face up to the hard facts.

    http://amp.nationalreview.com/article/452140/immigration-democratic-party-republican-party-dream-act-party-affiliation-conservatives-limited-government-traditional-values?utm_source=PANTHEON_STRIPPED&utm_medium=PANTHEON_STRIPPED

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    • Replies: @AM

    More Immigration Would Mean More Democrats
     
    Someone is going to catch hell for letting that article slip through. Being pro-immigration is how you demonstrate to Democrats you're not a racist while (probably) lining your own pocket. There are no downsides.
    , @Guy de Champlagne
    He puts forwards the worst possible argument against immigration: that immigrants are bad because they are less likely to support economic policies that benefit a tiny elite at the expense of the rest of society. What a douche.
    , @Desiderius
    Right Alinskyism* pays dividends.

    * - gaming split-the-difference/unprincipled authorities/institutions by acting maximally radical in the preferred direction you want the center (Overton Window) to move.

    Even those who would prefer principled leadership are currently priced into this strategy by the massive moral hazard created by past fecklessness.
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  18. New England has a surprisingly large portion of Puerto Ricans. Florida, New York, Illinois has a lot more Puerto Ricans than New England, but they are here.

    Puerto Rico must be made a millstone around the necks of the Democrat Party. Jebby Bush was hurt in Iowa and New Hampshire when he said Puerto Rico should be considered for statehood and that the United States government should pay the 70 billion dollars that Puerto Rico owes to investors. Iowa voters of German and Dutch ancestry blew a fuse when Jebby Bush started talking about bailing out Puerto Rico from their 70 billion debt.

    President Trump should make it clear that investors are on their own in regards to getting bailed out on belly up Puerto Rican government debt. Investors should be told: Put some salt on your worthless Puerto Rican government bonds and eat them!

    Puerto Rico must be cut free of the United States as soon as possible. Preparations should be made by the United States to unilaterally cut those Puerto Ricans free and clear of the United States. An emergency Puerto Rican deportation plan should be put into place to humanely remove Puerto Ricans from the United States.

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    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    When you mentioned "New England" and "Puerto Rico", I couldn't help but think "Aaron Hernandez".

    The guy could play, though.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Hernandez

    https://youtu.be/H6xJDaS8va4
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  19. dearieme says:

    “Finlay was born Juan Carlos Finlay y de Barrés in Puerto Príncipe (now Camagüey), Cuba to Scottish born Edward (Eduardo) Finlay and French born Elisa de (Isabel) Barrés”. [WKPD]

    So he he was Cuba-born all right, but a North West European by parentage. They were all the rage at the time, NW Europeans.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    I bet more northwest Europeans migrated to Cuba in the 19th Century than to Puerto Rico.
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  20. AM says:
    @27 year old
    Off/on topic:

    Jason Richwine seems to have found employment again, writing at NRO:

    More Immigration Would Mean More Democrats


    by Jason Richwine
    October 3, 2017 4:00 AM
    Republicans need to face up to the hard facts.


    http://amp.nationalreview.com/article/452140/immigration-democratic-party-republican-party-dream-act-party-affiliation-conservatives-limited-government-traditional-values?utm_source=PANTHEON_STRIPPED&utm_medium=PANTHEON_STRIPPED

    More Immigration Would Mean More Democrats

    Someone is going to catch hell for letting that article slip through. Being pro-immigration is how you demonstrate to Democrats you’re not a racist while (probably) lining your own pocket. There are no downsides.

    Read More
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  21. Whiskey says: • Website

    Somewhat OT, how come no comment on the most iSteviest TV series EVER? Marvel’s Inhumans?

    Lets see, the “heroes” are a King and Queen ruling over the Inhumans on the Moon (sort-of mutants, only genetically engineered to be killer warriors by the Kree from “Guardians of the Galaxy” that did not turn out so hot). There is a strict caste system with Inhumans with no powers or very limited powers working as slaves in the mines, and absolute monarchy.

    With the hero-King wanting to keep the strict social hierarchy amidst very limited resources on the Moon, with some living like Kim Jong Un while the rest starve, and the “villain” wanting to move to Earth and end the caste system and defacto slavery.

    Its a deeply weird show, not the least of which is that it seems to be written with the unconscious part of the writer’s room screaming that inequality and an emerging GoodWhite caste system is bad; against the conscious view that it is indeed, very good. Its also fascinating — I’ve never seen on TV or film such an open discussion about caste, “meritocracy” (the King and Queen use that to denote the privileged position of those with strong powers) and, downward mobility (not have powers and only being the King’s brother can save you from the mines).

    Hollywood writers are not totally unaware of the coming crisis. They just can’t speak openly about it.

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  22. George says:

    Compare Puerto Rico with America’s other island possession Hawaii. Hawaii has 2 senators and 1 representative which entitles them to major military installations, a major university, lots of other taxpayer swag. If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.

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    • Replies: @JMcG
    PortoRico had military installations. They voted them out. A University in Porto Rico would have to deal with the PISA scores there. No Japs want to live there as so many want to live in Hawaii. A unique and uniquely difficult problem is Porto Rico
    , @AnotherDad

    If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.
     
    Swag? Seriously.

    Puerto Rico has a much sweeter deal--Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax. Yet, the residents are eligible for all the usual federal goodies--Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, DoD money, highway money, etc. Puerto Rico basically has you fill out the same forms as the feds and pay the exact same income taxes you would to the feds--but it all goes to the government of Puerto Rico. The problem is the Puerto Rican state takes all that money and ... pisses it away. Featherbedding bureaucracy, useless welfare handouts, graft ... more bureaucracy and featherbedding. It's Latin Caribbean style government corruption\incompetence but amped up by being on the federal tit.

    Statehood would be a major fiscal hit to the joint.

    It's pretty much a case study in the effects of welfare, plus HBD and Latin culture. Puerto Rico, is what California--and its fiscal situation--would be without the tech, defense and Hollywood industries, the remaining white people and Asians. And what California could well become down the line if it becomes fiscally untenable and the whites and their industries leave.

    The right remedy is Puerto Rican independence. Making people stand on their own two feet and bear the costs of their decisions--which at least gradually encourages better behavior--is pretty much always the right choice.
    , @Diversity Heretic
    At this stage, I'm ready to give Hawaii its independence. Steve has pointed out that Hawaii was admitted to the Union as a part of a move to make the U.S. appear more attractive to the developing world, so that they wouldn't turn to those Marxists in the USSR and PRC. How'd that work out? Hawaii is in many ways different from the rest of the states, although some continental states are close to Hawaii's racial diversity(unfortunately) and it's a long way from North America. It invariably votes Democratic. Time to ditch it.

    The fact that we might have to close naval bases there is a feature, not a bug. The U.S. needs to concentrate on North America. The entire projection into the Pacific, aside from just keeping sea lines of communication open, has been an expensive and futile distraction.
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  23. syonredux says:

    The problem of Puerto Rico’s atrocious public schools gets virtually zero coverage in the States because, well, Puerto Rico doesn’t seem like our country. Everybody there speaks Spanish, so it’s hard to follow what’s going on.

    Yep. And that’s also why all the media coverage and op-eds about the crisis in Puerto Rico drone on about how they are “American citizens.” They know that Americans really don’t view them as fellow citizens.

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    • Replies: @Corn
    And Puerto Ricans have their own teams in the Olympics. I don’t know any Puerto Ricans here in rural Illinois but I doubt most Puerto Ricans consider themselves especially American.
    , @Brutusale
    I don't even consider the ones living in the 48 contiguous states citizens. If even one had an American flag instead of a Puerto Rican one I'd reconsider, but, like Sasquatch and Nessie, I doubt such an animal exists.
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  24. anon says: • Disclaimer

    The U.S. invested heavily in Puerto Rico, using tax breaks to encourage manufacturing companies to relocate there, especially after Cuba aligned with the Soviet Union. In 1976, when Cuba was sending expeditionary forces to fight for communism in Africa, Congress granted a massive corporate-income-tax loophole to American firms with high intellectual-property costs, such as pharmaceutical companies, that established plants in Puerto Rico.

    This is the why of it. It is left over from prior Imperial aspirations, became irrelevant, but was always too much trouble to resolve. Puerto Rico was supposed to be … for a brief, shining moment … our version of a capitalistic Cuba. Ouch.

    However, it is now making the financial news for another reason. PR munis have always been triple tax free. Every diversified tax free bond fund needed some of them to compete with every other muni fund. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bonds_issued_by_Puerto_Rico

    And prior to the hurricanes, PR munis were in the midst of a workout. The bonds themselves aren’t a financial catastrophe waiting to happen to anyone except PR. However, like everything …. its all in the details. The manner in which they are ‘worked out’ impacts the multi trillion US municipal finance system. Whatever happens will be disruptive and the worst case is most disruptive.

    The arithmetic is obvious. Total debt is $80 billion or so. Hurricane damage is mostly uninsured and may be roughly another $80 billion. A lot of it is their electric utilities which have been deteriorating for decades and need a lot of cash.

    By mid January 2017, the debt had reached $70 billion or $12,000 per capita in a territory with a 45 percent poverty rate and double digit unemployment that is more than twice the mainland U.S. average.

    It isn’t going away anytime soon. If there is anything that Trump has personal expertise with, it is bankruptcy and even more important, restructuring debt.

    The place is a disaster in every way imaginable. However, one thing about bailouts …. if you are going to do it, do it sooner and do it bigger.

    All the current quarter economic statistics have been roiled by the hurricanes. Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example — as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    If every tragedy is an opportunity, maybe Trump can turn this into something. Or not. This is a big and good topic. Something for everyone.

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    • Replies: @anon
    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-10-04/trump-roils-slew-of-assets-with-puerto-rico-comments

    Note that what I meant by 'bailout' wasn't the bailout of PR bondholders. Rather it would involve their quasi bankruptcy with restructuring their debt. This is going to happen -- it can't get paid at 100 cents on the dollar.

    On the other hand, judicial proceedings take forever. I am suggesting a cramdown, taking out the creditors at a massive discount, and moving on. But sooner rather than later. The island is uninvestible now due to the uncertainty. Resolving this would be a huge benefit to PR. The 2008 bailouts ... mostly involved massive losses for the theoretical owners of Citi, Bank of America, the GSE's, GM stockholders and bondholders. This was glossed over in the largely correct but superficial critiques.

    Trump's casual comment may make that easier. If he can panic the market, it makes negotiation and resolution easier. The lower the bond prices, the easier the negotiation. But it is never close to easy.

    , @Flip
    I really hope the Feds don't bail out the PR bondholders. We need to set an example for IL and CT.
    , @Coemgen
    Hm, not well thought out yet but, Trump can offer to rebuild PR then "inject" cash into their economy by relocating U.S. citizens, from the states, who are living on "entitlements," to PR (think section-8).
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Nixon's Attorney General John Mitchell is reputed to have said, "If you know you are going to have to eat s**t, you don't want to take small bites".
    , @Jim Don Bob
    Nixon's Attorney General John Mitchell is reputed to have said, "If you know you are going to have to eat s**t, you don't want to take small bites".
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example — as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.
     
    That's not at all contrary to common sense, Anon, as the key phrase is "short-term". The "broken-windows fallacy", going back to Fred Bastiat in 1850, was popularized in an erroneous sense by the notorious economist Paul Krugman.

    Puerto Rico, I'm sure, has lots of actual broken windows, but the phrase here figuratively covers all kinds of damage and destruction from acts of God and wars. Sure, early on afterwards, lots of economic activity will happen, but that activity is being paid for by money that could have been used for capital investment or some other productive activity.

    I would say this is total common sense, without even a reading of Bastiat or the Mises article (link above). The fallacy is believing that there is a long-term economic benefit from destruction of otherwise working assets/property. Why not just clear out some US cities (wait, OK, not what I meant ;-}, bomb them to the stone age, and then start right over, with all that rebuilding economic activity? This stupidity can be observed most readily in the economist Paul Maynard Krugman.

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  25. syonredux says:

    Off-topic,

    Larry David discovers that he has a slave-owning ancestor who fought for the Confederacy:

    Almost all of those ancestors settled in New York City, where David was born in 1947, with one major exception. The comedian was baffled to learn that his great-grandmother Henrietta was born in Mobile, Alabama. “What?!” he asks over and over. “I’m a little more exotic than I thought I was,” he says. “Is Alabama exotic? I don’t know. Germany’s exotic? I’ve got probably some of the most racist places in the world connected.”

    <blockquote>Even more shocking was the fact that Henrietta’s father, David’s great-great-grandfather, Henry Bernstein, was one of only about 3,000 Jewish men to fight on the side of the Confederacy. “Are you telling me that my great-great-grandfather fought for the South in the Civil War?” David asks. “What?! Are you kidding?! That is mind-blowing to me, I can’t believe it.
    “This is just such an odd combination on my father’s side of Germany and the South,” he adds. “Two places that we have fought against as a country. Oh my goodness, I hope no slaves show up on this.” At that point, Gates instructs him to turn the page. “You did it! I knew it!” David shouts. “Unbelievable. Oh boy, oh boy.”
    The two slaves listed on the document Gates’ researchers found are labeled “mulatto,
    ” a term that was ironically featured prominently in a Season 4 episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm called “The Surrogate.” In that episode, Larry buys a mixed race doll as a present for a friend’s baby shower and offends the guests when he says, “It’s a mulatto.” As they stare at him in disbelief for using such an outdated and offensive word, he asks, “No good?”

    https://www.thedailybeast.com/larry-david-shocked-to-learn-his-ancestor-was-a-confederate-slave-owner

    Read More
    • Replies: @markflag
    The sign of a true narcsissist, "That's mind-blowing to me . . . " Why the "to me"? BECAUSE HE WANTS TO USE A FIRST PERSON PRONOUN.
    , @black sea

    Oh my goodness, I hope no slaves show up on this.” At that point, Gates instructs him to turn the page. “You did it! I knew it!” David shouts. “Unbelievable. Oh boy, oh boy.”
    The two slaves listed on the document Gates’ researchers found are labeled “mulatto,”
     
    Gates could have immortalized that moment simply by answering David's shocked cries with, "Reparations time, Baby!"*

    *Larry David's net worth is around $900 million dollars.
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  26. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @anon

    The U.S. invested heavily in Puerto Rico, using tax breaks to encourage manufacturing companies to relocate there, especially after Cuba aligned with the Soviet Union. In 1976, when Cuba was sending expeditionary forces to fight for communism in Africa, Congress granted a massive corporate-income-tax loophole to American firms with high intellectual-property costs, such as pharmaceutical companies, that established plants in Puerto Rico.

     

    This is the why of it. It is left over from prior Imperial aspirations, became irrelevant, but was always too much trouble to resolve. Puerto Rico was supposed to be ... for a brief, shining moment ... our version of a capitalistic Cuba. Ouch.

    However, it is now making the financial news for another reason. PR munis have always been triple tax free. Every diversified tax free bond fund needed some of them to compete with every other muni fund. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bonds_issued_by_Puerto_Rico

    And prior to the hurricanes, PR munis were in the midst of a workout. The bonds themselves aren't a financial catastrophe waiting to happen to anyone except PR. However, like everything .... its all in the details. The manner in which they are 'worked out' impacts the multi trillion US municipal finance system. Whatever happens will be disruptive and the worst case is most disruptive.

    The arithmetic is obvious. Total debt is $80 billion or so. Hurricane damage is mostly uninsured and may be roughly another $80 billion. A lot of it is their electric utilities which have been deteriorating for decades and need a lot of cash.


    By mid January 2017, the debt had reached $70 billion or $12,000 per capita in a territory with a 45 percent poverty rate and double digit unemployment that is more than twice the mainland U.S. average.
     
    It isn't going away anytime soon. If there is anything that Trump has personal expertise with, it is bankruptcy and even more important, restructuring debt.

    The place is a disaster in every way imaginable. However, one thing about bailouts .... if you are going to do it, do it sooner and do it bigger.

    All the current quarter economic statistics have been roiled by the hurricanes. Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example -- as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    If every tragedy is an opportunity, maybe Trump can turn this into something. Or not. This is a big and good topic. Something for everyone.

    https://www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2017-10-04/trump-roils-slew-of-assets-with-puerto-rico-comments

    Note that what I meant by ‘bailout’ wasn’t the bailout of PR bondholders. Rather it would involve their quasi bankruptcy with restructuring their debt. This is going to happen — it can’t get paid at 100 cents on the dollar.

    On the other hand, judicial proceedings take forever. I am suggesting a cramdown, taking out the creditors at a massive discount, and moving on. But sooner rather than later. The island is uninvestible now due to the uncertainty. Resolving this would be a huge benefit to PR. The 2008 bailouts … mostly involved massive losses for the theoretical owners of Citi, Bank of America, the GSE’s, GM stockholders and bondholders. This was glossed over in the largely correct but superficial critiques.

    Trump’s casual comment may make that easier. If he can panic the market, it makes negotiation and resolution easier. The lower the bond prices, the easier the negotiation. But it is never close to easy.

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  27. One of the most frustrating things about the media’s coverage of Trump is just how stupid it is, in the sense of not even attempting to understand the man.

    The media is, of course, desperate to blame Trump over his treatment of Puerto Rico, just as they did so successfully with George Bush and Katrina.

    But the thing is, Trump obviously loves to do this sort of thing. He loves to help out, and being seen to be helping out, he loves to oversee these sort of big logistics projects — quite similar to his big real estate developments.

    Look, if the media wants to go after him for tweeting like an adolescent at 3 AM, well, they’ve got a point.

    But trying to make Trump look bad when he’s naturally looking very good is just a stupid and losing proposition.

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.

    Read More
    • Agree: AM
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Of course they won't because they hate the man and wouldn't give him credit even if he personally put back all the power poles in Puerto Rico.

    It's like the recent brouhaha where the school librarian in Cambridge, MA wrote a letter to Melania rejecting her gift of Dr. Seuss books and point out what a terrible racist Seuss was and how it was wrong to allow children to be exposed to these terrible books. Then a picture came out of this same librarian in a Cat in the Hat costume reading to kids a few months ago and there were pictures of Moochelle reading Dr. Seuss to kids. So obviously the problem was not with the Dr. Seuss books at all but that is was the despicable Melania who was sending them and the librarian would be damned if she would give Melania any credit for doing anything good.
    , @Olorin

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.
     
    Where's the incentive for them to be other than feckless, mindless, and mendacious?

    Ernie Kovacs once observed that TV was called "a medium. Because it is neither rare nor well done."

    The fat part of the bell curve doesn't want to understand anything. They just want to be told what to think to stay in step with the other bellcurvians at the pub or water cooler or game day trough-swilling party. In those settings, "understanding" is heresy because it challenges the current day, week, month or year slogans.

    , @Guy de Champlagne
    he loves to oversee these sort of big logistics projects

    And what are the examples of this so far during his presidency? The photo ops of him loading supplies on to trucks after Irma?

    The media criticism of Trump as a feckless president content to troll on twitter rather than actually administer anything seems pretty spot on to me but I don't claim any special insight.

    , @Citizen of a Silly Country

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.
     
    Hell no! First, they believe all of this shit. Second, they are rewarded for being as stupid leftist as possible and punished for anything close to an iSteve thought - and that latter part goes for Fox and the other "conservative" media.
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  28. Trump and the rest of the GOP seem completely clueless about the electoral consequences of further migrations out of puerto rico. That’s something that should have been shaping puerto rico policy all along and especially the hurricane response.

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  29. Jack D says:
    @candid_observer
    One of the most frustrating things about the media's coverage of Trump is just how stupid it is, in the sense of not even attempting to understand the man.

    The media is, of course, desperate to blame Trump over his treatment of Puerto Rico, just as they did so successfully with George Bush and Katrina.

    But the thing is, Trump obviously loves to do this sort of thing. He loves to help out, and being seen to be helping out, he loves to oversee these sort of big logistics projects -- quite similar to his big real estate developments.

    Look, if the media wants to go after him for tweeting like an adolescent at 3 AM, well, they've got a point.

    But trying to make Trump look bad when he's naturally looking very good is just a stupid and losing proposition.

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.

    Of course they won’t because they hate the man and wouldn’t give him credit even if he personally put back all the power poles in Puerto Rico.

    It’s like the recent brouhaha where the school librarian in Cambridge, MA wrote a letter to Melania rejecting her gift of Dr. Seuss books and point out what a terrible racist Seuss was and how it was wrong to allow children to be exposed to these terrible books. Then a picture came out of this same librarian in a Cat in the Hat costume reading to kids a few months ago and there were pictures of Moochelle reading Dr. Seuss to kids. So obviously the problem was not with the Dr. Seuss books at all but that is was the despicable Melania who was sending them and the librarian would be damned if she would give Melania any credit for doing anything good.

    Read More
    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, I read about this one, and it would have worked too, if it hadn't been for that meddling internet. Things that the lyin press used to get away with are not working anymore, and that indeed makes them just look stupid, as Candid Observer wrote.
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  30. Olorin says:
    @candid_observer
    One of the most frustrating things about the media's coverage of Trump is just how stupid it is, in the sense of not even attempting to understand the man.

    The media is, of course, desperate to blame Trump over his treatment of Puerto Rico, just as they did so successfully with George Bush and Katrina.

    But the thing is, Trump obviously loves to do this sort of thing. He loves to help out, and being seen to be helping out, he loves to oversee these sort of big logistics projects -- quite similar to his big real estate developments.

    Look, if the media wants to go after him for tweeting like an adolescent at 3 AM, well, they've got a point.

    But trying to make Trump look bad when he's naturally looking very good is just a stupid and losing proposition.

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.

    Where’s the incentive for them to be other than feckless, mindless, and mendacious?

    Ernie Kovacs once observed that TV was called “a medium. Because it is neither rare nor well done.”

    The fat part of the bell curve doesn’t want to understand anything. They just want to be told what to think to stay in step with the other bellcurvians at the pub or water cooler or game day trough-swilling party. In those settings, “understanding” is heresy because it challenges the current day, week, month or year slogans.

    Read More
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  31. markflag says:
    @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    Larry David discovers that he has a slave-owning ancestor who fought for the Confederacy:


    Almost all of those ancestors settled in New York City, where David was born in 1947, with one major exception. The comedian was baffled to learn that his great-grandmother Henrietta was born in Mobile, Alabama. “What?!” he asks over and over. “I’m a little more exotic than I thought I was,” he says. “Is Alabama exotic? I don’t know. Germany’s exotic? I’ve got probably some of the most racist places in the world connected.”
     
    <blockquote>Even more shocking was the fact that Henrietta’s father, David’s great-great-grandfather, Henry Bernstein, was one of only about 3,000 Jewish men to fight on the side of the Confederacy. “Are you telling me that my great-great-grandfather fought for the South in the Civil War?” David asks. “What?! Are you kidding?! That is mind-blowing to me, I can’t believe it.
    “This is just such an odd combination on my father’s side of Germany and the South,” he adds. “Two places that we have fought against as a country. Oh my goodness, I hope no slaves show up on this.” At that point, Gates instructs him to turn the page. “You did it! I knew it!” David shouts. “Unbelievable. Oh boy, oh boy.”
    The two slaves listed on the document Gates’ researchers found are labeled “mulatto,
    ” a term that was ironically featured prominently in a Season 4 episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm called “The Surrogate.” In that episode, Larry buys a mixed race doll as a present for a friend’s baby shower and offends the guests when he says, “It’s a mulatto.” As they stare at him in disbelief for using such an outdated and offensive word, he asks, “No good?”
     https://www.thedailybeast.com/larry-david-shocked-to-learn-his-ancestor-was-a-confederate-slave-owner

    The sign of a true narcsissist, “That’s mind-blowing to me . . . ” Why the “to me”? BECAUSE HE WANTS TO USE A FIRST PERSON PRONOUN.

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  32. Olorin says:

    Good dinnertalk fodder, host, thanks.

    Nobody washes a rented car and nobody treats Puerto Rico like it’s his or her own country.

    Reminds me of that old saw in real estate listings–”Pride of ownership.”

    This is precisely why “rootless cosmopolitanism” is an existential threat to human civilization and evolution.

    It’s no accident that that way of life can produce nothing but use-and-discard consumerism fueled by (lucrative for some) debt and rentier predation. It’s in that system’s DNA so to speak.

    As is the view of humans as fungible undifferentiated cogs…so DIVERSE in their featureless similitude.

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  33. Jack D says:

    Once the Cold War was over, Puerto Rico had zero strategic or propaganda or any other value to the US and we should have given them their independence just like we gave it to the Philippines. There is zero reason for this island with its alien history and language and not very bright people to be part of the United States, not as a state, not as a territory, not as a Commonwealth , not at all. Then they could be a poor but corrupt nation like the Dominican Republic but they wouldn’t be our problem.

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  34. @dearieme
    "Finlay was born Juan Carlos Finlay y de Barrés in Puerto Príncipe (now Camagüey), Cuba to Scottish born Edward (Eduardo) Finlay and French born Elisa de (Isabel) Barrés". [WKPD]

    So he he was Cuba-born all right, but a North West European by parentage. They were all the rage at the time, NW Europeans.

    I bet more northwest Europeans migrated to Cuba in the 19th Century than to Puerto Rico.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Not Raul
    I believe that you are correct

    http://collections.mnhs.org/MNHistoryMagazine/articles/56/v56i05p286-300.pdf
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  35. Luis Gutierrez is the archetype of the greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Rican. Luis Gutierrez is a Democrat Party politician whore from Puerto Rico.

    Is it any wonder why the schools in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are staffed by greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Ricans? Is it any wonder why the test scores in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are full of Puerto Ricans?

    THE USA MUST CUT PUERTO RICO LOOSE NOW!

    Luis Gutierrez wants to destroy the United States. Luis Gutierrez uses his support of mass immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders to attack White Core America. Luis Gutierrez should be deported back to Puerto Rico as soon as possible.

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state. Puerto Rico has over 70 billion dollars of government debt that they have no way of paying. Jebby Bush was screaming about bailing out investors by paying off Puerto Rico’s debt. Does anybody besides those who hold Puerto Rican government bonds think that that is a good idea?

    Luis Gutierrez got nasty with a great American woman named Jessica Vaughan, and it still pisses me off. Gutierrez should not be in the United States, let alone attacking a fine White Core American like Jessica Vaughn.

    Paul Ryan’s Pal Luis Gutierrez Attacks Jessica Vaughan:

    Read More
    • Replies: @AM

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state.
     
    It's not nice that they're not a state. It seems unfair and will definitely hurt someone's feelings.

    It's the running a kindergarten approach to government. Seems sound.
    , @Lugash

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state. Puerto Rico has over 70 billion dollars of government debt that they have no way of paying. Jebby Bush was screaming about bailing out investors by paying off Puerto Rico’s debt. Does anybody besides those who hold Puerto Rican government bonds think that that is a good idea?
     
    Jebby tried to float this turd for two reasons 1) Pay off Wall St. speculators 2) Keep PRs from moving to Florida.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich
     
    Gingrich was born in 1943. Were he born eight months earlier, he could have voted in the 1960 election, years before any "baby boomer rat" could vote anywhere.
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  36. @candid_observer
    One of the most frustrating things about the media's coverage of Trump is just how stupid it is, in the sense of not even attempting to understand the man.

    The media is, of course, desperate to blame Trump over his treatment of Puerto Rico, just as they did so successfully with George Bush and Katrina.

    But the thing is, Trump obviously loves to do this sort of thing. He loves to help out, and being seen to be helping out, he loves to oversee these sort of big logistics projects -- quite similar to his big real estate developments.

    Look, if the media wants to go after him for tweeting like an adolescent at 3 AM, well, they've got a point.

    But trying to make Trump look bad when he's naturally looking very good is just a stupid and losing proposition.

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.

    he loves to oversee these sort of big logistics projects

    And what are the examples of this so far during his presidency? The photo ops of him loading supplies on to trucks after Irma?

    The media criticism of Trump as a feckless president content to troll on twitter rather than actually administer anything seems pretty spot on to me but I don’t claim any special insight.

    Read More
    • Agree: Dan Hayes
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  37. Clyde says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    But Steve has pointed out in other posts the strategic indispensability of Puerto Rico in guarding the Panama Canal from Kaiser Wilhelm's Dreadnought battleships and the junks of the Chinese Dowager Empress.

    This legacy of the Spanish-American War should have been given its independence many years ago, whether the PRs wanted it or not.

    This legacy of the Spanish-American War should have been given its independence many years ago, whether the PRs wanted it or not.

    I wish they had voted for Independence years ago. Whatever happened to the great Puerto Rican Independence movement? Now we are stuck with these leeches, exemplified by that demented mayor of San Juan. Even worse, enough PRs will vamoose to Florida to tilt that state permanent Democrat.

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  38. “A recent study of Puerto Rican islanders’ genomes suggests they tend to be about 65 percent European by ancestry, 20 percent black, and 15 percent American Indian. This shouldn’t be a hopeless racial mix.”

    It is a hopeless racial mix. Puerto Rican IQ is 84. 90% of Puerto Ricans are black (from light to dark skinned). There is nothing that can be done for them.

    IQ is the starting point. Then you look at race. The Philippines has an avg. IQ of 86 (Asian). India has an avg. IQ of 82 (Asian).

    Egypt has an avg. IQ of 81. 90% of Egyptians have black ancestry. IQ – that is the question.

    Of course, even though the Japanese are the only intelligent Asians, they are still Asian.

    Trump has come up with some idea about getting rid of Puerto Rico’s debt. The only way to do this is to give the Puerto Ricans their independence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    How can they have an IQ of 84 and be 65% white.

    African Americans have an IQ of ~85 and they're, what, around 15% white. With that high of a percentage of European ancestry, PRicans should be ~92 IQ, maybe a touch higher.
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  39. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    How the heck does a country with a 65% European geome have such lousy test scores? This indicates that being 20% black and 15% Indian carries so many low IQ genes you have to be pretty much pure white to keep your IQ up.

    I just looked at the statistics. 75% of the population is considered to be white. How is it that a 75% population can be so extremely stupid? Most of the Hispanic ancestry is from the Canary Islands and Andalusia. Maybe there’s something wrong with people from those regions of Spain. Canary Islanders have Berber background from about 1000 BC, so maybe that’s where the substandard genes are coming in from.

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  40. @Anon
    Why this need for Replacism against the native folks?

    They are the last holdout.

    Globalists got all the media, academia, entertainment, finance, whore-politicians, deep state, and etc.

    The one holdout is 50% of the population that resiliently remains conservative. They cannot be persuaded even if their leaders are cucky-wucked.

    So, the only way is to replace them.

    Yep, and the Globalists are on track.

    But, thankfully, history isn’t linear. Things change, often in unexpected ways.

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  41. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Can we at least call it Puerto Pobre now?

    Btw, have they been any more successful in capturing Chupacabra than Haven Monahan?

    Maybe they can make a movie called
    CHUPACABRA PROPHECIES.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Mmmm . . . Chupacabra.
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  42. @27 year old
    Off/on topic:

    Jason Richwine seems to have found employment again, writing at NRO:

    More Immigration Would Mean More Democrats


    by Jason Richwine
    October 3, 2017 4:00 AM
    Republicans need to face up to the hard facts.


    http://amp.nationalreview.com/article/452140/immigration-democratic-party-republican-party-dream-act-party-affiliation-conservatives-limited-government-traditional-values?utm_source=PANTHEON_STRIPPED&utm_medium=PANTHEON_STRIPPED

    He puts forwards the worst possible argument against immigration: that immigrants are bad because they are less likely to support economic policies that benefit a tiny elite at the expense of the rest of society. What a douche.

    Read More
    • Replies: @27 year old
    Who cares? It's national review. Play to the audience. Tell them whatever they need to hear to want less immigration.
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  43. NickG says:

    The Mess Before Maria

    Surely this should have been entitled ‘How do you solve a problem like Maria?

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  44. @Charles Pewitt
    Steve Sailer says:

    For instance, the island has unbelievably ineffective public schools. Puerto Rican students in the United States are not terribly high-scoring, of course, but Puerto Rican public-school test scores are abysmal. On the federal 2015 National Assessment of Educational Progress test (in Spanish and specifically designed for Puerto Rico), zero percent of island public-school eighth graders scored at either the Advanced or Proficient levels. Six percent scored Basic, and a staggering 94 percent performed Below Basic, the lowest tier.

     

    I say: The problem with Puerto Rican schools is the preponderance of Puerto Rican students.

    Feel like I read that huge numbers of PR kids go to private school, not posh private schools, more like old-school Catholic schools. That could explain those numbers.

    Welcome to our future.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    23% of students in Puerto Rico go to private schools versus 10% of students in America. Heck, Benicio del Toro's lawyer dad not only sent little Benicio to a private school, it was a boarding school in Pennsylvania.

    But that can't really account for why, of the 77% of the students who are in public school in Puerto Rico, why 94% are Below Basic rather than Basic. I forget the exact Hispanic figures for the US, but the bottom 77% of Hispanic students in the US would be, maybe, roughly half divided between Basic and Below Basic.

    , @Alden
    That's probably true.
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  45. @attilathehen
    "A recent study of Puerto Rican islanders’ genomes suggests they tend to be about 65 percent European by ancestry, 20 percent black, and 15 percent American Indian. This shouldn’t be a hopeless racial mix."

    It is a hopeless racial mix. Puerto Rican IQ is 84. 90% of Puerto Ricans are black (from light to dark skinned). There is nothing that can be done for them.

    IQ is the starting point. Then you look at race. The Philippines has an avg. IQ of 86 (Asian). India has an avg. IQ of 82 (Asian).

    Egypt has an avg. IQ of 81. 90% of Egyptians have black ancestry. IQ - that is the question.

    Of course, even though the Japanese are the only intelligent Asians, they are still Asian.

    Trump has come up with some idea about getting rid of Puerto Rico's debt. The only way to do this is to give the Puerto Ricans their independence.

    How can they have an IQ of 84 and be 65% white.

    African Americans have an IQ of ~85 and they’re, what, around 15% white. With that high of a percentage of European ancestry, PRicans should be ~92 IQ, maybe a touch higher.

    Read More
    • Replies: @attilathehen
    This is propaganda DNA. I live in an area where there are many PRs. They are black and hang with the blacks in the area. Jennifer Lopez is a light-skinned black. She is dating A-Rod. He is a light-skinned black from the Dominican Republic. Luis Gutierrez the congressman from Illinois is black. PRs who are black know they are black.

    Remember, world history can be summed up in 2 words: IQ.

    Blacks/Asians have the lowest IQs.
    , @Unladen Swallow
    Gregory Clark has pointed out that French Canadians in the US also score very low on occupational and educational attainment as well. This has to do with very selective out migration of poor, often illiterate Quebecois to the US ( New England specifically ) from between 1865 and 1920. Although they don't score as poorly as blacks, their success is well below what one would expect from a comparable European population such as the Irish and the Italians.
    , @Logan
    According to various DNA testing groups, American blacks average 19% to 29% European ancestry.

    http://www.theroot.com/exactly-how-black-is-black-america-1790895185

    Meanwhile, whites average well under 1% African ancestry.

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  46. @candid_observer
    One of the most frustrating things about the media's coverage of Trump is just how stupid it is, in the sense of not even attempting to understand the man.

    The media is, of course, desperate to blame Trump over his treatment of Puerto Rico, just as they did so successfully with George Bush and Katrina.

    But the thing is, Trump obviously loves to do this sort of thing. He loves to help out, and being seen to be helping out, he loves to oversee these sort of big logistics projects -- quite similar to his big real estate developments.

    Look, if the media wants to go after him for tweeting like an adolescent at 3 AM, well, they've got a point.

    But trying to make Trump look bad when he's naturally looking very good is just a stupid and losing proposition.

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.

    Will the media ever catch on? Probably not.

    Hell no! First, they believe all of this shit. Second, they are rewarded for being as stupid leftist as possible and punished for anything close to an iSteve thought – and that latter part goes for Fox and the other “conservative” media.

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  47. @Anon
    Can we at least call it Puerto Pobre now?

    Btw, have they been any more successful in capturing Chupacabra than Haven Monahan?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u5SSwSRyz5I

    Maybe they can make a movie called
    CHUPACABRA PROPHECIES.

    Mmmm . . . Chupacabra.

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  48. Flip says:
    @Anon
    Why this need for Replacism against the native folks?

    They are the last holdout.

    Globalists got all the media, academia, entertainment, finance, whore-politicians, deep state, and etc.

    The one holdout is 50% of the population that resiliently remains conservative. They cannot be persuaded even if their leaders are cucky-wucked.

    So, the only way is to replace them.

    That’s why they want to take away our guns. I am thankful for Trump and Gorsuch.

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  49. I’ve worked down there. Most vivid memories are burglar bars everywhere and bullet holes in the police stations.

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  50. Flip says:
    @anon

    The U.S. invested heavily in Puerto Rico, using tax breaks to encourage manufacturing companies to relocate there, especially after Cuba aligned with the Soviet Union. In 1976, when Cuba was sending expeditionary forces to fight for communism in Africa, Congress granted a massive corporate-income-tax loophole to American firms with high intellectual-property costs, such as pharmaceutical companies, that established plants in Puerto Rico.

     

    This is the why of it. It is left over from prior Imperial aspirations, became irrelevant, but was always too much trouble to resolve. Puerto Rico was supposed to be ... for a brief, shining moment ... our version of a capitalistic Cuba. Ouch.

    However, it is now making the financial news for another reason. PR munis have always been triple tax free. Every diversified tax free bond fund needed some of them to compete with every other muni fund. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bonds_issued_by_Puerto_Rico

    And prior to the hurricanes, PR munis were in the midst of a workout. The bonds themselves aren't a financial catastrophe waiting to happen to anyone except PR. However, like everything .... its all in the details. The manner in which they are 'worked out' impacts the multi trillion US municipal finance system. Whatever happens will be disruptive and the worst case is most disruptive.

    The arithmetic is obvious. Total debt is $80 billion or so. Hurricane damage is mostly uninsured and may be roughly another $80 billion. A lot of it is their electric utilities which have been deteriorating for decades and need a lot of cash.


    By mid January 2017, the debt had reached $70 billion or $12,000 per capita in a territory with a 45 percent poverty rate and double digit unemployment that is more than twice the mainland U.S. average.
     
    It isn't going away anytime soon. If there is anything that Trump has personal expertise with, it is bankruptcy and even more important, restructuring debt.

    The place is a disaster in every way imaginable. However, one thing about bailouts .... if you are going to do it, do it sooner and do it bigger.

    All the current quarter economic statistics have been roiled by the hurricanes. Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example -- as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    If every tragedy is an opportunity, maybe Trump can turn this into something. Or not. This is a big and good topic. Something for everyone.

    I really hope the Feds don’t bail out the PR bondholders. We need to set an example for IL and CT.

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  51. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Feel like I read that huge numbers of PR kids go to private school, not posh private schools, more like old-school Catholic schools. That could explain those numbers.

    Welcome to our future.

    23% of students in Puerto Rico go to private schools versus 10% of students in America. Heck, Benicio del Toro’s lawyer dad not only sent little Benicio to a private school, it was a boarding school in Pennsylvania.

    But that can’t really account for why, of the 77% of the students who are in public school in Puerto Rico, why 94% are Below Basic rather than Basic. I forget the exact Hispanic figures for the US, but the bottom 77% of Hispanic students in the US would be, maybe, roughly half divided between Basic and Below Basic.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason

    But that can’t really account for why, of the 77% of the students who are in public school in Puerto Rico, why 94% are Below Basic rather than Basic.
     
    I dunno, but I lived for a few years in the neighboring Dominican Republic and the standard of education in the public schools there is also pitiful. The teachers are incredibly ignorant and even the textbooks are full of errors!

    But some of the same memes occur in the US. I was casually reading a Medicare handbook while waiting for an appointment in Florida. The handbook was written in Spanish, and was full of gross spelling and grammatical errors that even a Spanish proofreading dunce like myself could readily detect, and Spanish is my third language.

    I think once you have a nonliterate culture, it is incredibly difficult to turn it around. Britain had an alleged literacy rate of about 99% in the 1890s, which is why a great cultural icon like the Daily Mail was able to sell 397,215 copies of its first published edition in 1896 and reached a circulation of half a million by 1899.
    , @Anon
    Caribbean character formation is specific. Tendency to laziness. IQ just indicates a potential.
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  52. @Guy de Champlagne
    He puts forwards the worst possible argument against immigration: that immigrants are bad because they are less likely to support economic policies that benefit a tiny elite at the expense of the rest of society. What a douche.

    Who cares? It’s national review. Play to the audience. Tell them whatever they need to hear to want less immigration.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Guy de Champlagne
    That's a good point. Although I think I've also read Jonah Goldberg argue in NR that immigration is good for economic conservatism because all the diversity ensures that people are too busy fighting amongst themselves to be able to organize against and challenge the wealthy.
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  53. Coemgen says:
    @anon

    The U.S. invested heavily in Puerto Rico, using tax breaks to encourage manufacturing companies to relocate there, especially after Cuba aligned with the Soviet Union. In 1976, when Cuba was sending expeditionary forces to fight for communism in Africa, Congress granted a massive corporate-income-tax loophole to American firms with high intellectual-property costs, such as pharmaceutical companies, that established plants in Puerto Rico.

     

    This is the why of it. It is left over from prior Imperial aspirations, became irrelevant, but was always too much trouble to resolve. Puerto Rico was supposed to be ... for a brief, shining moment ... our version of a capitalistic Cuba. Ouch.

    However, it is now making the financial news for another reason. PR munis have always been triple tax free. Every diversified tax free bond fund needed some of them to compete with every other muni fund. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bonds_issued_by_Puerto_Rico

    And prior to the hurricanes, PR munis were in the midst of a workout. The bonds themselves aren't a financial catastrophe waiting to happen to anyone except PR. However, like everything .... its all in the details. The manner in which they are 'worked out' impacts the multi trillion US municipal finance system. Whatever happens will be disruptive and the worst case is most disruptive.

    The arithmetic is obvious. Total debt is $80 billion or so. Hurricane damage is mostly uninsured and may be roughly another $80 billion. A lot of it is their electric utilities which have been deteriorating for decades and need a lot of cash.


    By mid January 2017, the debt had reached $70 billion or $12,000 per capita in a territory with a 45 percent poverty rate and double digit unemployment that is more than twice the mainland U.S. average.
     
    It isn't going away anytime soon. If there is anything that Trump has personal expertise with, it is bankruptcy and even more important, restructuring debt.

    The place is a disaster in every way imaginable. However, one thing about bailouts .... if you are going to do it, do it sooner and do it bigger.

    All the current quarter economic statistics have been roiled by the hurricanes. Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example -- as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    If every tragedy is an opportunity, maybe Trump can turn this into something. Or not. This is a big and good topic. Something for everyone.

    Hm, not well thought out yet but, Trump can offer to rebuild PR then “inject” cash into their economy by relocating U.S. citizens, from the states, who are living on “entitlements,” to PR (think section-8).

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  54. I am surprised that no one pointed out that Obama pardoned convicted Puerto Rican terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera. Lopez’s pardon was greeted with great joy by dems across the country. I believe NYC or Chicago named a street after him. “Hamilton” director Miranda said he cried tears of joy at the news. So, a convicted bomber, is a dem hero, and his claim to fame was being a leader of FALN, the movement for PR independence. Wait, these people didn’t want to be American citizens and killed to try and effect that change, but forget that, because Trump is the POTUS now.

    Read More
    • Agree: Desiderius
    • Replies: @JMcG
    Dear Joe,
    The iSteve meetup of a month or two ago seems to have fizzled out. If you want to arrange a meetup somewhere between Viagra Falls and Baltimore, I’ll be there. You are my kind of people.
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  55. @AndrewR
    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?

    We should try to pay them to take it back from us, to make up for the loss of Catalonia

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  56. Not Raul says:
    @Steve Sailer
    I bet more northwest Europeans migrated to Cuba in the 19th Century than to Puerto Rico.
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  57. @anon

    The U.S. invested heavily in Puerto Rico, using tax breaks to encourage manufacturing companies to relocate there, especially after Cuba aligned with the Soviet Union. In 1976, when Cuba was sending expeditionary forces to fight for communism in Africa, Congress granted a massive corporate-income-tax loophole to American firms with high intellectual-property costs, such as pharmaceutical companies, that established plants in Puerto Rico.

     

    This is the why of it. It is left over from prior Imperial aspirations, became irrelevant, but was always too much trouble to resolve. Puerto Rico was supposed to be ... for a brief, shining moment ... our version of a capitalistic Cuba. Ouch.

    However, it is now making the financial news for another reason. PR munis have always been triple tax free. Every diversified tax free bond fund needed some of them to compete with every other muni fund. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bonds_issued_by_Puerto_Rico

    And prior to the hurricanes, PR munis were in the midst of a workout. The bonds themselves aren't a financial catastrophe waiting to happen to anyone except PR. However, like everything .... its all in the details. The manner in which they are 'worked out' impacts the multi trillion US municipal finance system. Whatever happens will be disruptive and the worst case is most disruptive.

    The arithmetic is obvious. Total debt is $80 billion or so. Hurricane damage is mostly uninsured and may be roughly another $80 billion. A lot of it is their electric utilities which have been deteriorating for decades and need a lot of cash.


    By mid January 2017, the debt had reached $70 billion or $12,000 per capita in a territory with a 45 percent poverty rate and double digit unemployment that is more than twice the mainland U.S. average.
     
    It isn't going away anytime soon. If there is anything that Trump has personal expertise with, it is bankruptcy and even more important, restructuring debt.

    The place is a disaster in every way imaginable. However, one thing about bailouts .... if you are going to do it, do it sooner and do it bigger.

    All the current quarter economic statistics have been roiled by the hurricanes. Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example -- as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    If every tragedy is an opportunity, maybe Trump can turn this into something. Or not. This is a big and good topic. Something for everyone.

    Nixon’s Attorney General John Mitchell is reputed to have said, “If you know you are going to have to eat s**t, you don’t want to take small bites”.

    Read More
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  58. @anon

    The U.S. invested heavily in Puerto Rico, using tax breaks to encourage manufacturing companies to relocate there, especially after Cuba aligned with the Soviet Union. In 1976, when Cuba was sending expeditionary forces to fight for communism in Africa, Congress granted a massive corporate-income-tax loophole to American firms with high intellectual-property costs, such as pharmaceutical companies, that established plants in Puerto Rico.

     

    This is the why of it. It is left over from prior Imperial aspirations, became irrelevant, but was always too much trouble to resolve. Puerto Rico was supposed to be ... for a brief, shining moment ... our version of a capitalistic Cuba. Ouch.

    However, it is now making the financial news for another reason. PR munis have always been triple tax free. Every diversified tax free bond fund needed some of them to compete with every other muni fund. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bonds_issued_by_Puerto_Rico

    And prior to the hurricanes, PR munis were in the midst of a workout. The bonds themselves aren't a financial catastrophe waiting to happen to anyone except PR. However, like everything .... its all in the details. The manner in which they are 'worked out' impacts the multi trillion US municipal finance system. Whatever happens will be disruptive and the worst case is most disruptive.

    The arithmetic is obvious. Total debt is $80 billion or so. Hurricane damage is mostly uninsured and may be roughly another $80 billion. A lot of it is their electric utilities which have been deteriorating for decades and need a lot of cash.


    By mid January 2017, the debt had reached $70 billion or $12,000 per capita in a territory with a 45 percent poverty rate and double digit unemployment that is more than twice the mainland U.S. average.
     
    It isn't going away anytime soon. If there is anything that Trump has personal expertise with, it is bankruptcy and even more important, restructuring debt.

    The place is a disaster in every way imaginable. However, one thing about bailouts .... if you are going to do it, do it sooner and do it bigger.

    All the current quarter economic statistics have been roiled by the hurricanes. Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example -- as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    If every tragedy is an opportunity, maybe Trump can turn this into something. Or not. This is a big and good topic. Something for everyone.

    Nixon’s Attorney General John Mitchell is reputed to have said, “If you know you are going to have to eat s**t, you don’t want to take small bites”.

    Read More
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  59. @Charles Pewitt
    New England has a surprisingly large portion of Puerto Ricans. Florida, New York, Illinois has a lot more Puerto Ricans than New England, but they are here.

    Puerto Rico must be made a millstone around the necks of the Democrat Party. Jebby Bush was hurt in Iowa and New Hampshire when he said Puerto Rico should be considered for statehood and that the United States government should pay the 70 billion dollars that Puerto Rico owes to investors. Iowa voters of German and Dutch ancestry blew a fuse when Jebby Bush started talking about bailing out Puerto Rico from their 70 billion debt.

    President Trump should make it clear that investors are on their own in regards to getting bailed out on belly up Puerto Rican government debt. Investors should be told: Put some salt on your worthless Puerto Rican government bonds and eat them!

    Puerto Rico must be cut free of the United States as soon as possible. Preparations should be made by the United States to unilaterally cut those Puerto Ricans free and clear of the United States. An emergency Puerto Rican deportation plan should be put into place to humanely remove Puerto Ricans from the United States.

    https://twitter.com/CharlesPewitt/status/616700161478168576

    When you mentioned “New England” and “Puerto Rico”, I couldn’t help but think “Aaron Hernandez”.

    The guy could play, though.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Hernandez

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    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II

    The guy could play, though.
     
    And do you think that is a redeeming quality?
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  60. JMcG says:
    @George
    Compare Puerto Rico with America's other island possession Hawaii. Hawaii has 2 senators and 1 representative which entitles them to major military installations, a major university, lots of other taxpayer swag. If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.

    PortoRico had military installations. They voted them out. A University in Porto Rico would have to deal with the PISA scores there. No Japs want to live there as so many want to live in Hawaii. A unique and uniquely difficult problem is Porto Rico

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    • Replies: @Bugg
    Many but not all Puerto Ricans demanded the Navy vacate the live fire base they had at Viques. Of course, once the Navy left all the jobs on the base and economic activity it generated disappeared like a fart in a hurricane. The MLB player and avowed Socialist Carlos Delgado made a very big deal about closing Viques , and then immediately complained about the loss of jobs. And were there right now such a naval base with landing strips and other infrastructure to support these operations, this whole recovery would be going much smoother.
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  61. AM says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Luis Gutierrez is the archetype of the greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Rican. Luis Gutierrez is a Democrat Party politician whore from Puerto Rico.

    Is it any wonder why the schools in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are staffed by greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Ricans? Is it any wonder why the test scores in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are full of Puerto Ricans?

    THE USA MUST CUT PUERTO RICO LOOSE NOW!

    Luis Gutierrez wants to destroy the United States. Luis Gutierrez uses his support of mass immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders to attack White Core America. Luis Gutierrez should be deported back to Puerto Rico as soon as possible.

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state. Puerto Rico has over 70 billion dollars of government debt that they have no way of paying. Jebby Bush was screaming about bailing out investors by paying off Puerto Rico's debt. Does anybody besides those who hold Puerto Rican government bonds think that that is a good idea?

    Luis Gutierrez got nasty with a great American woman named Jessica Vaughan, and it still pisses me off. Gutierrez should not be in the United States, let alone attacking a fine White Core American like Jessica Vaughn.

    Paul Ryan's Pal Luis Gutierrez Attacks Jessica Vaughan:

    https://youtu.be/nTVnsz3ixnU

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state.

    It’s not nice that they’re not a state. It seems unfair and will definitely hurt someone’s feelings.

    It’s the running a kindergarten approach to government. Seems sound.

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    • Replies: @Anon
    Sell them back to Spain to use the place as a prison camp for Catalans.
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  62. Corn says:
    @syonredux

    The problem of Puerto Rico’s atrocious public schools gets virtually zero coverage in the States because, well, Puerto Rico doesn’t seem like our country. Everybody there speaks Spanish, so it’s hard to follow what’s going on.
     
    Yep. And that's also why all the media coverage and op-eds about the crisis in Puerto Rico drone on about how they are "American citizens." They know that Americans really don't view them as fellow citizens.

    And Puerto Ricans have their own teams in the Olympics. I don’t know any Puerto Ricans here in rural Illinois but I doubt most Puerto Ricans consider themselves especially American.

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    • Replies: @Jonathan Mason
    Puerto Rico seems to have the highest proportion of Taino Indian genes of the large islands of the Caribbean. Would it not be feasible to classify Puerto Ricans as Native Americans, then redesignate the entire island as a reservation and let them have casinos to generate income to pay off the national debt?

    There could also be a nice big Taino themed park with hotels and resorts and canoe rides and cannibals and artificial hurricanes to attract more tourists from Europe to be cheated out of their Euros in the casinos.
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  63. JMcG says:
    @Buffalo Joe
    I am surprised that no one pointed out that Obama pardoned convicted Puerto Rican terrorist Oscar Lopez Rivera. Lopez's pardon was greeted with great joy by dems across the country. I believe NYC or Chicago named a street after him. "Hamilton" director Miranda said he cried tears of joy at the news. So, a convicted bomber, is a dem hero, and his claim to fame was being a leader of FALN, the movement for PR independence. Wait, these people didn't want to be American citizens and killed to try and effect that change, but forget that, because Trump is the POTUS now.

    Dear Joe,
    The iSteve meetup of a month or two ago seems to have fizzled out. If you want to arrange a meetup somewhere between Viagra Falls and Baltimore, I’ll be there. You are my kind of people.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Buffalo Joe
    JMcG, you're a funny guy.
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  64. @27 year old
    Who cares? It's national review. Play to the audience. Tell them whatever they need to hear to want less immigration.

    That’s a good point. Although I think I’ve also read Jonah Goldberg argue in NR that immigration is good for economic conservatism because all the diversity ensures that people are too busy fighting amongst themselves to be able to organize against and challenge the wealthy.

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  65. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @AM

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state.
     
    It's not nice that they're not a state. It seems unfair and will definitely hurt someone's feelings.

    It's the running a kindergarten approach to government. Seems sound.

    Sell them back to Spain to use the place as a prison camp for Catalans.

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    • Replies: @syonredux

    Sell them back to Spain to use the place as a prison camp for Catalans.
     
    Does Kaiser Bill have any descendants? We could make one of them Emperor of Puerto Rico and turn the island into a giant Steampunk Theme Park:" Tremble as the Kaiser readies his war-fleet of Mjolnir-class destroyers for an all-out attack on our Isthmian Canal! Cheer as Teddy Roosevelt prepares to unleash Edison's new magneto-electric cannon!"
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  66. Read More
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  67. @27 year old
    Off/on topic:

    Jason Richwine seems to have found employment again, writing at NRO:

    More Immigration Would Mean More Democrats


    by Jason Richwine
    October 3, 2017 4:00 AM
    Republicans need to face up to the hard facts.


    http://amp.nationalreview.com/article/452140/immigration-democratic-party-republican-party-dream-act-party-affiliation-conservatives-limited-government-traditional-values?utm_source=PANTHEON_STRIPPED&utm_medium=PANTHEON_STRIPPED

    Right Alinskyism* pays dividends.

    * – gaming split-the-difference/unprincipled authorities/institutions by acting maximally radical in the preferred direction you want the center (Overton Window) to move.

    Even those who would prefer principled leadership are currently priced into this strategy by the massive moral hazard created by past fecklessness.

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  68. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    It seems so many whites are playing baby chess.

    In chess, one can make a move for easy gain. Move to take a piece. Elemental.

    Now, if EVERYONE plays chess like this — only for short-term direct gain — , it will balance out since no one will have any advantage over his opponents. They will all play like retards.

    But people who know the game don’t play that way. They see moves ahead. They understand that short-term or easy gain can lead to sure death.
    A player could take one easy piece, then another, then another… only to find himself trapped or set up for a kill.

    There seems to be no sense of ‘seeing moves ahead’ in much of US politics.

    When GOP was talking about ‘free trade’ and ‘diversity’, it was always in terms of short-term gain(though delusional even on that level).

    But the more Con Inc. play this game, the more they are set up for checkmate.

    Florida and Texas turning blue is checkmate. It’s over.

    Jews(and maybe the people of dot) seem to be the only ones who look several moves ahead in the global game of power. Most others will overlook future moves and go for the easiest pickings and gains.

    We need a grandmaster, not babies who play chess like checkers.

    An apparent gain can be a bait. Learn from THE COUNSELOR.

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    • Replies: @Daniel Chieh

    There seems to be no sense of ‘seeing moves ahead’ in much of US politics.
     
    This is for better or worse, pretty much required if you're a politician in a democracy.

    If you don't win the next election, you don't have any voice either. By definition, short-term elections privilege short-term planning. This is not unique to politics, quite a few corporations do the same thing with quarterly earnings.

    , @Harry Baldwin
    I've concluded that the Republican establishment doesn't care much if it doesn't hold power. It's content to be a token opposition and enjoy the perks attendant thereto, such as well-paid sinecures for its members should they lose their seats for failing to represent your base. See: Eric Cantor.
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  69. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    How can they have an IQ of 84 and be 65% white.

    African Americans have an IQ of ~85 and they're, what, around 15% white. With that high of a percentage of European ancestry, PRicans should be ~92 IQ, maybe a touch higher.

    This is propaganda DNA. I live in an area where there are many PRs. They are black and hang with the blacks in the area. Jennifer Lopez is a light-skinned black. She is dating A-Rod. He is a light-skinned black from the Dominican Republic. Luis Gutierrez the congressman from Illinois is black. PRs who are black know they are black.

    Remember, world history can be summed up in 2 words: IQ.

    Blacks/Asians have the lowest IQs.

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  70. Alden says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    Feel like I read that huge numbers of PR kids go to private school, not posh private schools, more like old-school Catholic schools. That could explain those numbers.

    Welcome to our future.

    That’s probably true.

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  71. @Steve Sailer
    23% of students in Puerto Rico go to private schools versus 10% of students in America. Heck, Benicio del Toro's lawyer dad not only sent little Benicio to a private school, it was a boarding school in Pennsylvania.

    But that can't really account for why, of the 77% of the students who are in public school in Puerto Rico, why 94% are Below Basic rather than Basic. I forget the exact Hispanic figures for the US, but the bottom 77% of Hispanic students in the US would be, maybe, roughly half divided between Basic and Below Basic.

    But that can’t really account for why, of the 77% of the students who are in public school in Puerto Rico, why 94% are Below Basic rather than Basic.

    I dunno, but I lived for a few years in the neighboring Dominican Republic and the standard of education in the public schools there is also pitiful. The teachers are incredibly ignorant and even the textbooks are full of errors!

    But some of the same memes occur in the US. I was casually reading a Medicare handbook while waiting for an appointment in Florida. The handbook was written in Spanish, and was full of gross spelling and grammatical errors that even a Spanish proofreading dunce like myself could readily detect, and Spanish is my third language.

    I think once you have a nonliterate culture, it is incredibly difficult to turn it around. Britain had an alleged literacy rate of about 99% in the 1890s, which is why a great cultural icon like the Daily Mail was able to sell 397,215 copies of its first published edition in 1896 and reached a circulation of half a million by 1899.

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    • Replies: @black sea

    I think once you have a nonliterate culture, it is incredibly difficult to turn it around.
     
    This is an interesting, and perhaps overlooked, point. A literate culture is one in which people not only can read, but do read in the course of a normal day. It might be newspapers and magazines, and less frequently books, but reading -- and talking about what people are reading or have read -- is a not entirely uncommon feature of middle class life.

    However, in much of the world, even as economies grow, there is no such culture of reading, and since such a culture is increasingly anachronistic even in the West, it's unlikely that this culture will develop.

    For the most part, people either fall into the habit of reading in their childhood, or they don't develop the habit at all. And since people are fairly herd-like in their behavior, for this to happen they tend to need a family and social environment in which reading appears normal and intrinsically interesting, not some weird and exhausting affectation.
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  72. @Corn
    And Puerto Ricans have their own teams in the Olympics. I don’t know any Puerto Ricans here in rural Illinois but I doubt most Puerto Ricans consider themselves especially American.

    Puerto Rico seems to have the highest proportion of Taino Indian genes of the large islands of the Caribbean. Would it not be feasible to classify Puerto Ricans as Native Americans, then redesignate the entire island as a reservation and let them have casinos to generate income to pay off the national debt?

    There could also be a nice big Taino themed park with hotels and resorts and canoe rides and cannibals and artificial hurricanes to attract more tourists from Europe to be cheated out of their Euros in the casinos.

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    • Replies: @Ed
    There are already quite a few casinos in Puerto Rico. Also many Puerto Rican's actually call themselves Taino in NYC there are gangs that use the name.
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  73. Bugg says:
    @JMcG
    PortoRico had military installations. They voted them out. A University in Porto Rico would have to deal with the PISA scores there. No Japs want to live there as so many want to live in Hawaii. A unique and uniquely difficult problem is Porto Rico

    Many but not all Puerto Ricans demanded the Navy vacate the live fire base they had at Viques. Of course, once the Navy left all the jobs on the base and economic activity it generated disappeared like a fart in a hurricane. The MLB player and avowed Socialist Carlos Delgado made a very big deal about closing Viques , and then immediately complained about the loss of jobs. And were there right now such a naval base with landing strips and other infrastructure to support these operations, this whole recovery would be going much smoother.

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    • Replies: @Ivy
    Sin in haste.
    Repent mañana.
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  74. syonredux says:
    @Anon
    Sell them back to Spain to use the place as a prison camp for Catalans.

    Sell them back to Spain to use the place as a prison camp for Catalans.

    Does Kaiser Bill have any descendants? We could make one of them Emperor of Puerto Rico and turn the island into a giant Steampunk Theme Park:” Tremble as the Kaiser readies his war-fleet of Mjolnir-class destroyers for an all-out attack on our Isthmian Canal! Cheer as Teddy Roosevelt prepares to unleash Edison’s new magneto-electric cannon!”

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    • Replies: @27 year old
    This is a great idea, we could also deport all the people who are into steampunk
    , @Flip
    The current King of Spain is one of them, in fact, through his mother.
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  75. @JMcG
    Dear Joe,
    The iSteve meetup of a month or two ago seems to have fizzled out. If you want to arrange a meetup somewhere between Viagra Falls and Baltimore, I’ll be there. You are my kind of people.

    JMcG, you’re a funny guy.

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  76. I actually went to elementary school for a few years in Puerto Rico. Private, of course. That’s one thing that Steve didn’t consider in his article – anybody in PR who can scrape together the money will send their kids to private school, therefore private school attendance is much higher than in the states. I don’t think those test scores included private schools.

    At my particular school I’d say my classmates were about 25% relocated state-siders and about 75% middle to upper class Puerto Rican. One of them was the son of a Boston Red Sox player.

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  77. @Verymuchalive
    OT Mr Steve, but knowing your interest in Country Clubs, Jewish or otherwise, here's how they do it in Israel. Kochav Ya'ir doesn't have a golf course, but it does have a swimming pool. Looks like they're scared of Arabs peeing in the pool.
    https://www.sott.net/article/363596-Separate-and-unequal-Israel-uses-legal-tricks-to-segregate-its-own-citizens-inside-the-Green-Line

    There’s nothing wrong with what these folks are doing. They want to, want their kids to, socialize with other Jews, not Arabs. Because of behavioral differences, or simply to more effectively propagate their tribe. There was, of course, absolutely nothing wrong with Gentile clubs here excluding Jews, or for that matter–as Steve pointed out–the established German-Jewish clubs excluding these obnoxious Russian country-bumpkin arrivistes.

    ~

    BTW, if a nation is stuck with “multicultralism”–as the US was to a limited extent before the Jewish ascension, 1965, amnesty and the deluge–the reasonable/pleasant way to handle it is to leave people/groups alone in their private affairs. Let them have their separate neighborhoods, country clubs, churches, schools, bars, restaurants, businesses as much or as little as they like. People who can/are-happy-to share a culture will integrate, those who can’t/don’t-want-to, won’t.

    Instead what the left has given us is the most obnoxious way to handle it, with the state micromanaging every fricking thing anyone does. And each group in town mau-mauing for the right to enlist state power to bop all its enemies on the head. Peachy.

    Read More
    • Agree: Coemgen
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson II
    Agree.
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  78. Thea says:

    In every situation our leaders are doing the exact opposite of what is good for core Americans.

    Shared hardships can form strong bonds, however. Core Americans let those bonds slip during the halcyon days. Reforming them remains the most important challenge.

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  79. @syonredux

    Sell them back to Spain to use the place as a prison camp for Catalans.
     
    Does Kaiser Bill have any descendants? We could make one of them Emperor of Puerto Rico and turn the island into a giant Steampunk Theme Park:" Tremble as the Kaiser readies his war-fleet of Mjolnir-class destroyers for an all-out attack on our Isthmian Canal! Cheer as Teddy Roosevelt prepares to unleash Edison's new magneto-electric cannon!"

    This is a great idea, we could also deport all the people who are into steampunk

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  80. So it’s unlikely that we will either reorganize or liberate our useless colony.

    http://takimag.com/article/the_mess_before_maria_steve_sailer/print#ixzz4ubMdNwUV

    Liberate – let us help them self-determinate their liberation – withdraw all federal subsidies. I am sure they will do well.

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  81. Lurker says:
    @AndrewR
    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?

    Perhaps PR could be given to Cuba? The left would happy with that surely? The more I think about it, the more obvious a solution it appears.

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  82. @Paul Jolliffe
    When you mentioned "New England" and "Puerto Rico", I couldn't help but think "Aaron Hernandez".

    The guy could play, though.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aaron_Hernandez

    https://youtu.be/H6xJDaS8va4

    The guy could play, though.

    And do you think that is a redeeming quality?

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  83. @AnotherDad
    There's nothing wrong with what these folks are doing. They want to, want their kids to, socialize with other Jews, not Arabs. Because of behavioral differences, or simply to more effectively propagate their tribe. There was, of course, absolutely nothing wrong with Gentile clubs here excluding Jews, or for that matter--as Steve pointed out--the established German-Jewish clubs excluding these obnoxious Russian country-bumpkin arrivistes.

    ~

    BTW, if a nation is stuck with "multicultralism"--as the US was to a limited extent before the Jewish ascension, 1965, amnesty and the deluge--the reasonable/pleasant way to handle it is to leave people/groups alone in their private affairs. Let them have their separate neighborhoods, country clubs, churches, schools, bars, restaurants, businesses as much or as little as they like. People who can/are-happy-to share a culture will integrate, those who can't/don't-want-to, won't.

    Instead what the left has given us is the most obnoxious way to handle it, with the state micromanaging every fricking thing anyone does. And each group in town mau-mauing for the right to enlist state power to bop all its enemies on the head. Peachy.

    Agree.

    Read More
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  84. @Citizen of a Silly Country
    How can they have an IQ of 84 and be 65% white.

    African Americans have an IQ of ~85 and they're, what, around 15% white. With that high of a percentage of European ancestry, PRicans should be ~92 IQ, maybe a touch higher.

    Gregory Clark has pointed out that French Canadians in the US also score very low on occupational and educational attainment as well. This has to do with very selective out migration of poor, often illiterate Quebecois to the US ( New England specifically ) from between 1865 and 1920. Although they don’t score as poorly as blacks, their success is well below what one would expect from a comparable European population such as the Irish and the Italians.

    Read More
    • Replies: @attilathehen
    But French Canadians are Caucasian, European, white. They are our own. Not all whites are going to be brilliant, but overall the Caucasian/Europeans races are the best. We owe it to them to have safe, clean, prosperous countries.

    I have no interest in blacks/Asians.
    , @AM

    Although they [Quebecois] don’t score as poorly as blacks, their success is well below what one would expect from a comparable European population such as the Irish and the Italians.
     
    Just from my own experiences, it's a combo of factors. I am afraid that when I think the French Canadian side of my own family..the word "bright" does not come to mind. They were however, sane and would rise up to very clean and orderly if given the right conditions. (More so than the English around them at times.)

    My English side was brighter by standards of formal IQ. My grandfather was a self taught civil engineer; my grandmother an executive secretary for the AP Canadian Press Core in the 1920/1930's or so. I still have her recipe cards - all typed up. :)

    On the other hand, my Mom had mental illness problems for her entire life, several of the grand children had drinking problems, my uncles have are really strange formality to them, and to a person today they all think Christianity is to be worked against. (Too clever for all that backward thinking, doncha know?)

    In other words, straight up IQ and achievement is not all that it's cracked up to be.

    There were also different social/cultural factors involved with the Irish and the Italians. The Irish/Italians picked up and completely left home. They had to make it here and ties to home were letters and expensive (impossible) travel. Quebecois just moved a little south in comparison. They were still pretty close to home, including in physical environment. Probably not as motivated to make it or assimilate for that matter.

    And as another cultural observation, rural Frenchmen on this side of the pond tend to have much lower levels achievement versus the French that gravitate towards cities. It's the difference between Cajun and Creole. In other words, when you get a Frenchman in shack in the middle of nowhere, that's the way they like it for the most part. You won't be talking them into the fancy pants city ways of their cousins.

    , @Flip
    I've read that there is a not insignificant amount of Indian ancestry in French Canadians.
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  85. @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Puerto Rico is a fairly typical Caribbean Island nation that just happens to be the Schrodinger's State of the U.S. due to a quirk of history.

    There is a lot to like about living in a Caribbean Island nation - the pace of life, ease of living, lots of free time to go to the park/beach with the family, pig roasts and oceanside fish fries, generally warm and sunny weather, etc.

    But in most Caribbean Island nations the tradeoff is accepted - things just won't run efficiently and your generally low-stress life will probably end with your first significant illness or serious injury. And if a series of large storms come through things are going to be awful (other than the weather) for a long time.

    It's just that being sort of part of America allows Puerto Ricans to expect the best of both worlds.

    And perhaps I'm not the only one who thinks there is some sinister media intent here - Anna Navarro is reported to have encouraged Puerto Ricans to flee for swing states and register to vote on CNN. I believe she named Pennsylvania and Florida explicitly. Part of me thinks that the failure of Puerto Rico has been engineered to a degree from the Obama White House to preview its unstoppable political hegemony knowing Puerto Ricans will settle in Philadelphia/Suburbs and the Orlando area.

    …and register to vote on CNN.

    When was CNN deputized to accept voter registrations?

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    • Replies: @Anon
    IKR? I registered at Breitbart like all good dittoheads.
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  86. Lugash says:
    @Charles Pewitt
    Luis Gutierrez is the archetype of the greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Rican. Luis Gutierrez is a Democrat Party politician whore from Puerto Rico.

    Is it any wonder why the schools in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are staffed by greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Ricans? Is it any wonder why the test scores in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are full of Puerto Ricans?

    THE USA MUST CUT PUERTO RICO LOOSE NOW!

    Luis Gutierrez wants to destroy the United States. Luis Gutierrez uses his support of mass immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders to attack White Core America. Luis Gutierrez should be deported back to Puerto Rico as soon as possible.

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state. Puerto Rico has over 70 billion dollars of government debt that they have no way of paying. Jebby Bush was screaming about bailing out investors by paying off Puerto Rico's debt. Does anybody besides those who hold Puerto Rican government bonds think that that is a good idea?

    Luis Gutierrez got nasty with a great American woman named Jessica Vaughan, and it still pisses me off. Gutierrez should not be in the United States, let alone attacking a fine White Core American like Jessica Vaughn.

    Paul Ryan's Pal Luis Gutierrez Attacks Jessica Vaughan:

    https://youtu.be/nTVnsz3ixnU

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state. Puerto Rico has over 70 billion dollars of government debt that they have no way of paying. Jebby Bush was screaming about bailing out investors by paying off Puerto Rico’s debt. Does anybody besides those who hold Puerto Rican government bonds think that that is a good idea?

    Jebby tried to float this turd for two reasons 1) Pay off Wall St. speculators 2) Keep PRs from moving to Florida.

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  87. Perhaps PR could be given to Cuba?

    Did Mohammed move a mountain, or was that just PR?

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  88. @Charles Pewitt
    Luis Gutierrez is the archetype of the greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Rican. Luis Gutierrez is a Democrat Party politician whore from Puerto Rico.

    Is it any wonder why the schools in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are staffed by greedy, corrupt and stupid Puerto Ricans? Is it any wonder why the test scores in Puerto Rico are so bad when the schools are full of Puerto Ricans?

    THE USA MUST CUT PUERTO RICO LOOSE NOW!

    Luis Gutierrez wants to destroy the United States. Luis Gutierrez uses his support of mass immigration and amnesty for illegal alien invaders to attack White Core America. Luis Gutierrez should be deported back to Puerto Rico as soon as possible.

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich and Jebby Bush want to make Puerto Rico a state. Puerto Rico has over 70 billion dollars of government debt that they have no way of paying. Jebby Bush was screaming about bailing out investors by paying off Puerto Rico's debt. Does anybody besides those who hold Puerto Rican government bonds think that that is a good idea?

    Luis Gutierrez got nasty with a great American woman named Jessica Vaughan, and it still pisses me off. Gutierrez should not be in the United States, let alone attacking a fine White Core American like Jessica Vaughn.

    Paul Ryan's Pal Luis Gutierrez Attacks Jessica Vaughan:

    https://youtu.be/nTVnsz3ixnU

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich

    Gingrich was born in 1943. Were he born eight months earlier, he could have voted in the 1960 election, years before any “baby boomer rat” could vote anywhere.

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    • Replies: @Charles Pewitt
    Reg Caesar says:

    Gingrich was born in 1943. Were he born eight months earlier, he could have voted in the 1960 election, years before any “baby boomer rat” could vote anywhere.

     

    I say:

    1943 is close enough to 1945 to qualify as a baby boomer rat cuckservative.

    Baby boomer cuckservative rat Newt Gingrich pushed the North American Free Trade Agreement. Gingrich wants to give statehood to Puerto Rico. Gingrich pushed for mass legal immigration. Gingrich pushes mass immigration, multiculturalism and globalization.

    Gingrich's presidential run in 2012 was funded by billionaire rat Shelly Adelson. Shelly Adelson puts the interests of Israel ahead of the interests of the United States.

    Gingrich is a filthy whore for treasonous rat globalizers. Gingrich is a corporate propaganda whore for billionaire rat Rupert Murdoch.
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  89. Two reviews of the Eugene McCarthy book here:

    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc0303/article_238.shtml

    ====

    Despite his long-time record as a left-of-center Democrat, McCarthy also makes critical remarks about illegal immigration and multiculturalism that will strike most ‘professional conservatives’ inside the [Washington, DC] Beltway as excessively rightist.

    ====

    If one thinks of the classic definition of colonialsim the arrival of large numbers of people who impose their cultural values and language on the pre-existing society it is not hard to define the current wave of immigration as a colonizing force on the United States. What distinguishes the United States from other colonized societies is that we have the power to prevent it, but choose not to use it.

    ====

    Working on the new edition of my [the reviewer's] book on American conservatism made me aware of how obsolete the political labels of even twenty years ago have become. Those who appeal to blue-collar Democrats by stressing the responsibilities of multinational corporations to an American labor force will be attacked as neo-Nazis in what are taken to be conservative magazines.

    ====

    I had no idea that McCarthy was such a neo-Nazi!

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    • Replies: @Desiderius

    we have the power to prevent it
     
    cite needed
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  90. @George
    Compare Puerto Rico with America's other island possession Hawaii. Hawaii has 2 senators and 1 representative which entitles them to major military installations, a major university, lots of other taxpayer swag. If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.

    If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.

    Swag? Seriously.

    Puerto Rico has a much sweeter deal–Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax. Yet, the residents are eligible for all the usual federal goodies–Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, DoD money, highway money, etc. Puerto Rico basically has you fill out the same forms as the feds and pay the exact same income taxes you would to the feds–but it all goes to the government of Puerto Rico. The problem is the Puerto Rican state takes all that money and … pisses it away. Featherbedding bureaucracy, useless welfare handouts, graft … more bureaucracy and featherbedding. It’s Latin Caribbean style government corruption\incompetence but amped up by being on the federal tit.

    Statehood would be a major fiscal hit to the joint.

    It’s pretty much a case study in the effects of welfare, plus HBD and Latin culture. Puerto Rico, is what California–and its fiscal situation–would be without the tech, defense and Hollywood industries, the remaining white people and Asians. And what California could well become down the line if it becomes fiscally untenable and the whites and their industries leave.

    The right remedy is Puerto Rican independence. Making people stand on their own two feet and bear the costs of their decisions–which at least gradually encourages better behavior–is pretty much always the right choice.

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    • Replies: @george
    "Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax. Yet, the residents are eligible for all the usual federal goodies–Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, DoD money, highway money, etc."

    I don't know. A very brief search of the net shows PR does pay SS FICA taxes on payroll. A complexity is that states like Florida have large numbers of PR born workers who pay taxes. My guess is PR ends up as part of Florida to avoid giving them 2 senators, although my fantasy is they are added to Hawaii along with all those other bits of legacy imperialism like US Virgin Islands, Guam, and Samoa. And maybe a few other places. Maybe Rhode Island and Providence Plantations too or should they be part of Connecticut? I have it in for Hawaii recently for some reason.

    Payroll taxes
    Withholding taxes on salaries and wages
    All employers are required to withhold Puerto Rico income tax from all wages paid to its employees.

    Federal Social Security and Medicare (FICA)
    The Federal Social Security and Medicare Law applies in full in Puerto Rico. The tax rate is imposed on both the employer and the employee. For 2017, the tax rate is 7.65%, which consists of 6.2% of Social Security and 1.45% of Medicare Tax. The Social Security Tax is calculated on the first USD 127,200 (year 2017) of wages received, and the Medicare Tax is calculated on the total wages, without ceiling.

    In addition, an employer must withhold a 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax from wages paid to an employee in excess of USD 200,000 in a calendar year. The employer is required to begin withholding Additional Medicare Tax in the pay period in which wages are paid in excess of USD 200,000 to an employee and continue to withhold it each pay period until the end of the calendar year. Additional Medicare Tax is only imposed on the employee. There is no employer share of Additional Medicare Tax. All wages that are subject to Medicare tax are subject to Additional Medicare Tax withholding if paid in excess of the USD 200,000 withholding threshold.

    http://taxsummaries.pwc.com/ID/Puerto-Rico-Corporate-Other-taxes
    , @Reg Cæsar

    Puerto Rico has a much sweeter deal–Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax.
     
    Few would anyway-- almost all of them fall far beneath the income threshold.

    But then, they wouldn't get EITC if they don't file. Or do they?
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  91. black sea says:
    @Jonathan Mason

    But that can’t really account for why, of the 77% of the students who are in public school in Puerto Rico, why 94% are Below Basic rather than Basic.
     
    I dunno, but I lived for a few years in the neighboring Dominican Republic and the standard of education in the public schools there is also pitiful. The teachers are incredibly ignorant and even the textbooks are full of errors!

    But some of the same memes occur in the US. I was casually reading a Medicare handbook while waiting for an appointment in Florida. The handbook was written in Spanish, and was full of gross spelling and grammatical errors that even a Spanish proofreading dunce like myself could readily detect, and Spanish is my third language.

    I think once you have a nonliterate culture, it is incredibly difficult to turn it around. Britain had an alleged literacy rate of about 99% in the 1890s, which is why a great cultural icon like the Daily Mail was able to sell 397,215 copies of its first published edition in 1896 and reached a circulation of half a million by 1899.

    I think once you have a nonliterate culture, it is incredibly difficult to turn it around.

    This is an interesting, and perhaps overlooked, point. A literate culture is one in which people not only can read, but do read in the course of a normal day. It might be newspapers and magazines, and less frequently books, but reading — and talking about what people are reading or have read — is a not entirely uncommon feature of middle class life.

    However, in much of the world, even as economies grow, there is no such culture of reading, and since such a culture is increasingly anachronistic even in the West, it’s unlikely that this culture will develop.

    For the most part, people either fall into the habit of reading in their childhood, or they don’t develop the habit at all. And since people are fairly herd-like in their behavior, for this to happen they tend to need a family and social environment in which reading appears normal and intrinsically interesting, not some weird and exhausting affectation.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Logan
    I have noticed that more and more websites are largely video-based rather than text-based. If I want certain information I have to watch a talking head tell me what I could have just read in 1/10 the time.

    Very frustrating, but increasingly popular.
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  92. black sea says:
    @syonredux
    Off-topic,

    Larry David discovers that he has a slave-owning ancestor who fought for the Confederacy:


    Almost all of those ancestors settled in New York City, where David was born in 1947, with one major exception. The comedian was baffled to learn that his great-grandmother Henrietta was born in Mobile, Alabama. “What?!” he asks over and over. “I’m a little more exotic than I thought I was,” he says. “Is Alabama exotic? I don’t know. Germany’s exotic? I’ve got probably some of the most racist places in the world connected.”
     
    <blockquote>Even more shocking was the fact that Henrietta’s father, David’s great-great-grandfather, Henry Bernstein, was one of only about 3,000 Jewish men to fight on the side of the Confederacy. “Are you telling me that my great-great-grandfather fought for the South in the Civil War?” David asks. “What?! Are you kidding?! That is mind-blowing to me, I can’t believe it.
    “This is just such an odd combination on my father’s side of Germany and the South,” he adds. “Two places that we have fought against as a country. Oh my goodness, I hope no slaves show up on this.” At that point, Gates instructs him to turn the page. “You did it! I knew it!” David shouts. “Unbelievable. Oh boy, oh boy.”
    The two slaves listed on the document Gates’ researchers found are labeled “mulatto,
    ” a term that was ironically featured prominently in a Season 4 episode of Curb Your Enthusiasm called “The Surrogate.” In that episode, Larry buys a mixed race doll as a present for a friend’s baby shower and offends the guests when he says, “It’s a mulatto.” As they stare at him in disbelief for using such an outdated and offensive word, he asks, “No good?”
     https://www.thedailybeast.com/larry-david-shocked-to-learn-his-ancestor-was-a-confederate-slave-owner

    Oh my goodness, I hope no slaves show up on this.” At that point, Gates instructs him to turn the page. “You did it! I knew it!” David shouts. “Unbelievable. Oh boy, oh boy.”
    The two slaves listed on the document Gates’ researchers found are labeled “mulatto,”

    Gates could have immortalized that moment simply by answering David’s shocked cries with, “Reparations time, Baby!”*

    *Larry David’s net worth is around $900 million dollars.

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    • Replies: @Anon

    Larry David’s net worth is around $900 million dollars.
     
    Saying "dollars" twice is how we know you really mean it...
    , @Logan
    I'm eternally amused by those who carefully track their biological ancestry back for many generations.

    The entire edifice is erected on the foundation of the idea that the bio-dad of each and every child in the sequence is the husband of the mother, or at least the man she designates as being the father.

    This is, to put it mildly, an unjustified assumption.
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  93. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Reg Cæsar

    ...and register to vote on CNN.
     
    When was CNN deputized to accept voter registrations?

    IKR? I registered at Breitbart like all good dittoheads.

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  94. Eagle Eye says:
    @Currahee
    earlier today Lucianne.com linked to this article; then, the link disappeared. wonder why?

    earlier today Lucianne.com linked to this article; then, the link disappeared. wonder why?

    Lucianne got a call from her son Jonah Goldberg begging mom not to embarrass him again.

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  95. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @black sea

    Oh my goodness, I hope no slaves show up on this.” At that point, Gates instructs him to turn the page. “You did it! I knew it!” David shouts. “Unbelievable. Oh boy, oh boy.”
    The two slaves listed on the document Gates’ researchers found are labeled “mulatto,”
     
    Gates could have immortalized that moment simply by answering David's shocked cries with, "Reparations time, Baby!"*

    *Larry David's net worth is around $900 million dollars.

    Larry David’s net worth is around $900 million dollars.

    Saying “dollars” twice is how we know you really mean it…

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    • Replies: @black sea
    $900 million US dollars, net worth, not gross, . . . in dollars
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  96. @AndrewR
    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?

    The Spanish-American War increasingly appears as one of the most disastrous geostrategic moves on the part of the United States. Not only was the casus belli a highly improbable mine attack on the Maine in Havana harbor (the Spanish mined their own harbor??) but it left us with Puerto Rico, the leech that just keeps on sucking blood from the continental United States. And the occupation of the Phillipines resulted in a very vicious war to suppress its independence movement, and also put the U.S. on a collision course with Japan in the western Pacific. McKinley, T.R. Roosevelt and Hearst have a lot to answer for.

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  97. @George
    Compare Puerto Rico with America's other island possession Hawaii. Hawaii has 2 senators and 1 representative which entitles them to major military installations, a major university, lots of other taxpayer swag. If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.

    At this stage, I’m ready to give Hawaii its independence. Steve has pointed out that Hawaii was admitted to the Union as a part of a move to make the U.S. appear more attractive to the developing world, so that they wouldn’t turn to those Marxists in the USSR and PRC. How’d that work out? Hawaii is in many ways different from the rest of the states, although some continental states are close to Hawaii’s racial diversity(unfortunately) and it’s a long way from North America. It invariably votes Democratic. Time to ditch it.

    The fact that we might have to close naval bases there is a feature, not a bug. The U.S. needs to concentrate on North America. The entire projection into the Pacific, aside from just keeping sea lines of communication open, has been an expensive and futile distraction.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    Hawaii is not going to be "ditched". Where do you even come up with these proposals?
    , @Corvinus
    "And the occupation of the Phillipines resulted in a very vicious war to suppress its independence movement, and also put the U.S. on a collision course with Japan in the western Pacific. McKinley, T.R. Roosevelt and Hearst have a lot to answer for."

    Eerily similar to how Europeans engaged in imperialism and colonization back in the good old days.
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  98. Ed says:
    @Jonathan Mason
    Puerto Rico seems to have the highest proportion of Taino Indian genes of the large islands of the Caribbean. Would it not be feasible to classify Puerto Ricans as Native Americans, then redesignate the entire island as a reservation and let them have casinos to generate income to pay off the national debt?

    There could also be a nice big Taino themed park with hotels and resorts and canoe rides and cannibals and artificial hurricanes to attract more tourists from Europe to be cheated out of their Euros in the casinos.

    There are already quite a few casinos in Puerto Rico. Also many Puerto Rican’s actually call themselves Taino in NYC there are gangs that use the name.

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  99. @anon

    The U.S. invested heavily in Puerto Rico, using tax breaks to encourage manufacturing companies to relocate there, especially after Cuba aligned with the Soviet Union. In 1976, when Cuba was sending expeditionary forces to fight for communism in Africa, Congress granted a massive corporate-income-tax loophole to American firms with high intellectual-property costs, such as pharmaceutical companies, that established plants in Puerto Rico.

     

    This is the why of it. It is left over from prior Imperial aspirations, became irrelevant, but was always too much trouble to resolve. Puerto Rico was supposed to be ... for a brief, shining moment ... our version of a capitalistic Cuba. Ouch.

    However, it is now making the financial news for another reason. PR munis have always been triple tax free. Every diversified tax free bond fund needed some of them to compete with every other muni fund. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_bonds_issued_by_Puerto_Rico

    And prior to the hurricanes, PR munis were in the midst of a workout. The bonds themselves aren't a financial catastrophe waiting to happen to anyone except PR. However, like everything .... its all in the details. The manner in which they are 'worked out' impacts the multi trillion US municipal finance system. Whatever happens will be disruptive and the worst case is most disruptive.

    The arithmetic is obvious. Total debt is $80 billion or so. Hurricane damage is mostly uninsured and may be roughly another $80 billion. A lot of it is their electric utilities which have been deteriorating for decades and need a lot of cash.


    By mid January 2017, the debt had reached $70 billion or $12,000 per capita in a territory with a 45 percent poverty rate and double digit unemployment that is more than twice the mainland U.S. average.
     
    It isn't going away anytime soon. If there is anything that Trump has personal expertise with, it is bankruptcy and even more important, restructuring debt.

    The place is a disaster in every way imaginable. However, one thing about bailouts .... if you are going to do it, do it sooner and do it bigger.

    All the current quarter economic statistics have been roiled by the hurricanes. Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example -- as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    If every tragedy is an opportunity, maybe Trump can turn this into something. Or not. This is a big and good topic. Something for everyone.

    Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example — as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.

    That’s not at all contrary to common sense, Anon, as the key phrase is “short-term”. The “broken-windows fallacy”, going back to Fred Bastiat in 1850, was popularized in an erroneous sense by the notorious economist Paul Krugman.

    Puerto Rico, I’m sure, has lots of actual broken windows, but the phrase here figuratively covers all kinds of damage and destruction from acts of God and wars. Sure, early on afterwards, lots of economic activity will happen, but that activity is being paid for by money that could have been used for capital investment or some other productive activity.

    I would say this is total common sense, without even a reading of Bastiat or the Mises article (link above). The fallacy is believing that there is a long-term economic benefit from destruction of otherwise working assets/property. Why not just clear out some US cities (wait, OK, not what I meant ;-}, bomb them to the stone age, and then start right over, with all that rebuilding economic activity? This stupidity can be observed most readily in the economist Paul Maynard Krugman.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief

    This stupidity can be observed most readily in the economist Paul Maynard Krugman
     
    Krugman declared that the Greek economy should be treated in the way, the PR economy is being treated by the US. And as in the PR case, he didn't think one bit about long term effects. I must admit, I was baffled, when I realized, that he was taken seriously by parts of the European public.

    Must admit: I'm stiff baffled.

    The more your arguments are short-circuited, the more likely it is, that you will succeed? Is this the dynamic behind such efforts as Krugman's? Is that what makes them successful?

    Btw - he is not really a Keynesian since Keynes had investments in mind, which made economically sense in such a way, that they'd enable the investor (could be: The government), to not only pay back the credits, but pay interests for those credits, too. All that is left out, if the deficit spending has no other purpose than paying for actual consumption (=imports, in the Greek case).

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  100. @Jack D
    Of course they won't because they hate the man and wouldn't give him credit even if he personally put back all the power poles in Puerto Rico.

    It's like the recent brouhaha where the school librarian in Cambridge, MA wrote a letter to Melania rejecting her gift of Dr. Seuss books and point out what a terrible racist Seuss was and how it was wrong to allow children to be exposed to these terrible books. Then a picture came out of this same librarian in a Cat in the Hat costume reading to kids a few months ago and there were pictures of Moochelle reading Dr. Seuss to kids. So obviously the problem was not with the Dr. Seuss books at all but that is was the despicable Melania who was sending them and the librarian would be damned if she would give Melania any credit for doing anything good.

    Yep, I read about this one, and it would have worked too, if it hadn’t been for that meddling internet. Things that the lyin press used to get away with are not working anymore, and that indeed makes them just look stupid, as Candid Observer wrote.

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  101. I agree totally with your sentiments. There should be a sharp distinction between the public and the private, which most Western nations once had. The state should not interfere in the private sphere. Private clubs are very definitely in the private sphere and how they conduct themselves is no business of non-members.
    The point I was trying to make was concerning the hypocrisy of many Jews. They bewail discrimination, particularly against themselves, whilst flagrantly dishing it out to others. Self-awareness does not seem to be a Jewish virtue, as Mr Steve has mentioned numerous times.
    Oops. Should be reply to 76. AnotherDad

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  102. black sea says:
    @Anon

    Larry David’s net worth is around $900 million dollars.
     
    Saying "dollars" twice is how we know you really mean it...

    $900 million US dollars, net worth, not gross, . . . in dollars

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    • Replies: @FPD72
    Do you understand the concept of redundancy? “$” and “dollars.”
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  103. Logan says:
    @Alec Leamas (hard at work)
    Puerto Rico is a fairly typical Caribbean Island nation that just happens to be the Schrodinger's State of the U.S. due to a quirk of history.

    There is a lot to like about living in a Caribbean Island nation - the pace of life, ease of living, lots of free time to go to the park/beach with the family, pig roasts and oceanside fish fries, generally warm and sunny weather, etc.

    But in most Caribbean Island nations the tradeoff is accepted - things just won't run efficiently and your generally low-stress life will probably end with your first significant illness or serious injury. And if a series of large storms come through things are going to be awful (other than the weather) for a long time.

    It's just that being sort of part of America allows Puerto Ricans to expect the best of both worlds.

    And perhaps I'm not the only one who thinks there is some sinister media intent here - Anna Navarro is reported to have encouraged Puerto Ricans to flee for swing states and register to vote on CNN. I believe she named Pennsylvania and Florida explicitly. Part of me thinks that the failure of Puerto Rico has been engineered to a degree from the Obama White House to preview its unstoppable political hegemony knowing Puerto Ricans will settle in Philadelphia/Suburbs and the Orlando area.

    I’ve done a fair amount of consulting work on various Caribbean islands. As you say, there is a lot that is charming about the islands and their people.

    But it is incredibly frustrating to actually try and get anything done.

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    • Replies: @black sea
    Vacationing in a laid-back, short-time horizon society can be sort of soothing, in that you can imagine for a week or so that nobody worries too much and everything works out in the end.

    Working in such an environment can be stressful annd maddening as hell. Large scale, modern institutions are not village bazaars, and require a frame of mind that many of the locals either don't have, or don't care to exercise. Taking an interest in how your decisions or actions affect the people you work for or with doesn't necessarily come naturally.

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  104. Logan says:
    @black sea

    Oh my goodness, I hope no slaves show up on this.” At that point, Gates instructs him to turn the page. “You did it! I knew it!” David shouts. “Unbelievable. Oh boy, oh boy.”
    The two slaves listed on the document Gates’ researchers found are labeled “mulatto,”
     
    Gates could have immortalized that moment simply by answering David's shocked cries with, "Reparations time, Baby!"*

    *Larry David's net worth is around $900 million dollars.

    I’m eternally amused by those who carefully track their biological ancestry back for many generations.

    The entire edifice is erected on the foundation of the idea that the bio-dad of each and every child in the sequence is the husband of the mother, or at least the man she designates as being the father.

    This is, to put it mildly, an unjustified assumption.

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    • Replies: @Ed
    This has been tested repeatedly through genetics, paternal error, where a woman says one man is the father & he's not, is extremely rare. In Europe it's historically been less than 1% or so. It's not that much higher in Africa.

    Women just aren't that interested in sleeping around and the few that are rely on modern contraception & abortion to help facilitate unwanted pregnancies. The pill being a recent development.
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  105. @Stephen Marle
    Two reviews of the Eugene McCarthy book here:

    http://www.thesocialcontract.com/artman2/publish/tsc0303/article_238.shtml

    ====

    Despite his long-time record as a left-of-center Democrat, McCarthy also makes critical remarks about illegal immigration and multiculturalism that will strike most 'professional conservatives' inside the [Washington, DC] Beltway as excessively rightist.

    ====

    If one thinks of the classic definition of colonialsim the arrival of large numbers of people who impose their cultural values and language on the pre-existing society it is not hard to define the current wave of immigration as a colonizing force on the United States. What distinguishes the United States from other colonized societies is that we have the power to prevent it, but choose not to use it.

    ====

    Working on the new edition of my [the reviewer's] book on American conservatism made me aware of how obsolete the political labels of even twenty years ago have become. Those who appeal to blue-collar Democrats by stressing the responsibilities of multinational corporations to an American labor force will be attacked as neo-Nazis in what are taken to be conservative magazines.

    ====

    I had no idea that McCarthy was such a neo-Nazi!

    we have the power to prevent it

    cite needed

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  106. Logan says:
    @black sea

    I think once you have a nonliterate culture, it is incredibly difficult to turn it around.
     
    This is an interesting, and perhaps overlooked, point. A literate culture is one in which people not only can read, but do read in the course of a normal day. It might be newspapers and magazines, and less frequently books, but reading -- and talking about what people are reading or have read -- is a not entirely uncommon feature of middle class life.

    However, in much of the world, even as economies grow, there is no such culture of reading, and since such a culture is increasingly anachronistic even in the West, it's unlikely that this culture will develop.

    For the most part, people either fall into the habit of reading in their childhood, or they don't develop the habit at all. And since people are fairly herd-like in their behavior, for this to happen they tend to need a family and social environment in which reading appears normal and intrinsically interesting, not some weird and exhausting affectation.

    I have noticed that more and more websites are largely video-based rather than text-based. If I want certain information I have to watch a talking head tell me what I could have just read in 1/10 the time.

    Very frustrating, but increasingly popular.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, I am the same way, Logan. As soon as as know some video is loading, often bogging down the browser, I immediately click back. Audio is, of course, the same, as far as speed goes. I have nothing against John Derbyshire's voice, but his weekly VDare "Radio-Derb" podcasts take 45 minutes or so, and I can easily read the transcripts in 8-10 min, which is what I do. Even if the time didn't matter, I like reading better.

    Of course, some of the talking boobs heads have very nice breasts and that changes everything. I don't learn as much with the sound off though.
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  107. Logan says:
    @Citizen of a Silly Country
    How can they have an IQ of 84 and be 65% white.

    African Americans have an IQ of ~85 and they're, what, around 15% white. With that high of a percentage of European ancestry, PRicans should be ~92 IQ, maybe a touch higher.

    According to various DNA testing groups, American blacks average 19% to 29% European ancestry.

    http://www.theroot.com/exactly-how-black-is-black-america-1790895185

    Meanwhile, whites average well under 1% African ancestry.

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  108. Escher says:

    How do you solve a problem like Maria?

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  109. black sea says:
    @Logan
    I've done a fair amount of consulting work on various Caribbean islands. As you say, there is a lot that is charming about the islands and their people.

    But it is incredibly frustrating to actually try and get anything done.

    Vacationing in a laid-back, short-time horizon society can be sort of soothing, in that you can imagine for a week or so that nobody worries too much and everything works out in the end.

    Working in such an environment can be stressful annd maddening as hell. Large scale, modern institutions are not village bazaars, and require a frame of mind that many of the locals either don’t have, or don’t care to exercise. Taking an interest in how your decisions or actions affect the people you work for or with doesn’t necessarily come naturally.

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  110. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Steve Sailer
    23% of students in Puerto Rico go to private schools versus 10% of students in America. Heck, Benicio del Toro's lawyer dad not only sent little Benicio to a private school, it was a boarding school in Pennsylvania.

    But that can't really account for why, of the 77% of the students who are in public school in Puerto Rico, why 94% are Below Basic rather than Basic. I forget the exact Hispanic figures for the US, but the bottom 77% of Hispanic students in the US would be, maybe, roughly half divided between Basic and Below Basic.

    Caribbean character formation is specific. Tendency to laziness. IQ just indicates a potential.

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  111. george says:
    @AnotherDad

    If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.
     
    Swag? Seriously.

    Puerto Rico has a much sweeter deal--Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax. Yet, the residents are eligible for all the usual federal goodies--Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, DoD money, highway money, etc. Puerto Rico basically has you fill out the same forms as the feds and pay the exact same income taxes you would to the feds--but it all goes to the government of Puerto Rico. The problem is the Puerto Rican state takes all that money and ... pisses it away. Featherbedding bureaucracy, useless welfare handouts, graft ... more bureaucracy and featherbedding. It's Latin Caribbean style government corruption\incompetence but amped up by being on the federal tit.

    Statehood would be a major fiscal hit to the joint.

    It's pretty much a case study in the effects of welfare, plus HBD and Latin culture. Puerto Rico, is what California--and its fiscal situation--would be without the tech, defense and Hollywood industries, the remaining white people and Asians. And what California could well become down the line if it becomes fiscally untenable and the whites and their industries leave.

    The right remedy is Puerto Rican independence. Making people stand on their own two feet and bear the costs of their decisions--which at least gradually encourages better behavior--is pretty much always the right choice.

    “Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax. Yet, the residents are eligible for all the usual federal goodies–Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, DoD money, highway money, etc.”

    I don’t know. A very brief search of the net shows PR does pay SS FICA taxes on payroll. A complexity is that states like Florida have large numbers of PR born workers who pay taxes. My guess is PR ends up as part of Florida to avoid giving them 2 senators, although my fantasy is they are added to Hawaii along with all those other bits of legacy imperialism like US Virgin Islands, Guam, and Samoa. And maybe a few other places. Maybe Rhode Island and Providence Plantations too or should they be part of Connecticut? I have it in for Hawaii recently for some reason.

    Payroll taxes
    Withholding taxes on salaries and wages
    All employers are required to withhold Puerto Rico income tax from all wages paid to its employees.

    Federal Social Security and Medicare (FICA)
    The Federal Social Security and Medicare Law applies in full in Puerto Rico. The tax rate is imposed on both the employer and the employee. For 2017, the tax rate is 7.65%, which consists of 6.2% of Social Security and 1.45% of Medicare Tax. The Social Security Tax is calculated on the first USD 127,200 (year 2017) of wages received, and the Medicare Tax is calculated on the total wages, without ceiling.

    In addition, an employer must withhold a 0.9% Additional Medicare Tax from wages paid to an employee in excess of USD 200,000 in a calendar year. The employer is required to begin withholding Additional Medicare Tax in the pay period in which wages are paid in excess of USD 200,000 to an employee and continue to withhold it each pay period until the end of the calendar year. Additional Medicare Tax is only imposed on the employee. There is no employer share of Additional Medicare Tax. All wages that are subject to Medicare tax are subject to Additional Medicare Tax withholding if paid in excess of the USD 200,000 withholding threshold.

    http://taxsummaries.pwc.com/ID/Puerto-Rico-Corporate-Other-taxes

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  112. @Anon
    It seems so many whites are playing baby chess.

    In chess, one can make a move for easy gain. Move to take a piece. Elemental.

    Now, if EVERYONE plays chess like this -- only for short-term direct gain -- , it will balance out since no one will have any advantage over his opponents. They will all play like retards.

    But people who know the game don't play that way. They see moves ahead. They understand that short-term or easy gain can lead to sure death.
    A player could take one easy piece, then another, then another... only to find himself trapped or set up for a kill.

    There seems to be no sense of 'seeing moves ahead' in much of US politics.

    When GOP was talking about 'free trade' and 'diversity', it was always in terms of short-term gain(though delusional even on that level).

    But the more Con Inc. play this game, the more they are set up for checkmate.

    Florida and Texas turning blue is checkmate. It's over.

    Jews(and maybe the people of dot) seem to be the only ones who look several moves ahead in the global game of power. Most others will overlook future moves and go for the easiest pickings and gains.

    We need a grandmaster, not babies who play chess like checkers.

    An apparent gain can be a bait. Learn from THE COUNSELOR.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gA6nvk88AEY

    There seems to be no sense of ‘seeing moves ahead’ in much of US politics.

    This is for better or worse, pretty much required if you’re a politician in a democracy.

    If you don’t win the next election, you don’t have any voice either. By definition, short-term elections privilege short-term planning. This is not unique to politics, quite a few corporations do the same thing with quarterly earnings.

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  113. @Reg Cæsar

    Cuckservative baby boomer rats such as Newt Gingrich
     
    Gingrich was born in 1943. Were he born eight months earlier, he could have voted in the 1960 election, years before any "baby boomer rat" could vote anywhere.

    Reg Caesar says:

    Gingrich was born in 1943. Were he born eight months earlier, he could have voted in the 1960 election, years before any “baby boomer rat” could vote anywhere.

    I say:

    1943 is close enough to 1945 to qualify as a baby boomer rat cuckservative.

    Baby boomer cuckservative rat Newt Gingrich pushed the North American Free Trade Agreement. Gingrich wants to give statehood to Puerto Rico. Gingrich pushed for mass legal immigration. Gingrich pushes mass immigration, multiculturalism and globalization.

    Gingrich’s presidential run in 2012 was funded by billionaire rat Shelly Adelson. Shelly Adelson puts the interests of Israel ahead of the interests of the United States.

    Gingrich is a filthy whore for treasonous rat globalizers. Gingrich is a corporate propaganda whore for billionaire rat Rupert Murdoch.

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  114. TheJester says:

    I can wax endlessly about Britain and France’s racial problems as self-inflicted wounds as they tried desperately to hold on to the last vestiges of their colonial empires … by inviting the Bantu, North Africans, Pakistanis, and Hindi to come live with them.

    We Americans have our own self-inflicted wounds from imperial ventures … and these are not following through with Abraham Lincon’s plan to repatriate ex-slaves to Africa after the Civil War as well as keeping Puerto Rico after the Spanish-American War.

    Having become truly “diverse”, it seems that Western Civilization will spend its last days struggling with the social, cultural, and religious challenges of diversity as our borders collapse and we reidentify ourselves with the disparate (and desperate) parts of the Third World. I don’t see any more “moon shots” on the horizon.

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    • Replies: @Corvinus
    "Having become truly “diverse”, it seems that Western Civilization will spend its last days struggling with the social, cultural, and religious challenges of diversity as our borders collapse and we reidentify ourselves with the disparate (and desperate) parts of the Third World."

    Western Civilization had its moments. Now it's off to retirement. [Cue riding into sunset]
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  115. Ed says:
    @Logan
    I'm eternally amused by those who carefully track their biological ancestry back for many generations.

    The entire edifice is erected on the foundation of the idea that the bio-dad of each and every child in the sequence is the husband of the mother, or at least the man she designates as being the father.

    This is, to put it mildly, an unjustified assumption.

    This has been tested repeatedly through genetics, paternal error, where a woman says one man is the father & he’s not, is extremely rare. In Europe it’s historically been less than 1% or so. It’s not that much higher in Africa.

    Women just aren’t that interested in sleeping around and the few that are rely on modern contraception & abortion to help facilitate unwanted pregnancies. The pill being a recent development.

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    • Replies: @Logan
    Not sure where you get your numbers.

    Here's an article claiming 5% to 15% for paternal error.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/07/who-s-your-daddy/305969/
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  116. @Unladen Swallow
    Gregory Clark has pointed out that French Canadians in the US also score very low on occupational and educational attainment as well. This has to do with very selective out migration of poor, often illiterate Quebecois to the US ( New England specifically ) from between 1865 and 1920. Although they don't score as poorly as blacks, their success is well below what one would expect from a comparable European population such as the Irish and the Italians.

    But French Canadians are Caucasian, European, white. They are our own. Not all whites are going to be brilliant, but overall the Caucasian/Europeans races are the best. We owe it to them to have safe, clean, prosperous countries.

    I have no interest in blacks/Asians.

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    • Replies: @AM

    But French Canadians are Caucasian, European, white.
     
    Overall French Canadians fit sort of a profile of rural Irish-Scots. Not elite material, but not terrible to have as sort of peasantry. (Indeed, most of them are from the Celtic region in north France called Brittany, if my info is correct.)

    The clever French stayed home. But the French on this side the pond, while not always the brightest, mostly want to be left alone. Their worst habits are their drinking habits, which they share with the English.

    And in pinch, they'll help out - that's where the Cajun Navy of Houston came from. Also, they'll make quirky cooking shows and say "Bam!" a lot.

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  117. NO BAILOUT FOR PUERTO RICO BONDS

    NO BAILOUT FOR INVESTORS IN PUERTO RICO GOVERNMENT DEBT

    CUT PUERTO RICO LOOSE NOW!

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  118. @AndrewR
    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?

    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?

    The whole US imperial period that followed the war was the worst period for the US’s foreign policy. Prior to that we’d mostly run with the founders wisdom, looked after our own interests and resisted becoming too involved in other folks’ business. Roosevelt’s sleazy war against the Filipinos to make them a colony stands to this day as the worst, most morally depraved use of US power.

    Taking the side of the Cuban and Philippine rebels and helping them toss the Spanish out–ok, fine, whatever. If we’d stuck to that policy generally and just been allies of “independence” and “republics” generally–peachy. But assembling a tiny empire of our own was both vile and stupid. And now more of the blowback is helping us becoming even dumber.

    Though I will point out, that all the human blowback from our imperial adventures is small potatoes compared to the human avalanche caused by dismantling the idea of the nation with David Brooks style “we are the world” ism.

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    • Replies: @Logan
    The conquest of the Philippines was almost complete by the time TR became president. Not really fair to blame him personally, though he was of course an avid proponent of the war. Indeed, of almost any war.
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  119. AM says:
    @Unladen Swallow
    Gregory Clark has pointed out that French Canadians in the US also score very low on occupational and educational attainment as well. This has to do with very selective out migration of poor, often illiterate Quebecois to the US ( New England specifically ) from between 1865 and 1920. Although they don't score as poorly as blacks, their success is well below what one would expect from a comparable European population such as the Irish and the Italians.

    Although they [Quebecois] don’t score as poorly as blacks, their success is well below what one would expect from a comparable European population such as the Irish and the Italians.

    Just from my own experiences, it’s a combo of factors. I am afraid that when I think the French Canadian side of my own family..the word “bright” does not come to mind. They were however, sane and would rise up to very clean and orderly if given the right conditions. (More so than the English around them at times.)

    My English side was brighter by standards of formal IQ. My grandfather was a self taught civil engineer; my grandmother an executive secretary for the AP Canadian Press Core in the 1920/1930′s or so. I still have her recipe cards – all typed up. :)

    On the other hand, my Mom had mental illness problems for her entire life, several of the grand children had drinking problems, my uncles have are really strange formality to them, and to a person today they all think Christianity is to be worked against. (Too clever for all that backward thinking, doncha know?)

    In other words, straight up IQ and achievement is not all that it’s cracked up to be.

    There were also different social/cultural factors involved with the Irish and the Italians. The Irish/Italians picked up and completely left home. They had to make it here and ties to home were letters and expensive (impossible) travel. Quebecois just moved a little south in comparison. They were still pretty close to home, including in physical environment. Probably not as motivated to make it or assimilate for that matter.

    And as another cultural observation, rural Frenchmen on this side of the pond tend to have much lower levels achievement versus the French that gravitate towards cities. It’s the difference between Cajun and Creole. In other words, when you get a Frenchman in shack in the middle of nowhere, that’s the way they like it for the most part. You won’t be talking them into the fancy pants city ways of their cousins.

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  120. Flip says:
    @syonredux

    Sell them back to Spain to use the place as a prison camp for Catalans.
     
    Does Kaiser Bill have any descendants? We could make one of them Emperor of Puerto Rico and turn the island into a giant Steampunk Theme Park:" Tremble as the Kaiser readies his war-fleet of Mjolnir-class destroyers for an all-out attack on our Isthmian Canal! Cheer as Teddy Roosevelt prepares to unleash Edison's new magneto-electric cannon!"

    The current King of Spain is one of them, in fact, through his mother.

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  121. Flip says:
    @Unladen Swallow
    Gregory Clark has pointed out that French Canadians in the US also score very low on occupational and educational attainment as well. This has to do with very selective out migration of poor, often illiterate Quebecois to the US ( New England specifically ) from between 1865 and 1920. Although they don't score as poorly as blacks, their success is well below what one would expect from a comparable European population such as the Irish and the Italians.

    I’ve read that there is a not insignificant amount of Indian ancestry in French Canadians.

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    • Replies: @AM

    I’ve read that there is a not insignificant amount of Indian ancestry in French Canadians.
     
    Depends on the family. I could also do an Elizabeth Warren in terms of native percentage. My Dad has coloring that has a lot of native to it. Very annoying as his more English daughters freckled.

    On the hand, my French Canadian side also intermarried with English families here since the Pilgrims. My maiden name is actually an old English name and I knew many French Canadians that could not be picked by their last names.

    French Canadians and marriage: "not fussy" comes to mind.
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  122. Brutusale says:
    @syonredux

    The problem of Puerto Rico’s atrocious public schools gets virtually zero coverage in the States because, well, Puerto Rico doesn’t seem like our country. Everybody there speaks Spanish, so it’s hard to follow what’s going on.
     
    Yep. And that's also why all the media coverage and op-eds about the crisis in Puerto Rico drone on about how they are "American citizens." They know that Americans really don't view them as fellow citizens.

    I don’t even consider the ones living in the 48 contiguous states citizens. If even one had an American flag instead of a Puerto Rican one I’d reconsider, but, like Sasquatch and Nessie, I doubt such an animal exists.

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  123. @AnotherDad

    If Puerto Rico had the same deal, 2 senators and probably 5 representatives Puerto Rico would have lots of the same federal government swag.
     
    Swag? Seriously.

    Puerto Rico has a much sweeter deal--Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax. Yet, the residents are eligible for all the usual federal goodies--Social Security, Medicare, Medicaid, DoD money, highway money, etc. Puerto Rico basically has you fill out the same forms as the feds and pay the exact same income taxes you would to the feds--but it all goes to the government of Puerto Rico. The problem is the Puerto Rican state takes all that money and ... pisses it away. Featherbedding bureaucracy, useless welfare handouts, graft ... more bureaucracy and featherbedding. It's Latin Caribbean style government corruption\incompetence but amped up by being on the federal tit.

    Statehood would be a major fiscal hit to the joint.

    It's pretty much a case study in the effects of welfare, plus HBD and Latin culture. Puerto Rico, is what California--and its fiscal situation--would be without the tech, defense and Hollywood industries, the remaining white people and Asians. And what California could well become down the line if it becomes fiscally untenable and the whites and their industries leave.

    The right remedy is Puerto Rican independence. Making people stand on their own two feet and bear the costs of their decisions--which at least gradually encourages better behavior--is pretty much always the right choice.

    Puerto Rico has a much sweeter deal–Puerto Rican residents do not pay federal income tax.

    Few would anyway– almost all of them fall far beneath the income threshold.

    But then, they wouldn’t get EITC if they don’t file. Or do they?

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  124. Puerto Rico must be allowed to go belly up. The bond owners who own Puerto Rican debt must go tits up. The US government must not bail out the investors who purchased Puerto Rican government debt, or any debt whatsoever connected to Puerto Rico. Seth Klarman has been revealed as a person who has bought Puerto Rican bonds in hopes of cashing out big.

    SETH KLARMAN must be given a salt shaker to sprinkle salt on his worthless Puerto Rican bonds before he eats them. Klarman must lose 100 cents on the dollar for his greedy purchase of Puerto Rican debt. Klarman has loads of loot, and the Puerto Rican government debt was purchased for one of his funds. I am sure his investors won’t mind getting soaked by Seth for a bit of money — it is not even a whole billion dollars, only close to it.

    David Dayen says:

    Klarman, who has been described as the Oracle of Boston, has a history of buying unpopular or distressed assets on the cheap in hopes of a payday. Baupost manages over $30 billion in assets. He is known as the top campaign contributor in New England and has been a major donor in Republican politics in Massachusetts, including largely secret support for 2016’s Question 2, an ultimately unsuccessful effort to lift a state cap on charter schools. Klarman supported Hillary Clinton in 2016, calling Donald Trump “completely unqualified for the highest office in the land.”

    Klarman’s involvement in Puerto Rican debt will surely come as a surprise to activists in Massachusetts and Puerto Rico, who have never mentioned him among the “vultures” who are causing undue pain for the island’s U.S. citizens.

    https://theintercept.com/2017/10/03/we-can-finally-identify-one-of-the-largest-holders-of-puerto-rican-debt/

    President Trump must make Seth Klarman the face of the greedy financiers who intended on feasting on Puerto Rican debt.

    NO BAILOUT FOR PUERTO RICO BOND INVESTORS

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  125. anon says: • Disclaimer

    “We are going to work something out” on Puerto Rico’s debt, Trump said.
    “We have to look at their whole debt structure,” Trump said. “They owe a lot of money to your friends on Wall Street. We’re going to have to wipe that out. That’s going to have to be — you know, you can say goodbye to that. I don’t know if it’s Goldman Sachs but whoever it is, you can wave goodbye to that.”

    This got ‘walked back’.

    Current ‘position’ is that the country is currently in a quasi bankruptcy receivership. The GO’s hit record lows after Trump’s comments.

    https://www.bloombergquint.com/politics/2017/10/04/trump-suggests-puerto-rico-s-debt-may-need-to-be-wiped-out

    I haven’t heard anyone suggest that the bondholders be bailed out. The debt will be wiped out by bankruptcy — later rather than sooner — if nothing is done. Bondholders will be forced to take a haircut, and current market prices of 50% of face value is a proxy for what people think they will get.

    There are debt workouts all the time and sovereign debt workouts on an occasional basis. Greece more than once. So, it is unique in specifics but not uncommon in general.

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  126. Puerto Rico must be allowed to go belly up.

    If I owned Puerto Rico bonds, I would be all in favor of extracting as close to my pound of flesh from Puerto Rico over the next several years, but on the other hand if I owned Puerto Rico bonds I would have bought them knowing that they paid a higher rate of interest precisely because there was an element of risk involved and I might lose all my money.

    Unfortunately there are many naive investors and retirees who bought the bonds on the advice of their pain financial advisors, or were talked into it by salesmen, who probably did not fully understand the risk.

    But the trouble is that when you buy bonds issued by a local government entity, there is no system like a corporate bankruptcy where the bondholders get paid off first, before the shareholders get anything.

    Puerto Rico cannot cease to exist and emerge from bankruptcy like General Motors, because there is no potential for future profitable taxation, nor can the people and businesses on the island ever earn enough to pay off the debts.

    I suppose eventually there will be some kind of cramdown in which the government pensioners of Puerto Rico will have to take cutbacks, education will be provided only up to age 11, receipts from arrival taxes will immediately be handed over to bondholders, the general standard of living for workers will resemble Haiti more than the United States, healthcare will be provided by missionaries, and it will be so cheap to live there that US retirees on fixed incomes will move there in planeloads and US based Puerto Ricans will revive the economy by building retirement homes there instead of in Florida.

    There will never again be a general system for the distribution of electricity, so people will become more ingenious in building their own solar and wind systems. A large black plastic tub of water on the roof gets pretty warm on sunny days in the Caribbean, warm enough to shower and wash clothes. Wealthier individuals and condos will have diesel generators and Tesla inversor systems to store power for when the generators are not running.

    Residents will rely on buying bottled purified water for drinking, and collect rainwater in butts and cisterns for toilet flushing, bathing, and washing dishes and clothes.

    The island will be marketed as a haven for the green/renewable life , and as out of range of North Korean missiles, as an additional bonus.

    It will all work out beautifully.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman

    It will all work out beautifully.
     
    Puerto Rico could really use an optimist like, you John. That was a good explanation of the bond-finance stuff too. I'm surprised you haven't found the one slight snag in your otherwise rosy-sounding plan. The American retirees may be just as broke as the Puerto Ricans there, once the world has had enough of the propped-up US dollar.

    American municipal, state, and private pension plans will not remain solvent with current investment returns, but the FED can't let interest rates rise to a natural level or the US budget gets a hit with 30% of it being interest AND the stock market will take a dive. Some of these happy retired Americans in PR may find their checks either cut to 1/3 or that they have the same dollar figure on the front but the weekly check just buys 2 cases of water and 5 Big Mac meals (super-sized, at least, so there's that.)

    This brings me to mull on why Americans in general think this country can bail out anybody. I guess most don't know we are beyond broke. Ignorance is bliss, until it isn't.

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  127. AM says:
    @Flip
    I've read that there is a not insignificant amount of Indian ancestry in French Canadians.

    I’ve read that there is a not insignificant amount of Indian ancestry in French Canadians.

    Depends on the family. I could also do an Elizabeth Warren in terms of native percentage. My Dad has coloring that has a lot of native to it. Very annoying as his more English daughters freckled.

    On the hand, my French Canadian side also intermarried with English families here since the Pilgrims. My maiden name is actually an old English name and I knew many French Canadians that could not be picked by their last names.

    French Canadians and marriage: “not fussy” comes to mind.

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  128. AM says:
    @attilathehen
    But French Canadians are Caucasian, European, white. They are our own. Not all whites are going to be brilliant, but overall the Caucasian/Europeans races are the best. We owe it to them to have safe, clean, prosperous countries.

    I have no interest in blacks/Asians.

    But French Canadians are Caucasian, European, white.

    Overall French Canadians fit sort of a profile of rural Irish-Scots. Not elite material, but not terrible to have as sort of peasantry. (Indeed, most of them are from the Celtic region in north France called Brittany, if my info is correct.)

    The clever French stayed home. But the French on this side the pond, while not always the brightest, mostly want to be left alone. Their worst habits are their drinking habits, which they share with the English.

    And in pinch, they’ll help out – that’s where the Cajun Navy of Houston came from. Also, they’ll make quirky cooking shows and say “Bam!” a lot.

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  129. Corvinus says:
    @Anon
    Why this need for Replacism against the native folks?

    They are the last holdout.

    Globalists got all the media, academia, entertainment, finance, whore-politicians, deep state, and etc.

    The one holdout is 50% of the population that resiliently remains conservative. They cannot be persuaded even if their leaders are cucky-wucked.

    So, the only way is to replace them.

    “Globalists got all the media, academia, entertainment, finance, whore-politicians, deep state, and etc.”

    In a nutshell, we are dealing with a Fake News Story here.

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  130. Corvinus says:
    @TheJester
    I can wax endlessly about Britain and France's racial problems as self-inflicted wounds as they tried desperately to hold on to the last vestiges of their colonial empires ... by inviting the Bantu, North Africans, Pakistanis, and Hindi to come live with them.

    We Americans have our own self-inflicted wounds from imperial ventures ... and these are not following through with Abraham Lincon's plan to repatriate ex-slaves to Africa after the Civil War as well as keeping Puerto Rico after the Spanish-American War.

    Having become truly "diverse", it seems that Western Civilization will spend its last days struggling with the social, cultural, and religious challenges of diversity as our borders collapse and we reidentify ourselves with the disparate (and desperate) parts of the Third World. I don't see any more "moon shots" on the horizon.

    “Having become truly “diverse”, it seems that Western Civilization will spend its last days struggling with the social, cultural, and religious challenges of diversity as our borders collapse and we reidentify ourselves with the disparate (and desperate) parts of the Third World.”

    Western Civilization had its moments. Now it’s off to retirement. [Cue riding into sunset]

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  131. @Logan
    I have noticed that more and more websites are largely video-based rather than text-based. If I want certain information I have to watch a talking head tell me what I could have just read in 1/10 the time.

    Very frustrating, but increasingly popular.

    Yep, I am the same way, Logan. As soon as as know some video is loading, often bogging down the browser, I immediately click back. Audio is, of course, the same, as far as speed goes. I have nothing against John Derbyshire’s voice, but his weekly VDare “Radio-Derb” podcasts take 45 minutes or so, and I can easily read the transcripts in 8-10 min, which is what I do. Even if the time didn’t matter, I like reading better.

    Of course, some of the talking boobs heads have very nice breasts and that changes everything. I don’t learn as much with the sound off though.

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    • Replies: @Logan
    I actually listen to a LOT of audio, including Radio Derb, but only in the car. I have to drive all over the state for my job, and my nasty tendency to go to sleep at the wheel is ameliorated by an intelligent audio discussion. Music just puts me to sleep faster.
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  132. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Puerto Ratso

    Puerto Ratso and G.I. Joe Buck

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  133. Logan says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Yep, I am the same way, Logan. As soon as as know some video is loading, often bogging down the browser, I immediately click back. Audio is, of course, the same, as far as speed goes. I have nothing against John Derbyshire's voice, but his weekly VDare "Radio-Derb" podcasts take 45 minutes or so, and I can easily read the transcripts in 8-10 min, which is what I do. Even if the time didn't matter, I like reading better.

    Of course, some of the talking boobs heads have very nice breasts and that changes everything. I don't learn as much with the sound off though.

    I actually listen to a LOT of audio, including Radio Derb, but only in the car. I have to drive all over the state for my job, and my nasty tendency to go to sleep at the wheel is ameliorated by an intelligent audio discussion. Music just puts me to sleep faster.

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    • Agree: Harry Baldwin
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Interestingly, for me what works is Mountain Dew and Live at Budokan. To each his own.

    Have a good night, Logan.
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  134. Logan says:
    @AnotherDad

    Can anyone sincerely argue that the US would be worse off had Spain kept Puerto Rico?
     
    The whole US imperial period that followed the war was the worst period for the US's foreign policy. Prior to that we'd mostly run with the founders wisdom, looked after our own interests and resisted becoming too involved in other folks' business. Roosevelt's sleazy war against the Filipinos to make them a colony stands to this day as the worst, most morally depraved use of US power.

    Taking the side of the Cuban and Philippine rebels and helping them toss the Spanish out--ok, fine, whatever. If we'd stuck to that policy generally and just been allies of "independence" and "republics" generally--peachy. But assembling a tiny empire of our own was both vile and stupid. And now more of the blowback is helping us becoming even dumber.

    Though I will point out, that all the human blowback from our imperial adventures is small potatoes compared to the human avalanche caused by dismantling the idea of the nation with David Brooks style "we are the world" ism.

    The conquest of the Philippines was almost complete by the time TR became president. Not really fair to blame him personally, though he was of course an avid proponent of the war. Indeed, of almost any war.

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  135. @Jonathan Mason

    Puerto Rico must be allowed to go belly up.
     
    If I owned Puerto Rico bonds, I would be all in favor of extracting as close to my pound of flesh from Puerto Rico over the next several years, but on the other hand if I owned Puerto Rico bonds I would have bought them knowing that they paid a higher rate of interest precisely because there was an element of risk involved and I might lose all my money.

    Unfortunately there are many naive investors and retirees who bought the bonds on the advice of their pain financial advisors, or were talked into it by salesmen, who probably did not fully understand the risk.

    But the trouble is that when you buy bonds issued by a local government entity, there is no system like a corporate bankruptcy where the bondholders get paid off first, before the shareholders get anything.

    Puerto Rico cannot cease to exist and emerge from bankruptcy like General Motors, because there is no potential for future profitable taxation, nor can the people and businesses on the island ever earn enough to pay off the debts.

    I suppose eventually there will be some kind of cramdown in which the government pensioners of Puerto Rico will have to take cutbacks, education will be provided only up to age 11, receipts from arrival taxes will immediately be handed over to bondholders, the general standard of living for workers will resemble Haiti more than the United States, healthcare will be provided by missionaries, and it will be so cheap to live there that US retirees on fixed incomes will move there in planeloads and US based Puerto Ricans will revive the economy by building retirement homes there instead of in Florida.

    There will never again be a general system for the distribution of electricity, so people will become more ingenious in building their own solar and wind systems. A large black plastic tub of water on the roof gets pretty warm on sunny days in the Caribbean, warm enough to shower and wash clothes. Wealthier individuals and condos will have diesel generators and Tesla inversor systems to store power for when the generators are not running.

    Residents will rely on buying bottled purified water for drinking, and collect rainwater in butts and cisterns for toilet flushing, bathing, and washing dishes and clothes.

    The island will be marketed as a haven for the green/renewable life , and as out of range of North Korean missiles, as an additional bonus.

    It will all work out beautifully.

    It will all work out beautifully.

    Puerto Rico could really use an optimist like, you John. That was a good explanation of the bond-finance stuff too. I’m surprised you haven’t found the one slight snag in your otherwise rosy-sounding plan. The American retirees may be just as broke as the Puerto Ricans there, once the world has had enough of the propped-up US dollar.

    American municipal, state, and private pension plans will not remain solvent with current investment returns, but the FED can’t let interest rates rise to a natural level or the US budget gets a hit with 30% of it being interest AND the stock market will take a dive. Some of these happy retired Americans in PR may find their checks either cut to 1/3 or that they have the same dollar figure on the front but the weekly check just buys 2 cases of water and 5 Big Mac meals (super-sized, at least, so there’s that.)

    This brings me to mull on why Americans in general think this country can bail out anybody. I guess most don’t know we are beyond broke. Ignorance is bliss, until it isn’t.

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  136. @Logan
    I actually listen to a LOT of audio, including Radio Derb, but only in the car. I have to drive all over the state for my job, and my nasty tendency to go to sleep at the wheel is ameliorated by an intelligent audio discussion. Music just puts me to sleep faster.

    Interestingly, for me what works is Mountain Dew and Live at Budokan. To each his own.

    Have a good night, Logan.

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  137. FPD72 says:
    @black sea
    $900 million US dollars, net worth, not gross, . . . in dollars

    Do you understand the concept of redundancy? “$” and “dollars.”

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    No. could you explain it?
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  138. @Anon
    It seems so many whites are playing baby chess.

    In chess, one can make a move for easy gain. Move to take a piece. Elemental.

    Now, if EVERYONE plays chess like this -- only for short-term direct gain -- , it will balance out since no one will have any advantage over his opponents. They will all play like retards.

    But people who know the game don't play that way. They see moves ahead. They understand that short-term or easy gain can lead to sure death.
    A player could take one easy piece, then another, then another... only to find himself trapped or set up for a kill.

    There seems to be no sense of 'seeing moves ahead' in much of US politics.

    When GOP was talking about 'free trade' and 'diversity', it was always in terms of short-term gain(though delusional even on that level).

    But the more Con Inc. play this game, the more they are set up for checkmate.

    Florida and Texas turning blue is checkmate. It's over.

    Jews(and maybe the people of dot) seem to be the only ones who look several moves ahead in the global game of power. Most others will overlook future moves and go for the easiest pickings and gains.

    We need a grandmaster, not babies who play chess like checkers.

    An apparent gain can be a bait. Learn from THE COUNSELOR.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gA6nvk88AEY

    I’ve concluded that the Republican establishment doesn’t care much if it doesn’t hold power. It’s content to be a token opposition and enjoy the perks attendant thereto, such as well-paid sinecures for its members should they lose their seats for failing to represent your base. See: Eric Cantor.

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    • Agree: Jim Don Bob
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  139. @Achmed E. Newman

    Contrary to common sense, catastrophes provide a short term boost to economic activity. Car sales are up, for example — as many as 1/2 million cars were flooded in Houston.
     
    That's not at all contrary to common sense, Anon, as the key phrase is "short-term". The "broken-windows fallacy", going back to Fred Bastiat in 1850, was popularized in an erroneous sense by the notorious economist Paul Krugman.

    Puerto Rico, I'm sure, has lots of actual broken windows, but the phrase here figuratively covers all kinds of damage and destruction from acts of God and wars. Sure, early on afterwards, lots of economic activity will happen, but that activity is being paid for by money that could have been used for capital investment or some other productive activity.

    I would say this is total common sense, without even a reading of Bastiat or the Mises article (link above). The fallacy is believing that there is a long-term economic benefit from destruction of otherwise working assets/property. Why not just clear out some US cities (wait, OK, not what I meant ;-}, bomb them to the stone age, and then start right over, with all that rebuilding economic activity? This stupidity can be observed most readily in the economist Paul Maynard Krugman.

    This stupidity can be observed most readily in the economist Paul Maynard Krugman

    Krugman declared that the Greek economy should be treated in the way, the PR economy is being treated by the US. And as in the PR case, he didn’t think one bit about long term effects. I must admit, I was baffled, when I realized, that he was taken seriously by parts of the European public.

    Must admit: I’m stiff baffled.

    The more your arguments are short-circuited, the more likely it is, that you will succeed? Is this the dynamic behind such efforts as Krugman’s? Is that what makes them successful?

    Btw – he is not really a Keynesian since Keynes had investments in mind, which made economically sense in such a way, that they’d enable the investor (could be: The government), to not only pay back the credits, but pay interests for those credits, too. All that is left out, if the deficit spending has no other purpose than paying for actual consumption (=imports, in the Greek case).

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Yes, Mr. Kief, and Krugman is taken seriously by economists and government people here in America too. I don't think that it's really that they all think he's smart or believe any of his Statist ideas. It's more that they just want to keep the gravy train on the tracks until they are all retired and dead, so the financial SHTF won't affect them. As Maynard Keynes himself said "in the long run, we are all dead." I wonder if Mr Keynes had any children.

    As far as Mr. Keynes ideas, I don't believe in ANY government being allowed to invest in ANYTHING. However, yes, he was not an OPM* spendthrift as much as Krugman and believed that the feral government should pay off debts during better economic times. That makes me think that he did not ever meet a politician in his entire life.

    .
    .
    * Other People's Money
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  140. @Dieter Kief

    This stupidity can be observed most readily in the economist Paul Maynard Krugman
     
    Krugman declared that the Greek economy should be treated in the way, the PR economy is being treated by the US. And as in the PR case, he didn't think one bit about long term effects. I must admit, I was baffled, when I realized, that he was taken seriously by parts of the European public.

    Must admit: I'm stiff baffled.

    The more your arguments are short-circuited, the more likely it is, that you will succeed? Is this the dynamic behind such efforts as Krugman's? Is that what makes them successful?

    Btw - he is not really a Keynesian since Keynes had investments in mind, which made economically sense in such a way, that they'd enable the investor (could be: The government), to not only pay back the credits, but pay interests for those credits, too. All that is left out, if the deficit spending has no other purpose than paying for actual consumption (=imports, in the Greek case).

    Yes, Mr. Kief, and Krugman is taken seriously by economists and government people here in America too. I don’t think that it’s really that they all think he’s smart or believe any of his Statist ideas. It’s more that they just want to keep the gravy train on the tracks until they are all retired and dead, so the financial SHTF won’t affect them. As Maynard Keynes himself said “in the long run, we are all dead.” I wonder if Mr Keynes had any children.

    As far as Mr. Keynes ideas, I don’t believe in ANY government being allowed to invest in ANYTHING. However, yes, he was not an OPM* spendthrift as much as Krugman and believed that the feral government should pay off debts during better economic times. That makes me think that he did not ever meet a politician in his entire life.

    .
    .
    * Other People’s Money

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    I could think of quite a lot of poltiticians who could (or can) differentiate between investments and consumptive spendings. Ludwig Erhardt, Helmut Schimdt, Gerhard Schröder, Thilo Sarrazin.

    Volkswagen and Audi would have shrinked into irrelevance, if Schmidt and later Schröder wouldn't have made huge investments possible. Blair laughed at Schröder, when he asked him if he saw it as a problem, that BMW would overtake British Leyland and Rolls Royce. Blair thought, that making automobiles was something old and dying.

    But back to Krugman and Steve Sailers brilliant look at Puerto Rico - and the fact, that it appeared in Taki's Mag: Taki Theodoracopulos and his Editor-in-Chief Mandolyna Theodoracopulos at times write and or/ publish texts, which read, as if Krugman's economical ideas about Puerto Rico and Greece would strongly resonate in their heads.

    - One of the many occasions that sees me - stunned & baffled and going what what what...

    The formidable duo Krugman and Varoufakis. Zizek and - Goldman Sachs, the ones who worked hard to establish the Greek Euro-game, so to speak. This stuff goes on and on.

    (The postmodern side of it might mean, that it doesn't matter anymore, just how stupid an argument is. And this position seems to be pretty postmodern, since this is postmodernism: We're all done with stupid, because - you know: No stupidity without the absolutely power-contaminated (=Nazi) discrimination between sound and stupid arguments, unless such arguments are brought forward to suspend postmodern thinking...it's lots of circles of circles of circling thoughts - - maybe postmodernity could be brought to a halt by the time the postmodernists were officially allowed or even better: Kindly invited to give up discourse alltogether and switch over to carousels and the like. (Quite a few of them would feel a big relieve, I'm sure, if they would wake up one day, and wouldn't have to struggle any longer at universities and colleges with all those terrible textbooks, but rather work at a crazy multicultural fair...).

    It would be much harder to keep the austerity-Jeremiah-talks alive, if people would have a look at iSteve every oncve in a while.

    And "people" here would, as far as baffled me is concerned: People here should even - include the Theodoracopuloses.
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  141. black sea says:
    @FPD72
    Do you understand the concept of redundancy? “$” and “dollars.”

    No. could you explain it?

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  142. @Achmed E. Newman
    Yes, Mr. Kief, and Krugman is taken seriously by economists and government people here in America too. I don't think that it's really that they all think he's smart or believe any of his Statist ideas. It's more that they just want to keep the gravy train on the tracks until they are all retired and dead, so the financial SHTF won't affect them. As Maynard Keynes himself said "in the long run, we are all dead." I wonder if Mr Keynes had any children.

    As far as Mr. Keynes ideas, I don't believe in ANY government being allowed to invest in ANYTHING. However, yes, he was not an OPM* spendthrift as much as Krugman and believed that the feral government should pay off debts during better economic times. That makes me think that he did not ever meet a politician in his entire life.

    .
    .
    * Other People's Money

    I could think of quite a lot of poltiticians who could (or can) differentiate between investments and consumptive spendings. Ludwig Erhardt, Helmut Schimdt, Gerhard Schröder, Thilo Sarrazin.

    Volkswagen and Audi would have shrinked into irrelevance, if Schmidt and later Schröder wouldn’t have made huge investments possible. Blair laughed at Schröder, when he asked him if he saw it as a problem, that BMW would overtake British Leyland and Rolls Royce. Blair thought, that making automobiles was something old and dying.

    But back to Krugman and Steve Sailers brilliant look at Puerto Rico – and the fact, that it appeared in Taki’s Mag: Taki Theodoracopulos and his Editor-in-Chief Mandolyna Theodoracopulos at times write and or/ publish texts, which read, as if Krugman’s economical ideas about Puerto Rico and Greece would strongly resonate in their heads.

    - One of the many occasions that sees me – stunned & baffled and going what what what…

    The formidable duo Krugman and Varoufakis. Zizek and – Goldman Sachs, the ones who worked hard to establish the Greek Euro-game, so to speak. This stuff goes on and on.

    (The postmodern side of it might mean, that it doesn’t matter anymore, just how stupid an argument is. And this position seems to be pretty postmodern, since this is postmodernism: We’re all done with stupid, because – you know: No stupidity without the absolutely power-contaminated (=Nazi) discrimination between sound and stupid arguments, unless such arguments are brought forward to suspend postmodern thinking…it’s lots of circles of circles of circling thoughts – – maybe postmodernity could be brought to a halt by the time the postmodernists were officially allowed or even better: Kindly invited to give up discourse alltogether and switch over to carousels and the like. (Quite a few of them would feel a big relieve, I’m sure, if they would wake up one day, and wouldn’t have to struggle any longer at universities and colleges with all those terrible textbooks, but rather work at a crazy multicultural fair…).

    It would be much harder to keep the austerity-Jeremiah-talks alive, if people would have a look at iSteve every oncve in a while.

    And “people” here would, as far as baffled me is concerned: People here should even – include the Theodoracopuloses.

    Read More
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  143. Ivy says:
    @Bugg
    Many but not all Puerto Ricans demanded the Navy vacate the live fire base they had at Viques. Of course, once the Navy left all the jobs on the base and economic activity it generated disappeared like a fart in a hurricane. The MLB player and avowed Socialist Carlos Delgado made a very big deal about closing Viques , and then immediately complained about the loss of jobs. And were there right now such a naval base with landing strips and other infrastructure to support these operations, this whole recovery would be going much smoother.

    Sin in haste.
    Repent mañana.

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  144. Corvinus says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    At this stage, I'm ready to give Hawaii its independence. Steve has pointed out that Hawaii was admitted to the Union as a part of a move to make the U.S. appear more attractive to the developing world, so that they wouldn't turn to those Marxists in the USSR and PRC. How'd that work out? Hawaii is in many ways different from the rest of the states, although some continental states are close to Hawaii's racial diversity(unfortunately) and it's a long way from North America. It invariably votes Democratic. Time to ditch it.

    The fact that we might have to close naval bases there is a feature, not a bug. The U.S. needs to concentrate on North America. The entire projection into the Pacific, aside from just keeping sea lines of communication open, has been an expensive and futile distraction.

    Hawaii is not going to be “ditched”. Where do you even come up with these proposals?

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  145. Corvinus says:
    @Diversity Heretic
    At this stage, I'm ready to give Hawaii its independence. Steve has pointed out that Hawaii was admitted to the Union as a part of a move to make the U.S. appear more attractive to the developing world, so that they wouldn't turn to those Marxists in the USSR and PRC. How'd that work out? Hawaii is in many ways different from the rest of the states, although some continental states are close to Hawaii's racial diversity(unfortunately) and it's a long way from North America. It invariably votes Democratic. Time to ditch it.

    The fact that we might have to close naval bases there is a feature, not a bug. The U.S. needs to concentrate on North America. The entire projection into the Pacific, aside from just keeping sea lines of communication open, has been an expensive and futile distraction.

    “And the occupation of the Phillipines resulted in a very vicious war to suppress its independence movement, and also put the U.S. on a collision course with Japan in the western Pacific. McKinley, T.R. Roosevelt and Hearst have a lot to answer for.”

    Eerily similar to how Europeans engaged in imperialism and colonization back in the good old days.

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  146. Logan says:
    @Ed
    This has been tested repeatedly through genetics, paternal error, where a woman says one man is the father & he's not, is extremely rare. In Europe it's historically been less than 1% or so. It's not that much higher in Africa.

    Women just aren't that interested in sleeping around and the few that are rely on modern contraception & abortion to help facilitate unwanted pregnancies. The pill being a recent development.

    Not sure where you get your numbers.

    Here’s an article claiming 5% to 15% for paternal error.

    https://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/2007/07/who-s-your-daddy/305969/

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