The Unz Review: An Alternative Media Selection
A Collection of Interesting, Important, and Controversial Perspectives Largely Excluded from the American Mainstream Media
 TeasersiSteve Blog
Russian Heroic/Nuts Tech
🔊 Listen RSS
Email This Page to Someone

 Remember My Information



=>

Bookmark Toggle AllToCAdd to LibraryRemove from Library • BShow CommentNext New CommentNext New ReplyRead More
ReplyAgree/Disagree/Etc. More... This Commenter This Thread Hide Thread Display All Comments
AgreeDisagreeLOLTroll
These buttons register your public Agreement, Disagreement, Troll, or LOL with the selected comment. They are ONLY available to recent, frequent commenters who have saved their Name+Email using the 'Remember My Information' checkbox, and may also ONLY be used once per hour.
Ignore Commenter Follow Commenter
Search Text Case Sensitive  Exact Words  Include Comments
List of Bookmarks

Russia has never been as rich as America, so they make up for it in competition with us by having crazier technology, like, apparently, nuclear-powered (not just nuclear-armed, but nuclear-powered) cruise missiles. That sounds like something Richard Feynman and Klaus Fuchs would have brainstormed over lunch at Los Alamos in 1945.

U.S. Officials Suspect New Nuclear Missile in Explosion That Killed 7 Russians

By David E. Sanger and Andrew E. Kramer
Aug. 12, 2019

American intelligence officials are racing to understand a mysterious explosion that released radiation off the coast of northern Russia last week, apparently during the test of a new type of nuclear-propelled cruise missile hailed by President Vladimir V. Putin as the centerpiece of Moscow’s arms race with the United States.

American officials have said nothing publicly about the blast on Thursday, possibly one of the worst nuclear accidents in the region since Chernobyl, although apparently on a far smaller scale, with at least seven people, including scientists, confirmed dead. …

Late Sunday night, officials at a research institute that had employed five of the scientists who died confirmed for the first time that a small nuclear reactor had exploded during an experiment in the White Sea, and that the authorities were investigating the cause. …

But United States intelligence officials have said they suspect the blast involved a prototype of what NATO calls the SSC-X-9 Skyfall. That is a cruise missile that Mr. Putin has boasted can reach any corner of the earth because it is partially powered by a small nuclear reactor, eliminating the usual distance limitations of conventionally fueled missiles.

 
Hide 279 CommentsLeave a Comment
Commenters to Ignore...to FollowEndorsed Only
Trim Comments?
    []
  1. Lagertha says:

    hahahahahaa. It was nothing…nutting : https://youtu.be/pVSBDDOt6_Q

    • Replies: @Lagertha
  2. I believe the US tried something similar in the 1960s (project Pluto) before deciding that it was totally friggin’ crazy. I mean you can test an ICBM by taking the warhead off and launching towards the south pacific–when it splashes down no big deal–but testing a nuclear powered ramjet means that at the end of the flight you crash a nuclear reactor into the ground or ocean or whatever and blow it to smithereens. No landing gear on a cruise missile. That’s if the test works correctly–best case scenario. Oh and by the way radiation shielding is pretty heavy so I’m sure this is an unshielded reactor flying over everybody’s heads (including your own citizens/allies) on the way to the target. Totally crazy. Of course when they were doing above ground nuclear testing maybe this didn’t seem completely unreasonable but nowadays…I’m going to come out and say its a bad idea.

    Some notes on the physics of why you would do this–if you want to launch a thing from one continent to another, and stay at a lower altitude and move fast like a cruise missile, you’re going to use a ton of energy pushing through the relatively thick air. So hydrocarbons ain’t gonna cut it–not enough energy density. Need to use a denser source of energy like nuclear. On the other hand an ICBM that mostly travels through space doesn’t have to deal (as much) with air resistance and so lower density sources of energy like chemical propellants are A-OK. In fact ICBMs use solid propellants that are lower energy density than the optimal liquid fuel combinations. But, something on a ballistic trajectory is going to show up on radar and has the potential, at least in theory, for interception.

    Honestly though in the days of global real time satellite monitoring and the crazy radiation signature this though would throw out I can’t imagine it would be more difficult to intercept this than an ICBM. But, I’m probably missing something.

    Anyway Americans will say this is crazy while Russians say they had no choice because the U.S. is making the doctrine of MAD untenable by building anti-ballistic missile defenses and triggering an arms race, finger pointing, blah blah, whatever. Congratulations generals on your cold warring skills now that the cold war has been over for 30 years! And ignoring the real national security issue which is the Global North/Global South migration issue.

  3. It was something that the US brainstormed.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Pluto

    They decided that it was too provocative and insane. Luckily our present elites haven’t proven to be such dangerous madmen that the deterrence from such a dangerous weapon isn’t seen as unnecessarily risky.

    • Replies: @Paul Jolliffe
    , @AnotherDad
  4. utu says:

    Project Pluto
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Project_Pluto

    “On January 1, 1957, the U.S. Air Force and the U.S. Atomic Energy Commission selected the Lawrence Radiation Laboratory (the predecessor of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory, LLNL) to study the feasibility of applying heat from nuclear reactors to ramjet engines. This research became known as Project Pluto. The work was directed by Dr. Theodore Charles Merkle, leader of the laboratory’s R-Division.”

  5. Anonymous[187] • Disclaimer says:

    Recently, I’ve seen it stylized “Vladimir V. Putin” more. Three-name names are empirically more evil-sounding.

    • Replies: @Tusk
    , @Thomas
    , @Fredrik
    , @Neuday
  6. Anon7 says:

    Touting Russian technology is one way Putin stays on top in Russia. There is no need for a real nuclear-powered cruise missile to destroy America; if he is patient, we will destroy ourselves soon enough.

    For crying out loud, he could take over now if he walked in through Mexico with 10,000 slim Russian mail order brides and a bunch of hackers. As far as I can tell, we’re wide open.

    • Agree: Kylie
    • Replies: @Alfa158
    , @J
    , @Anonymous
    , @Jeff
    , @Lurker
  7. Lagertha says:

    they actually, don’t give a shit, left or right. – if this is a problem, there will be chatter on both sides – I suspect: no chatter; ergo, bring it, dumb asses of the world.

  8. According to the article, the nuclear powered cruise missile would have a more or less unlimited range like an ICBM but would be capable of flying low, variable route rather than a ballistic trajectory. The point is to create a missile that’s less vulnerable (or perhaps invulnerable? ) to U.S. missile defenses. The results don’t look very promising so far but trying to build a more effective weapon for use against a potential adversary doesn’t sound crazy.

  9. Clyde says:

    Any nuclear reactor that could power such a missile would be in destructo meltdown mode and would throw off shedloads of radioactive debris at launch and after. Even aside from this, highly unlikely .

  10. Lagertha says:
    @Lagertha

    Russians are very intelligent. Maybe much more than Chinese and Jews. They have only had their “break out” moment since 1989.

    Don’t miss this: https://youtube/wBllWfgdE6Q

    • Replies: @Lagertha
  11. I don’t think we (Americans) have any business calling other countries crazy.

  12. Tusk says:
    @Anonymous

    Agree. I’ve seen it multiple times in the past few days compared to seeing it never before.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  13. As we know from the way Hitler’s invasion of Russia played out, when pushed to the wall, Russians do heroic/nuts better than anybody else.

    The Washington Consensus has pushed Russia to the wall. Vladimir Putin said as much in 2007 to assembled Western leaders.

  14. Also, Madman Theory. Putin is just Nixon with more time in charge, and a weaker country.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  15. Twinkie says:

    Russia has never been as rich as America, so they make up for it in competition with us by having crazier technology

    No. Historically, they competed by making crude (or less complicated), but effective weapons more inexpensively.

    Russians armaments always had more bang for the buck though usually with much worse human ergonomics.

    Things started to go sideways for them when U.S. computer technology grew by leaps and bounds, and was finally much more cost-effective.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  16. @SimpleSong

    The first thing I thought was a ramjet? Do we know if it was???

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
  17. Alfa158 says:
    @Anon7

    True enough, but the Russians and a bunch of other people are wondering what sort of destructive things the Empire might do while lashing out in its death throes. Remember some of the crazy proposals we’ve seen already like the NATO threats to impose a no-fly zone over the Ukraine during the hotter phase of the Ukraine civil war.
    I just don’t see how the Russians acting crazy as well with schemes like this Project Pluto revival is going to help them. Acting crazy only works if the other guy is not just as crazy.

  18. Thomas says:
    @Anonymous

    Recently, I’ve seen it stylized “Vladimir V. Putin” more. Three-name names are empirically more evil-sounding.

    He’s “Vladimir Vladimirovich Putin,” Vladimir, son of Vladimir. That sounds much less evil than just that “V” sitting there.

  19. Always worth watching again.

    Russians’ unique combination of genius, bravery, determination, gross incompetence, melancholy and thuggishness make for a confounding people.

    • Agree: Kronos
    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  20. @SimpleSong

    I don’t have a link handy but I believe one of the crazier ideas to come out of the early Cold War *was* an unshielded nuclear reactor missile. The idea was to just fly it around enemy territory until everyone got terminal radiation poisoning.

  21. Thomas says:

    As some other commentators have already pointed out, the U.S. had the Dr. Strangelovian “Project Pluto” from 1957 until 1964, which it took as far as two engine tests in Nevada.

    I’m not really sure why anyone would need something like this. The U.S. abandoned the project thanks to improvement in ICBMs. Russian ballistic missile technology is certainly up to reaching anywhere Russia would want to hit. Of course, Russia has a long tradition of parading exotic and threatening new weapons—or at least claims of such weapons—to deter potential enemies, as well as a notoriously relaxed attitude towards safety in general and in its military and defense industry in particular.

    Anyway, some of these tidbits from an old Air & Space Magazine article about the project were pretty memorable:

    Pluto’s namesake was Roman mythology’s ruler of the underworld — seemingly an apt inspiration for a locomotive-size missile that would travel at near-treetop level at three times the speed of sound, tossing out hydrogen bombs as it roared overhead. Pluto’s designers calculated that its shock wave alone might kill people on the ground. Then there was the problem of fallout. In addition to gamma and neutron radiation from the unshielded reactor, Pluto’s nuclear ramjet would spew fission fragments out in its exhaust as it flew by. (One enterprising weaponeer had a plan to turn an obvious peace-time liability into a wartime asset: he suggested flying the radioactive rocket back and forth over the Soviet Union after it had dropped its bombs.)

    Meanwhile, at the Pentagon, Pluto’s sponsors were having second thoughts about the project. Since the missile would be launched from U.S. territory and had to fly low over America’s allies in order to avoid detection on its way to the Soviet Union, some military planners began to wonder if it might not be almost as much a threat to the allies. Even before it began dropping bombs on our enemies Pluto would have deafened, flattened, and irradiated our friends. (The noise level on the ground as Pluto went by overhead was expected to be about 150 decibels; by comparison, the Saturn V rocket, which sent astronauts to the moon, produced 200 decibels at full thrust.) Ruptured eardrums, of course, would have been the least of your problems if you were unlucky enough to be underneath the unshielded reactor when it went by, literally roasting chickens in the barnyard. Pluto had begun to look like something only Goofy could love.

    http://www.merkle.com/pluto/pluto.html

  22. Kronos says:

    Maybe they’re trying to pull a “Gravity’s Rainbow?” To utilize human essences and emotion for weapon platforms.

    • Replies: @Old Prude
  23. @JeremiahJohnbalaya

    Not sure. Maybe this is totally different than Pluto? No physical reason you couldn’t use other engine configurations. Man though anything more complex than a ramjet adds even more points of failure…extra nuts.

    • Replies: @JeremiahJohnbalaya
  24. @SimpleSong

    “Man though anything more complex than a ramjet adds even more points of failure…extra nuts.”

    I was going to point out that my grandfather’s generation (he served as an engineer in WWI and subsequently in the locomotive industry) was apparently not afraid of the Ruskies in early Cold War days b/c he and his peers didn’t think they made good engineers. I don’t know if that thesis has held up over time; they seem to be able to put stuff together pretty well. But, certainly this news made me think about it.

    And I was just reading about Project Pluto recently…

    • Replies: @Hippopotamusdrome
  25. @Thomas

    “Pluto’s namesake was Roman mythology’s ruler of the underworld”

    Mythological? Blasphemy! The article descends from there. Roasted chickens, oh my

  26. El Dato says:

    American intelligence officials are racing

    Ridiculous. Stop being asleep at the water cooler then.

    American officials have said nothing publicly about the blast on Thursday, possibly one of the worst nuclear accidents in the region since Chernobyl,

    “American officials saying nothing”. That’s a 20-year first. When the going gets real, “official sources” no longer provide eh, eh?

    Also, technically not a “nuclear accident” , but a nuclear-powered [thing] accident. Maybe they were testing a NERVA, whereby you pump hydrogen through a critical reactor to get some serious impulse. Tested by the US back in the 60s and 70s Eliminated by Nixon.

    Reminder that Russia is actually pursuing a fast breeder / plutonium cycle: Fast reactor starts clean nuclear energy era in Russia. Everybody else is too risk-averse or has not enough landmass to have a go.

    • Replies: @J
    , @NOTA
  27. @Clifford Brown

    Literally laugh out loud. Thank you

  28. less heroic and more like simply nuts.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kosmos_954

    soviets were comfortable with using nuclear reactors everywhere, with mostly predictable results. US was much more reluctant to use nuclear reactors everywhere, for safety reasons. US only ever launched this:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/SNAP-10A

    in fact, after Voyager, NASA did not allow nuclear reactors on spacecraft for almost 40 years. all craft had to be powered by some other method. but recently NASA decided to allow reactors again for certain missions. or something along those lines. i’m not an expert but that’s my impression.

  29. @SimpleSong

    “Honestly though in the days of global real time satellite monitoring and the crazy radiation signature this though would throw out I can’t imagine it would be more difficult to intercept this than an ICBM. But, I’m probably missing something.”

    hypothetically, hypersonic missiles are MUCH harder to detect, let alone intercept. you can’t see them until they’re almost right on you.

    for practical purposes though, what are the chances of intercepting ICBMs? probably not great. so how much more dangerous are hypersonic missiles compared to ICBMs. probably not much more dangerous to a city. they’re bad new for targets like ships though. in big numbers, like a volley, they could be a lot more dangerous even to cities i suppose, than ICBMs.

    • Replies: @J
    , @SimpleSong
    , @The Alarmist
  30. Anonymous[588] • Disclaimer says:

    Honestly, how can anyone be seriously surprised by the belligerence and paranoia of the Russians?

    Firstly, you had the catastrophe and disaster of the Gorbachev/Yeltsin years – two worthless, stupid gullible fools lead by the nose like donkeys by the sharpers of the west, who danced to any tune America played.
    Then you had NATO laughingly reneging on all the deals the tomfools Gorbachev and Yeltsin made.
    Add to this the weekly hysteria and bile shat out by The Economist – *the* voice of the Deep State, against *the Russian people* – and not ‘Russia’.

    The trouble for The Economist is that Putin is nobody’s fool. Neither is he a coward.

    • Replies: @Anonymousse
    , @J.Ross
  31. J says:
    @Anon7

    Absolutely.

    White births in the USA are now under 50%.

    Simple mathematics tells us that in under 40 years – roughly the median age – the USA will be finished. No its no buts, and I won’t waste my time by elaboration or further justification.

    40 years – no more distant than the Iranian hostage crisis.

    • Replies: @backup
  32. Kronos says:
    @Redneck farmer

    There’s some truth in that. Both came from modest backgrounds but possessed extraordinary IQs. (I forgot both scores but Nixon possessed a 20+ IQ point lead over Kennedy.) I’d also wager both are/were extremely hard working. (I read Nixon’s autobiography and someone from his law school said Nixon had a iron ass. The ability to sit in a chair and read law books for hours on end.)

    One major difference was their avenue to respective offices. Nixon possessed a legal background while Putin was KGB/SVR. But the two were/are VERY familiar with foreign affairs.

    Would you wager on who’s Putin’s Kissinger?

    • Replies: @dearieme
    , @reiner Tor
    , @Dmitry
  33. Kronos says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Yeah, they sure have a history of that.

    https://images.app.goo.gl/apzTAgZuov7FLmaR8

    Sergei Eisenstein

  34. Kronos says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Man, you really can’t tell if the audience are oppressed Soviet citizens or typically depressed 1980s American Gen Xers.

  35. When your goal is to deliver a nuclear knock-out blow in a doomsday scenario, do you really have to give a rat’s behind about the delivery system’s impact on the environment? Western-values really are bankrupt.

    • Replies: @NOTA
    , @Counterinsurgency
  36. backup says:
    @SimpleSong

    while Russians say they had no choice because the U.S. is making the doctrine of MAD untenable by building anti-ballistic missile defenses and triggering an arms race, finger pointing, blah blah, whatever.

    Thereby missing the point that MAD only made sense when the USSR and the US were confirmed enemies.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  37. @SimpleSong

    Project Pluto was to be a manned aircraft, so it needed shielding. A cruise missile needs no shielding at all.

    Russians are at the cutting edge of both hypersonic scramjet engine development and nuclear reactor production (they are building some 60% of nuclear reactors being built today), so that’d be a very nice fit for them to create something which would be difficult for Americans. (That Americans cannot even properly test a similar technology due to environmental regulations is the icing on the cake for them.)

    Anyway, I disagree regarding space travel. We’d need nuclear powered rocket engines in order to reach far away objects. Even reaching the outer edges of our own Solar System is pretty difficult using chemical rockets, nuclear propulsion would be pretty nice to have even there. And almost impossible to do without if you want to leave the Solar System.

    Nuclear powered spacecraft is the only thing which could put us at least to an extent back on track to the 1950s future of flying cars and interstellar travel. Okay, it won’t give us flying cars, but it might just give us interstellar travel.

    • Replies: @NOTA
  38. Old Prude says:

    During the Cold War the Russians came up with stuff like a titanium hulled submarine, which was noisy as hell, but could dive so deep no weapons could reach it. We countered with our battleships which could only be penetrated by nuclear tipped torpedoes.

    Or how about that crazy in ground effect amphibious assault ship the Caspian Sea Monster?

    From RPGs, to ZSUs to Hinds and counter-rotating blades and MiG 25s, the Russians were alway coming up with innovative and imaginative weapons and weapons systems. Thank god they were always crewed by drunks.

    • Replies: @Dan Hayes
  39. dearieme says:
    @Kronos

    … possessed extraordinary IQs. (I forgot both scores but Nixon possessed a 20+ IQ point lead over Kennedy …

    JFK’s IQ was 119. So say Nixon’s was 140 – pretty high but there would have been pupils in my secondary school with that IQ. Hardly extraordinary.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  40. backup says:
    @J

    Got a link for that birth rate?

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @anon
  41. Old Prude says:
    @Kronos

    If they pull that shit, we’ll make Marianne Williamson the Secretary of Defense. Check!

    • Replies: @Kronos
  42. J says: • Website
    @El Dato

    I wonder what it is. The reactor produces heat, but how does it move a ballistic missile? Does it shoot out neutrons?

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Jack D
  43. J says: • Website
    @prime noticer

    One can detect gliders and anything in the air, on the surface and under the sea – from satellites. And just last week Israel intercepted an ICBM in a trial that took place in Alaska. Metal vs Metal, direct hit.

  44. @Kronos

    Nixon possessed a legal background while Putin was

    …also a lawyer by training. He in fact chose to study learn in order to be able to join the KGB.

    • Replies: @Kronos
  45. Lot says:

    Russia already has a old tech that can evade any missile defense the US will have now or in the next 25 years: multiple independent reentry vehicles, meaning one ICMB comes down as 10 pieces. Blocking all ten is just beyond our capabilities.

    If anything, one fairly slow ultra long distance cruise missile would be easier to hit.

    The larger problem Russia has is that it is just too poor to follow through on any breakthrough by producing in quantities that have economies of scale. They’d be better off if they had just put more care into preserving Soviet conventional systems. And better still if they stopped pretending to be a major military power and focused all that defense spending on eugenic natalism.

    How many Russian babies will never be born because of their adventures in Chechnya, Ukraine, and Syria, and trying to field aircraft carriers?

    • Replies: @Anon
  46. Lot says:
    @backup

    The CDC releases the report on race and birth every year on their website.

    Actually about 51% of births are to white women, but two white parents is obviously below 50%. It goes above 50% again if you include the third or so of Hispanics who identify as white on the census. The actual share of U.S. hispanics who have no obvious non-European mixture I think is more like 5 to 10%.

    • Replies: @Travis
    , @Bardon Kaldian
    , @Bork
  47. Brutusale says:

    Drunken paranoids tend to make good weapons. They did develop the most effective infantry weapon the world has ever known.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/AK-47

    • Replies: @slumber_j
  48. Isn’t this pretty much just more “Evil Russians” crap?

    • Replies: @Jack D
  49. Anon[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Lot

    How many Russian babies will never be born because of their adventures in Chechnya, Ukraine, and Syria, and trying to field aircraft carriers?

    This is a ludicrous comment. Even low-balling the number of abortions performed— https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Abortion_statistics_in_the_United_States —the U.S. loses over 53,000 children each month to abortion. And this number is lower from the previous decades because of things like abortifacient drugs (abortion pill).

    But even the ones we’re having are a problem. The numbers of young white women are using birth control pills which is producing defective children. They’re having children in their 30’s after they’ve spent their most fertile years shacking up in serial sterile sexual relationships. The rise and prevalence of LGBTQA, effeminate men, masculine women, gender dysmorphia, liberal politics, hysterical reactions to events, etc… is due to the pill. Millions of women (particularly white women) have used the pill in their fertile years and then started having children later.

    So millions of women were/are fundamentally altering their body’s hormonal balance with ethinylestradiol (estrogen) and progestin (progestogen) and then discontinuing its use to have their 2.1 kids. These hormones also reduce neurotransmitter levels (particularly serotonin) affecting mental and emotional health. Discontinued use of the pill does not return hormonal balance in women and women who have used the pill have continued elevation of things like sex hormone-binding globulin. We all know the tragedy of prenatal cocaine exposure (crack babies) when a mother uses a nervous system stimulant. Yet a drug which fundamentally alters hormone levels in mothers will have no effect? Sure.

    Crack babies grow up to rob liquor stores. Estro-progestogen babies grow up to be white males in B&N coffee shops reading Becoming.

    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Anon
  50. Sean says:

    The US has quietly uprated proximity fuses for its land based ICBMs and the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sea_Hunter drones remove the ability of enemy ICBM subs to hide. America is edging ever closer to a first strike capability

    How does Russia rise to the technological challenge? By lashing a nuclear reactor onto a giant V1. Code name: Skyfail.

  51. Travis says:
    @Lot

    But 10% of white women have non-white children…2018 was a record low year for “White” births, the CDC counted under 1.9 million births to white females….which is under 50% of births….but 170,000 of these “white” births are not white children, since their fathers are not white. Thus the actual number of white births was below 1.8 million last year, the lowest number of white births since 1931. Thus the actual number of white births has been less than 50% of all births going back to 2012 when it was first reported by the NY Times. https://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb12-90.html

    It is more accurate to look at the census data, which already indicates 50% of the children under 16 are non-white. The 2020 census estimates are in and predicts that over 50% of those under the age of 20 will be non-white. Allowing millions of non-white aliens to migrate into America each year just compounds the low fertility problem.

    During the middle of the rest recession births to white women had fallen to 2.2 million in 2009. Nine years later the number of white births has fallen to 1.9 million, a decline of 14% while non-white births fell by just 5% since 2009.

    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Prodigal son
    , @ATBOTL
  52. @Steve Johnson

    Well, in our quest for long range bombers, we actually test flew a B-36 bomber (the one with six backward-pointing propeller engines on its wings) equipped with a small, one megawatt nuclear reactor a total of 47 times between 1955 and 1961. JFK put a stop to this program one month into his presidency.

    Its missions required an accompanying B-50 loaded with Marines to secure any possible crash site . . .

    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    , @Jim Don Bob
  53. @Paul Jolliffe

    Ah, the Cold War …

    • Replies: @Sean
  54. Anonymous[187] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon7

    The first half of that envoy in particular might cause some open-borders zealots to change their stance.

  55. anon[357] • Disclaimer says:
    @backup

    https://www.npr.org/sections/thetwo-way/2015/03/04/390672196/for-u-s-children-minorities-will-be-the-majority-by-2020-census-says

    For U.S. Children, Minorities Will Be The Majority By 2020, according to the Census department. They made this prediction 6 years ago….before the recent surge of migrants and since this time the white fertility rate has fallen faster and lower than ever before.

    for white Americans, the most common age was 58 years-old last year, The most common age was 11 for Hispanics, 27 for blacks and 29 for Asians as of last July. Americans of two or more races were by far the youngest racial or ethnic group in the Census Bureau data, with a most common age of just 3 years old. No only are white babies in decline , but white people are in decline as more Whites die each year than are born. the white population peaked in 2015 and has declined by 150,000 over the last 4 years.

    In 2016 more there were more white deaths than births…There were 1.8 times as many black births as deaths in 2016 and 4.1 times as many Asian American births as deaths. (The figure for Hispanics was 4.9 times as many births than deaths.)
    https://www.washingtonpost.com/news/politics/wp/2018/06/21/the-year-trump-was-elected-more-white-americans-died-than-were-born/?noredirect=on

  56. slumber_j says:
    @Brutusale

    Drunken paranoids tend to make good weapons.

    For example, Billy Martin was a pretty good weapon for the New York Yankees.

  57. NOTA says:
    @El Dato

    I think the big concern with breeder reactors is proliferation risk. (That is, you’re worried someone’s going to use it to make enough Pu to build their own nuke.)

    • Replies: @Paleo Liberal
  58. NOTA says:
    @The Alarmist

    Weapons you can’t test and experiment on tend not to work on the day you try to use them for real. If every test flight of your nuclear powered ramjet is a major environmental disaster, you’re going to have a hard time testing it enough to work the bugs out without screwing your own country over. (Or starting a war by flynig it over someone else.)

  59. NOTA says:
    @reiner Tor

    Sure, but we probably want to use chemical rockets in the atmospherre we plan to be living in, then have them start up the nuclear thermal rocket once they’re out atmosphere. Or you could revisit Orion, which was utterly and gloriously batshit nuts.

    • Replies: @utu
  60. Steve

    Off topic:

    CHRIS CUOMO=FREDO

    It happened on Shelter Island this past Weekend….

  61. Jack D says:
    @SimpleSong

    Aside from the thickness of the air, it also requires less energy to propel something on a ballistic trajectory than it does to send it in a straight line. For a ballistic missile, all you need to do is power it for (part) of the first half of the trip – once it reaches its apogee, it falls by gravity the rest of the way. A cruise missile needs to have its engine going constantly for the entire trip.

    Apparently the Russian device had both a conventional propellant based rocket engine 1st stage booster and the nuclear powered 2nd stage. The conventional rocket blew up on the launch pad (as sometimes happens during testing) and the explosion shattered the reactor (which as you say could not have been heavily shielded) and blew radiation all over the place as well as killing some of the people on the launch platform.

    The Russians have a much high tolerance than modern Americans for risking the lives of their own people in pursuit of their defense goals. It’s almost inconceivable that the US would build a comparable weapon in American 2019. 2nd strike capability – the ability to retaliate after the enemy has taken out your silos in a surprise attack, has always been a Russian goal since Soviet days. Putin has been bragging about his unstoppable superweapon which would finally allow the Russians to achieve that goal and which is not covered by any treaty. Finally, the Soviet Union (oops, I mean Russia) will again be restored to greatness and the world will respect (or at least fear) us again!

    The nuclear rocket was a great shortcut because it was a move that he knew the Americans could never (not for technological reasons but for political ones) match in kind. Normally the US or the Russians will develop a weapon, the other side will develop a comparable weapon and then they both agree with each other not to produce it or to destroy existing stocks in order to maintain the balance of power, but Putin didn’t have to worry about losing the use of his new weapon in this way because the US could never match his nuclear rocket. This explosion puts a serious dent on that goal.

    It’s interesting to see how many “Soviet” style behaviors Putin has reverted to. Secret cities, denials after accidents, etc. In part this is because Putin is a Soviet man but in part because these behaviors are deeply rooted in the Russian character which is in part an Eastern “face” culture (see Potemkin village) and had nothing to do with Communism per se (although having a totalitarian government certainly makes it easier to cover things up).

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Adûnâi
  62. Vladimir Putin and Martin Scorsese agree on this: adding Pennsylvania baby boomer beauty Sharon Stone to anything will make it more intelligent, crazy and good looking.

    Scorsese acted in a movie in the back of a cab about his wayward wife taking another lover. Putin sang “Blueberry Hill” in English in front of Sharon Stone and other baby boomer Hollywood boneheads.

    Scorsese was good at acting and Putin sang in English well enough to mesmerize those Hollywood baby boomer bastards such as Sharon Stone.

    Sharon Stone was giving Putin the kind of looks that got a multi-millionaire Jew slob to marry Sharon Stone.

    Yeah, I haven’t forgotten pretty boy baby boomer crackpot Kevin Costner in the list of Hollywood baby boomer bastards going bonkers for that Ruski bastard Putin using a cheap filthy propaganda stunt gimmick to win over these Hollywood baby boomer boobs.

    Putin once suggested using low level nuke detonations to stop some oil well spill and that crackpot baby boomer kook Kevin Costner suggested using 500 billion golf balls to stop the oil leak.

    Who is a bigger nutcake baby boomer wacko? — Putin or Costner or Stone?

    All the baby boomers, in every part of the world, are complete and total nutcakes, DAMMIT!

    Putin lost the extra “I” at the end of his name in a poker game with Lavrov and the bitter bastard Putin is still sore about it! It’s been 20 years Putin, get over it!

  63. @Travis

    Russia had more white births last year than America, for the first time.

    Russia , with a population of 147 million, had 1.8 million white births in 2018 verse 1.7 million in the United States. While the current White population in the U.S. is 197 million, Russia will soon have more white people than America , as 10% of white Americans will continue to have non-white children.

    • Replies: @snorlax
  64. @NOTA

    That is part of it.

    The other part is the waste.

    Not only is plutonium an extremely radioactive material, but it is also deadly if ingested. The alpha radiation plutonium emits can be stopped by the skin to some degree. You may get skin cancer. However, if ingested, there is no skin to prevent radiation poisoning of the internal organs. If the radiation poisoning doesn’t kill you, the cancer caused by the radiation probably will.

    Plutonium is rumored to be one of Putin’s favorite methods of getting rid of people he doesn’t like.

    • Replies: @El Dato
    , @Elsewhere
  65. Jack D says:
    @MikeatMikedotMike

    No. This is something that the Russians actually did which is actually evil (or at least sort of crazy risky to their own people). I guess it’s more because Russians have really done evil things in the past too. So have we but their evil tops our evil by a good margin. Evil is one thing that the Russians really are better at than Americans.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @SFG
  66. Jack D says:
    @Anon

    Even if everything that you say is true, this doesn’t change the situation in Russia. America is running out of white people but Russia is running out of people period (not to mention that they have their own “non-white” (in Russian terms) issues. Their birth rate is not that different than other Western countries (which is to say below replacement level) but their death rate is higher (Russian men tend to drink themselves into an early grave).

    • Replies: @JMcG
  67. snorlax says:
    @Prodigal son

    Not really, because c. 40% of those “white” births are to Muslims.

    • Replies: @Prodigal son
  68. Sean says:
    @Steve Sailer

    The B36 is too modern looking for nostalgic Russian designers.

    https://hips.hearstapps.com/pop.h-cdn.co/assets/17/34/640×411/gallery-1503595845-dh5oihixcaef12.jpg?resize=768:*

    A French bomber of the 1930s? No, ’tis the latest in Russian aviation technology, which they proudly expect to be introducing by 2022.

    • Replies: @Sean
  69. istevefan says:

    OT – What is going on with the tariffs? Every time it seems we have China on the ropes, we suspend the tariffs. Now we’ve pushed them back until December. I think the Chinese are just trying to wait out Trump.

  70. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    So have we but their evil tops our evil by a good margin.

    From whose point of view, Jews, blacks, Apaches? I would think that statement varies much by who is considering it.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  71. istevefan says:

    OT – What is up with Trump and the tariffs? On again, off again, delayed again, he seems to be letting the Chinese off the hook. Now they report most of the tariffs are going to be delayed until December. I think the Chinese are waiting out Trump’s term.

    • Replies: @Sean
    , @Charles Pewitt
    , @BB753
  72. Anon[393] • Disclaimer says:

    The journalist who wrote the iconic Wall Street book “Barbarians at the Gates” earlier in his career wrote a book, “Dragonfly,” about the now memoryjoled program in which American astronauts flew aboard the Russian Mir space station. The Americans were a bunch of sissy perfectionist crybabies. The Russians were not cowboys; rather, they were realistic, even tempered blue collar technicians. They come off really well compared to the American prima donnas. If something broke they just calmly figured out how to fix it.

    But there were also cowboy cosmonauts. In 1985 the Russians launched Vladimir Djanibekov and his crew into space with instructions to bring the abandoned Salyut 7 space station back to life. It was about to tumble into earth’s atmosphere. It had no oxygen, icicles were floating around inside it, and there was a lot of damage. It took them months to get it habitable.

    All in all, the Russians come off as the sort of people who will really inhabit space in the future, when it isn’t sexy, when you have to make do with broken down junker spaceships and get than sort of running. Or build your own out of parts, including duct tape and a shipping container.

    • Replies: @Brutusale
  73. anon[277] • Disclaimer says:

    David St. Hubbins: It’s such a fine line between stupid, and uh…

    Nigel Tufnel: Clever.

    https://memes.getyarn.io/yarn-clip/05f0a66d-241a-4961-862e-10a1192fde98

  74. Sean says:
    @istevefan

    The power of weakness. Their economy is looking too fragile and he does not want the blame if there is a crash. Trump promised things he so radical he needs another term for the authority to push them through. FDR was the same with the New Deal, and then WW2

  75. @Lot

    It depends on your view on race & identity. In my view, there will be even more Euro-Asians who may be viewed as “whites” (perhaps a bit exotic); also, white Hispanics are much more numerous, perhaps 30+% of US Hispanics. Even light Mestizos can pass for white.

    So, if one is a racial purist- this all is a disaster for white race in America. If one’s view is similar to mine, things are not that bad. Only mixing with blacks is generally unacceptable (although even there I don’t care for “one drop rule”. Why would it be important if a phenotypically & culturally white person has, say, 8% of “black blood”?).

    Just look at Spanish language Univision:

    Of course, I am aware that they are selected. But, race mixing of “pure whites” with some recessives – although not on a massive scale- like Indians, light Mestizos, perhaps darker Caucasians,… is not such a big deal. I am, in my opinion, a race realist, while most white nationalists are white idealists, not realistic enough.

    What is more important is race as “social construct” where those mixed “almost whites” will identify as white, to prevent what Steve (and perhaps others) have called “flight from the white”.

    • Replies: @Lot
    , @Travis
  76. Bruno says:

    😂😂😂

    Russia has done nothing after the Soviet Union. A group of right wing opportunist have replaced the looting jews of Eltsine area.

    A big stone on alt right thinking is that neither Russia, Poland nor Hungary have succeeded to restore white fertility. Worse, they have developped, with Natalist policies, disgenic trends because the poorer are the one benefiting and looking for the government helps.

    Even if it’s better than Africanization, it’s not an enthusiastic perspective. A redneck civilisation isn’t more exciting than a Brazilian one. If the choice is between Winter bones and La virgen de los sicarios, not sure what’s better …

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  77. To paraphrase Queen Victoria: “We are not impressed”. Qualitatively new breakthrough in military technology would be, say, robot soldiers, use of a swarm consisting of millions miniature drones, all guided with some super AI, quantum computers operating in multiverse, genetic engineering warfare..

    This stuff with missiles is … old.

  78. Gordo says:

    I’m sure Klaus Fuchs would have taken careful notes.

  79. @Anonymous

    I personally sleep a little better knowing a white Christian nation is developing more effective deterrence against America’s bellicose fellow white elites.

    Probably like how soviet dissidents were once upon a time glad that a strong America existed. My how things change…

    • Agree: HammerJack
  80. Fredrik says:
    @Anonymous

    Every American president in living memory’s been a three-namer. With the possible exception of Barry H Obama.

    • Replies: @FPD72
    , @njguy73
  81. Anon[139] • Disclaimer says:

    Maybe I am thick, but the most unbeatable attack seems to be with ballistic, high speed weapons. What you are describing is low speed. Add the tortuous route, and you are looking at even longer periods of vulnerability for the snail-in-the-sky. Kushner and Ivanka will be able to wake up get dressed, and see it fended off. With any luck, even The Big A-brain may come see it.

  82. @snorlax

    Only 7% of the Russian population is Muslim and they would be counted as white here in the United States , as they are Caucasians.

    The 1.7 million white births in American last year includes Muslims and Arabs, Persians, Egyptians etc…about 2% of white births in America are Muslim or North African/middle Eastern, etc…

  83. Prosa123 says:

    The Air Force actually conducted a few test flights of an atomic powered B-36 bomber. It proved impractical because the weight of the lead shielding needed to protect the crew prevented it from carrying any kind of meaningful payload.

  84. El Dato says:

    RT making fun of meedja using photos of some Russian ammo depot exploding (What’s with Russian ammo depots? They seem to explode all the time?)

    No, this Russian family is not looking at a nuclear explosion near their city, dear MSM viewers

    But a few news cycles and permutations later some readers and viewers in the US probably believe that that explosion was some kind of nuclear blast (and that Russians are really badass since they treat one as a spectacle rather than a reason to panic).

    Ever vigilant Russia-watcher Rachel Maddow, for example, showed the AP story in her latest episode about the mysterious rocket and how the Kremlin must be crazy to try what the US already tried and failed at with their Project Pluto in the 1960s.

    “The Russian government ultimately let it be known: OK this wasn’t just any sort of rocket that had exploded, this was some sort of nuclear explosion involving a missile,” Maddow told her viewers. It did not, and there have been no nuclear explosions in either Russia or the US for decades, of course. But accurate wordings probably don’t go down well with the ‘Russia nuclear threat’ narrative MSNBC want to convey, so no surprise about that.

    On Tuesday the media mutation process reached its logical conclusion, with Al Jazeera rolling out its report on the incident, complete with close-ups of what happened in Achinks with a caption stating: “The blast was seen and filmed from many kilometers aways”. The Siberian city was not mentioned once.

  85. Prosa123 says:

    Make fun of Russia all you will, but look at the audience for a recent performance of the national anthem in Red Square. There is a zero chance that you’ll ever see remotely as much enthusiasm among people in the US during the Star Spangled Banner.

  86. @Clifford Brown

    I wonder why are there so many videos of Russian roads, and so few of American roads, offices, hospitals, schools. Could it be that most Americans lost their hope that hard evidence would help heir case, whenever an injustice would occur? How that supposed to reflect badly on Russia?

  87. El Dato says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    Yes, you don’t want Pu particles to become common in the environment. See Mayak. The Japanese for one were lucky as their Westinghouse BWRs did NOT have a uranium/plutonium fuel mix when they melted down.

    Plutonium is rumored to be one of Putin’s favorite methods of getting rid of people he doesn’t like.

    Sounds totally legit.

    “You will die in … a few years … ”

    Seriously, WTF.

    So you have Putler offing people with Plutonium instead of just putting them into prison — and no-one is our meedja ever hears about any of that?

    • Replies: @prime noticer
  88. El Dato says:
    @J

    Well, either you carry a big tank of hydrogen with you (NERVA, also works if you want to go to the Moon) or you stay in the atmosphere and pump air through the reactor, heating and expelling it (Nuclear ramjet). Or I imagine you could drive a propeller connected to a turbine if you have a closed cycle system, but that sounds a bit old-fashioned.

  89. Jack D says:
    @istevefan

    Here you are trying to talk down Russian accomplishments. Russia is the undeniable #1 (at least in evil) no matter how much Americans try to minimize their accomplishments. There is nothing even remotely comparable in American history to Stalin’s crimes. Not even close. The Russians are in the big leagues of evil along with Hitler and Mao. America’s attempt at evil are bush league at best, especially when it comes to doing evil to your own citizens.

    • Replies: @Richard S
    , @El Dato
  90. istevefan says:

    Russia is the undeniable #1 (at least in evil) no matter how much Americans try to minimize their accomplishments. There is nothing even remotely comparable in American history to Stalin’s crimes. Not even close.

    Stalin wasn’t a Russian, neither were many of his henchmen. Though a heck of a lot of his victims were Russians.

  91. Richard S says:
    @Jack D

    Nothing even remotely comparable, eh? You destroyed the indigenous cultures on your continent, forced millions of slave labourers to harvest cash crops for centuries, then spent the past hundred years dropping high explosives on women and children from Vienna to Vietnam. Are you for real?

    There’s a reason Iran called the USA “Great Satan” and the USSR “Lesser Satan”. At least Stalin had the good form only to exterminate his own people…

  92. But United States intelligence officials have said they suspect the blast involved a prototype of what NATO calls the SSC-X-9 Skyfall. That is a cruise missile that Mr. Putin has boasted can reach any corner of the earth because it is partially powered by a small nuclear reactor, eliminating the usual distance limitations of conventionally fueled missiles.

    What a load of contrived BS. I am sure those “officials” all have honor degrees in journalism, political science and broadcasting. Enough “education” to not have a clue on the use of isotope power sources in military technology since 1960s, at least. It is still being used both in Russia and US.

  93. Neuday says:
    @Anonymous

    Jesus H. Christ, what a bonehead theory.

  94. Bork says:
    @Lot

    Actually about 51% of births are to white women, but two white parents is obviously below 50%.

    Ahem. It says “white” but what it means is “caucasian”. North africans, middle easterners, turks, gypsies etc are counted under “white” since they are caucasians, but they sure arent white. IMHO even equallying white with european is way too generous.

    The US census has never tracked the number of whites in America, it has always counted the number of caucasians.

    You have to understand that while all whites are caucasians, most caucasians in the world are not white. We lament white extinction but there is actually a caucasian population boom in the world.

    A lot of the post 1965 immigration that you complain about has consisted of non-white caucasians. The immigration problems in Europe are mainly caused by caucasians. I havent checked if the US census count indians separately or not from caucasians, but if they dont, well you get it.

    The term caucasian has eventually become a catch-all for everyone who isnt a polynesian, asian, african or whatever. That means that the number of whites left in America is seriously overstated. You can draw your own conclusions from this.

    • Replies: @Prodigal son
    , @Lot
  95. Richard S says:

    Don’t underestimate a people who will literally rather resort to cannibalism, with a medical supply system composed of vodka and revolvers, in their will to resist and survive.

    Hitler himself in his final days recognised that those hard Slavic bastards (“the stronger east-folk”) really are the toughest SOBs in the world.

    By old Russian practice, mere fire and destruction
    Are all we abandon behind us in war.
    We see alongside us the deaths of our comrades,
    By old Russian practice, the breast to the fore.

    Alyosha, till now we’ve been spared by the bullets.
    But when (for the third time) my life seemed to end,
    I yet still felt proud of the dearest of countries,
    The great bitter land I was born to defend.

    I’m proud that the mother who bore us was Russian;
    That Russian I’ll fall as my ancestors fell;
    That going to battle, the woman was Russian,
    Who kissed me three times in a Russian farewell!

    • Replies: @Captain Tripps
  96. Sean says:
    @Jack D

    Russian strategic deterrent. Code name: Budenovka.

    https://thebulletin.org/2017/03/how-us-nuclear-force-modernization-is-undermining-strategic-stability-the-burst-height-compensating-super-fuze/#

    In reality, however, that program has implemented revolutionary new technologies that will vastly increase the targeting capability of the US ballistic missile arsenal. This increase in capability is astonishing—boosting the overall killing power of existing US ballistic missile forces by a factor of roughly three—and it creates exactly what one would expect to see, if a nuclear-armed state were planning to have the capacity to fight and win a nuclear war by disarming enemies with a surprise first strike.

    The inability of Russia to globally monitor missile launches from space means that Russian military and political leaders would have no “situational awareness” to help them assess whether an early-warning radar indication of a surprise attack is real or the result of a technical error.

    Putin is not only a fatalistic Russian, but he is also a counterintelligence specialist (read professional paranoiac) by training. We can’t trust him to show the good sense that Yeltsin did in the https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Norwegian_rocket_incident

    So next time anything similar happens there will be only one option (chomp cigar): total commitment.

    Can’t someone just give the Russians a hint on how to build their own spaceborn surveillance capabilities?

    • Replies: @El Dato
  97. J.Ross says:

    Maybe these are the guys we shouldn’t be picking a fight with, and maybe we should ignore those voices who think it would be easy.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  98. @istevefan

    Trump is a big fat chump on his puny and weak tariff capitulation to the CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY.

    Trump must immediately implement a PROHIBITIVE TARIFF of 94 percent on all goods and services emanating from any and all territories or jurisdictions controlled by the CHINESE COMMUNIST PARTY.

    If 94 percent is not enough to Tariff Blockade the Chinese Communist Party cheap labor exports to the USA, then go for 194 percent Prohibitive Tariff.

    Trump is a weasel who won’t take a stand to confront the Chinese Communist Party.

    The evil and immoral and treasonous ruling class of the American Empire has been conspiring and colluding with the Chinese Communist Party to attack and destroy US sovereignty and good wages and working conditions for US workers.

    Richard Nixon started the American Empire’s anti-worker and anti-sovereignty collusion with the Chinese Communist Party, and now Trump is backsliding like a bastard on one of the only things that Trump has done that I whole-heartedly supported.

    Trump Has Crawled Into Bed With The Chinese Communist Party!

    Trump And Mitch McConnell Have Crawled Into Bed With The Chinese Communist Party!

    TREASON!

  99. El Dato says:
    @Epesteined

    https://www.wired.com/2013/02/russian-dash-cams/

    It’s a bit of a libertarian paradise:

    How is it possible that a dozen different motorists around the Russian city of Chelyabinsk were able to capture video of a massive meteor flying through the sky? Because almost everyone in Russia has a dash-mounted video camera in their car.

    The sheer size of the country, combined with lax – and often corrupt – law enforcement, and a legal system that rarely favors first-hand accounts of traffic collisions has made dash cams all but a requirement for motorists.

    “You can get into your car without your pants on, but never get into a car without a dash cam,” Aleksei Dozorov, a motorists’ rights activist in Russia told Radio Free Europe last year.

    A combination of inexpensive cameras, flash memory and regulations passed by the Interior Ministry in 2009 that removed any legal hurdles for in-dash cameras has made it easy and cheap for drivers to install the equipment.

    Still no UFOs though Russia is big in UFOs.

  100. Kronos says:
    @dearieme

    For public office, both those scores are extraordinary.

  101. Kronos says:
    @reiner Tor

    “Putin studied Law at the Leningrad State University (now Saint Petersburg State University) in 1970 and graduated in 1975.[6] His thesis was on “The Most Favored Nation Trading Principle in International Law”.[38] While there, he was required to join the Communist Party of the Soviet Union and remained a member until December 1991.[39] Putin met Anatoly Sobchak, an assistant professor who taught business law,[b] was co-author of the Russian constitution, and who would be influential in Putin’s career.[40]” -Wikipedia

    My bad, thanks for pointing this out!

  102. @Thomas

    I’m not really sure why anyone would need something like this.

    Well, first of all weapons systems should be planned for the future, not the present, as the US is now finding out after having dropped productive weapons research on the grounds that all present and anticipated threats had been met. Pluto might have been the only remaining option had Russian ABM worked out and the US ABM not.

    Second, one of the points of projects such as Pluto is to establish conclusively that they are a bad idea with very little prospect of improvement.

    Finally, at the time the US was frantically trying out the various possibilities of the Navy’s BWR design, hoping to get something else useful. That was also the era of NERVA [1] and the nuclear powered bomber [2], surface ships, and even a nuclear tractor [4]. Not to mention the attempts to use fission bombs as though they were a more powerful form of TNT [5]. Too bad they didn’t decide to pay first cost of developing a thorium reactor with the money, but sic friat crustulum .

    The point is that _nobody knew_ back then how these projects would work out. They were attempts to follow up on the unexpected success of nuclear submarines, and when they proved infeasible they were dropped. You can’t legitimately criticize decisions on the basis of information unavailable to the decision makers. It discredits you if you do.

    OTH, some of the output was used when it really should not have been. My favorite example is the “nuclear rifle grenade”, the M28/M29 Davy Crockett system. [5] If there was ever a suicide weapon with a chance of immense friendly fire casualties, M28/M29 was it. The crew had to dig in just to survive their own weapon’s overkill. Fortunately, the Davy Crockett wasn’t deployed for long (1961-1967 in Europe, retired from Army use 1971).

    The Pluto program shows up in Charles Stross’s supernatural horror fiction. It’s a fictional universe in which such things were actually built. Stross is big on “Americans are evil”, but seems to have no problem with Soviet actions of the same era.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear_Engine_for_Rocket_Vehicle_Application

    2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nuclear-powered_aircraft
    One of these was actually built and flown

    3] http://ansnuclearcafe.org/2018/01/25/nuclear-merchant-ships-five-fast-facts/
    One of these was actually built.

    4] No reference for the nuclear tractor. There was a popular article on this in _Science Digest_, in around 1960, if I remember correctly. Application was Arctic zone logistics. I suspect the project was only a paper study.

    5] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atoms_for_Peace

    6] https://armyhistory.org/the-m28m29-davy-crockett-nuclear-weapon-system/

    • Replies: @Jack D
  103. El Dato says:
    @Sean

    Can’t someone just give the Russians a hint on how to build their own spaceborn surveillance capabilities?

    Or maybe just stay in INF and START in good faith (unlike what is currently occurring) and refrain from “refreshing the nuclear arsenal” (all with an eye mostly on being able to control the Pacific theatre though). So, generally not behave like someone who thinks he’s Charles Bronson?

    Would you REALLY trust the USA to not pull a first strike, preceded by a fast-track demonization media campaign? I would not.

  104. El Dato says:
    @Jack D

    Stalin was from Georgia though.

    As for some of his companies they wer#CARRIER LOST#

    • Agree: Herbert West
    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  105. @Bork

    In addition many of the white women are having children with Blacks and mestizos, thus about 5% of the children of White women will be non-white and never identify as white.

    • Replies: @BB753
    , @Alden
  106. @J

    “One can detect gliders and anything in the air, on the surface and under the sea – from satellites.”

    the idea that you can detect hypersonic missiles with satellites, so they’re no big deal, is not correct. satellites move. you have to have them over the area to detect anything. so you’ll be able to detect or track hypersonic missiles sometimes. and sometimes not.

    this is why US military is correctly concerned about them. the only thing you will always be able to do is detect them from ground radar. which gives you almost no warning. it is 100% for sure that hypersonic missiles launched at aircraft carriers or other ships will sometimes get zero satellite detection or warning.

    even if they do, what then. intercepting them, probably not. intercepting existing missiles works, sometimes, in training. i’m under the impression it never has never worked during a real launch. US CIWS i think has never intercepted a missile in a real launch. i wouldn’t put money on intercepting an ICBM. tracking it with radar, yes. intercepting it, i doubt it. hypersonic missiles would be even harder to stop. strangely, surprising the other guy with a missile attack seems to still work, just as surprising the other guy has always worked. sarcasm implied.

    US carriers send up a drone that gives them more visibility on a much further horizon, but that’s still only extends detection time a few seconds, i’m thinking.

  107. @The Alarmist

    When your goal is to deliver a nuclear knock-out blow in a doomsday scenario, do you really have to give a rat’s behind about the delivery system’s impact on the environment?

    Right, that was the thinking immediately post WW II. The Russians also tended to think that way. The US changed its mind by c.a. 1960, the Russians not until Chernobyl.

    So how did that work out?

    The Russians have far more nuclear contaminated land than does the West. N. Korea almost contaminated maybe 20% of East Asia when the mountain within which the fission bomb exploded almost turned to rubble and slid into adjacent valleys.

    Western values aren’t all that bad.

    Counterinsurgency

  108. @backup

    Thereby missing the point that MAD only made sense when the USSR and the US were confirmed enemies.

    MAD started making sense again after Libya’s chief of state abandoned nuclear weapons development and got Libya bombed and invaded and himself unpleasantly killed.

    You must want the consequences of what you want.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  109. Kronos says:
    @Old Prude

    Yeah, I can imagine her as the Curtis LeMay of the Pentagon’s Psychic Devision.

  110. @prime noticer

    I agree with your point about the cities and that’s why this seems like a strange line of research for the Russians. For example the diagram above assumes that your target and your radar station are in the same place. If these are anti-city weapons, the radars would be up in Alaska and Canada looking for missiles coming over the pole, and the targets in the lower 48. Or, you detect via satellite. The interceptors would presumably also be up in Alaska and Canada and the interception trajectory could be a pursuit trajectory–launch after it flies past and catch up–which is easier to do than trying to hit it when you are going the opposite direction, like you would have to for an incoming ICBM. Plus Mach 5, the limit of hypersonic, is around 1500 m/s while on the way down the ICBM is going at around 5000 m/s. The interceptor would need to be very very fast but making a short range rocket that can fly at hypersonic speeds in the atmosphere is feasible with today’s technology. Plus, themal and radar signatures of a flying nuclear reactor are going to be enormous compared to a warhead passively falling via gravity.

    A small hypersonic carrier killer though would make sense.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
    , @Sam Haysom
  111. Lot says:
    @Bork

    Indians are counted as Asian, and can also select Indian as a subgroup.

    The USA doesn’t have a lot of middle eastern Muslims at the moment, though they are growing very fast from a small base. Middle eastern Christians and Jews have long been considered white, not just caucasoid. This was an issue in naturalization court cases for a long time as the law said “white,” and the cases said caucasoid wasn’t enough. They need to be a group that could assimilate into the general population.

    In other words I agree that including Saudi and Algerian Muslims as white is not accurate, it is not presently distorting the stats much.

    • Replies: @Travis
  112. Lot says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    Sure hapas will blend into the white population, especially in California where they are so common and white is gradually becoming a catch-all “sometimes mixed old white american” group. Though a hapa would really have stuck out in the midwest of the 1990s.

    But hapas are demographically insignificant and will be for a while. They tend to generate in areas with very low birthrates and high maternal age.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  113. t says:

    OT: NPR say the problem with The Treaty Of Versailles is that it didn’t allow enough Japanese immigration into white countries.

    https://www.npr.org/sections/codeswitch/2019/08/11/742293305/a-century-later-the-treaty-of-versailles-and-its-rejection-of-racial-equality?utm_source=pocket-newtab

  114. Elsewhere says:
    @Paleo Liberal

    I’m pretty sure the rumor was about Putin using polonium, not plutonium.

  115. utu says:
    @NOTA

    nuclear thermal rocket once they’re out atmosphere

    How this is supposed to work with no atmosphere? You need to have something to propel in opposite direction of your motion.

    • Replies: @Counterinsurgency
  116. BB753 says:
    @istevefan

    Chinese collusion in the coming elections? Perhaps Mueller should look into this matter! LOL?

  117. @El Dato

    “The Japanese for one were lucky as their Westinghouse BWRs did NOT have a uranium/plutonium fuel mix when they melted down.”

    those were General Electric Mark 1 reactors, not Westinghouse reactors. sorry, i know that’s pedantic, but my dad worked for Westinghouse and we’re annoyed about it getting confused so often.

  118. @Epesteined

    Russians were early adopters of car cams because insurance fraud is so rampant in Russia.

    • Replies: @HammerJack
  119. @Prosa123

    Make fun of Russia all you will, but look at the audience for a recent performance of the national anthem in Red Square. There is a zero chance that you’ll ever see remotely as much enthusiasm among people in the US during the Star Spangled Banner.

    Zero chance you’ll see as much enthusiasm in Times Square, anyway. The American national anthem has been massively cheapened by being overplayed and overnegrified in the way it’s sung, too.

  120. Dan Hayes says:
    @Old Prude

    Old Prude:

    “Drunk they are and drunk they were when they defeated Napoleon and Hitler.”

    • Agree: Richard S
  121. Kirt says:

    Could this “accident” be caused by cyber-sabotage on the part of the US? Hasn’t this been done before to the Iranians by the US and Israel?

  122. @Paul Jolliffe

    There is a conventionally powered B-36 under roof at the USAF museum in Dayton, Ohio. They put the roof on afterwards.

  123. @Lot

    It is more complicated. White mothers don’t have so much children with non-white fathers (other races much more so), but recent data are not available. Here are some from a few years ago; I got tables from some years ago where you could make a table including mother’s & father’s race. Here are tables for 2005 for US and for 2011, in percentages; I don’t now whether you can get these info now, but just a few years ago you could; of course, the last category of “father’s race not stated” dilutes the picture. But, here you are:

    • Replies: @Alden
  124. JMcG says:
    @Jack D

    They aren’t enshrining minority representation in their government.

  125. Jeff says:
    @Anon7

    If Vlad brings over 10k hotties, he’s got my vote…

  126. @Tusk

    Rather like the way the word “sputnik”, commonly used in early 60s Britain, suddenly vanished around 1963 from print and airwaves to be replaced by “satellite”.

  127. Anonymous[388] • Disclaimer says:
    @Prosa123

    There is a zero chance that you’ll ever see remotely as much enthusiasm among people in the US during the Star Spangled Banner.

    National pride:

    There also patriotism especially among our brave men and women in uniform. Be sure to thank them for their service in defending our freedom.
    https://pbs.twimg.com/media/EB3PF1HWsAAJvwA?format=png

    If not for these brave men and women in uniform, well, we’d be speaking German. Which is harder to learn than America’s future language:

  128. @Richard S

    Look up “East Prussia invaded by USSR”.

    • Replies: @Richard S
  129. @Bruno

    Worse, they have developped, with Natalist policies, disgenic trends because the poorer are the one benefiting and looking for the government helps.

    That’s untrue in Hungary. Pro-natalist policies are geared towards the upper middle class, sometimes even upper class (by Hungarian standards, at any rate), while earlier natalist policies (geared more towards the poor) were left untouched (and thus inflated away, even if inflation was pretty low over the last decade).

    The biggest problem is that Hungary is a weak country with an open economy, unable to stand up to TPTB, and the government is pretty kleptocratic, to boot.

    • Agree: Bruno
  130. Jack D says:
    @Richard S

    You really don’t get it. There was never any intention to exterminate the Indians on purpose. White people LOVED the Indians – they put them on the money, they adopted Indian food and clothing, etc. Of course they didn’t tolerate it when Indians attacked white people. They were treated with a lot of good will but there was such culture clash between a stone age people and Europeans that it was never going to end well. Mostly they died from disease which was unintentionally introduced. The outcome was horrible, but it was not intentional.

    OTOH, Stalin killed millions with full intention and he did so within living memory, not 200 years ago.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  131. Jack D says:
    @J.Ross

    Who is picking a fight with the Russians? Who thinks “it” would be easy? What is “it”? A nuclear war with the Russians? I’ve never heard of one single American, inside or outside of government who is interested in having a war with Russia, no less a nuclear war. Russians are (perhaps given their history justifiably) paranoid that the US is going to do this, but objectively the US has zero interest in starting a nuclear war. What would be the point? What would we gain? Even if some Russian traitor offered us the keys to Moscow for free, I doubt that we would want it.

    • Agree: Alden
  132. Re nuclear-powered space flight, look for “Freeman Dyson Project Orion” on YouTube.
    Also Dyson’s book Infinite in all Directions. The idea was to eject atomic bombs from
    the rear of the spacecraft like turds, explode ’em, and absorb the shock with some giant plate.
    No prototype was ever built, AFAIK.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  133. FPD72 says:
    @Fredrik

    As are most famous American assassins. John Wilkes Booth, Lee Harvey Oswald, John Hinkley Junior, James Earl Ray, etc. I guess Sirhan Sirhan is uncommon enough to get by with two. Even the two would-be female assassins of Gerald Ford are commonly known by two names: Sarah Jane Moore and Lynnette “Squeaky” Fromme.

  134. FPD72 says:
    @Richard S

    “At least Stalin had the good form only to exterminate his own people…”

    Exterminate? Well, he didn’t actually exterminate his own people, since the majority survived. But whatever Stalin did to Russians, he also did to Ukrainians, Poles, Germans, Hungarians, Estonians, etc. He was something of an equal opportunity tyrant.

    • Replies: @Richard S
  135. Travis says:
    @Lot

    The MENA (Middle Eastern and North African) population in the United States is close to 5 million. Over the last decade 1.1 million Muslims have been granted residency in America, increasing the Muslim population from 3.5 million to 4.6 million today.

    the MENA population living in America are all counted among the 197 million whites living in the United States. Which represents 2.5% of our “white” population.

  136. @SimpleSong

    ICBM is coming only from one direction (roughly, from the direction of Russia), while this unlimited range nuclear scramjet hypersonic cruise missile could come from any direction. So you’d need interceptor radars in all directions, which would be way more difficult.

    • Replies: @SimpleSong
  137. Jack D says:
    @J

    Perhaps in the vacuum of outer space a stream of neutrons would be enough force to propel a rocket but on earth you need to depend on the jet effect of hot gases – instead of making hot gas by burning jet fuel you heat air with the heat from a nuclear reaction.

    While it is theoretically possible to build a non-polluting closed cycle nuclear jet (you use a coolant loop to transfer heat from the reactor to the air without spewing radiation) the Russian design is probably similar to the Project Pluto design where you run air right thru the core and therefore constantly spew high levels of radiation as you go. This would be a very Russian approach to this type of design.

    This is a feature, not a bug. You could theoretically have the ram jet fly around over the enemies territory and pollute it for months if not years after dropping the payload (or at least until it was shot down if there is anyone left to do shooting) because the reactor fuel will last that long. As a practical matter, if the whole thing does not blow up in one small spot (as the Russian test device did), the radiation gets diluted in the huge volume of air going thru the reactor and so you can’t really do a lot of damage to the enemy that way. The trail of radiation that you leave over the enemy’s territory (and even your own) pales in comparison to the devastation that the warheads are going to unleash.

    • Replies: @Alfa158
  138. @Jack D

    I’ve never heard of one single American, inside or outside of government who is interested in having a war with Russia

    Unilateral no-fly zone in Syria would’ve been war. And I’ve heard people like Hillary Clinton and Senator Wicker propose that.

    • Agree: Prodigal son
    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    , @dfordoom
  139. JimB says:

    A nuclear powered cruise missile is useful if your foe is the 19th Century British Empire or you lack a navy to transport conventional cruise missiles to a distant theater of war. But there are no more empires, and Russia has a functional navy with global reach. And since nearly all of Russia’s strategic enemies are on her borders and within the range of conventional cruise missiles, I fail to see the value of this weapons tech.

    Also, it would be dumb to put a conventional warhead on it. Since you are going to make a radioactive mess anyway, you might as well detonate a nuclear warhead. But 50’s era ballistic missiles do the same job with fewer effective defenses against it. Sooo, I’m guessing this is for sale to Iran or North Korea.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  140. Travis says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    It will be interesting to see if the flight from white escalates. The 2020 census will allow us to view this soon. Back in 2010 27 million of the 50 million hispanics self-identified as White. In 2020 there are 60 million Hispanics , will the majority still self-identify as White ?

    There has been a significant flight from White since the Census allows respondents to select 2 or more races in 2000. They counted a total of 4.1 Native Americans in 2000. In 2010 they counted 5.2 million Native Americans, an increase of 27%. We should expect the “Native American” population will increase significantly in 2020, as more people follow the example of Elizabeth Warren and claim to be Native American based on their recent DNA tests.

    Yet of the 5.2 million Native Americans counted in 2010, 1.4 million claimed to be part white. Since respondents are able to select more than one race. Would not surprise me if the number of Native Americans in 2020 reaches 9 million, which would be double the number of Native Americans counted in 2000.

    • Replies: @Bardon Kaldian
  141. Old Prude says:
    @Dan Hayes

    Ya. Imagine what would happen if they were sober.

    And I call bullshit on the AK 47 myth: Captured Germans created that gun and the commies successfully convinced the world that some drunk peasant artillery officer designed it. Later in life when his liver was weakening he couldn’t keep the story straight.

  142. I don’t have a lot to add except to say that SLAM (the nuclear ramjet cruise missile) may have been the single worst thing ever invented in the history of mankind with the possible exception of Sunny Delight.

    • LOL: YetAnotherAnon
  143. @Steve Johnson

    Luckily our present elites haven’t proven to be such dangerous madmen …

    Huh? We have the worst, most dangerous, elites have any people have had ever.

    Even with all the abject stupdity down through history, no elites have so stupidly trashed the people they are suppose to lead. Ok, the Great Leap Forward was pretty bad. Pol Pot was worse. But even that isn’t as genocidal/suicidal as what our “elites” are doing.

    In comparison, some nuclear powered weapon is trivial nonsense.

    • Agree: Anonymousse
  144. @Richard S

    I’ve reassessed my view of the Russians over my lifetime, as I have with many points of view/understandings of what I thought I knew when young. Experience and the constant input of new information lead one to become wiser. I grew up during the height of the Cold War, with MAD, and scary Soviets and their “lackeys” constantly in the news. I know the Russians aren’t saints, and they have a bloody history. But pretty much any human group of significance does; its why I revisit the fundamental values and morals where I learned we are all fallen, and easily prone to sin. To do right requires an understanding of the good, and to constantly orient yourself in that direction, and checking the baser impulses that try to grab hold. I’ve also seen people of all races and ethnic groups do wonderful things. Russians are the same; they start off slow, but come on like gangbusters.

    Its why I think its ultimately silly to try and paint this or that group as the ultimate “evil” ones. I’m not trying to be Mr. Rosy Glasses; I’m a realist when it comes to individual characteristics and how they scale up within and between our various groups of humanity. But I find I am more comfortable living by the old saws: Hope for the best, plan for the worst; take each person you meet one at a time; manage the things I cannot change; husband my strength for the things I can; do unto others…

    Posted before, but worth a revisit:

    • Agree: Richard S
    • Replies: @Richard S
  145. Richard S says:
    @FPD72

    You’re wrong about that. The number of Stalin’s victims *in* the USSR is orders of magnitude greater than his victims *outside*.

    *Millions* of Soviet citizens versus *tens of thousands* of Poles and Germans..

  146. Cortes says:

    Bad days at work do happen.

    I recall a couple of times seeing leading edge US space ventures ending (as Hirohito might have observed) not necessarily to the advantage of the participants…

    Anyway, comment #36 may be interesting:

    https://www.moonofalabama.org/2019/08/the-man-who-weaponizes-and-loses-everything.html#comments

  147. @utu

    How this is supposed to work with no atmosphere? You need to have something to propel in opposite direction of your motion.

    https://www.livescience.com/34475-how-do-space-rockets-work-without-air.html

  148. Richard S says:
    @Redneck farmer

    Yes .. it was terribly provocative of the Soviet Union to start a war with NS Germany…

    Are you lads out of your minds?! Or just spectacularly misinformed??

  149. @Dan Hayes

    “Drunk they are and drunk they were when they defeated Napoleon and Hitler.”

    Alcohol nullifies fear, although it takes increasing doses to achieve the same result as the body reacts to alcohol exposure. That and building social cohesion during group drinking makes it the basic military drug.

    Counterinsurgency

  150. J.Ross says:
    @Anonymous

    How would we act if Russia took over the Deep South, called anything we did after that unprovoked aggression, and supplied terrorists in Saudi Arabia? We would probably be sputteringly angry and rather paranoid, yes?

  151. @Jack D

    I’ve never heard of one single American, inside or outside of government who is interested in having a war with Russia

    You’ve never heard of John “We’re all Georgians now” McCain?

    How about John Bolton? Bolton called Russia’s “interference” in the 2016 election “a true act of war”. In February of 2018 he advocated a retaliatory cyber attack against Russia that would be “decidedly disproportionate” and that would be so severe it would cause Russia to disband her “cyberwarfare plans”. In 2018 he advocated joint military exercises between U.S., NATO forces and Ukraine. He said Putin should “hear the rumble of artillery and NATO tank tracks conducting joint field exercises with Ukraine’s military.”

    Calling for war, and calling for policies that are very likely to lead to war are substantially the same thing.

    What would be the point? What would we gain?

    There would be no point and we’d gain nothing of value. Unfortunately doing pointless, stupid things seems to be in fashion amongst our “foreign policy experts”. We’re saddled with lunatics like Bolton and unread mediocrities like Max Boot nursing their ethnic grudges.

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Brutusale
  152. @prime noticer

    Anything that puts out enough of an exhaust plume will be picked up by the satellites. What makes the hypersonic systems interesting is a somewhat broader choice of paths they may take to reach a target coupled with an increased capability to avoid being tracked, locked onto and destroyed. One might expect that latter advantage to fall away over time as defensive systems evolve.

    A point to be made here is that these are likely, at least for the foreseeable future, to remain counter-force systems, i.e. ones designed to deliver a knockout blow to an opponent’s first and second strike capabilities; they could be used as counter-value systems, i.e. city-killers, but MIRVd ICBMs are a cheaper and more effective way to deliver on that strategy.

  153. @Richard S

    You destroyed the indigenous cultures on your continent, forced millions of slave labourers to harvest cash crops for centuries, then spent the past hundred years dropping high explosives on women and children from Vienna to Vietnam.

    There’s a reason Iran called the USA “Great Satan” and the USSR “Lesser Satan”.

    YOu want atrocities? _Here_ are atrocities.

    “Mughal India ~ The Biggest Holocaust in World History”
    https://www.sikhnet.com/news/islamic-india-biggest-holocaust-world-history

    This is why India and Pakistan don’t get along well. It’s also why the Indians should be thanking the English on a special holiday each year: it was the English who eventually took out the Muslim rulers.

    Counterinsurgency

  154. Jack D says:
    @JimB

    What you say makes sense as a strategic matter but you did not take politics into account. For whatever reason (Putin’s popularity is flagging – he’s now ruled Russia in one form or another for 20 years and people are getting kind of sick of him) Putin wanted to be able to tout that Russia had a new superweapon against which all enemies of Russia would be helpless. This sounds like a really good and strong thing to say – Russia restored to greatness in Putin’s hands, its enemies fear it again, etc. Sure to play well with the very patriotic Russian people. So here it is. Whether it makes any strategic sense or not is besides the point.

  155. JimB says:

    Putin’s popularity is flagging – he’s now ruled Russia in one form or another for 20 years and people are getting kind of sick of him

    Unfortunately, Putin doesn’t have a son to be heir apparent, but he has two 30-something daughters. If he started using them as informal advisors, he might be able to run one of them successfully for his prime minister job in a few years. Then he could operate in the background.

  156. gp says:

    The USA did plenty of crazy nuclear research too, including nuclear propelled aircraft. But I came here to say: if you need ANY kind of vacuum tubes, radiation detectors, or ancient specimens of early semiconductor technology, the republics of the old USSR have warehouses full of them, and you can buy them direct on eBay.

  157. SFG says:
    @Jack D

    Poor countries like Russia and China tend to employ casualty-heavy tactics like human wave attacks because they’re rich in lives and poor in tech. You use what you have. (I’d love to hear one of the military history buffs here comment further.)

    I’m glad to be an American, but we should also be realistic about the role luck plays in our comfort.

    And not to get all lefty, but you could always mention the Native Americans and slavery. (No, not pulling the guilt card; every nation has its crimes. Including ones you wouldn’t expect–Uruguay wiped out its natives a while ago, and that’s probably one of the reasons it’s so relatively successful now, awful as it sounds.)

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Counterinsurgency
  158. Richard S says:
    @Captain Tripps

    Russians have an extraordinary combination of practical mechanical ingenuity, callous peasant ruthlessness and profoundly meditative souls.

    There’s no reason whatsoever why *we* can’t be friends with the Russians, plenty of reasons why we should, and a millennium of lived experience that shows why we shouldn’t pick an argument with them..

    I mean, I see the “geostrategic” reasons why US and EU elites can’t tolerate an independent operator muscling in on the action (the psychology is neatly elucidated in any gangster movie). But ordinary people in every country just want to be left alone to live their lives in peace.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  159. BB753 says:
    @Prodigal son

    More like 10 percent or 15 percent.

  160. Jack D says:
    @SFG

    Maybe China is rich in lives but Russia isn’t. It’s just that Russian rulers don’t always care about lives that are not their own.

  161. Anon7 says:

    One of my favorite Russian fringe technological marvels are these gas-powered rocket boots.

    https://youtube.com/watch?v=w7s-tnzPZ3c

    Just imagine if (in addition to my earlier mentioned plan of a Russian bride/hacker army and expeditionary force) V.V. Putin decided to hand out a half million pairs of rocket boots to eager immigrants! The border cops would never capture any of them.

  162. Jack D says:
    @Epesteined

    To amplify what Clifford said, no one in Russia would ever admit fault if you didn’t have video. Nor would any insurer pay you based upon your own statement. It’s pretty much expected that everyone is going to lie thru their teeth. They wouldn’t know what to do if you actually told the truth – they’d probably figure that that was some kind of extra clever scam and try to figure out what angle you are working. Everyone has a car cam or else you would never be able to collect a dime on insurance. This has worked out well in that we have gotten videos of meteorites and things that were never recorded on film before because millions of people have cameras running constantly.

  163. Lurker says:
    @Anon7

    Recently the commandant of the USMC bleated that protecting the US border interferes with his real job . . . in which case, what is that?

    https://www.militarytimes.com/news/your-military/2019/03/21/border-ops-straining-marine-corps-commandant-warns/

  164. Dmitry says:
    @Kronos

    who’s Putin’s Kissinger?

    Foreign policy of Putin, is mostly from Primakov, or least using all the same concepts, language and rhetoric that was inherited from Primakov.

    Putin foreign policy is more moderate than Primakov though, and also he is preferable and less scary domestically.

    extraordinary IQs

    Putin’s “IQ” will be a lot higher than of incompetent American presidents like Nixon or Kennedy. Problem is Putin’s mind is often directed in the wrong areas (he doesn’t understand much about the economy – although there are sometimes hired competent people in that area).

    • Replies: @Kronos
    , @Jack D
  165. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    OTOH, Stalin killed millions with full intention and he did so within living memory, not 200 years ago.

    Stalin wasn’t a Russian, neither were many of his henchmen.

  166. @SimpleSong

    Yes it’s a good bet that these weapons are almost entirely designed as carrier killers.

    Russia and China have talked themselves back into the mindset of Imperial Japanese war planners. And I’m not saying they are even wrong to do so it’s just where we are. Sneak attack and Put enough carriers into Davy Jones locker and USA will fold.

  167. @Counterinsurgency

    That’s not MAD though. Iran and North Korea will never build enough nuclear weapons to destroy the US. They won’t even have enough nuclear missiles to force the US to retaliate with sub based as opposed to silo based missiles.

  168. @reiner Tor

    That’s not being interested in a war with Russia though.

    And a something tells me if Russia instituted a no fly zone over Venezuela you would think it was fine for the US to attack Russia.

    Honestly we are approaching the point where the US could likely wipe out Russian nuclear forces with a first strike Russia needs to stop flexing so much. Put aside right and wrong don’t pick fights with people bigger and smarter than yourself.

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  169. dfordoom says: • Website
    @Richard S

    At least Stalin had the good form only to exterminate his own people…

    That raises an interesting question. Are you more evil, or less evil, if you only kill your own people?

    • Replies: @Richard S
  170. dfordoom says: • Website
    @reiner Tor

    I’ve never heard of one single American, inside or outside of government who is interested in having a war with Russia

    Unilateral no-fly zone in Syria would’ve been war. And I’ve heard people like Hillary Clinton and Senator Wicker propose that.

    They may not actually want a nuclear war but there are plenty of people in the U.S. prepared to do stupid crazy things that just might start one. Wars are often things that nations blunder into (the First World War comes to mind).

    During the Cold War the U.S. was still run (mostly) by grown-ups. Are there any grown-ups left in the U.S. Government?

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  171. Dmitry says:
    @Jack D

    If you were balanced, you can also write an American list of tragic history episodes, and see that America can compare to Russia in this dimension as well.

    I would list:

    1. American settlers have partially “ethnically cleansed” native Indian peoples of North America – some aspects were unintentional (smallpox), but others were intentional – e.g. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Genocide_of_indigenous_peoples#United_States_colonization_and_westward_expansion

    2. Until the second half of 19th century, the American landowner class in the Southern states has used millions of Africans to work as slaves, in order to increase profits.

    3. From the late 19th century, until the middle of the 20th century, thousands of former African slaves are murdered across the Southern states of the country, in the lynchings.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynching_in_the_United_States

    4. In 1945, America launches two nuclear bombs on Japanese cities – targeting civilian populations of what is still today a more culturally advanced country.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atomic_bombings_of_Hiroshima_and_Nagasaki

    There’s a lot of admirable things in American history, too. But your comments read, a bit unbalanced.

    Stalin killed millions

    (Khrushchev memorandum) Between 1921-1954 – 642,980 people executed in the Soviet Union.

    (Pospelov Commission) Between 1921-1954 – 688.503 executed in the Soviet Union.

    Shvernik commission, gave a still larger figure- 748,146 killed during the period 1935-1953, of which 681,692 – in 1937-38. (including 631,897 on the decision of extrajudicial bodies.)

    In 1988, KGB document submitted to Gorbachev – 786,098 people killed between 1930-55.”

    A proportion of those executed in this time, are ordinary criminals – so the number executed for political reasons is lower than the figures cited above. Another larger proportion have died indirectly, as a result of working camp.

    The numbers are very bad, but I have read some quite ridiculous exaggerations about these numbers too.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @kaganovitch
  172. Jack D says:
    @Dmitry

    You are omitting various other categories of deaths caused by Stalin. The Holodomor alone involved upward of 3 million deaths – some say much higher, especially if you include all famine related deaths in the USSR in the ’32-33 period. By some counts, Stalin was responsible for 20 million deaths.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Dmitry
  173. Richard S says:
    @dfordoom

    In international law? Less

  174. The Russians are at least trying to advance engineering a bit. Is there a chance that this was a scramjet attempt?

    Meanwhile America’s energy is directed towards inventing new ‘isms, biological horrors that would make Mengele vomit, gay electronic toys, and social media/apps designed to work on psychologic triggers.

    Honestly, who’s crazy.

  175. Kronos says:
    @Dmitry

    Thanks! Do you read “The Saker?”

  176. Jack D says:
    @Dmitry

    Nixon was probably one of the most intelligent US Presidents. He had many character flaws but he was not lacking in intelligence.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Alden
  177. @reiner Tor

    True, although I would think adding a little extra oomph to an ICBM to make a possible trajectory over the pacific/atlantic/south pole would be simpler than a clean sheet nuclear cruise missile design…

    • Replies: @reiner Tor
  178. Anon[278] • Disclaimer says:

    OT

    Sarah Silverman was cancelled from a movie because in an old sketch she wore blackface.

    The iSteve angle: The clip is in YouTube, and the sketch involved Country Club Derangement Syndrome. Silverman visits a country club (for tennis, not golf) and is turned away as a non-member, as cheerleader-blonde Beckys walk by.

    “I was the victim of a hate crime. The country club would not let me play tennis because I’m Jewish. Everywhere I go I’m a second-class citizen.”

    She gets into a argument with a black guy over who has had it the worse. She wants a black-like-me experience so she has a stage makeup guy do her up with (ridiculously fake) blackface, and an Aunt Jemima bandana.

    https://www.imdb.com/title/tt1087347/

    It’s quite long, not a flash of blackface. The punchline is when the blackface is finally removed a Hitler moustache remains.

    A bunch of extras also wear blackface. If any of them currently have a career in film or television, I bet they are sweating bullets right now. One of them gets outed at IMDB:

    — Norma Jean: Black-Faced Sarah Supporter

    Norma Jean has worked as recently as 2015, but at 52 she’s probably aged out of the actress gig.

  179. @Dmitry

    3. From the late 19th century, until the middle of the 20th century, thousands of former African slaves are murdered across the Southern states of the country, in the lynchings.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lynching_in_the_United_States

    A substantial majority of those, were guilty of the crimes they were lynched for. In any case Stalin killed 4 times as many as were killed in the USA in a century, in a couple of weeks at Katyn forest.

    • Replies: @Dmitry
  180. Alfa158 says:
    @Clifford Brown

    Vodka. You forgot to include lots and lots of vodka.
    These guys drive real cars about as well as I drive in video games.

  181. vinny says:
    @Jack D

    So if LOVE your family and decide to move my family into your backyard, I’ll call your attempts to get me out of there a “culture clash.” And then use those attempts to justify my moving you out to the desert.

  182. @Jack D

    Americans don’t want war, but the cold hard fact is that their opinions don’t matter to our self-styled rulers.

    Israel wants war, and they usually get what they want sooner or later.

  183. Alfa158 says:
    @Jack D

    Pluto was designed to carry 10 warheads and fly at Mach 3 at tree top level. After dropping all warheads it would have flown around leaving a trail of destruction from the transonic shock waves. The designers calculated a three week flight time. There would be lots of fissionable fuel left after three weeks, but the reaction would diminish due to contamination of the core by fission products.

  184. istevefan says:
    @Richard S

    . At least Stalin had the good form only to exterminate his own people…

    That’s just it. Most of his victims were not his own people.

    • Replies: @Richard S
  185. Alfa158 says:
    @Uncle Jack

    The concept was tested using conventional explosives and a small model. Worked fine.

  186. J.Ross says:

    Disgusting episode of Reveal just now on NPR, illustrating many disgusting jernamalismisms.
    –Addict Pinoy washed-up wrestler Cesar Sayoc was “a white supremacist” who “mailed bombs” (Sayoc was almost certainly an establishment hoax, none of his bombs could have gotten through the mail, in fact none of them could have gotten into the mail, and none of them were bombs).
    –A lot of flat out lying about the Bundy BLM standoff.
    –The sole source introducing anti-government ideology was an inarticulate and dishonest idiot imprisoned for trying to bomb a government property. The journalism here consisted of verbal eye rolling. The joke is that a lot of what the worst witness the prosecution — I mean, the journalist — could find was actually widely understood to be true and either reported in mainstream sources or in use by mainstream academia. In one case the jernamalist declares a deep state to be ufo-level conspiratorial rambling. The deep state is Sir Humphrey Appleby, darling, and if you need that explained to you then your opinions are not interesting. Even if you grok, your opinions are not news.
    –The gist of the first part of the show was that some kind of confused relationship or workplace dispute which ended in a spectacular suicide — all free of discernable political content — bore out the debunked lie that we are under assault by white supremacist terrorists. This part was marked by the observation that you would surely have heard of this event if the culprit had brown skin, because we all know how good the news is of keeping track of every mestizo and mandingo marital dispute.
    –Unforgivably, the propaganda task of this show was to defend the indefensible and unforgivable FBI rope-a-dope scam. Instead of actually doing police work or protecting the public safety, some FBI agents convince a Muslim or Militia retard to touch a fake bomb. In a hilarious twist, when said retard is able to get a real lawyer (as a number of Muslims were in the W years), he walks, because the rope-a-dope scam is bs which protects no one. Foolishly the jernamalist so tasked admitted on the air that this particular rope-a-doping took several years and required a half dozen agency assets (agents and informants, comprising the majority of the target dope’s militia group), who of course out of patriotism surely worked for free all those years they could have been dealing with the cartels. This was to “catch” one guy who needed years of prodding to “do” anything. The prodding was so clumsy that there was chatter (quoted in the show) among the agents (that is, the near-entirety of the fearsome militia) that they were being too clumsy with the prodding.
    –But the jernamalist had a plan to ratchet it back, which was the aforementioned big sin of real journalism (or cardinal rule of Soviet Writer’s Union; to each their own) of finding the worst possible representative and letting them babble. See? Both sides. We report. You decide. Jernamalists on Reveal are always ready to tell the audience how to feel with musical cues, sound effects, fake ad language, and deadpan telling you how to feel, so once the conspiracy babble was allowed to run for a few sound bites, the jernamalist tells wall number four that she felt less sorry for this objectively pro-fascist wrecker (getting targeted by a completely unjustifiable waste of taxpayer dollars) having heard him talk nearly visible thoughtcrime and inarticulately reference news stories she had not heard.
    –And of course this brainiac “is a Trump supporter” — the first and only one so identified to my knowledge on Reveal.
    And then I turned it to jazz, which makes more sense.

  187. njguy73 says:
    @Fredrik

    Or the four-namer: George Herbert Walker Bush.

  188. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    The Holodomor alone involved upward of 3 million deaths – some say much higher,

    Are we discussing Stalin or Kaganovich?

  189. APilgrim says:

    Actually, this is what the Russians said …

    ‘They were thrown into sea as it blew up’: Rosatom gives details of deadly experimental engine blast, Russia News, Published time: 10 Aug, 2019 15:41, Edited time: 12 Aug, 2019 14:51, https://www.rt.com/russia/466238-russian-rocket-blast-sea-rosatom/

    The term “isotope power source” used in the report refers to a radioisotope thermoelectric generator, a device that collects heat from natural radioactive decay to produce a relatively small amount of electricity and does not utilize a nuclear chain reaction like a regular nuclear reactor.

    ————————————————-

    Typically such power sources are Pu-238 (Space-Battery, or Rocket-Fuel), possibly the most carcinogenic substance on Earth. And that does not take into account any deception or missing details. The US uses Pu-238 Space-Batteries, mostly on deep-space launches. A few have fallen back to earth.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  190. Richard S says:
    @istevefan

    Yes they were mate; to a rounding error, Stalin’s victims were entirely citizens of the USSR.

    You tell me why [t̶h̶e̶s̶e̶ ̶i̶g̶n̶o̶r̶a̶n̶t̶ ̶A̶m̶e̶r̶i̶c̶a̶n̶s̶ ̶] our commenter-colleagues are right and I’m wrong.

    I don’t know how much more obvious I can make this point. Governments *are allowed* to shoot their own citizens, but it *is* considered unethical to murder foreigners. That’s why the USA and its little bitch Israel are pariahs in international law. Yes? You see?

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
    , @istevefan
  191. @Lurker

    Recently the commandant of the USMC bleated that protecting the US border interferes with his real job . . . in which case, what is that?

    USMC is an assault / reaction force. Its job is to provide rapid armed response to armed threats, especially those near seacoasts. Since a substantial fraction of the world’s population live near seacoasts, and most of the largest cities are located there (they were once port based economies) this isn’t as restrictive as it sounds.

    Assault/reaction forces are different from guarding forces an different from heavy infantry / armor. In assault / reaction, speed and aggressive spirit count. The idea is to attack before the enemy can get set up (build logistics networks, determine SOP, pre-plan responses, etc.). The same speed and aggressive spirit will only produce massive casualties if the opposition is already set up.
    Marines have been deployed as conventional infantry in attrition wars (Korea, Vietnam), and have usually done well, but if so employed they cannot be put back on assault / reaction force duty without re-training and in some cases without the passage of perhaps a decade.
    So: making border guards out of Marines for a year or two would leave the US without a response / assault force.(except the Airborne units, of course, but those are even more lightly equipped anssupported than the Marines (which at least have carrier aircraft on call).

    And maybe it will come to that. Expeditionary forces such as the Marines used to be fairly common. Every Great Power had an expeditionary capability. Now only the US has major expeditionary capability. Russia has some, China is sort of developing some, but that’s about it. At some point, the US expeditionary capability may vanish as all others have. The Marine Comandant is simply asking whether we want to start the vanishing right now.

    Counterinsurgency

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  192. @Lurker

    Recently the commandant of the USMC bleated that protecting the US border interferes with his real job . . . in which case, what is that?

    USMC is an assault / reaction force. Its job is to provide rapid armed response to armed threats, especially those near seacoasts. Since a substantial fraction of the world’s population live near seacoasts, and most of the largest cities are located there (they were once port based economies) this isn’t as restrictive as it sounds.

    Assault/reaction forces are different from guarding forces an different from heavy infantry / armor. In assault / reaction, speed and aggressive spirit count. The idea is to attack before the enemy can get set up (build logistics networks, determine SOP, pre-plan responses, etc.). The same speed and aggressive spirit will only produce massive casualties if the opposition is already set up.
    Marines have been deployed as conventional infantry in attrition wars (Korea, Vietnam), and have usually done well, but if so employed they cannot be put back on assault / reaction force duty without re-training and in some cases without the passage of perhaps a decade.
    So: making border guards out of Marines for a year or two would leave the US without a response / assault force.(except the Airborne units, of course, but those are even more lightly equipped anssupported than the Marines (which at least have carrier aircraft on call).

    And maybe it will come to that. Expeditionary forces such as the Marines used to be fairly common. Every Great Power had an expeditionary capability. Now only the US has major expeditionary capability. Russia has some, China is sort of developing some, but that’s about it. At some point, the US expeditionary capability may vanish as all others have. The Marine Comandant is simply asking whether we want to start the vanishing right now.

    Counterinsurgency

  193. @Prosa123

    Spar bangled spanner be racist.

  194. @Clifford Brown

    And you’re a fool if you drive through even slightly vibrantized areas of the USA without a dash cam, for much the same reason. Well that and the likelihood of instant physical violence. How you protect your micro-sd card is another matter.

  195. Poor countries like Russia and China tend to employ casualty-heavy tactics like human wave attacks because they’re rich in lives and poor in tech.

    Lanchester’s laws are usually cited here [1,2], and the usual summary is that, given units armed with identical ranged fire weapons (such as rifles or naval guns) the effectiveness of each force is given by the square of its numbers. Thus, a force of 3 ships against a force of 4 ships (all ships and crew competence being equal) wouldn’t be facing odds of 4 to 3, it would be facing odds of 4*4 to 3*3, or 16 to 9.

    Another way of putting this is that the 3 ship force would need to be 16/9 times as lethal (higher rate of fire, heavier rounds, better tactical sense) as the 4 ship force _just to face equal odds_. Mathematics, at least, favors the big battalions.

    Ive seen studies to the effect that in WW I, Imperial German forces had about 5 times the lethality per soldier as the Imperial Russian forces. However, the Imperial Russian forces held the line until the Imperial Germany managed to start the Bolshevik Revolution, simply because of greater numbers.

    Obviously things are more complicated than that, and Lanchester’s work describes tactical encounters rather than full attrition warfare in which numerically superior forces arrive over time rather than in one large invasion, but it does show that quantity really does have a quality of its own.

    Counterinsurgency

    1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lanchester%27s_laws

    2] http://eaton.math.rpi.edu/CSUMS/Papers/War/Lanchesters%20equations%20in%20three%20dimensions.pdf
    Shows that the simple case of lanchester’s law isn’t the only case.

  196. @Lurker

    Recently the commandant of the USMC bleated that protecting the US border interferes with his real job . . . in which case, what is that?

    Diversity and inclusion, duh!

  197. Kronos says:
    @William Badwhite

    Michael Hudson has some ideas on why the US is aggressive against Russia.

    “A nightmare scenario of U.S. geopolitical strategists is coming true: foreign independence from U.S.-centered financial and diplomatic control. China and Russia are investing in neighboring economies on terms that cement Eurasian integration on the basis of financing in their own currencies and favoring their own exports. They also have created the Shanghai Cooperation Organization (SCO) as an alternative military alliance to NATO.[1] And the Asian Infrastructure Investment Bank (AIIB) threatens to replace the IMF and World Bank tandem in which the United States holds unique veto power.”

    https://michael-hudson.com/2015/12/the-imf-changes-its-rules-to-isolate-china-and-russia/

    It’s the best explanation I’ve heard on why Bolton and company are utilizing “dick-swinging” diplomacy. There isn’t anything else that explains this bizarre behavior. Yeah, Jewish neuroticism is in the mix but geared towards preserving the US dollar as the World’s reserve currency.

  198. @Kronos

    The idea that creating payment systems (esp for oil, which afaik is usually traded in dollars) not dependent on the dollar can lead to US unpleasantness is not a new one. Weren’t Gadaffi and Saddam selling oil for euros/gold?

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Petrodollar_warfare#Political_events

    • Replies: @Jack D
  199. Corn says:
    @Lurker

    “. in which case, what is that?”

    Naval police, according to Harry Truman.

  200. Jack D says:
    @APilgrim

    Why would you need an “isotope power source” on a missile?

  201. Dmitry says:
    @Jack D

    Numbers who die in famines in the Ukraine in 1932 and 33, together are 1,3 million as a high estimate (a very large number, but it is not millions as plural).

    Neither was it “caused by Stalin” in an intentional way, except through incompetence – there was a failure of harvest in 1932* – although it was partly a result of Stalin’s program of forced collectivization, which had involved brutal repressions of rural population, and misallocationss of resources.

    Behaviour of authorities during the famine were in some ways more brutal and incompetent, than British authorities during the Irish Potato famine of the 1840s. But are very similar to British authorities in famines in India, which repeated continuously from the late 18th century, through to the 20th century, killing order of magnitude more Indians.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Famine_in_India#British_response

    *
    https://www.newcoldwar.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/06/Tauger-The-1932-Harvest-and-the-Famine-of-1933-Slavic-REview-1991.pdf?50d5a1&50d5a1

  202. Dmitry says:
    @kaganovitch

    Yes I am sure victims of lynchings in the Southern states of America, had a very “fair trial and sentencing process”, and the mob has carefully examined the evidence in each case – probably the victims of Stalin can be envious.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  203. @J

    can you really detect anything under the sea from satellites? If so, why are submarines still a thing?

  204. @Richard S

    ” But ordinary people in every country just want to be left alone to live their lives in peace.”

    Yes. My government (with its relatively open border strategy which is filling my home town with Africans, Asians and various swarthy types from anywhere between the Balkans and Xingjiang) is doing my quality of life infinitely more damage than Putin threatens to do.

  205. Brutusale says:
    @William Badwhite

    Don’t forget Obama’s Three Harpies.

    https://www.newyorker.com/magazine/2014/12/22/land-possible

    The link mentions one of Steve’s favorite Jews, Shmuley Boteach.

  206. Jack D says:
    @Counterinsurgency

    In the early days, people thought that there would be nuclear everything. If a reactor could be safely scaled down to fit in a submarine, then why not an airplane? Maybe you could have a nuclear furnace in your basement or a nuclear hand warmer? The fact that a nuclear device did not have to be refueled for months if not years and that only a tiny amount of fuel was consumed was an incredible advantage – a loaded 747 burns around 150,000 lbs of fuel on a transatlantic trip, which is a large fraction of its payload. Sure a reactor needs shielding but 150,000 lbs. buys you a lot of lead.

    Other technologies had been scaled down in the past – piston engines were once large stationary devices in mines and then they were made small enough to be put on automobiles and then small enough to propel model airplanes. And they had been scaled up to drive steamships. Who knew how scalable nuclear reactors could be? Scaling down ENIAC (which filled the entire basement of the Moore School) to the size of something that could fit in your pocket was probably beyond the wildest dreams of its designers and yet it happened.

    That being said, it was immediately understood that nuclear technology posed grave dangers due to radioactivity and some of these experiments were just plain stupid, not just in hindsight but could have been seen to be stupid and impractical even at the time. But the Cold War involved a lot of fear and panic and people do stupid stuff when they are gripped by fear and panic. But Putin doesn’t really have that excuse, just Russian paranoia which is a sort of constant.

  207. Jack D says:
    @Dmitry

    If you are in fact guilty of a capital crime, the fact that you did not get a fair trial is “no harm, no foul” – the end result is the same.

    While Stalin executed whole classes of people (e.g. the entire officer corp of the Polish Army), it was not the practice in the South to execute all blacks or even random blacks. Nor was there ever any organized campaign to starve blacks to death – famine is basically unknown in American history, especially intentionally caused famine.

    Usually lynchings were based upon credible accusations of rape or murder. Now these were not 100% correct but they were probably right more often than not. But the main thing is that lynchings didn’t really add up to a lot of victims, especially not INNOCENT victims. Whereas the vast majority of people executed by Stalin for political crimes were totally innocent – the charges of “wrecking” or sabotage or enemy collaboration were false almost 100% of the time. They were merely pretexts for getting rid of people.

    In the case of lynching you are talking about a few thousand victims over the space of a continent and a century – one or two here and there on rare occasions (a lot fewer than the current rate of black on black homicide). Even one innocent victim is bad, but you just can’t compare the scale of lynching with the scale of Stalin’s crimes. He is just in a completely different league of evil.

    What you (and others) are doing is called “what about-ism”. It’s a way of changing the subject. You mention the Holocaust and the “what-abouters” mention the “concentration camps” that America set up for the Japanese in WWII. The what-abouter’s counter examples are usually not remotely comparable to the scale of the original crime.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @Dmitry
  208. @Richard S

    This place attracts some real retards. Maybe too many above ground nuclear tests.

    • LOL: Richard S
  209. @Kronos

    Russians have small dicks that don’t work because they are always drunk. Naturally this offends big dicked WASPs like me and John Bolton.

    We are just explaining to them in the only language they understand that if they are gonna wave dicks their plastic dildo from 1973 doesn’t count and it’s really pathetic to act like it does. Basically Russia is at the same stage that France was in 1953 it still thinks it’s a world player and it’s not. Eventually de gaulle retired and France got the message. Eventually Putin will die and Russia will get the message.

    • Replies: @istevefan
    , @Jack D
  210. Jack D says:
    @YetAnotherAnon

    This stuff doesn’t make any sense. As long as the dollar/euro/gold are freely exchangeable with each other you can price your contracts and settle your payments in any medium you want and if the recipient doesn’t like that form of payment he can immediately go out into the market and trade it for another form. There is a slight risk that the exchange rate or the price of gold in dollars will change a little over the course of the contract but this can be covered by hedging. Pricing oil in Euros or gold is not grounds for war in the view of Bolton or anyone else.

    Kadhafy and Saddam were (quite intentionally) trying to make themselves thorns in the side of the US (as are Russia and China now). Their efforts to detach themselves from the dollar were the RESULT of their opposition to America, not the cause of America’s opposition to them. During the period of detente (and because the Soviets were always short of hard currency) the Soviets often did barter type deals where they would trade oil for food or something that they wanted. Nobody hated the Russians because they priced oil in bushels of wheat instead of dollars.

    • Agree: Johann Ricke
  211. Nonsense. Gadaffi wasn’t trying to be a thorn in the side of the US – he was Mr Good Boy, a far cry from the chap who armed the IRA twenty five years before. He closed his nuclear programs, best mates with Tony Blair, Libyan Air Force at Fairford every year (like the Ukrainians are these days), SAS training his soldiers.

    What have Russia done to harm the US? Zilch. But the US has done a lot to harm them.

    “As long as the dollar/euro/gold are freely exchangeable with each other you can price your contracts and settle your payments in any medium you want”

    But if you don’t pay in dollars you don’t have to hold dollars. That’s the point. And the fewer countries that have to hold dollars, the less of a global means of exchange the dollar is.

    At present the dollar is the global currency, as sterling once was. Are you saying the US doesn’t care if the RMB or the Euro supersede it?

    Sam Haysom – the list of French interventions in Francophone Africa is a long one and goes up to the present. Not to mention the blowing up of ships in New Zealand harbours.

    • Replies: @YetAnotherAnon
  212. @YetAnotherAnon

    Of course you used to have to hold dollars because the US was the workshop of the world from 1945-75.

    But how many consumer goods do people buy from US factories these days? The deindustrialisation of the US and UK were acts of elite treachery.

  213. Anon[257] • Disclaimer says:
    @Anon

    Do you live in the projects? You must to be so familiar with crack babies.

  214. Alden says:
    @Prodigal son

    It’s against the laws of affirmative action to hire Whites. So the White women who birth black or Spanish surname children will have prosperous descendants. While the blue eyed children of 2 White parents will end up homeless and childless.

    Instead of blaming White women for not having children why not blame the White male President Vice President senators congress critters federal and state judges and attorneys who created affirmative action?

    Every person involved in affirmative action, Johnson Humphrey Nixon Carter Chief Justice Brennan the entire federal judiciary all the lawyers were White men. European Whites, not Persians and Arabs.

    White European men did it all in just 5 years, 1968 affirmative action act to 1973, Griggs vs Duke Power.

    I know Ron has total freedom of speech here. But maybe commenters could comment about the article instead of their pet peeves and strange interest in other people’s sex lives?

    And how many White children have the White men blaming White women for not having children fathered?

    If you feel so strongly get married young and have 4-6 White children and make provision for them to make a living without having to beg the capitalist pigs for jobs in an affirmative action discrimination country.

    My husband and most of the men in our extended family managed it. If you couldn’t you’re a loser.

  215. Alden says:
    @Bardon Kaldian

    What does your table have to do with the article? Nothing . If you’re so concerned have some White children.

  216. Alden says:
    @Jack D

    Nixon was the affirmative action president who opened to China thus precipitating a zillion East Asians eligible for affirmative action into America

    May he burn in hell forever and ever amen. Of all the anti White presidents, Nixon was the worst.

  217. istevefan says:
    @Richard S

    You tell me why [t̶h̶e̶s̶e̶ ̶i̶g̶n̶o̶r̶a̶n̶t̶ ̶A̶m̶e̶r̶i̶c̶a̶n̶s̶ ̶] our commenter-colleagues are right and I’m wrong.

    This post, and the sub-thread a few of us diverged onto, was about Russians. Some commenter(s) suggested Russians were very evil and brought up Stalin as an example.

    But Stalin was not Russian. He was a Georgian. And the Soviet Union is not synonymous with Russia. Therefore to suggest that Stalin’s crimes, or even Soviet crimes, are to be attributed to ethnic Russians is wrong. Ethnic Russians probably suffered as much or more than any other ethnic group under Stalin and the USSR.

    • Replies: @Richard S
  218. istevefan says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Basically Russia is at the same stage that France was in 1953 it still thinks it’s a world player and it’s not. Eventually de gaulle retired and France got the message. Eventually Putin will die and Russia will get the message.

    There is no doubt that Russia is not as powerful as she thinks or wants. But where would you put the US on the timeline of world history? Eventually we will be a minority-majority nation with no floor in site for what the founding population should be.

    Will the US still be the US with a 50% White population? What about when that population drops to 40% or 30%? Is there any floor to the historic population to which you would still consider the US to be the US?

    And going back to France in your example, would you consider them better or worse off than they were in 1953? Will the demographic change taking place before our eyes leave them better or worse off than they were?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Sam Haysom
  219. J.Ross says:

    Their efforts to detach themselves from the dollar were the RESULT of their opposition to America, not the cause of America’s opposition to them.

    America was already opposed to them, but only wanted their heads after this.

  220. Jack D says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Excellent analogy. For the French, it took getting their asses kicked, first in Vietnam and then in Algeria to really make them realize that they were not a first rank world power anymore. The US in Vietnam and the Soviets in Afghanistan also suffered humiliations that caused reassessments. Putin so far has succeeded at pretty much every move he has tried (Crimea, Syria) so he is going to draw the opposite lesson until he overreaches and gets Russia’s ass kicked somewhere. Unfortunately for everyone (not least Russia itself) Putin is going to have to learn this lesson the hard way.

  221. Jack D says:
    @istevefan

    Again, more what-aboutism. Maybe the US is not the country it once was either (and someday will be even less than it is now), but our decline (at least up until now) pales in comparison to the Russian Empire which was once (in its guise as the USSR) considered to be the co-equal of the US as a world power and is now a mere shadow of its former self with half the population of the US, a place where deaths exceeded births until recently and an economy the size of Mexico’s. Even if what you say about the US is true, this does not change Sam’s point, it merely changes the subject.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  222. @istevefan

    Who knows what happens to America. Currently it’s the biggest baddest kid on the playground. My disposition is towards modesty and not rubbing that in people’s face but I also have an instinctual disdain for the second biggest or really third or fourth at this point kid whose ass has already been kicked trying to pretend like he’s equal to the baddest kid and muttering under his breath about just you wait. The US is fast approaching a point where it can legitimately expect to win a nuclear war with Russia. Once you’ve reached that point Russia needs to just shut the fuck up.

    So maybe the US will face a precipitous decline at which point Russia is welcome to do whatever they like but the two faced Unz commenter posture of osicsllating between why is Globohomo picking on poor Russia and Russia’s gonna kick the US’s ass because of this sweet new anti-air craft battery or whatever is obnoxious. And until that decline I believe Russia is simply inviting “encirclement” if it continues to demand to be treated as a world power.

    As for France I’d say they were probably better off in 1953 but the demographics of today’s France were inevitable. In fact the return of 100s of thousands of pied noir made france’s demographics less bleak than they otherwise would have been. European empires were a mistake but complaints from people who can’t hide their boner for a reconstituted Russian empire are complete sour grapes. Just like when Russian bots bitch about US-Saudi alliance. They’d give their left nut for the Saudis to ditch the US for Russia.

    In short the guy that keeps writing in his journal why can’t I run the playground I hate that bully who does. Doesn’t actually hate bullies.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  223. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    Maybe the US is not the country it once was either (and someday will be even less than it is now), but our decline (at least up until now) pales in comparison

    I suppose to you the fact that the US is still the sole super power is all that matters. But to historic Americans our decline has been epic and unprecedented. We once comprised 85% of the strongest nation in the world. Today we comprise about 62%, and there is no end in site or a guaranteed floor to which will we remain. In what time and place has that ever happened without some sort of military conquest or plaque?

    This blog is a literal diary of the coming apart at the seams that is in store for the USA as it hurdles faster and faster toward the demographic replacement of its historic population.

    a place where deaths exceeded births until recently

    Aren’t White Americans in a similar situation?

  224. @Jack D

    Right on the money. When America declines my point is nullified but until then Russian delusions of grandeur are inviting a response.

    It’s funny this crew loves the Suez Crisis in 1956 because Israel got it in the face but overlooks the fact that it’s actually a great analogy for Russian power. France and England were acting with the kind of impunity that they could get away with a century before. But the world had changed and it blew up in their face. Russia continues to want to act like it’s still 1949 or 1821 and then acts like it’s being wronged when the world doesn’t let them push people around. A sphere of influence isn’t something russia just gets to have. It’s something they used to have the strength to demand.

    The US probably is a little to forcefully in the world (although as far as hegemons go it’s the best yet) but there isn’t a country in the world that has less of a leg to stand on in complaining about bullies than Russia. Even when they are weak Russians can’t even pretend to not be plotting to reconstruct it’s empire.

    • Replies: @istevefan
  225. Richard S says:
    @istevefan

    I’m afraid you may be misunderstanding the historical reality.

    Lenin himself criticised the Russified Georgians Stalin and Ordzhonikidze for their Great Russian chauvinism

  226. istevefan says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Who knows what happens to America. Currently it’s the biggest baddest kid on the playground.

    I have no concern for being the biggest, baddest kid on the block when my country can’t or won’t even defend its borders. I have no concern for being the biggest, baddest country when increasingly that country is not even mine.

    As for who knows, that’s a problem. People are pushing a massive, unprecedented demographic transformation and all they can say is “who knows”. Man, you would think before pushing such a policy, they’d have a little more understanding than that.

    The US is fast approaching a point where it can legitimately expect to win a nuclear war with Russia. Once you’ve reached that point Russia needs to just shut the fuck up.

    That’s insane to even contemplate. Do you have an ethnic animus towards Russians?

    And until that decline I believe Russia is simply inviting “encirclement” if it continues to demand to be treated as a world power.

    Why would one be interested in encircling Russia while our borders are being breached on a daily basis? Why does it matter what is going on around Russia when our historic population is being replaced as we speak?

    You seem pretty hung up on the Russians. Maybe they did something to your ethnic group and you resent them.

    I suppose we are just diametrically opposed on policy. You seem to be a foreign policy hawk living in the Cold War who looks at the world like a giant board game of Risk and seeks to position one’s nation in advantageous positions versus regional rivals.

    I am focused on the fact that my people are being replaced at an alarming rate, and thus who controls some little country in some far off part of the world is less concerning than who populates and runs my nation.

    Having a nuclear arsenal designed to contain a Cold War enemy is of little use when 6 billion potential invaders begin to trickle and then flood north. If people on your side cannot see this then we are in for some bad times. We won’t be able to get anything done unless enough people come together. So long as we have a significant chunk ignoring the 800 pound gorilla that is global migration and focusing instead on the 98 pound weakling that is Russia, we are screwed. In the short term you might get your pound of flesh off the Russians. In the long term we will have lost our country. That would be a stupid trade off.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  227. ATBOTL says:
    @Travis

    We need to remember this when we look at statistics. Many of the children born to white women are mixed race. The the white birthrate is significantly lower than it seems. It’s similar to how we have to remove the Middle Eastern and sometimes Hispanic people from the “white” category in various statistics to get the true picture. There is no reason for us to want to hide this data or pretend that mixed/Hispanic/MENA people are “white” like Europeans are white.

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Johann Ricke
  228. istevefan says:
    @Sam Haysom

    What is the origin of your ethnic animus towards Russians?

    As a person who lived through the final stages of the Cold War, I recall myself hating the Soviet Union and giving high-fives to my classmates when we read about some Mujahideen blowing up a Soviet convoy. We rooted against them at the Olympics, and in the army we used their likenesses as targets on the rifle range. We even sang cadences about the nasty things we would do to them in a war.

    But once the Cold War ended, and communism ceased there, so did my hatred. I see them as fellow Europeans and am encouraged by their attempts to re-Christianize. Yet many like you seem to hate them almost more than we hated them as Soviets.

    I don’t get this animosity. If you are going to hate Russians for what they have done in the past, then I suppose you despise Germans, French, English, Japanese and so on.

    I do not wish to hate or fight fellow Europeans again. The 20th century has been brutally tough for Europeans and the entire European world is sick. They once referred to the Ottomans as the sick man of Europe. Well now most of Europe and her New World nations are the sick ones. Russia is sick too. Maybe 70 plus years of Bolshevism left them terminal.

    The point is the European world is in a bad position. Most of our nations are losing their historic populations at an alarming rate. We have no time for further infighting. The rest of the world is not sitting back watching anymore. They are moving in, and we are in jeopardy of losing what has taken millennia to create.

    • Agree: Prodigal son
    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @Sam Haysom
  229. Dmitry says:
    @Jack D

    called “what about-ism”

    You seem to forget your posts above.

    I am responding to your claims that “Russia is more evil than America”.

    Listing some tragic episodes in American history is relevant in this context – considering it is the country you are using for comparison to.

    especially intentionally caused famine.

    1932 famine was not intentionally caused, as the evidence shows there was a real failure of the harvest – read source I added above. Whether it was artificially caused is another question – but here it is more about incompetence, and definitely criminal incompetence.

    Usually lynchings were based upon credible accusations of rape or murder. Now these were not 100% correct but they were probably right more often than not.

    They were “probably right more often than not”- because you say? Is “lynching revisionism” view, supported by historical scholarship?

    main thing is that lynchings didn’t really add up to a lot of victims,

    There were thousands of victims. In the history of a large country, this is not quantitatively significant, but qualitatively it is rather in opposition to the self-image and raison d’être of America as a land of respect for law and judicial process.

    you just can’t compare the scale of lynching with the scale of Stalin’s crimes.

    Sure, I will agree with this – lynchings are relatively minor when judged by their scale, and are not comparable to Stalin’s crimes.

    But America has things comparable in scale to Stalin’s crimes in its history. For example, slavery in America’s South, had a quite significant scale:
    “The total slave population in the South eventually reached 4 million before liberation.”
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Slavery_in_the_United_States

    the “concentration camps” that America set up for the Japanese in WWII.

    Here is another unfortunate episode in America’s history, although it seems a relatively minor one, compared to nuclear bombing of civilian targets in Japan.

    Enough such tragic episodes add up, that you can realize American history is not particularly lacking in them, and doesn’t need to look to Russia for such things.

  230. @Jack D

    The French didn’t “get their asses kicked”, they won militarily but could not govern the place without tying themselves to the Algerian majority population. De Gaulle gave them a referendum, took in the Pieds-Noirs and then his successors went ahead and imported Algerians en masse anyway.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  231. @Richard S

    You realise the Office of Indian Affairs was staffed by Northeastern WASPs and their cultural wannabes who believed the indians would become good productive farmers if not for those deploreable settlers causing problems? That the major power struggle dealing with the Indian question was between an Army dealing with the Indian raids and dying and the OIA insisting that the Army and settlers were wiping out whole villages?

    Where have we heard this dichotomy before?

  232. @Counterinsurgency

    The marines aren’t being used as “border guards”. Their rear echelon support units are being rotated in and out to do clerical tasks, refueling, drive buses, and occasionally work radar trucks. They’re not allowed to do any actual law enforcement.

    The Marine Commandant isn’t “asking questions” as much as DoD is used to being the 800lb gorilla in the room and doesn’t like that DHS is calling the shots and telling the military where to go/what to do.

  233. @Jack D

    Are we really playing “Putin doesn’t know what he’s doing he’s just lucky consistently!”.

    Woo boy, the ethnic projection.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  234. Jack D says:
    @istevefan

    So is ethnic animus the only possible explanation?

    And your sympathies are just the mirror image of the American Left, which loved Russia when it was Soviet but hates it now. The world has not changed as much as either of you think. Putin is the same man he always was. He wasn’t a good man when he was a good Red and he’s still not a good man as a good White. A lot of Soviet behavior was really Russian in character and a lot of current Russian behavior is really Soviet.

    You may think of the Russian leadership (the Russian people, individually, can be as boundlessly good and kind as their leaders are bad) as Fellow White People but that’s not how they think of you. Putin sees the world as a zero sum game where your loss is his gain and he does not wish you well as you wish him well.

  235. @istevefan

    Yep the guy with the going on 15 comments on Russia is just a sure a shooting American Yankee Doodle dandy yes sir.

    Who do you think you are kidding? We can “encircle” russia and protect our borders. Our porous borders are a will power problem not a resources problem. Encircling russia is about insulating Europe from Eurasian barbarism. Keep the men with chains out. You want to act as a Trojan horse for central Asian thuggery and then whine about European demographics. Fuck off. It was Moscow’s favorite senator teddy Kennedy that brought the third world to our shores consider it payback for the 70 years Russians spent pumping third worldism into the US via their fellow travellers.

  236. @istevefan

    I have no use for “Europeans” who just spent four decades points nuclear missiles at Europe and brutally occupying a bunch of European countries.

    Russians are as European as Armenians which is to say not at all. No one did more damage to Europeans over the last 50 years than Russians. So yea this full blooded wasp does have an ethnic hatred for Russians. The question is why don’t you?

  237. Jack D says:
    @ATBOTL

    pretend that mixed/Hispanic/MENA people are “white” like Europeans are white.

    Some of them ARE white already and some can be bred back to whiteness pretty quickly. My next door neighbor is 1/2 S. Asian but was born and raised in the Midwest and she is the Indian version of an “Oreo” or a “banana” (white on the inside) – is there a name for it? She once told me about having to go back to India for a family funeral or something and how she found the whole place to be filthy and disgusting – you could tell that she was completely detached psychologically from the idea of being Indian. Intellectually she knew that these were her people, even her blood relatives but she just couldn’t identify with them.

    In appearance she doesn’t really look Indian but is not quite N. European either – you thing Greek or Spanish or something you can’t quite put your finger on. But she is married to a white guy and her kids show zero sign of being Indian – they just look like normal white kids even though their grandpa is 100% (high caste) Indian.

    The only way these people will be “not white” is if it pays big time for them to be not white. If you take away the artificial incentives they would melt into the American melting pot as dozens of other ethnic groups have before them.

    • Replies: @Svigor
  238. @Jack D

    the mirror image of the American Left, which loved Russia when it was Soviet but hates it now

    The left didn’t love Russia so much as loved the Soviets. Because the Soviets were communist. Now that there is no USSR and Russia is not communist, there is no reason to hate it. The fact that the left does anyway is curious.

    Why do so many people (you apparently included Jack) seem unable to grasp that there are points on the spectrum that fall in between “love Russia” and “hate Russia”? We don’t have to choose between those two.

    What if someone (such as me) doesn’t really care much about Russia one way or the other? Russia does not threaten the US in any realistic way. I don’t want war with Russia for the same reason I don’t want war with Argentina or Mali – there is no reason for it.

    Putin is the same man he always was. He wasn’t a good man when he was a good Red and he’s still not a good man as a good White.

    Couldn’t care less, not our business.

    Putin sees the world as a zero sum game where your loss is his gain

    The Crimean peninsula isn’t our loss.

    • Replies: @Jack D
  239. @Sam Haysom

    Encircling russia is about insulating Europe from Eurasian barbarism. Keep the men with chains out.

    That’s the United States’ job? I must have missed that Amendment.

    then whine about European demographics. Fuck off.

    Your vulgarity and inability to control your emotions makes me doubt your claims to be a full-blooded “wasp”. As does your writing “For some reason my German ancestors…” earlier today.

    We can “encircle” russia

    “We” huh…remind us which service you’re in Toughie? Or do you mean “we” in the Max Boot/Bill Kristol sense?

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  240. @William Badwhite

    Forgive me for omitting wife’s in that sentence. I notice you don’t post under your own name. Haysom is about as English and founding stock a name you can have. Sorry you can’t be equally proud of your own heritage. Another hint is the fact that you think WASPs aren’t prone to anger when their patience is tested by men in gold chains. We didn’t hone our patience with years of Talmudic studies like your let me guess parental parents ancestors did.

    We WASPs have longed honer our ability to detect a self-hating crypto and boy so you have all the signs Mosh… I mean William.

    • Replies: @William Badwhite
  241. @Jack Hanson

    I’m going with losing Ukraine is the kind of embarrassing defeat that undid all the putative progress Putin had obtained. Putin is powerless without high oil prices.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  242. Jack D says:
    @William Badwhite

    Maybe you are personally indifferent about Russia but there seem to be a number of people around here who are fans and see it as a model for White Nationalism (which it isn’t).

    So if what Russia does is not our business so long as they don’t invade Alaska, I guess you’d agree that the Israelis can do whatever the hell they want with the Palestinians?

  243. istevefan says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Encircling russia is about insulating Europe from Eurasian barbarism. Keep the men with chains out.

    In case you have been asleep for the past couple of decades, Europe is being invaded right now by men with chains. And the USA is doing nothing about it. And it is not Russia doing the invasion.

    Heck, if you so big on military use and such, I’d support you if you wanted to use the US military to overthrow the EU and install governments that actually protected Europeans from foreign invasion.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  244. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    Fellow White People but that’s not how they think of you.

    Trust me. We are fully aware about how fellow White People think about us.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  245. istevefan says:
    @Jack D

    So if what Russia does is not our business so long as they don’t invade Alaska, I guess you’d agree that the Israelis can do whatever the hell they want with the Palestinians?

    So long as we pay money to Israel, then what she does is our business. I wasn’t aware that we were paying the Russians anything. If we are paying them, sure, we have a right to stick our nose in their business.

    • LOL: Svigor
  246. @ATBOTL

    It’s similar to how we have to remove the Middle Eastern and sometimes Hispanic people from the “white” category in various statistics to get the true picture. There is no reason for us to want to hide this data or pretend that mixed/Hispanic/MENA people are “white” like Europeans are white.

    Census classifications have political consequences. If Nixon hadn’t consented to the Hispanic category, would we have quota preferences for them today? Nixon was supposed to be one of the smartest presidents in American history. But politically, he had massive blind spots.

  247. @istevefan

    We can’t do everything for the Europe. Keeping the drunk men with gold chains out is our civilizational gift to Europe. They need to figure out to stop the other ones.

    And yes if that were an option I would. I grew up in Belgian and it’s gotten so bad my family no longer visits. But again Russia had hundreds of nuclear missiles pointed at Belgium for decades. So we know what the Eurasian horde had in store for it.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  248. @istevefan

    Us? So you are Russian now? Then what was all that Yankee Doodle dandy stuff up above?

  249. @Cagey Beast

    Unsurprisingly the French Foreign Legion had his number. If only they had succeeded. Surprised BAP hasn’t talked bout that more.

  250. @Sam Haysom

    “Losing Ukraine” lel okay bud.

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  251. @Jack Hanson

    Oh so I guess we are playing the deny reality because we can’t cope game too

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  252. J.Ross says:
    @Sam Haysom

    And now, ladies and gentlemen, I will surpass my own previous attempts at chucklerustling by quoting Mr Sam DFG Haysom without additional material.
    “Russia had hundreds of nuclear missiles pointed at Belgium.”

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  253. JMcG says:
    @Jack D

    Well, in fairness, we aren’t giving Russia billions in foreign aid and subsidized weapons. Borrowed billions at that.

  254. @Sam Haysom

    And there’s the ethnic projection I talked about earlier. Quelle shock.

  255. @J.Ross

    Shows how much you know about the Cold War. Again my condolences that your side didn’t win.

    • Replies: @J.Ross
  256. J.Ross says:
    @Sam Haysom

    Look at it this way: setting aside the fact that I actually studied Russian history and literature at university, and you are a pajeet working off a stylesheet, your [sponsor’s] kind already tricked/commanded my kind into a completely unnecessary war in Babylon, may justice prove to not be a bedtime story, o blood-bathed wealth-inheritor, and, try as you might, your kind will not trick/command my kind into a completely unnecessary war in Sarmatia, probably because of your aforementioned gore-decorated success. Pot legalization or no, we retain some memory. For the time being, anyway.

  257. Svigor says:

    Russia has never been as rich as America, so they make up for it in competition with us by having crazier technology, like, apparently, nuclear-powered (not just nuclear-armed, but nuclear-powered) cruise missiles. That sounds like something Richard Feynman and Klaus Fuchs would have brainstormed over lunch at Los Alamos in 1945.

    That’s because everyone took a very long look at nuclear propulsion in the fifties and sixties. Think fleets of enormous, nuclear-power-propelled bombers up in the air 24/7, huge cruise missiles with effectively unlimited range, giant interstellar spacecraft launched by nuclear pulse propulsion, etc.

    TL;DR, it all turned out to be too big, heavy, or dangerous.

    NASA’s still researching nuclear propulsion for space. It’s the best option for some applications, as I understand it, which isn’t well at all – the impression I get is that it’s for deep space propulsion, after orbit is achieved with chemical rockets.

  258. Svigor says:
    @Jack D

    Like you know anything about WNism. When was the last time you made a non-hostile comment about WNism? You’re too busy hating pro-Whites to come up with an honest take there, guy. All you know is what’s in Jewish interests.

    And oh, look, (((Johann))) laughed at your joke that wasn’t even a joke.

    I know a few people like that, who laugh at everything I say. Annoying people everyone wants to get away from. I have good delivery, sure, but not everything I say is LOL-funny.

  259. Svigor says:
    @Jack D

    Stick to breeding the Palestinians to Israeliness, eh? You Jews are always trying to get someone else to mix; go mix your own blood with the Arabs’ and leave us alone.

  260. @Sam Haysom

    That’s not being interested in a war with Russia though.

    A no-fly zone is created by first going in, destroying all aircraft flying, then attacking airports and suppressing and eventually destroying air defense assets. In other words, attacking the Russian military stationed in Syria.

    You are pretty idiotic if you think that attacking the Russian military in Syria (which the proposal would’ve meant in practice – there’s no other way to create a no-fly zone) is not a war.

    So, yes, Hillary and Senator Wicker (and a number of others) were proposing war with Russia. They might not have understood it, or they might have hoped that Russia wouldn’t shoot back, but it’s like saying that

    if Russia instituted a no fly zone over Venezuela

    It’s interesting that people from the US of A, the country which is the biggest proponent of the Rule-Based International System™, don’t understand what rules are. Russians are in both Venezuela and Syria with the permission of the internationally recognized governments there.

    Honestly we are approaching the point where the US could likely wipe out Russian nuclear forces with a first strike Russia needs to stop flexing so much.

    And now you’re wondering why they’re “paranoid.” Though you are probably a nobody, from what I heard from American politicians, think tanks, and other similar influential people, their thinking is probably pretty similar to yours.

    • Replies: @Jack Hanson
  261. @dfordoom

    A no-fly zone is created by destroying all aircraft flying in it, and then suppressing and destroying all air defense assets in the area. In other words, it would have been quite literally war. Granted, not nuclear war (at least unless the Russians decided to escalate to that level), but that’s what it’d have been. Jack D wrote that

    I’ve never heard of one single American, inside or outside of government who is interested in having a war with Russia

    which is simply wrong. They were advocating for the no-fly zone, which would literally be war.

  262. @SimpleSong

    They are also doing that. They just want to be absolutely sure that they can reach the US.

    Strategic nuclear capabilities are a top priority for Russia, quite understandably, given the bellicosity of both the American public and elite.

  263. Adûnâi says:
    @Jack D

    “It’s interesting to see how many “Soviet” style behaviors Putin has reverted to. Secret cities, denials after accidents, etc.”

    The practice of military/science cities was never abandoned, even after the fall of the USSR. Why would it have been? Doesn’t the US have a similar concept of Federal Land?

    • Replies: @Jack D
    , @J.Ross
  264. @Jack D

    Maybe you are personally indifferent about Russia but there seem to be a number of people around here who are fans and see it as a model for White Nationalism (which it isn’t).

    Again, I think you’re conflating not hating Russia with loving Russia. As I said, there is a lot of white space between those two points. I read most of the comments here (though my “commenters to ignore” list is fairly long) and I don’t recall many actual Russia “fans”, except maybe the couple of Russians that post.

    I will concede that I find Putin to be interesting as a western leader (yes I know Russia spans two continents so is only partly “western”) in that he seems to actually be concerned with the welfare and the future of the people he is governing, something you don’t see in the west much. Certainly not in the US, UK, Germany, or Canada.

    There is no reason for Russia to be an enemy of the US. That doesn’t mean she should be an ally (though I think our interests as they pertain to terrorism and to China overlap). Russia is just another country – GDP smaller than Korea’s and only slightly larger than Spain’s. Way too much time and attention is given to Russia.

    I guess you’d agree that the Israelis can do whatever the hell they want with the Palestinians?

    Sure, fine by me. Whether I personally think it right or wrong, it doesn’t necessarily follow that makes it a US foreign policy issue. Since you asked though, in the specific case of the Palestinians, they’ve mostly brought this on themselves. Yes they got a raw deal in 1948 (though just HOW that land came to be theirs is an open question and I sincerely hope that doesn’t lead to 5,000 comments on the topic) but since then they’ve consistently shown they’re not willing (or able) to be part of the solution.

  265. @Sam Haysom

    I notice you don’t post under your own name.

    I don’t post under my own name because I’m not a blithering idiot. I get that nobody at the Applebee’s where you work cares what you post, but some of us are in more sensitive positions.

    Another hint is the fact that you think WASPs aren’t prone to anger when their patience is tested by men in gold chains…We WASPs have longed honer our ability to detect a self-hating crypto and boy so you have all the signs Mosh… I mean William.

    Calm down toughie, I get you’re all mad and sheeitt and one of these days you’re gonna beat up Russia. One reason I doubt your WASP bona fides is you seldom address the pertinent issue in your posts (i.e. just why “we” should go to war with Russia) instead of boasting and calling people names and flinging f-bombs. That’s a very…ethnic…way to behave.

    I notice you ducked the question about which service you’re in there. Lemme guess, you’re an 11-star general in the Chairborne Warriors, Keyboard Division?

    Sorry, no ashkenazi (nor Elizabeth Warren injun) blood here. I’m a founding stock American Mr Boot, first ancestor arrived well before the revolution, none arriving since well before the “civil” war. Mostly British Isles/Scots-Irish with some German and even Dutch (way back, 1700’s) mixed in. Btw, I wouldn’t brag about being “WASP”. Its now a synonym for “effete”, which doesn’t square with you being so fearsome.

    Since you claim to be so personally offended by Russians and since you’re such an obvious tough guy, rather than drunkenly cranking out belligerent and boasting comments (remember when you said you were “6’3″ and clean up on white chicks” lol), you should head for the Donbass and sign up with the Ukrainians. I bet they’d welcome the help from the Belgian Badass (or maybe were you blacked when you posted that you grew up there).

    • Replies: @Sam Haysom
  266. @reiner Tor

    Some one in the foreign policy apparatus realised Russia was playing for keepsies in Syria, thankfully, and knew America would either be going to war over a shot down fighter jet or the Imperial system would collapse shortly thereafter.

    Never a surprise that the same people who handwave the Russian Rocket Forces are the same people who will never be on the business end of an S400 or that Pinnochio launcher they rolled out. This isn’t even touching on that signals jammer that apparently not can shut down anything it wants, but can decide when it wants to turn the lights off on your drone/jet/whatever.

  267. Jack D says:
    @Adûnâi

    No, we don’t have secret cities that don’t appear on any map. The closest we came to that was Los Alamos during the height of the Manhattan Project. During the war, all mail destined for Los Alamos was addressed to P.O. Box 1663, Santa Fe, NM. All babies born at Los Alamos had that address on their birth certificate. But as soon as the war was over we stopped doing that.

  268. J.Ross says:
    @Adûnâi

    We absolutely do that (by the way, don’t talk to Jack about two things, the evilness of the Russians or the goodness of the Israelis; he’s good on any other topic) but we never did it on the same scale and brazenness and completeness as our rivals.

  269. @William Badwhite

    Lol and there’s that Talmudic wordiness. Crypto fo sho.

  270. @JeremiahJohnbalaya

    they seem to be able to put stuff together pretty well

    This blog posts news article:

    U.S. Officials Suspect New Nuclear Missile in Explosion That Killed 7 Russians

    mysterious explosion that released radiation off the coast of northern Russia

    one of the worst nuclear accidents in the region since Chernobyl

    nuclear reactor had exploded during an experiment

    Oh and speaking of Chernobyl…

Current Commenter
says:

Leave a Reply - Comments are moderated by iSteve, at whim.


 Remember My InformationWhy?
 Email Replies to my Comment
Submitted comments become the property of The Unz Review and may be republished elsewhere at the sole discretion of the latter
Subscribe to This Comment Thread via RSS Subscribe to All Steve Sailer Comments via RSS
PastClassics
The “war hero” candidate buried information about POWs left behind in Vietnam.
Which superpower is more threatened by its “extractive elites”?
What Was John McCain's True Wartime Record in Vietnam?
Are elite university admissions based on meritocracy and diversity as claimed?