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Rough Diamond: "Guns, Germs, and Steel" After 20 Years
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Inspired by Gregory Cochran’s recent review of Jared Diamond’s 20-year-old Pulitzer Prize winning tome Guns, Germs, and Steel The Fate of Human Societies, here’s my new column in Taki’s Magazine:

Rough Diamond
by Steve Sailer
September 06, 2017

… Why are some races of humans so much more economically and scientifically productive than other races?

Diamond charmingly phrased this as Yali’s Question, after a Melanesian cargo cultist the UCLA physiologist had met on a bird-watching trip to New Guinea:

“Why is it that you white people developed so much cargo and brought it to New Guinea, but we black people had little cargo of our own?”

It’s not that New Guineans don’t care about cargo. In fact, after observing American and Australian military men deposit upon jungle airfields vast quantities of delightful goods, they formed cargo cults to replicate the white man’s magic. As William Manchester recounted in Goodbye, Darkness: A Memoir of the Pacific War:

The native is no dummy. He can imitate any rite. He puts together a facsimile of a telephone with tin cans and string. He shuffles papers and speaks into the can; then he searches the sky, predicting, “Moni i kam baimbai.” (“Money he come by and by”)…

Frustrated, a New Hanover tribe formed a “Lyndon B. Johnson cult” in the 1960s. Even in New Guinea people knew that nobody was more effective with gadgets and telephones than Lyndon Johnson…. Somehow they amassed sixteen hundred dollars for a one-way ticket from Washington to Moresby and sent the ticket to the White House. Johnson didn’t arrive…. It seems a pity. LBJ would have made a marvelous king of the blackfellows, and he would have enjoyed the job immensely.

Read the whole thing there.

 
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  1. anonguy says:

    GG&S was a nice just so story. When I read it, the obvious paradox was obvious to me at least.

    He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition.

    Florida, famously narrow, is ground zero for invasive species, meaning that its own native species just aren’t all that competitive. It is a net importer of invasive species.

    I’ll give him that for making that notion really clear to me.

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    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    "He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition. "

    Been 20 years since I read that book, but that point still seems like it is valid to me.

    The other thing that I got from that book, was the thing about the random basis of plants and animals in a region suitable for agriculture and other uses.

    There just aren't that many plants that were amenable to the kind of selective breeding and development that became our agricultural staples, at least as far as mass produced carbohydrates go.

    Other than the grain family, corn and rice are about it. And there are even less animals that proved suitable for draft and mount purposes. Horses, oxen, in some places Llamas and Elephants (though no one ever hitched an elephant to a plow as far as I know).

    From that standpoint the Middle East really was favored for the development of agriculture. The Great Plains or the Canadian Shield not so much. (Yeah I know the Indians exterminated native horses, but that isn't the point exactly.)
    , @anon

    Florida, famously narrow, is ground zero for invasive species, meaning that its own native species just aren’t all that competitive. It is a net importer of invasive species.
     
    Invasive species? They're species with a DREAM!!!
    , @Pat Boyle
    The idea that his native buddy was smarter than he (Diamond) was, is a charming conceit and we all admire humility, but if that were true surely we would be reading a book by Yali not by Diamond. No?

    I've read all of Diamonds books and written long refutations of their theses in the Amazon book reviews. In short every book by Diamond is wrong in its major points. His theory of Rapa Nu (Easter Island) is particularly wrongheaded. His story about the Easter Island history and culture is not very old but more recent research has shown it to be wrong in every particular by researchers who have actually visited the island..

    The problem seems to be that Diamond does not pursue the facts about a people like those of Rapa Nu but rather he chooses peoples and cultures that illustrate his preconceived notions. He has it in his head that modern man is doomed because of his insults to the natural world. Then and only then does he search for cases that illustrate his fixed ideas. There has grown up now a cottage industry of scholars who delight in refuting his notions. Diamond knows a lot about birds in New Guinea. Other places - not so much.

    His last book "The World Until Yesterday" is particularly bizarre. He thinks we - modern westerners - have much to learn from primitives. Maybe so but his examples prove just the opposite.
    , @AnotherDad

    GG&S was a nice just so story. When I read it, the obvious paradox was obvious to me at least.
    He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition.
     
    Been a while, but I thought it was a good book. I took the smart Yali stuff with a grain of salt. And I thought a few chapters in the back wrapping up were quite bad--really larded up with PC nonsense.

    But I thought his basic argument about coming up with a decent "crop package" of crops and animals as being critical and the larger longitudinal sweep across Eurasia providing the best options and wide transference were reasonable and cogent ideas that have some validity about why that region "took off" with civilization first.

    But then, of course--what Steve said. That "crop package" and eventually the "civilization" based on it is the new environment in which selection is occurring. Essentially there's gene-culture co-evolution. Humans are now much more dramatically affecting the environment in which they are evolving.

    Diamond admits this. That's the whole point of the issue of "germs" when the Europeans hit the New World. A bunch of evolved germs and some evolved resistance in Europeans for said germs. (Pretty well trod ground.) Diamond just doesn't want to--for political and career reasons--want to think or say the obvious.

    But that's par for the course. We have this absolutely bizarre situation where supposedly educated people prattle on about "evolution" and "science", but somehow believe that "everyone is the same". Or pressed, admit that there was--obvious--evolution of differences in appearance, maybe some evolution for resistance to disease, maybe some evolution to adapt to new foods (lactose tolerance, or alcohol tolerance) but never ever never ever any selection on brain function, even though our brains are humans main survival advantage and this whole process of settlement and civilization has obviously massively changed the nature of cognitive demands that allow one to "get ahead" in life.

    It's stupid shit, but it's the routine stupid shit that's the ideological straightjacket that's been imposed. And apparently very large numbers of supposedly "smart" and supposedly "educated" people are unable to penetrate it.
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  2. robot says: • Website

    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word “woke”? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    Read More
    • Replies: @theo the kraut
    Woke. We own the bitches.
    , @Jack Hanson
    "Based" is the term du jour.
    , @27 year old
    Woke is fine

    Based is more commonly used by the alt right.

    Woke is not a partisan term, it's used by groups of all kinds to mean somebody who is aware of the stuff the in-group is supposed to know. It can mean literally opposite things when used by different people.
    , @Daniel Chieh
    "Woke" can be stolen. But failing that, there's always "redpill."
    , @Lot
    It is not a new term. I think black twitter made it more common.

    Circa the 1760s Kant said Hume awoke him from his dogmatic slumbers. Decades ago David Duke had an awakening.

    , @JamesG
    "noticing"
    , @anonymous-antimarxist
    Woke as been used by Alt-Righters for a while now, unironically. I concur in believing that the Rappers perhaps stole it from Grandpa Duke.
    , @AndrewR
    Red-pilled
    , @sayless
    "woke".

    Is everyone too tired to write or say, "awakened"?
    , @guest
    The alt-right can simply use "woke," which has the bonus of sounding funny.

    But "woke" is just another word for the Dead White Male concept of Enlightenment. Since we own the Western Tradition, we can use that.

    , @Neil Templeton
    To me, "woke" sounds a little bit like "dove" instead of "dived", "lit" instead of "lighted", and "obliged" instead of "obligated". Prob'ly the good thinkers best shy from this "low hanging fruit".
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  3. It took me three or four tries before I was able to get into this. Every time I started I’d get annoyed with Diamond’s insistence that Yali is much smarter than me.

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    • Agree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @bomag

    Yali is much smarter than me.
     
    One of Isaac Newton's professors resigned and suggested Newton for the post. I'm waiting for Diamond to help install a New Guinean in a post at UCLA.
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  4. “After Diamond’s rather eye-rolling opening about high-IQ Papuans, his book settled down into a productive groove, working what has become the dominant trait of intellectual conventional wisdom in the 21st century: antiquarianism.”

    There are two ways to make a wrong use of the past: To get lost in it (= first Historicism, now Aquarianism (great term)) – and to try to improve it (= (heart-wrenching) humanism). Diamond might be a mixture of both.

    The best of Dimonds writing is to be found in his latest book “The World Until Yesterday”.This book features a lot of very detailed – reporting even – about: Early peasants – and their tendency to fight – proto-wars, lets say. Those chapters are eye-opening – and fit with shocking precision into the darker chapters of Erich Fromm’s depiction of us human beings in “The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness”.

    Diamond did so on the basis of decades of interaction with early peasants. He does know things about those people from experience, which is a great accomplishment.

    He might even love them – and at times – – – idealize them. For example by claiming, that their understanding of the world – and of existence, might be not only different from ours, but might – in the long run – turn out to be superior, because of the powers, the western civilization has developed (= to extinguish all human life at will in about 40 minutes – this might be the ost frightening one).

    I think, Diamond uses the word intelligence in “Guns Germs and Steele” in such a way, that he says: Imagine a deterioration of our industrialised culture, which – cf. “Collapse”… might occur any time – and think for a minute, who then would survive. And on that basis, he comes to the conclusion: It might turn out, that my beloved Papuans might – under such conditions of a collapsed industrial civilization – be the ones with the better performance/ survival rates.

    - I think, that that’s what Diamond says in “Guns Germs and Steele”. And in “Collapse” and in “The World Until Yesterday”, too.

    Diamond redefines intelligence in such a way, that it is useful to make speculatins about the different survival rates of different civilizations under the supposition, that the industrialised world collapses. That would be the simple version of his argument. A more complex version would reflect on the contrafctual version of world history: The question, wether a world without the progress made by non-pacific islanders would be less devastating and less risky. (Diamond – as far as I recall, does not elaborate on this version of his thought).

    Well – with his broad-scale skepticism about the current state of the world, Diamond is neither irrational, nor without company (I hint at Heidegger and his dark versions of the “Gestell”…).

    What Diamond says about intelligence for example, is not what’s discussed within the framework of IQ as a means to predict future behavior/ performance of people living in industrialized societies. I think, that’s something else alltogether, and Diamond obfuscates such insights.

    I think Diamond is a great writer and adventurer, and explorer of the world of the proto-wars of early peasants, and a great birder and all. But he knows very little about modern society. Steve Sailer’s insightful critique of Diamond is therefor very far from being unnecessary, or superflous. It’s rather brilliant, really.

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    • Replies: @Chet
    Dieter Kief says:

    Diamond did so on the basis of decades of interaction with early peasants. He does know things about those people from experience, which is a great accomplishment.
     
    No. JD has no experience with "early peasants" and nobody does.
    In episode one of the National Geographic Program based on GGS, Diamond makes an astonishing statement,

    Instead of just reading about this lifestyle in archaeological books, I’ve been lucky enough to witness it first hand, to see for myself how we all lived 13,000 years ago, and how we found food.
     
    Anthropologist Stephen Corrie wrote, in reference to Diamond’s works, based largely on New Guinean natives,

    It is important to note that, although Diamond’s thesis is that we were all once “hunter-­gatherers” and that this is the main key to them being seen as our window into the past, in fact most New Guineans do little hunting. They live principally from cultivations, as they probably have for millennia. Diamond barely slips in the fact that their main foodstuff, sweet potato, was probably imported from the Americas, perhaps a few hundred or a thousand years ago. No one agrees on how this came about, but it is just one demonstration that “globalization” and change have impacted on Diamond’s “traditional” peoples for just as long as on everyone else. Disturbingly, Diamond knows these things, but he does not allow them to spoil his conclusions.
     
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/30/savaging-primitives-why-jared-diamond-s-the-world-until-yesterday-is-completely-wrong.html

    This is actually a well-known fallacy, again from Corry:

    Britain’s foremost expert on prehistoric man, Chris Stringer of London’s Natural History Museum, for example, routinely cautions against seeing modern hunter--gatherers as “living fossils,” and repeatedly emphasizes that, like everyone else, their “genes, cultures and behaviors” have continued to evolve to the present. They must have changed, of course, or they simply would not have survived.
     
    Diamond’s use of other supposed stone-age-level tribes is fraught with the same problems, for example, with respect to the Yanomamo,

    Prior to 1492, these researchers say, this portion of central Amazonia was a prosperous, cosmopolitan, multiethnic network of big villages, fed by fish from the great river and reliant upon a multitude of forest products. When that network was thrown into turmoil by the arrival of European slavers and European diseases, the Yanomamö and many other groups fled into the hinterlands, where they now reside.
    If this is correct, these people are not “pure” or “pristine”; they are dispossessed. And their existence in small bands is reflective not of humankind’s ancient past but of a shattered society that has preserved its liberty by retreat. It would be risky to base conclusions about the evolution of society on the study of pockets of refugees, perhaps especially those who have survived both a holocaust and a diaspora.
     
    http://www.livinganthropologically.com/2013/02/06/yanomami-science-violence-empirical-data-facts/

    Modern primitives are not clones of "our" ancestors.
    , @Jack D
    If the ability to survive after a collapse is the standard for "intelligence" then cockroaches are even smarter than Papuans.

    Intelligence has a very real, specific and scientific meaning but there are a lot of people around who seem to want to muddle the definition because they don't like the outcome when you apply the real meaning.
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  5. @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    Woke. We own the bitches.

    Read More
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  6. Randal says:

    For all its errors (surely unavoidable in a book of such broad sweep), Diamond’s book is still a good read. Here’s my comment from your Taki article:

    Guns, Germs and Steel is a fantastic book, and one I have thought ought to be required reading for all adolescents wanting to begin to understand the world around them, provided it is followed by Michael Hart’s much less well known Understanding Human History.

    Understanding Human History

    The combination is a particularly good one, because Guns, Germs and Steel is a hugely informative and educational tour de force despite being fundamentally incorrect in a key aspect of its overall conclusions, while Understanding Human History directly targets the precise reason why such an educated and intelligent analyst as Diamond came to be so wrong on such an important point – ideology and the refusal to view the facts dispassionately. And in doing so it directly targets the most profound ideologically-based delusion that most damagingly warps received opinion about the world throughout the societies of the modern US sphere. That delusion is anti-racism – the faith-based assertion that there cannot be genetically-based differences between groups of humans that are behaviourally significant, or significant in terms of outcomes.

    After reading and understanding both books, it is clear where and how Diamond rejects the simplest explanations for moral reasons, as he himself admits explicitly. That insight alone is more informative than all of the often very interesting, useful and informative facts and insights Diamond’s work conveys, and far more important in the particular context of modern western culture.

    Guns, Germs and Steel followed by Understanding Human History is a key to recognising one of the most basic and most pervasive intellectual and moral pathologies of our culture.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Guns, Germs and Steel followed by Understanding Human History is a key to recognising one of the most basic and most pervasive intellectual and moral pathologies of our culture.

    This is why they are worth spending the time to read?
    , @Frau Katze
    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left. (Is there any other kind?)

    Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus.

    This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews.

    The Nazis had an industrialized country with railways, the ability to build gas chambers plus modern guns. Plus the target population was conveniently living in European cities.

    The early Conquistadors' situation could not be more different. Let's assume for the sake of argument that they were as bad as Hitler in wanting to kill them (that's doubtful. They had the idea that they could be enslaved, sort of like serfs.)

    That would be a lot easier and cheaper than getting slaves from Africa.

    What means did the Spanish have in the 16th century? Primitive ships, very primitive guns, steel swords and some horses. Their supply line was very long. The only communication with Spain was via letters going back by ship. And hope that required items would be forthcoming on the next returning ship (assuming it didn't sink).

    And the target population was spread over an immense area and some very rough terrain.

    The horses and steel weapons were certainly a big help in skirmishes but the Spanish were unbelievably outnumbered.

    But the crazy left is so desperate to blame every single problem on evil Europeans that they can't think straight.

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  7. The only news site you’ll ever need!

    https://www.bbc.com/pidgin

    “Nigerian government dey complain as thousands of Resident doctors across di country don hang their coat say dem no work again.”

    “Water resources minister, Rajiv Ranjan, don say na rats im blame for di flooding wey kill more than 500 people, come pursue another 12 million people comot house for im State of Bihar, India.
    Mr Ranjan say di rat dig hole put for inside the barriers wen dem use take block water; na dis one come make di barriers weak well-well sotay flood water pass through, begin cause palava for di people.”

    De one we dem de read well well

    1 Serena Williams don born her first pickin
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    3 Hurricane Irma don reach Caribbean Islands dem
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    5 Indian woman divorce husband because dem no get toilet
    6 North Korea dey warn Nigeria on top Twitter?
    7 Ghana import 30 million condoms but dem no use am
    8 Kenya: Opposition dey celebrate court ruling
    9 Hurricane Irma don reach category five
    10 Marvel’s Black Panther Dey Finally Come Lagos

    Read More
    • LOL: BB753
    • Replies: @Jack D
    Dis be de fron page from de New York Times don come year 2047.
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  8. Sunbeam says:
    @anonguy
    GG&S was a nice just so story. When I read it, the obvious paradox was obvious to me at least.

    He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition.

    Florida, famously narrow, is ground zero for invasive species, meaning that its own native species just aren't all that competitive. It is a net importer of invasive species.

    I'll give him that for making that notion really clear to me.

    “He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition. ”

    Been 20 years since I read that book, but that point still seems like it is valid to me.

    The other thing that I got from that book, was the thing about the random basis of plants and animals in a region suitable for agriculture and other uses.

    There just aren’t that many plants that were amenable to the kind of selective breeding and development that became our agricultural staples, at least as far as mass produced carbohydrates go.

    Other than the grain family, corn and rice are about it. And there are even less animals that proved suitable for draft and mount purposes. Horses, oxen, in some places Llamas and Elephants (though no one ever hitched an elephant to a plow as far as I know).

    From that standpoint the Middle East really was favored for the development of agriculture. The Great Plains or the Canadian Shield not so much. (Yeah I know the Indians exterminated native horses, but that isn’t the point exactly.)

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  9. Jake says:

    Another brilliant Sailer article. I doubt John the Pod will read it – way too much self-righteous oozing puss to risk learning something.

    Steve’s ending made me think of the Zombie craze. Whites across the globe, and many Asians, as well, have become enthralled by zombie fiction. I say that the zombie craze comes from the bedrock fear of just such a Third World, specifically black African, population explosion to, say 4 billion. Those blacks Africans will keep flloding out of their continent, bringing their propensities for violent crime and demanding welfare and dropping children fro which they will never provide halfway close to adequately.

    Those blacks will be something like zombies: they will demand to eat endlessly, and they will be beyond reason. You won’t be able to negotiate with them: anything short of giving them even more tribute than they receive now in various charities for blacks – which is trillions of dollars every year – will be met with their turning to cannibalizing the evil whites who caused all their suffering.

    Zombie fiction is one of the very few ways a white Liberal can deal with the coming horror – which is born of far too much charity and bleeding heart Liberalism for blacks while using society to inhibit and even punish non-Elite whites – and remain an anti-racist.

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    • Replies: @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_sV9luPnMk

    Showed this to a Filipino wife, certainly not a zombie movie watcher, and they loved it.
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  10. I thought that Eugene Burdick (who wrote the late 1950′s classic The Ugly American about post WWII Asia with William Lederer) was among the first, in 1961, to make cargo cults in the Melanesia well-known to the general public in his other classic—about Melanesia and the South Pacific—Blue of Capricorn. The book is a must read for HBDers.

    Apparently a young David Attenborough also wrote about them in 1960.

    Anyway, as Wikipedia notes about the John Frum cargo cult

    …the movement gained popularity in the early 1940s, when 300,000 American troops were stationed in New Hebrides during World War II, bringing with them an enormous amount of supplies (or “cargo”). After the war and the departure of the Americans, followers of John Frum built symbolic landing strips to encourage American airplanes to land and bring them “cargo”. Versions of the cult that emphasize the American connection interpret “John Frum” as a corruption of “John from (America)” (though it could mean John from anywhere), and credit the presence of African American soldiers for the idea that John Frum may be black.

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    • Replies: @anonymous
    John Frum may have triggered dysfunctional behavior to spawn across the south Pacific. Consider a scenario where he spoofed the natives. That is plausible. John from America could be a missing link in numerous phony PhD dissertations.
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  11. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Actually, Steve, I really and truly believe that Jared Diamond is onto something.

    How else can you possibly explain Merkel’s Boner, the EU’s ‘Asylum and Refugee’ diktats, the Italian Mediterranean ‘rescues’ of the aforementioned fraudsters, Bryan Caplan’s justifications for massive uncontrolled third world immigration to the west, the western Deep State actually being dumb enough to ‘believe’ Caplan’s garbage and implement it, and lastly and lastly the existence – and baleful influence – of The Economist magazine.

    I mean our black-skinned, penis-sheath wearing, human brain eating, human jaw-bone bedecked brethren from the Antipodes *surely surely* cannot be *THAT* dumb?

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    • Agree: Frau Katze
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  12. @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    “Based” is the term du jour.

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  13. @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    Woke is fine

    Based is more commonly used by the alt right.

    Woke is not a partisan term, it’s used by groups of all kinds to mean somebody who is aware of the stuff the in-group is supposed to know. It can mean literally opposite things when used by different people.

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    • Replies: @BB753
    I thought "woke" originated in ebonics, jive, black slang.... you get my drift..
    , @Alfa158
    I'm sticking with "awake". I guess it's just an old White guy thing.
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  14. Damn, has it really been 20 years?

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  15. BB753 says:
    @27 year old
    Woke is fine

    Based is more commonly used by the alt right.

    Woke is not a partisan term, it's used by groups of all kinds to mean somebody who is aware of the stuff the in-group is supposed to know. It can mean literally opposite things when used by different people.

    I thought “woke” originated in ebonics, jive, black slang…. you get my drift..

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    • Replies: @guest
    Possibly, considering how ungrammatical it is.
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  16. peterike says:

    Isn’t the Occam’s Butterknife explanation for all this simply that Diamond, like so many members of his tribe, is just a high-functioning con artist? He surveys the landscape, figures out precisely what’s going to sell, and then provides it. Result? Wealth, fame, a “Genius” grant, etc

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    • Agree: Charles Pewitt
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  17. bomag says:
    @Cloud of Probable Matricide
    It took me three or four tries before I was able to get into this. Every time I started I'd get annoyed with Diamond's insistence that Yali is much smarter than me.

    Yali is much smarter than me.

    One of Isaac Newton’s professors resigned and suggested Newton for the post. I’m waiting for Diamond to help install a New Guinean in a post at UCLA.

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  18. A great deal of the population of the United States are believers in a giant cargo cult, or the precursor to it. What else would you call people who believe money can be conjured up by shuffling a few papers and talking into a can and muttering an incantation (aipassdisbill) “I pass this bill.” For a great deal of our population that is exactly where money comes from.

    After we have no more money, and no one willing to lend it, people will still demand that we shuffle papers and talk into a can to produce it. They pretty much do already. Our Chinese masters will smile.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Correctomundo, Mr. Future. It works just fine until it doesn't. Too bad Ron Paul was kept out of the limelight.
    , @Flip
    It all hangs together until the bond market revolts and there's a dollar crisis. You can't spend more than you make forever. Just ask Venezuela.
    , @Thea
    I wish we understood better the economic fiasco we seem to be facing. It seems more urgent than understanding hbd right now.

    How does it work that we still can accrue such big loans without paying our huge debts?

    I imagine everyone with dual citizenship will jump ship to fairer pastures while us plains American and offspring are left to face the consequences. What will those be?
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson

    Our Chinese masters will smile.
     
    Only if they can rule as geriatrics. Numbers may have its own quality, but marshaling a horde of pensioners to rule the world is a stretch, to say the least.
    , @Flip
    “You have to choose between trusting to the natural stability of gold and the natural stability of the honesty and intelligence of the members of the government. And, with due respect to these gentlemen, I advise you, as long as the capitalist system lasts, to vote for gold.”
     
    -George Bernard Shaw
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  19. In reality, larger populations are more likely to enjoy rare favorable mutations.

    Selection against unfavorable combinations of alleles and for favorable combinations of alleles is more likely the cause.

    Those larger populations, and in particular, larger population densities, requiring more more complex societies result in greater selection for more intelligence …

    WRT to the notion that larger populations are more likely to enjoy rare favorable mutations, can we expect Africa, with its projected 4Bn people to become the super-intelligent super-human future of humanity?

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  20. Alfa158 says:
    @27 year old
    Woke is fine

    Based is more commonly used by the alt right.

    Woke is not a partisan term, it's used by groups of all kinds to mean somebody who is aware of the stuff the in-group is supposed to know. It can mean literally opposite things when used by different people.

    I’m sticking with “awake”. I guess it’s just an old White guy thing.

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  21. eD says:

    Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence.

    And since its bound to come up here, New Guinea is yet another of those places that don’t fit into American racial paradigms: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanesians

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.
    , @Dieter Kief

    “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence
     
    Yeah - Diamond's argument goes in that direction - he does not explain exactly, what he means by intelligence - he leaves it at a rough comparison and then makes his - to him - most important point, which could be reformulated in this way too: Those people I've met there know their ways in the world - and they are reliable and proud and - ok: Capable and bright as well.

    While talking about this friend, Diamond implicitly holds, that it makes no sense to think any deeper about intelligence.

    (At least, that's how I, too, remember Diamond's point. I even know where the book sits in my bookshelves - just two doors away. But I tend to think I remember this stuff correctly and hesitate to - really look it up).

    Steve Sailer's argument could have gone by and large in the same direction if he would have made a quote to support his claim, but he would have needed one more step then to bring his point home a tad more properly.

    , @Dieter Kief

    “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence
     
    Yeah - Diamond's argument goes in that direction - he does not explain exactly, what he means by intelligence - he leaves it at a rough comparison and then makes his - to him - most important point, which could be reformulated in this way too: Those people I've met there know their ways in the world - and they are reliable and proud and - ok: Capable and bright as well.

    Steve Sailer's argument could have gone by and large in the same direction if he would have made a quote to support his claim, but he might have needed one more step then to bring his point home a tad more properly.


    Ok - I finally looked it up now: Diamond never writes about IQ - always about intelligence. And he admits, that he has made no tests - he is simply speaking about his impressions - and his relations with nice people in the wilderness, who are not totally nice, though: Lots of them die in the numerous fights, that are part of their everyday life.

    That then gives him room for just another one of his speculations: That the more intelligent a hunter and gatherer is, the higher would be the likelihood, that he would survive and / or avoid those often times occuring deadly fights. Which would then result in a positive selection for the brightest - just because their chance to survive their violent manners is higher...

    Plus - he sees disgenetic effects of western life: The TV as experience- and intelligence-killer...But of course: That's all extremely vage.

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  22. @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    “Woke” can be stolen. But failing that, there’s always “redpill.”

    Read More
    • Agree: Peter Johnson
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    “Woke” can be stolen.
     
    Maybe, but maybe not. "Racism" was redefined to mean bias against the preferred (non-white) classes of humanity. (How many hate crimes are non-whites prosecuted for?) But anti-white bigotry is harder to twist and pervert.
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  23. Lot says:

    I feel good as a San Diego homeowner to know our local gov, like NYC in some respects, considers us too important to tolerate the race leftist agenda.

    First, our lack of “affordable housing” makes us the least black metro area out of the top 50 in the USA. I do not think we have any project high rises at all.

    Second, we are not a sanctuary city. We might be the largest non sanctuary city in the USA. If ICE wants someone in the county jail held, we hold him then turn him over.

    Third, we are pro police. Crime is very low and when there is a LEO shooting, we side with the LEO over the thug he shot. Here is one such case. No criminal charges against the cop, and no jackpot settlement for the thug’s family. Our DA took the civil suit to trial and won before the jury.

    https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/2017/09/05/san-diego-officer-cleared-fatal-shooting-gang-member/

    Read More
    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    Lot, do you think the attitude there, vs. most of the rest of California, has to do with the amount of Navy and ex-Navy men there in San Diego?

    Or, maybe people have been red-pilled/woke-up/whatever by the striking aerial view of the difference right at the border line between Tijuana and National City while on approach to Runway 27?
    , @AndrewR
    How about siding with the facts and the law?
    , @RadicalCenter
    Glad to hear it, but it looks like that state of affairs won't last much longer in San Diego:

    https://sdcdp.ngpvanhost.com/chairscorner/san-diego-democrats-flex-muscle-and-sweep-elections

    Another beautiful American city -- and Cali city -- headed for deterioration.
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  24. songbird says:

    It is easy to laugh at cargo cults, but none of it is very different from what we do in the West now.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Such as?
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  25. Lot says:
    @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    It is not a new term. I think black twitter made it more common.

    Circa the 1760s Kant said Hume awoke him from his dogmatic slumbers. Decades ago David Duke had an awakening.

    Read More
    • Replies: @David
    It's interesting that the form "woke" never did develop. There was a past participle "woken" hardly used anymore. Looks like the word "weak" used to trade under the form "woke" so there was no room for a participle in the same slot.
    , @Charles Erwin Wilson
    You are citing David Duke? Hmm.
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  26. Lot says:

    I like both gc’s writing and a good nasty book review. But them together and you have something great.

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    • Agree: MEH 0910
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  27. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @anonguy
    GG&S was a nice just so story. When I read it, the obvious paradox was obvious to me at least.

    He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition.

    Florida, famously narrow, is ground zero for invasive species, meaning that its own native species just aren't all that competitive. It is a net importer of invasive species.

    I'll give him that for making that notion really clear to me.

    Florida, famously narrow, is ground zero for invasive species, meaning that its own native species just aren’t all that competitive. It is a net importer of invasive species.

    Invasive species? They’re species with a DREAM!!!

    Read More
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  28. Sunbeam says:
    @eD
    Its been years since I read "Guns Germs and Steel" but if I remember correctly, Diamond's argument about Yali's intelligence is that Yali hasn't outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence.

    And since its bound to come up here, New Guinea is yet another of those places that don't fit into American racial paradigms: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanesians

    “Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence.”

    Really not wanting to be the devil’s advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don’t get anything for free.

    It’s pretty obvious how useful writing is and what’s it’s done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of … bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot… with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus’ profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I’m not saying that modern humans couldn’t do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don’t have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and … doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you’d have been much better off with him than me.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of … bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory.

    Isn't memory more or less fixed?
    , @Pat Boyle
    All pre-literate societies had bards who memorized very long poems. They didn't memorize much prose because that was so much harder. And if they got interrupted for any reason they normally would have to go back to the beginning.

    In the famous words of Jack Warner "An oral contract isn't worth the paper it's printed on".

    You are romanticizing primitives. Many cooks judge everything by eye but better cooks measure. In any case no one makes a jet engine by eye. Only simple artifacts can be made without measurement.
    , @guest
    If it paid to recite long stretches of verse from memory, people would do it. People probably still do it, for fun or other reasons. They still have the capacity.

    It's just that our culture doesn't much care. We don't need it and don't much value it for its own sake.
    , @Expletive Deleted
    There's an old Gaelic complaint about the pernicious effects of literacy from the time the bards were being suppressed (I think, could be earlier). "The wing of a goose has driven memory from Man".
    , @anonguy

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era.
     
    Millenials are utterly clueless, comparatively, when it comes to any manual skill.

    Just filling your shopping bags at the grocery store, a million questions, for something that was done nominally and without note or question ever 30 years ago.
    , @Anonymous
    They had a plumb line, a compass and a square, and some sort of ruler made by any of several methods. It didn't have to be accurate to other rulers. Just to itself, so Long as everyone used the same one.
    , @Jack D
    I doubt that you can really build anything more than a log cabin (where the logs are not necessarily exactly the same length) just by eyeball but that doesn't mean that you need a tape measure either. In a lot of carpentry, the important thing is that all the pieces be the same length so if I pick some arbitrary length (about "so" high) and mark that length off on a gauge stick or with a pair of dividers (like a compass) then I could build you a perfectly fine structure or piece of furniture without a ruler or even a standard system of measurement. Of course in such a system you can't have standard size doors, etc. that you buy premade but if you are making everything on site you would be just fine.

    The Romans and even the Egyptians had lot of little tricks for building level and square. For level you can dig a little trench in the ground and fill it with water. For square you can use a 3,4,5 triangle. For plumb, a plumb bob ( a lead weight on a string). Combine a few of these tricks and you can build a perfectly fine structure. Probably the Romans knew more of these tricks than the Papuans ever will and we could rediscover them pretty quickly, if nothing else than by reading the Roman sources which the Papuan can't.
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  29. Jason Liu says:

    The book has some merit, but its lack of racism ruins it. You can’t tell if Diamond is making an objective analysis of environmental effects on civilizations, or if he’s doing so to distract from biological differences. No reason why it can’t be both.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Bill
    Diamond claims that differences in human accomplishment are caused by genes . . . plant genes.

    What else do you need to know?
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  30. The only thing wrong with Guns, Germs and Steel is the nonsensical main thesis, which one can glide over easily and enjoy the rest of the book.

    Jared Diamond must have a bad case of “blindsight” as John Derbyshire calls it here https://www.unz.com/jderbyshire/. Jared Diamond understands evolutionary psychology, has solid analytical skills, but still lives with the mainstream fantasy that HBD is not an obvious explanation for the social scientific data all around us about group behavioural differences.

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  31. @Lot
    I feel good as a San Diego homeowner to know our local gov, like NYC in some respects, considers us too important to tolerate the race leftist agenda.

    First, our lack of "affordable housing" makes us the least black metro area out of the top 50 in the USA. I do not think we have any project high rises at all.

    Second, we are not a sanctuary city. We might be the largest non sanctuary city in the USA. If ICE wants someone in the county jail held, we hold him then turn him over.

    Third, we are pro police. Crime is very low and when there is a LEO shooting, we side with the LEO over the thug he shot. Here is one such case. No criminal charges against the cop, and no jackpot settlement for the thug's family. Our DA took the civil suit to trial and won before the jury.

    https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/2017/09/05/san-diego-officer-cleared-fatal-shooting-gang-member/

    Lot, do you think the attitude there, vs. most of the rest of California, has to do with the amount of Navy and ex-Navy men there in San Diego?

    Or, maybe people have been red-pilled/woke-up/whatever by the striking aerial view of the difference right at the border line between Tijuana and National City while on approach to Runway 27?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Lot
    The ex Navy and Marine presence is part of why San Diego is relatively conservative. But overall, they are a fairly small part of the population. A larger part is that we got more midwestern, western, and southern white migrants while SF/LA was more likely to get people from the Northeast and Coastal Pac Northwest. Or SF/LA got middle Americans who had more liberal values and we got the more conservative ones.

    We also never had LA's big garment industry that attracted so many poor migrants whose citizen children are left wing and raise costs for and crowd out native whites.

    Another factor is we have long been a place for rich people to retire or have family vacations.

    A final factor I can think of is we get fewer illegals because they want to put more distance between themselves and the border, and the rule that makes summary deportations much easier within 100 miles from the international border. The 100-mile area includes all of SD County and then goes up to include about half of Orange County, running through Newport Beach and Irvine.

    San Diego the city also never developed a left-wing central city because downtown is a rich residential area and because the city limits include many conservative suburbs and even a few rural farming areas. This leaves the left-wing whites and few urban blacks in the urban core with absolutely no local government power. The only theoretically left-wing cities we have in San Diego County are National City and Chula Vista, which are both suburban and Mexican majority (plus some whites and Filipinos), and where conservative developers have politicians in their back pockets.
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  32. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Diamond is obsessed with peasants making war? Surprise, surprise, surprise.

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  33. It will sound reprllent to Jack D, but bored identity believes that The White Man’s Cargo is the most burdensome cargo cult that ever existed :

    “Give me Your Tired, Your Poor, Your Huddled Masses of Goulds, Diamonds & Silvers Yearning to Take a Breath Away From You and Your Children.”

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  34. Lot says:
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  35. JamesG says:
    @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    “noticing”

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  36. Luke Lea says:

    Steve wrote: “Diamond makes environmental differences seem so compelling that it’s hard to believe that humans would not become somewhat adapted to their homelands through natural selection.”

    In his novel 1984 Orwell paints a totalitarian society in which the inhabitants have been conditioned to be able to believe two mutually contradictory propositions as the same time. If I remember, he calls it doublethink. I am coming more and more to think that multiculturalism (with its identity politics and mindless celebration of diversity) is in fact a totalitarian ideology in disguise. It is undoubtedly hegemonic on college campuses, in the corporate media, in both political parties, and most recently, as demonstrated by the James Damore affair, in Silicon Valley. As we drift inexorably towards a racially-stratified class society, our emergent globalist governing meritocracy love it because it turns out to be the ideal instrument to divide and conquer the democratic majority.

    Read More
    • Agree: Charles Pewitt
    • Replies: @Charles Erwin Wilson

    multiculturalism (with its identity politics and mindless celebration of diversity) is in fact a totalitarian ideology in disguise
     
    Indeed. I had an argument over that very fact with one of my Indian-immigrant coworkers in the early 90's. He could not understand why I did not love all cultures and want to learn more about them. I tried to explain that learning cultures had nothing to do with it. Destroying American culture was its purpose.
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  37. Pat Boyle says:

    OT

    Why do we have these guys standing beside public officials doing all those hand signs. I have bad hearing and I don’t like to wear my hearing aid, so I simply turn on the captioning. Almost all modern TVs have this feature. If the true deaf want to understand Governor Scott’s announcement on hurricane Irma wouldn’t it be easier to read the text on the screen? I suppose there are some deaf who can’t read but can they read American Sign Language?

    The guy who stands beside the announcer and signs seems to me to be an anachronism now unneeded.

    I write this here because this is where the sensible people congregate.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Almost Missouri
    It's a government job, so it will never go away.
    , @Yak-15
    One of the simpler courses I took in college was American Sign Language. The deaf have been fiercely trying to defend their ASL focused culture in the face of advances such as cochlear implants and the like.

    Part of their "civil rights movement" was the struggle to have public information relayed through hand signs - somewhat like handicap ramps. Anyhow, this still remains as an edifice of this struggle and as a public jobs programs for the deaf.

    As an aside, if you know ASL and meet a deaf single chick, you have a great chance of getting it in if you aren't horribly ugly. One of the perks of taking the class was going to deaf events where there was lots of drinking and lots of single deaf girls.
    , @S. Anonyia
    I've always wondered this myself. The interpreters always look farcical and 90sesque, like wheelchair Barbie. I guess it's part of the disability industrial complex- a lot of universities have ASL programs and those people need jobs. Paying the salaries (which are probably decent) of these people probably takes away from resources that could be used for actual disaster relief, same way many public schools with 35 + normal kids crammed in a classroom are required to hire speech pathologists and behavior aides and adaptive PE teachers to take care of 10-15 kids a year.
    , @Lot
    There are some low-IQ deaf people who can speak ASL but cannot read and write in English.

    I think it may have something to do with translating for a live crowd, or because of random local laws requiring them.
    , @guest
    It's symbolic of the victory of the Def Comedy Jam...er, I mean Deaf Rights Movement*. Such are the many spoils of out Pokemon-pointing rival groups. You get to feel satisfied seeing a person standing there, and you get to feel happy knowing you force regular people to watch and think (hopefully for their sake not say) "Why is she there?" Your fellow diversicrats get to revel in the knowledge that they're rubbing normal people's noses in it. Certain others pretend it's entertaining, either because they're virtue-signalling or because they're idiots.

    It's not enough to win. You must also humiliate the other side. Most people won't be humiliated by the admittedly slight inconvenience of having to watch a person wave their hands around. But some will.

    *There's a rights movement for everything. Including Stale Pale Males, though they have to sit at the back of the Rights Bus.

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  38. Anon says: • Website • Disclaimer

    One of the funniest stories I heard is how Sailer made Diamond run like a mothafuc*a.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Opinionator
    What?
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  39. Anon says: • Website • Disclaimer

    I think for some white globies, GGS by Diamond sort of lets them off the hook morally for white historical domination.

    PC says whites came to dominate cuz white are evil.

    GGS says white just got lucky with horses and cows. And whites just sneezed and accidentally killed all them indios in New World. They didn’t mean to. It just happened.

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    • Replies: @guest
    You may be onto something, though globies don't want to be let off the hook, by and large. What share of the population really needs an excuse for the crimes of the White Man but in every other aspect still want to be goodthinkers? Who are we talking?

    I think the reason the book was such a success is because people want to revel in the playground of HBD without touching the Race Question. Diamond gives you something more than pure environment/culture with geography, biology, and some evolution. All without turning you into Hitler. There's no swastika on the cover, I swear.

    That's the appeal, I think. Science without boring old science-y stuff, but also without going nuts like Coming of Age in Somoa. We're not *that* naive anymore. There's a dose of Noticing. Enough to be interesting, but not enough to be Naziesque.

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  40. Numinous says:

    Why didn’t the Papuans invent calculus, gunpowder, or penicillin?

    Did they need to?

    The entire thesis of GGS can be summarized as: people do what they need to do in order to survive and reproduce; and what they need to do to survive and reproduce is highly dependent on geography.

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    • Agree: utu
    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Unfortunately, when they meet another group who are good at conquering new territory, then they need have invented things like calculus and gunpowder.

    The native Americans proved that, to their detriment.

    The Papuans have also proved that in the western part of the island called Papua (but called Irian Jaya by the Indonesian Malays who have engaged in a good deal of ethnic cleansing.
    , @anonymous

    The entire thesis of GGS can be summarized as: people do what they need to do in order to survive and reproduce; and what they need to do to survive and reproduce is highly dependent on geography.
     
    If that is the thesis, it's dumb.
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  41. Anon says: • Website • Disclaimer

    In important idea in GGS is that there is more to Out of Africa than what people assume.

    People think black Africans(as we know them today) left Africa.

    But Diamond argues that considerable evolutionary differentiation between North Africans and Sub-Saharan Africans had occurred before the Out of Africa.

    So, even if OOA happened, 60,000 yrs ago, the difference between non-Africans and Sub-Saharan Africans goes deeper. It was Out of North Africa, and North Africans, though dark skinned, were already different from other Africans.

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  42. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    OT – I think this is bad optics on the part of Israel.

    In wake of Harvey devastation, Israel pledges $1m. to Houston’s Jewish community

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    Since when did Ivrim care about optics?
    , @Joe Sweet
    I wonder how many times that amount the Houston Jewish community sends to Israel on an average year.
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  43. Robard says:

    I don’t think British farmers in South Africa were at all involved in ostrich farming. The farms around Oudtshoorn in the Klein Karoo were exclusively in Boer hands when the trade started around 1820, coincidentally the year in which the British settlers arrived to take up farming in the Eastern Cape, but not of ostriches. Oudtshoorn’s “ostrich palaces” with the aristocratic sounding English names actually belonged Lithuanian Jews who arrived in the 1880′s to make their fortunes in the marketing of the feathers to Europe.

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  44. Tyrion says:

    The Bantu are quite a new people. They were less than 34 million in 1560 and were still expanding territorially. I wonder on their origins as a distinct grouping. Were they isolated by the desertification of the Sahara and formed in a small nucleus just South of it before growing from a familial tribe to the 4 billion they will become in 2100?

    The rise from 2000BC initial expansion to 1560AD 34 million signpost to 4 billion in 2100 seems quite smooth. It also raises the question on whether they really were slow in developing civilisational sophistication or were actually kind of quick but got started very late. Their late start being explained by their late origins but also by the fact that they only came up against territorial limitations thousands of years after everyone else.

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  45. @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    Woke as been used by Alt-Righters for a while now, unironically. I concur in believing that the Rappers perhaps stole it from Grandpa Duke.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    I think you are wrong here.
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  46. @Pat Boyle
    OT

    Why do we have these guys standing beside public officials doing all those hand signs. I have bad hearing and I don't like to wear my hearing aid, so I simply turn on the captioning. Almost all modern TVs have this feature. If the true deaf want to understand Governor Scott's announcement on hurricane Irma wouldn't it be easier to read the text on the screen? I suppose there are some deaf who can't read but can they read American Sign Language?

    The guy who stands beside the announcer and signs seems to me to be an anachronism now unneeded.

    I write this here because this is where the sensible people congregate.

    It’s a government job, so it will never go away.

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  47. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @PiltdownMan
    I thought that Eugene Burdick (who wrote the late 1950's classic The Ugly American about post WWII Asia with William Lederer) was among the first, in 1961, to make cargo cults in the Melanesia well-known to the general public in his other classic—about Melanesia and the South Pacific—Blue of Capricorn. The book is a must read for HBDers.

    Apparently a young David Attenborough also wrote about them in 1960.

    Anyway, as Wikipedia notes about the John Frum cargo cult


    ...the movement gained popularity in the early 1940s, when 300,000 American troops were stationed in New Hebrides during World War II, bringing with them an enormous amount of supplies (or "cargo"). After the war and the departure of the Americans, followers of John Frum built symbolic landing strips to encourage American airplanes to land and bring them "cargo". Versions of the cult that emphasize the American connection interpret "John Frum" as a corruption of "John from (America)" (though it could mean John from anywhere), and credit the presence of African American soldiers for the idea that John Frum may be black.
     

    John Frum may have triggered dysfunctional behavior to spawn across the south Pacific. Consider a scenario where he spoofed the natives. That is plausible. John from America could be a missing link in numerous phony PhD dissertations.

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  48. Jared Diamond made a lot of money by pandering to the ideological predilections of greedy, middle class White morons who have benefited from globalization. The greedy White morons do not want to accept the fact that sub-Saharan African Negroids, Mestizos and Amerindians have, on average, substantially lower IQs than do Whites and North Asians. I use the word “negroid” to be specific about racial origins. After all, Charlize Theron and Candace Swanepoel could be described by some wags as sub-Saharan Africans.

    Jared Diamond is a Jew who would never acknowledge the tremendous debt of gratitude his people owe to the European Christian people. Jared Diamond is an ungrateful Jew academic, and the United States is flooded with the type. Jared Diamond wrote a whole book that attempted to dismiss the simple fact that the European Christian people had the brains, balls and heart to conquer the world.

    Jared Diamond is no better than the Neo-Cons when it come to dishonesty, deceit and duplicitousness.

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  49. Yak-15 says:
    @Pat Boyle
    OT

    Why do we have these guys standing beside public officials doing all those hand signs. I have bad hearing and I don't like to wear my hearing aid, so I simply turn on the captioning. Almost all modern TVs have this feature. If the true deaf want to understand Governor Scott's announcement on hurricane Irma wouldn't it be easier to read the text on the screen? I suppose there are some deaf who can't read but can they read American Sign Language?

    The guy who stands beside the announcer and signs seems to me to be an anachronism now unneeded.

    I write this here because this is where the sensible people congregate.

    One of the simpler courses I took in college was American Sign Language. The deaf have been fiercely trying to defend their ASL focused culture in the face of advances such as cochlear implants and the like.

    Part of their “civil rights movement” was the struggle to have public information relayed through hand signs – somewhat like handicap ramps. Anyhow, this still remains as an edifice of this struggle and as a public jobs programs for the deaf.

    As an aside, if you know ASL and meet a deaf single chick, you have a great chance of getting it in if you aren’t horribly ugly. One of the perks of taking the class was going to deaf events where there was lots of drinking and lots of single deaf girls.

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    • Replies: @utu
    I read about chauvinism of the deaf in Oliver Sacks Seeing Voices. One of their arguments was that by signing entirely different (richer) dynamic of multi-interlocutor conversation is possible.
    , @Anonymous
    You and every other swinging dick. The deaf are notoriously promiscuous and VD is rampant.
    , @dr kill
    Haha, is that the sign where you move your left index finger back and forth in the circle made from your right index finger and thumb?
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  50. Just a thought!!!!

    Perhaps Steve Sailer would want to publish a “Book Burning” of Guns, Germs and Steel. and post it to Youtube.

    Steve would hang out with some young Alt-Righters in the back yard. Steve and guests would first hold a serious discussion of the absurdities and contradictions found in Diamond’s book and then suggest much better alternative authors like Nicholas Wade or Greg Cochran.

    The event would end with Steve and friends then burning their copies of Guns, Germs and Steel.

    An event sure to trigger millions of lefties and perhaps red pilling lots of normies who are willing to actually watch the video.

    There are dozens of books beloved by the left deserving the the same treatment, namely The Mismeasure of Man, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Diary of Ann Frank, Night by Elie Wiesel.

    Of course the left could retaliate by holding their own book burning of America’s Half-Blood Prince: Barack Obama’s “Story of Race and Inheritance”, but I think Steve would say bring it on.

    For an idea of just how this would enrage the clueless left see the following.

    https://angrywhitemen.org/2017/05/22/mike-peinovich-suggests-staging-a-book-burning-and-charging-the-media-for-the-photos/

    Mosley had a different idea, however. He suggested a “large scale” book burning instead, which Peinovich supported. In fact, he claimed to have recently burned a copy of To Kill a Mockingbird with an acquaintance at an “undisclosed location”:

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  51. David says:
    @Lot
    It is not a new term. I think black twitter made it more common.

    Circa the 1760s Kant said Hume awoke him from his dogmatic slumbers. Decades ago David Duke had an awakening.

    It’s interesting that the form “woke” never did develop. There was a past participle “woken” hardly used anymore. Looks like the word “weak” used to trade under the form “woke” so there was no room for a participle in the same slot.

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  52. AndrewR says:
    @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    Red-pilled

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    • Replies: @Santoculto
    Red-killed
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  53. @Pat Boyle
    OT

    Why do we have these guys standing beside public officials doing all those hand signs. I have bad hearing and I don't like to wear my hearing aid, so I simply turn on the captioning. Almost all modern TVs have this feature. If the true deaf want to understand Governor Scott's announcement on hurricane Irma wouldn't it be easier to read the text on the screen? I suppose there are some deaf who can't read but can they read American Sign Language?

    The guy who stands beside the announcer and signs seems to me to be an anachronism now unneeded.

    I write this here because this is where the sensible people congregate.

    I’ve always wondered this myself. The interpreters always look farcical and 90sesque, like wheelchair Barbie. I guess it’s part of the disability industrial complex- a lot of universities have ASL programs and those people need jobs. Paying the salaries (which are probably decent) of these people probably takes away from resources that could be used for actual disaster relief, same way many public schools with 35 + normal kids crammed in a classroom are required to hire speech pathologists and behavior aides and adaptive PE teachers to take care of 10-15 kids a year.

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  54. AndrewR says:
    @Lot
    I feel good as a San Diego homeowner to know our local gov, like NYC in some respects, considers us too important to tolerate the race leftist agenda.

    First, our lack of "affordable housing" makes us the least black metro area out of the top 50 in the USA. I do not think we have any project high rises at all.

    Second, we are not a sanctuary city. We might be the largest non sanctuary city in the USA. If ICE wants someone in the county jail held, we hold him then turn him over.

    Third, we are pro police. Crime is very low and when there is a LEO shooting, we side with the LEO over the thug he shot. Here is one such case. No criminal charges against the cop, and no jackpot settlement for the thug's family. Our DA took the civil suit to trial and won before the jury.

    https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/2017/09/05/san-diego-officer-cleared-fatal-shooting-gang-member/

    How about siding with the facts and the law?

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    • Replies: @Lot

    How about siding with the facts and the law?
     
    I have no objection to that, and I wish I could do the same. However, I feel compelled to be blindly pro-local LEO to counterbalance people who are blindly anti-LEO.
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  55. AndrewR says:
    @anonymous
    OT - I think this is bad optics on the part of Israel.

    In wake of Harvey devastation, Israel pledges $1m. to Houston's Jewish community

    Since when did Ivrim care about optics?

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  56. benjaminl says:

    Off-topic:

    The Narrative reconsiders California history

    Yosemite and genocide

    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/02/opinion/sunday/goodbye-yosemite-hello-what.html

    Shockley, racist

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    • Replies: @Lot

    Of course, none of this will mean much without input from Native Californians like Mark Minch
     
    Indians have blood wisdom we need to consult.

    Also whites have guilt running in their blood for the crimes of their distant ancestors in the 1850-1880s against the Indians (or just as often the crimes of completely unrelated white people from 160 years ago).

    The monopoly on casinos California gives "Indians," worth billions a year and quite often $150,000+ a year in free cash to every member of the tribe, is not enough to pay our blood debt.
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  57. @eD
    Its been years since I read "Guns Germs and Steel" but if I remember correctly, Diamond's argument about Yali's intelligence is that Yali hasn't outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence.

    And since its bound to come up here, New Guinea is yet another of those places that don't fit into American racial paradigms: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanesians

    “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence

    Yeah – Diamond’s argument goes in that direction – he does not explain exactly, what he means by intelligence – he leaves it at a rough comparison and then makes his – to him – most important point, which could be reformulated in this way too: Those people I’ve met there know their ways in the world – and they are reliable and proud and – ok: Capable and bright as well.

    While talking about this friend, Diamond implicitly holds, that it makes no sense to think any deeper about intelligence.

    (At least, that’s how I, too, remember Diamond’s point. I even know where the book sits in my bookshelves – just two doors away. But I tend to think I remember this stuff correctly and hesitate to – really look it up).

    Steve Sailer’s argument could have gone by and large in the same direction if he would have made a quote to support his claim, but he would have needed one more step then to bring his point home a tad more properly.

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    • Replies: @guest
    That sounds like dodging the intelligence question rather than arguing they're more intelligent. If I were to say, for instance, that my plumber has more intelligence than me, just so happens that his brainpower is in his hands, people would know I was at best speaking metaphorically. At worst, I would be an idiot. Because no one has brains in their hands.

    Everyone knows what intelligence means, roughly. It doesn't mean you'll have a happier life or be more in tune with man's purpose in nature. Doesn't mean you'll be better at survival if left on your own, either. No one thinks it does, so what are we talking about?

    Diamond can come up with some superlative to describe this Yali person's superiority over me. Then we can argue about it, or move on. But let's not talk around intelligence without talking about it. That irks me. Because he's not stupid. He knows what he's doing. He knows Yali and his people would never come up with questions like these, let alone the intellectual disciplines Diamond studied on his way up to be able to write books like Guns, Germs, and Steel. (Though he can formulate questions--which, contrary to Diamond, aren't very insightful and have been asked in various forms by countless white men, too--like why did white men sail to the New World with goodies instead of the other way around?)

    What an ingrate Diamond is. He lives in this (relatively) smart-person culture, and uses smart person culture to tear down smart person culture in favor of stupid person culture. But he won't admit it's stupid. He pretends it's smart, in its own way. Which he can only get away with by going just so far and refusing to go further in admitting intelligence is at issue.

    He's a conman, in other words. Or not that smart. Take your pick.

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  58. Lot says:
    @Achmed E. Newman
    Lot, do you think the attitude there, vs. most of the rest of California, has to do with the amount of Navy and ex-Navy men there in San Diego?

    Or, maybe people have been red-pilled/woke-up/whatever by the striking aerial view of the difference right at the border line between Tijuana and National City while on approach to Runway 27?

    The ex Navy and Marine presence is part of why San Diego is relatively conservative. But overall, they are a fairly small part of the population. A larger part is that we got more midwestern, western, and southern white migrants while SF/LA was more likely to get people from the Northeast and Coastal Pac Northwest. Or SF/LA got middle Americans who had more liberal values and we got the more conservative ones.

    We also never had LA’s big garment industry that attracted so many poor migrants whose citizen children are left wing and raise costs for and crowd out native whites.

    Another factor is we have long been a place for rich people to retire or have family vacations.

    A final factor I can think of is we get fewer illegals because they want to put more distance between themselves and the border, and the rule that makes summary deportations much easier within 100 miles from the international border. The 100-mile area includes all of SD County and then goes up to include about half of Orange County, running through Newport Beach and Irvine.

    San Diego the city also never developed a left-wing central city because downtown is a rich residential area and because the city limits include many conservative suburbs and even a few rural farming areas. This leaves the left-wing whites and few urban blacks in the urban core with absolutely no local government power. The only theoretically left-wing cities we have in San Diego County are National City and Chula Vista, which are both suburban and Mexican majority (plus some whites and Filipinos), and where conservative developers have politicians in their back pockets.

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    • Replies: @Hapalong Cassidy
    "A larger part is that we got more midwestern, western, and southern white migrants while SF/LA was more likely to get people from the Northeast and Coastal Pac Northwest. Or SF/LA got middle Americans who had more liberal values and we got the more conservative ones."

    And as I understand it, Bakersfield was the terminus for migrating Appalachian Scots-Irish types. They even had their own sub-genre of country music.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakersfield_sound
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  59. Pat Boyle says:

    OT

    As an example of semi-Fake News there is the reporting on hurricane Irma. It is NOT the most powerful hurricane of all time. It is the most powerful Atlantic hurricane but several hurricanes from the Gulf of Mexico have had higher winds. Included among these was the hurricane in the Bogart-Bacall movie “Key Largo.”

    Bogey got through it OK.

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  60. Lot says:
    @AndrewR
    How about siding with the facts and the law?

    How about siding with the facts and the law?

    I have no objection to that, and I wish I could do the same. However, I feel compelled to be blindly pro-local LEO to counterbalance people who are blindly anti-LEO.

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    • Replies: @AndrewR
    And they likely feel compelled to be blindly anti-LEO to counter blindly pro-LEO types. Break the cycle of retardation.
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  61. @eD
    Its been years since I read "Guns Germs and Steel" but if I remember correctly, Diamond's argument about Yali's intelligence is that Yali hasn't outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence.

    And since its bound to come up here, New Guinea is yet another of those places that don't fit into American racial paradigms: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melanesians

    “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence

    Yeah – Diamond’s argument goes in that direction – he does not explain exactly, what he means by intelligence – he leaves it at a rough comparison and then makes his – to him – most important point, which could be reformulated in this way too: Those people I’ve met there know their ways in the world – and they are reliable and proud and – ok: Capable and bright as well.

    Steve Sailer’s argument could have gone by and large in the same direction if he would have made a quote to support his claim, but he might have needed one more step then to bring his point home a tad more properly.

    Ok – I finally looked it up now: Diamond never writes about IQ – always about intelligence. And he admits, that he has made no tests – he is simply speaking about his impressions – and his relations with nice people in the wilderness, who are not totally nice, though: Lots of them die in the numerous fights, that are part of their everyday life.

    That then gives him room for just another one of his speculations: That the more intelligent a hunter and gatherer is, the higher would be the likelihood, that he would survive and / or avoid those often times occuring deadly fights. Which would then result in a positive selection for the brightest – just because their chance to survive their violent manners is higher…

    Plus – he sees disgenetic effects of western life: The TV as experience- and intelligence-killer…But of course: That’s all extremely vage.

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    • Replies: @Autochthon

    Those people I’ve met there know their ways in the world – and they are reliable and proud and – ok: Capable and bright as well.

    Lots of them die in the numerous fights, that are part of their everyday life.

    The more intelligent a hunter and gatherer is, the higher would be the likelihood, that he would survive and / or avoid those often times occuring deadly fights. Which would then result in a positive selection for the brightest – just because their chance to survive their violent manners is higher….
     

    So he wrote a paeon to Celts in the southeastern U.S.A. and Appalacia?
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  62. Lot says:
    @Pat Boyle
    OT

    Why do we have these guys standing beside public officials doing all those hand signs. I have bad hearing and I don't like to wear my hearing aid, so I simply turn on the captioning. Almost all modern TVs have this feature. If the true deaf want to understand Governor Scott's announcement on hurricane Irma wouldn't it be easier to read the text on the screen? I suppose there are some deaf who can't read but can they read American Sign Language?

    The guy who stands beside the announcer and signs seems to me to be an anachronism now unneeded.

    I write this here because this is where the sensible people congregate.

    There are some low-IQ deaf people who can speak ASL but cannot read and write in English.

    I think it may have something to do with translating for a live crowd, or because of random local laws requiring them.

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  63. Pat Boyle says:
    @anonguy
    GG&S was a nice just so story. When I read it, the obvious paradox was obvious to me at least.

    He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition.

    Florida, famously narrow, is ground zero for invasive species, meaning that its own native species just aren't all that competitive. It is a net importer of invasive species.

    I'll give him that for making that notion really clear to me.

    The idea that his native buddy was smarter than he (Diamond) was, is a charming conceit and we all admire humility, but if that were true surely we would be reading a book by Yali not by Diamond. No?

    I’ve read all of Diamonds books and written long refutations of their theses in the Amazon book reviews. In short every book by Diamond is wrong in its major points. His theory of Rapa Nu (Easter Island) is particularly wrongheaded. His story about the Easter Island history and culture is not very old but more recent research has shown it to be wrong in every particular by researchers who have actually visited the island..

    The problem seems to be that Diamond does not pursue the facts about a people like those of Rapa Nu but rather he chooses peoples and cultures that illustrate his preconceived notions. He has it in his head that modern man is doomed because of his insults to the natural world. Then and only then does he search for cases that illustrate his fixed ideas. There has grown up now a cottage industry of scholars who delight in refuting his notions. Diamond knows a lot about birds in New Guinea. Other places – not so much.

    His last book “The World Until Yesterday” is particularly bizarre. He thinks we – modern westerners – have much to learn from primitives. Maybe so but his examples prove just the opposite.

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    • Agree: Lot
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Might well be that Diamond thinks, that his UCLA work is less important than what is being done by his New Guinean friends - - - this then would mean, that he has to apply as a New Guinean of honour or something in order to improve his status...
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  64. @Numinous
    Why didn't the Papuans invent calculus, gunpowder, or penicillin?

    Did they need to?

    The entire thesis of GGS can be summarized as: people do what they need to do in order to survive and reproduce; and what they need to do to survive and reproduce is highly dependent on geography.

    Unfortunately, when they meet another group who are good at conquering new territory, then they need have invented things like calculus and gunpowder.

    The native Americans proved that, to their detriment.

    The Papuans have also proved that in the western part of the island called Papua (but called Irian Jaya by the Indonesian Malays who have engaged in a good deal of ethnic cleansing.

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  65. Lot says:
    @benjaminl
    Off-topic:

    The Narrative reconsiders California history

    Yosemite and genocide
    https://www.nytimes.com/2017/09/02/opinion/sunday/goodbye-yosemite-hello-what.html

    Shockley, racist

    Of course, none of this will mean much without input from Native Californians like Mark Minch

    Indians have blood wisdom we need to consult.

    Also whites have guilt running in their blood for the crimes of their distant ancestors in the 1850-1880s against the Indians (or just as often the crimes of completely unrelated white people from 160 years ago).

    The monopoly on casinos California gives “Indians,” worth billions a year and quite often $150,000+ a year in free cash to every member of the tribe, is not enough to pay our blood debt.

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  66. @songbird
    It is easy to laugh at cargo cults, but none of it is very different from what we do in the West now.

    Such as?

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    • Replies: @utu
    Such as when reading a book on how to be successful, how to dress for success and so on. Or when using iPhone w/o a clue how does the thing works.
    , @songbird
    The list is pretty long, but mainly I'm thinking of political stuff, where so many motions are made, where there are so many bureaucrats, so many speeches, where so much fortune and sometimes blood is spent, but the whole thing relies on a kind of faith, where you can turn one thing into another thing, if only you invest enough energy and resources in it.

    For example, turning Iraq into a democracy, or closing some racial test gap. Richard Feynman used to talk a lot about cargo cult science. It wouldn't surprise me if he used the term in relation to the government too.
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  67. @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.

    But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of … bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory.

    Isn’t memory more or less fixed?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Socrates
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  68. AndrewR says:
    @Lot

    How about siding with the facts and the law?
     
    I have no objection to that, and I wish I could do the same. However, I feel compelled to be blindly pro-local LEO to counterbalance people who are blindly anti-LEO.

    And they likely feel compelled to be blindly anti-LEO to counter blindly pro-LEO types. Break the cycle of retardation.

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    • Disagree: AndrewR
    • Replies: @Lot

    And they likely feel compelled to be blindly anti-LEO to counter blindly pro-LEO types. Break the cycle of retardation.
     
    No, they are blindly anti-LEO because they are criminals themselves, have criminals in their family and social circle, or simply don't like the primarily white and Asian victims of crime that much.

    To the extent my reaction causes a further counter-reaction, that is OK with me. Nice guy politics is not working for us right now. We have law enforcement on our side probably more than any other important power structure in America. I want them stronger and less constrained.

    To me the occasional abuses and excesses of law enforcement are largely unavoidable, sometimes to my benefit, and ultimately not something that concerns me. I am a little more leery of the FBI and ATF, and even more so of DOJ and U.S. Attorneys when Dems are in power, but still supportive.

    But all of my interactions with San Diego police have been completely and uniformly positive. They do great work here, and my only possible complaint, is they are a tad too nice with criminals, too much of the don't bump your head on the car, to use the joke Trump stole from Seinfeld.
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  69. Sean says:

    I have read that the most primitive people are the most intelligent in books so old it is clear the idea had been around for decades before Diamonds’s book.. It is the thesis of Man in Decline: A Re-Appraisal of Humanity’s Course by Gerhard Kraus. He also said that the first modern humans were more intelligent than people today. Not entirely silly as all people today have significantly smaller brains than Cromagnonss

    SJ Gould’s thesis, in Wonderful Life at least, was that intelligent life (humanity) was the result of a series of extremely unlike occurrences and therefor we are all alone in the universe because intelligent life never evolved anywhere else. Like just about every scientist in the world (even Fritz Zwicky, the Rocky Balboa of astro-physics) who has ever expressed an opinion on the future, he thought that humans must come together for peaceful cooperation to survive.

    But I think destruction will arrive as a result of us acting ever more rationally. Is refusing to believe that on average blacks have less intelligence that Chinese or Europeans rational or not? The brainiest people with the best jobs all seem to espouse equalitarianism, so I suppose it is irrational to believe, or at least let on that you believe, blacks are relatively unintelligent on average.

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  70. @Anon
    One of the funniest stories I heard is how Sailer made Diamond run like a mothafuc*a.

    What?

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  71. Pat Boyle says:
    @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.

    All pre-literate societies had bards who memorized very long poems. They didn’t memorize much prose because that was so much harder. And if they got interrupted for any reason they normally would have to go back to the beginning.

    In the famous words of Jack Warner “An oral contract isn’t worth the paper it’s printed on”.

    You are romanticizing primitives. Many cooks judge everything by eye but better cooks measure. In any case no one makes a jet engine by eye. Only simple artifacts can be made without measurement.

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  72. @Dieter Kief

    “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence
     
    Yeah - Diamond's argument goes in that direction - he does not explain exactly, what he means by intelligence - he leaves it at a rough comparison and then makes his - to him - most important point, which could be reformulated in this way too: Those people I've met there know their ways in the world - and they are reliable and proud and - ok: Capable and bright as well.

    Steve Sailer's argument could have gone by and large in the same direction if he would have made a quote to support his claim, but he might have needed one more step then to bring his point home a tad more properly.


    Ok - I finally looked it up now: Diamond never writes about IQ - always about intelligence. And he admits, that he has made no tests - he is simply speaking about his impressions - and his relations with nice people in the wilderness, who are not totally nice, though: Lots of them die in the numerous fights, that are part of their everyday life.

    That then gives him room for just another one of his speculations: That the more intelligent a hunter and gatherer is, the higher would be the likelihood, that he would survive and / or avoid those often times occuring deadly fights. Which would then result in a positive selection for the brightest - just because their chance to survive their violent manners is higher...

    Plus - he sees disgenetic effects of western life: The TV as experience- and intelligence-killer...But of course: That's all extremely vage.

    Those people I’ve met there know their ways in the world – and they are reliable and proud and – ok: Capable and bright as well.

    Lots of them die in the numerous fights, that are part of their everyday life.

    The more intelligent a hunter and gatherer is, the higher would be the likelihood, that he would survive and / or avoid those often times occuring deadly fights. Which would then result in a positive selection for the brightest – just because their chance to survive their violent manners is higher….

    So he wrote a paeon to Celts in the southeastern U.S.A. and Appalacia?

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  73. @Cwhatfuture
    A great deal of the population of the United States are believers in a giant cargo cult, or the precursor to it. What else would you call people who believe money can be conjured up by shuffling a few papers and talking into a can and muttering an incantation (aipassdisbill) "I pass this bill." For a great deal of our population that is exactly where money comes from.

    After we have no more money, and no one willing to lend it, people will still demand that we shuffle papers and talk into a can to produce it. They pretty much do already. Our Chinese masters will smile.

    Correctomundo, Mr. Future. It works just fine until it doesn’t. Too bad Ron Paul was kept out of the limelight.

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  74. @Opinionator
    But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of … bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory.

    Isn't memory more or less fixed?

    Socrates

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  75. anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Numinous
    Why didn't the Papuans invent calculus, gunpowder, or penicillin?

    Did they need to?

    The entire thesis of GGS can be summarized as: people do what they need to do in order to survive and reproduce; and what they need to do to survive and reproduce is highly dependent on geography.

    The entire thesis of GGS can be summarized as: people do what they need to do in order to survive and reproduce; and what they need to do to survive and reproduce is highly dependent on geography.

    If that is the thesis, it’s dumb.

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  76. sayless says:
    @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    “woke”.

    Is everyone too tired to write or say, “awakened”?

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  77. guest says:
    @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    The alt-right can simply use “woke,” which has the bonus of sounding funny.

    But “woke” is just another word for the Dead White Male concept of Enlightenment. Since we own the Western Tradition, we can use that.

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  78. guest says:
    @BB753
    I thought "woke" originated in ebonics, jive, black slang.... you get my drift..

    Possibly, considering how ungrammatical it is.

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  79. @Pat Boyle
    The idea that his native buddy was smarter than he (Diamond) was, is a charming conceit and we all admire humility, but if that were true surely we would be reading a book by Yali not by Diamond. No?

    I've read all of Diamonds books and written long refutations of their theses in the Amazon book reviews. In short every book by Diamond is wrong in its major points. His theory of Rapa Nu (Easter Island) is particularly wrongheaded. His story about the Easter Island history and culture is not very old but more recent research has shown it to be wrong in every particular by researchers who have actually visited the island..

    The problem seems to be that Diamond does not pursue the facts about a people like those of Rapa Nu but rather he chooses peoples and cultures that illustrate his preconceived notions. He has it in his head that modern man is doomed because of his insults to the natural world. Then and only then does he search for cases that illustrate his fixed ideas. There has grown up now a cottage industry of scholars who delight in refuting his notions. Diamond knows a lot about birds in New Guinea. Other places - not so much.

    His last book "The World Until Yesterday" is particularly bizarre. He thinks we - modern westerners - have much to learn from primitives. Maybe so but his examples prove just the opposite.

    Might well be that Diamond thinks, that his UCLA work is less important than what is being done by his New Guinean friends – – – this then would mean, that he has to apply as a New Guinean of honour or something in order to improve his status…

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  80. guest says:
    @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.

    If it paid to recite long stretches of verse from memory, people would do it. People probably still do it, for fun or other reasons. They still have the capacity.

    It’s just that our culture doesn’t much care. We don’t need it and don’t much value it for its own sake.

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  81. Flip says:
    @Cwhatfuture
    A great deal of the population of the United States are believers in a giant cargo cult, or the precursor to it. What else would you call people who believe money can be conjured up by shuffling a few papers and talking into a can and muttering an incantation (aipassdisbill) "I pass this bill." For a great deal of our population that is exactly where money comes from.

    After we have no more money, and no one willing to lend it, people will still demand that we shuffle papers and talk into a can to produce it. They pretty much do already. Our Chinese masters will smile.

    It all hangs together until the bond market revolts and there’s a dollar crisis. You can’t spend more than you make forever. Just ask Venezuela.

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  82. guest says:
    @Pat Boyle
    OT

    Why do we have these guys standing beside public officials doing all those hand signs. I have bad hearing and I don't like to wear my hearing aid, so I simply turn on the captioning. Almost all modern TVs have this feature. If the true deaf want to understand Governor Scott's announcement on hurricane Irma wouldn't it be easier to read the text on the screen? I suppose there are some deaf who can't read but can they read American Sign Language?

    The guy who stands beside the announcer and signs seems to me to be an anachronism now unneeded.

    I write this here because this is where the sensible people congregate.

    It’s symbolic of the victory of the Def Comedy Jam…er, I mean Deaf Rights Movement*. Such are the many spoils of out Pokemon-pointing rival groups. You get to feel satisfied seeing a person standing there, and you get to feel happy knowing you force regular people to watch and think (hopefully for their sake not say) “Why is she there?” Your fellow diversicrats get to revel in the knowledge that they’re rubbing normal people’s noses in it. Certain others pretend it’s entertaining, either because they’re virtue-signalling or because they’re idiots.

    It’s not enough to win. You must also humiliate the other side. Most people won’t be humiliated by the admittedly slight inconvenience of having to watch a person wave their hands around. But some will.

    *There’s a rights movement for everything. Including Stale Pale Males, though they have to sit at the back of the Rights Bus.

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    So we need a "meta rights" movements.
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  83. guest says:
    @Anon
    I think for some white globies, GGS by Diamond sort of lets them off the hook morally for white historical domination.

    PC says whites came to dominate cuz white are evil.

    GGS says white just got lucky with horses and cows. And whites just sneezed and accidentally killed all them indios in New World. They didn't mean to. It just happened.

    You may be onto something, though globies don’t want to be let off the hook, by and large. What share of the population really needs an excuse for the crimes of the White Man but in every other aspect still want to be goodthinkers? Who are we talking?

    I think the reason the book was such a success is because people want to revel in the playground of HBD without touching the Race Question. Diamond gives you something more than pure environment/culture with geography, biology, and some evolution. All without turning you into Hitler. There’s no swastika on the cover, I swear.

    That’s the appeal, I think. Science without boring old science-y stuff, but also without going nuts like Coming of Age in Somoa. We’re not *that* naive anymore. There’s a dose of Noticing. Enough to be interesting, but not enough to be Naziesque.

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  84. @anonymous-antimarxist
    Woke as been used by Alt-Righters for a while now, unironically. I concur in believing that the Rappers perhaps stole it from Grandpa Duke.

    I think you are wrong here.

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  85. The Papuan tribe thought they could buy Lyndon B Johnson for $1600. The were naïve in terms of the amount, but not entirely wrong. Another tribe has a similar idea, but they are paying a bit more: http://m.jpost.com/US-Elections/US-Jews-contribute-half-of-all-donations-to-the-Democratic-party-468774

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    The Papuan tribe thought they could buy Lyndon B Johnson for $1600. The were naïve in terms of the amount, but not entirely wrong. Another tribe has a similar idea, but they are paying a bit more ... [link omitted]
     
    Your linked article didn't have any money numbers, but what do you think, over the 4 years maybe 3 orders of magnitude more? It's just like the old joke "we've already established who you are, we are just negotiating the price", except, wait, what did the Papuans want to buy LBJ for again?
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  86. guest says:
    @Dieter Kief

    “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence
     
    Yeah - Diamond's argument goes in that direction - he does not explain exactly, what he means by intelligence - he leaves it at a rough comparison and then makes his - to him - most important point, which could be reformulated in this way too: Those people I've met there know their ways in the world - and they are reliable and proud and - ok: Capable and bright as well.

    While talking about this friend, Diamond implicitly holds, that it makes no sense to think any deeper about intelligence.

    (At least, that's how I, too, remember Diamond's point. I even know where the book sits in my bookshelves - just two doors away. But I tend to think I remember this stuff correctly and hesitate to - really look it up).

    Steve Sailer's argument could have gone by and large in the same direction if he would have made a quote to support his claim, but he would have needed one more step then to bring his point home a tad more properly.

    That sounds like dodging the intelligence question rather than arguing they’re more intelligent. If I were to say, for instance, that my plumber has more intelligence than me, just so happens that his brainpower is in his hands, people would know I was at best speaking metaphorically. At worst, I would be an idiot. Because no one has brains in their hands.

    Everyone knows what intelligence means, roughly. It doesn’t mean you’ll have a happier life or be more in tune with man’s purpose in nature. Doesn’t mean you’ll be better at survival if left on your own, either. No one thinks it does, so what are we talking about?

    Diamond can come up with some superlative to describe this Yali person’s superiority over me. Then we can argue about it, or move on. But let’s not talk around intelligence without talking about it. That irks me. Because he’s not stupid. He knows what he’s doing. He knows Yali and his people would never come up with questions like these, let alone the intellectual disciplines Diamond studied on his way up to be able to write books like Guns, Germs, and Steel. (Though he can formulate questions–which, contrary to Diamond, aren’t very insightful and have been asked in various forms by countless white men, too–like why did white men sail to the New World with goodies instead of the other way around?)

    What an ingrate Diamond is. He lives in this (relatively) smart-person culture, and uses smart person culture to tear down smart person culture in favor of stupid person culture. But he won’t admit it’s stupid. He pretends it’s smart, in its own way. Which he can only get away with by going just so far and refusing to go further in admitting intelligence is at issue.

    He’s a conman, in other words. Or not that smart. Take your pick.

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    He lives in this (relatively) smart-person culture, and uses smart person culture to tear down smart person culture in favor of stupid person culture. But he won’t admit it’s stupid. He pretends it’s smart, in its own way. Which he can only get away with by going just so far and refusing to go further in admitting intelligence is at issue.
     
    Yeah, right.

    My way to explain Diamond's stand:

    a) He does love to be with them - which I think i s a great achievement and - together with his fine reporting - is his biggest accomplishment (a really big one - it will make him read for ages, I'd hold).

    b) - - There is this naggin' - unfortunately counterfactual - point, that a world with only New Guinean early peasants and/or hunters & gatherers would be a world without the power to eradicate (not only...) human life, and a world without those millions and millions of half dead zombie-like consumerist people, which he doesn't like at all (I understand this point, too).

    He tries to synthisize a) and b)

    - - - This leads him to the following solution: He - finally - puts respect (= all men is created equal) above factual analysis (=scientific truth). I could imagine that he even knows what he's doing. If so though, he might not understand, that what he does is wrong by modern ethical standards.

    - Kant for example (and Goethe) - knew quite well, that it's at times inappropriate, to tell the whole truth. What they would have loathed, though (=what they both did loath numerous times) was the idea, that somebody would have made wrong claims/statements intentionally.

    I guess - that is your and Steve Sailer's (and my) big point against Diamond.

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  87. kihowi says:

    Cargo cultism is one of those things, like projection, that are everywhere once you start looking for it.

    Not very intelligent people see intelligent people find meanings beneath meanings, so they start seeing everything as a metaphor for something else, expecting to become intelligent.

    Conspiracy theorists see scientists find hidden explanations behind everyday situations, so they start finding hidden explanations behind everything, expecting to become scientists.

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  88. @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.

    There’s an old Gaelic complaint about the pernicious effects of literacy from the time the bards were being suppressed (I think, could be earlier). “The wing of a goose has driven memory from Man”.

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  89. @AndrewR
    Red-pilled

    Red-killed

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  90. Lot says:
    @AndrewR
    And they likely feel compelled to be blindly anti-LEO to counter blindly pro-LEO types. Break the cycle of retardation.

    And they likely feel compelled to be blindly anti-LEO to counter blindly pro-LEO types. Break the cycle of retardation.

    No, they are blindly anti-LEO because they are criminals themselves, have criminals in their family and social circle, or simply don’t like the primarily white and Asian victims of crime that much.

    To the extent my reaction causes a further counter-reaction, that is OK with me. Nice guy politics is not working for us right now. We have law enforcement on our side probably more than any other important power structure in America. I want them stronger and less constrained.

    To me the occasional abuses and excesses of law enforcement are largely unavoidable, sometimes to my benefit, and ultimately not something that concerns me. I am a little more leery of the FBI and ATF, and even more so of DOJ and U.S. Attorneys when Dems are in power, but still supportive.

    But all of my interactions with San Diego police have been completely and uniformly positive. They do great work here, and my only possible complaint, is they are a tad too nice with criminals, too much of the don’t bump your head on the car, to use the joke Trump stole from Seinfeld.

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    • Replies: @Jim Don Bob
    Agree completely. The cops here in the Peoples' Republic of ***** are the politest you will ever see. All the Dindus, including the latest Driving While Black Victim Michael Bennet (F**k ESPN) had to do was follow Chris Rocks advice, which all the YTs do automatically.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uj0mtxXEGE8

    De-policing black neighborhoods only hurts poor blacks.
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  91. @Jake
    Another brilliant Sailer article. I doubt John the Pod will read it - way too much self-righteous oozing puss to risk learning something.

    Steve's ending made me think of the Zombie craze. Whites across the globe, and many Asians, as well, have become enthralled by zombie fiction. I say that the zombie craze comes from the bedrock fear of just such a Third World, specifically black African, population explosion to, say 4 billion. Those blacks Africans will keep flloding out of their continent, bringing their propensities for violent crime and demanding welfare and dropping children fro which they will never provide halfway close to adequately.

    Those blacks will be something like zombies: they will demand to eat endlessly, and they will be beyond reason. You won't be able to negotiate with them: anything short of giving them even more tribute than they receive now in various charities for blacks - which is trillions of dollars every year - will be met with their turning to cannibalizing the evil whites who caused all their suffering.

    Zombie fiction is one of the very few ways a white Liberal can deal with the coming horror - which is born of far too much charity and bleeding heart Liberalism for blacks while using society to inhibit and even punish non-Elite whites - and remain an anti-racist.

    Showed this to a Filipino wife, certainly not a zombie movie watcher, and they loved it.

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    • Replies: @jim jones
    This has already been done by "World War Z"
    , @Achmed E. Newman

    Showed this to a Filipino wife, certainly not a zombie movie watcher, and they loved it.
     
    You have MULTIPLE Filipina wives, Joe? How do get off away with this? Is there a volume discount, is really what I'm getting at. Do you have a newsletter that I can subscribe to, to learn more?

    ;-}
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  92. utu says:
    @Opinionator
    Such as?

    Such as when reading a book on how to be successful, how to dress for success and so on. Or when using iPhone w/o a clue how does the thing works.

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  93. BB753 says:

    Great piece, Steve! One of your very best!

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  94. utu says:
    @Yak-15
    One of the simpler courses I took in college was American Sign Language. The deaf have been fiercely trying to defend their ASL focused culture in the face of advances such as cochlear implants and the like.

    Part of their "civil rights movement" was the struggle to have public information relayed through hand signs - somewhat like handicap ramps. Anyhow, this still remains as an edifice of this struggle and as a public jobs programs for the deaf.

    As an aside, if you know ASL and meet a deaf single chick, you have a great chance of getting it in if you aren't horribly ugly. One of the perks of taking the class was going to deaf events where there was lots of drinking and lots of single deaf girls.

    I read about chauvinism of the deaf in Oliver Sacks Seeing Voices. One of their arguments was that by signing entirely different (richer) dynamic of multi-interlocutor conversation is possible.

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    • Replies: @Yak-15
    I found that to be somewhat true. The deaf use much more facial expression than speakers do. They appear like caricatures when they speak because it the best outlet to convey emotion.
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  95. Diamond also massively overrated the power of cavalry.

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    • Replies: @Peripatetic commenter
    Well, to be fair, cavalry had a pretty good run after it dealt with the Roman Legions about the time of the Battle of Adrianople until they met the Swiss Pikemen.

    See, for example, Charles Oman.
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  96. @Lot
    I feel good as a San Diego homeowner to know our local gov, like NYC in some respects, considers us too important to tolerate the race leftist agenda.

    First, our lack of "affordable housing" makes us the least black metro area out of the top 50 in the USA. I do not think we have any project high rises at all.

    Second, we are not a sanctuary city. We might be the largest non sanctuary city in the USA. If ICE wants someone in the county jail held, we hold him then turn him over.

    Third, we are pro police. Crime is very low and when there is a LEO shooting, we side with the LEO over the thug he shot. Here is one such case. No criminal charges against the cop, and no jackpot settlement for the thug's family. Our DA took the civil suit to trial and won before the jury.

    https://timesofsandiego.com/crime/2017/09/05/san-diego-officer-cleared-fatal-shooting-gang-member/

    Glad to hear it, but it looks like that state of affairs won’t last much longer in San Diego:

    https://sdcdp.ngpvanhost.com/chairscorner/san-diego-democrats-flex-muscle-and-sweep-elections

    Another beautiful American city — and Cali city — headed for deterioration.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    The GOP has 5 out of 5 seats of the Board of Supervisors, which are very powerful in California, and actually picked up one seat in 2016. Though one of the GOP members, who represents the most hispanic district, is pretty liberal, and likely will be replaced by a hispanic dem. But we will still control the board 4-1.

    The Dems now have a 5-4 majority in the city counsel, however we have the mayor who can veto anything he does not like. We are also a strong-mayor city, so we hold the single most important local office in the county. And I would say the supervisors qualify as the next 5, so we have 6 out of 6 of the most important offices.

    The post you linked to is mostly the Dems bragging about picking up a few random city counsel seats in suburban towns. Whoop dee doo!

    Dems potentially could make big gains against US House Republicans in 2018 here, knocking off long-term incumbents like Issa and Rohrabacher. If they do that, then they would have something to brag about.

    Finally, keep in mind that we have a lot of hispanic office holders here in CA that come from poor families and are cheaply bought by conservative business groups. The fact we also have term limits means these guys know that politician is not a lifetime office like elsewhere, and if they want a good job with a big company after they term out, they better play ball.
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  97. Thea says:
    @Cwhatfuture
    A great deal of the population of the United States are believers in a giant cargo cult, or the precursor to it. What else would you call people who believe money can be conjured up by shuffling a few papers and talking into a can and muttering an incantation (aipassdisbill) "I pass this bill." For a great deal of our population that is exactly where money comes from.

    After we have no more money, and no one willing to lend it, people will still demand that we shuffle papers and talk into a can to produce it. They pretty much do already. Our Chinese masters will smile.

    I wish we understood better the economic fiasco we seem to be facing. It seems more urgent than understanding hbd right now.

    How does it work that we still can accrue such big loans without paying our huge debts?

    I imagine everyone with dual citizenship will jump ship to fairer pastures while us plains American and offspring are left to face the consequences. What will those be?

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    • Replies: @anon
    People have been waiting for the 'inevitable' reversal from the gfc/2008. That is, massive inflation. Bloomberg TV keeps talking about the 'Trump Reflation' trade as one of their canned, go to explanations for market index moves. They feel compelled to say something, and I rather prefer 'risk on' and 'risk off' without any details. Reflation being a reversal of a lengthy secular trend of deflationary pressures.

    Instead, the US dollar has done rather too well since 2014 which further slowed economic growth. And the Fed has been closely waiting for a whiff of inflation to further increase rates. The inflation we have seen has been generated by government regulation and financing of the health and education sectors.

    Betting against US financial solidity has been a losing trade for almost a decade.

    When Japan starts paying down its debt is when you should get worried.

    If you want economic disaster porn, Zero Hedge will fill that need.

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  98. @Lot

    And they likely feel compelled to be blindly anti-LEO to counter blindly pro-LEO types. Break the cycle of retardation.
     
    No, they are blindly anti-LEO because they are criminals themselves, have criminals in their family and social circle, or simply don't like the primarily white and Asian victims of crime that much.

    To the extent my reaction causes a further counter-reaction, that is OK with me. Nice guy politics is not working for us right now. We have law enforcement on our side probably more than any other important power structure in America. I want them stronger and less constrained.

    To me the occasional abuses and excesses of law enforcement are largely unavoidable, sometimes to my benefit, and ultimately not something that concerns me. I am a little more leery of the FBI and ATF, and even more so of DOJ and U.S. Attorneys when Dems are in power, but still supportive.

    But all of my interactions with San Diego police have been completely and uniformly positive. They do great work here, and my only possible complaint, is they are a tad too nice with criminals, too much of the don't bump your head on the car, to use the joke Trump stole from Seinfeld.

    Agree completely. The cops here in the Peoples’ Republic of ***** are the politest you will ever see. All the Dindus, including the latest Driving While Black Victim Michael Bennet (F**k ESPN) had to do was follow Chris Rocks advice, which all the YTs do automatically.

    De-policing black neighborhoods only hurts poor blacks.

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    • Replies: @Achmed E. Newman
    That was hilarious, J.D.! I've never seen much of Chris Rock, but just Michael Scott of The Office doing imitations of Chris Rock:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=-N-lix79zuk

    Actually, that is even more hilarious (but you've gotta know the characters on the show). I am in tears, no kidding!
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  99. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Why were blacks in Africa unable to domesticate animals? Could it be they themselves weren’t ‘tamed’(like other races)? Indeed, blacks in America tend to make a mess of things because they hadn’t been ‘tamed’ in the few centuries they were here.

    Most other races had been ‘tamed’ by climate(cold winters that forced people to cooperate better and delay immediate gratification) or by rise of civilization that ruthlessly weeded out unruly trouble-makers. It’s like feudal Japan weeded out anyone who acted ‘crazy’. Sure, Japan had the samurai, but samurai were not unruly warriors but highly disciplined and obedient warrior force. And it was hereditary than based on who-can-fight-best. So, a weakling son of a samurai could be a warrior but a tough son of a farmer had to plant rice.

    So, maybe a people have to be tamed before animals are tamed. People project their own traits onto animals. So, a tamed people will want animals that are also tamed and cooperative.
    In contrast, an untamed people will project wildness onto animals that are, well, already wild.

    Compare how white folks raise dogs and how black people raise dogs. White people prefer dogs that are tame and cooperative. Black people like ‘dawgs’, esp pitbulls, that act like rapper thugs into maul-mode.

    So, if white folks tamed the wolf into dog, blacks are now ‘wilding’ the dog into ‘dawg’, a thug-dog, or thog.

    It’s like how whites use guns vs how blacks use guns. Whites use guns for hunting and defense. Blacks use guns to play ‘gangsta’. Dogs or guns, in the hands of Negroes, they tend to go ‘wild’.

    Now, it may have been possible to ‘tame’ blacks thru selective breeding(the process that ‘tamed’ the other races). Blacks were brought over as slaves, and if whites had only allowed tamer and nicer Negroes to breed and if this process had continued for 1000 yrs, your average Negro might be more like Nat King Cole than Chuck D.

    But stupid whites were looking for strong powerful Negroes to carry bales of cotton, and they let strong muscled Negroes to breed much. So, instead of selecting for tame genes, white slave-owners made people like Sonny Liston have lots of kids.

    Another reason why blacks are stronger and more aggressive is because they evolved in dangerous Africa. Primitive Tribes of the Amazon can be nasty too, but they smaller, weaker, and less aggressive because (1) their ancestors had gone through the ‘wintering’ process and (2) there weren’t as many dangerous animals in South America that selectively bred for toughest warriors.

    In Africa, Negroes had to run like a mothafuc*a from or chuck spears at hippos, rhinos, elephants, lions, hyenas, cape buffaloes, crocs, leopards, warthogs, killer bees, and etc. And if they ventured into the jungle, they might get whupped by gorillas, chimps, or baboons.

    So, just like the tough conditions made zebras especially hyper and jumpy, it made Negroes sort of ‘crazy’-like, therefore harder to ‘tame’.

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  100. Bill says:
    @Jason Liu
    The book has some merit, but its lack of racism ruins it. You can't tell if Diamond is making an objective analysis of environmental effects on civilizations, or if he's doing so to distract from biological differences. No reason why it can't be both.

    Diamond claims that differences in human accomplishment are caused by genes . . . plant genes.

    What else do you need to know?

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  101. anonguy says:
    @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era.

    Millenials are utterly clueless, comparatively, when it comes to any manual skill.

    Just filling your shopping bags at the grocery store, a million questions, for something that was done nominally and without note or question ever 30 years ago.

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  102. @Lot
    The ex Navy and Marine presence is part of why San Diego is relatively conservative. But overall, they are a fairly small part of the population. A larger part is that we got more midwestern, western, and southern white migrants while SF/LA was more likely to get people from the Northeast and Coastal Pac Northwest. Or SF/LA got middle Americans who had more liberal values and we got the more conservative ones.

    We also never had LA's big garment industry that attracted so many poor migrants whose citizen children are left wing and raise costs for and crowd out native whites.

    Another factor is we have long been a place for rich people to retire or have family vacations.

    A final factor I can think of is we get fewer illegals because they want to put more distance between themselves and the border, and the rule that makes summary deportations much easier within 100 miles from the international border. The 100-mile area includes all of SD County and then goes up to include about half of Orange County, running through Newport Beach and Irvine.

    San Diego the city also never developed a left-wing central city because downtown is a rich residential area and because the city limits include many conservative suburbs and even a few rural farming areas. This leaves the left-wing whites and few urban blacks in the urban core with absolutely no local government power. The only theoretically left-wing cities we have in San Diego County are National City and Chula Vista, which are both suburban and Mexican majority (plus some whites and Filipinos), and where conservative developers have politicians in their back pockets.

    “A larger part is that we got more midwestern, western, and southern white migrants while SF/LA was more likely to get people from the Northeast and Coastal Pac Northwest. Or SF/LA got middle Americans who had more liberal values and we got the more conservative ones.”

    And as I understand it, Bakersfield was the terminus for migrating Appalachian Scots-Irish types. They even had their own sub-genre of country music.

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bakersfield_sound

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  103. @The Millennial Falcon
    Diamond also massively overrated the power of cavalry.

    Well, to be fair, cavalry had a pretty good run after it dealt with the Roman Legions about the time of the Battle of Adrianople until they met the Swiss Pikemen.

    See, for example, Charles Oman.

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  104. @robot
    OT: Has anyone proposed an alt-right equivalent for the word "woke"? (What could be less woke than following the NY Times?)

    To me, “woke” sounds a little bit like “dove” instead of “dived”, “lit” instead of “lighted”, and “obliged” instead of “obligated”. Prob’ly the good thinkers best shy from this “low hanging fruit”.

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  105. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Yak-15
    One of the simpler courses I took in college was American Sign Language. The deaf have been fiercely trying to defend their ASL focused culture in the face of advances such as cochlear implants and the like.

    Part of their "civil rights movement" was the struggle to have public information relayed through hand signs - somewhat like handicap ramps. Anyhow, this still remains as an edifice of this struggle and as a public jobs programs for the deaf.

    As an aside, if you know ASL and meet a deaf single chick, you have a great chance of getting it in if you aren't horribly ugly. One of the perks of taking the class was going to deaf events where there was lots of drinking and lots of single deaf girls.

    You and every other swinging dick. The deaf are notoriously promiscuous and VD is rampant.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yak-15
    It makes sense why deaf women would be promiscuous. They live their lives often isolated, unable to communicate and with an unattractive speech impediment. When they finally get some male attention they feel obligated to return it.
    , @Yak-15
    Sometimes the deaf professors from my college would come to my house's parties. They were generally awesome people to be around who liked to have fun.
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  106. @Cwhatfuture
    A great deal of the population of the United States are believers in a giant cargo cult, or the precursor to it. What else would you call people who believe money can be conjured up by shuffling a few papers and talking into a can and muttering an incantation (aipassdisbill) "I pass this bill." For a great deal of our population that is exactly where money comes from.

    After we have no more money, and no one willing to lend it, people will still demand that we shuffle papers and talk into a can to produce it. They pretty much do already. Our Chinese masters will smile.

    Our Chinese masters will smile.

    Only if they can rule as geriatrics. Numbers may have its own quality, but marshaling a horde of pensioners to rule the world is a stretch, to say the least.

    Read More
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  107. dr kill says:
    @Yak-15
    One of the simpler courses I took in college was American Sign Language. The deaf have been fiercely trying to defend their ASL focused culture in the face of advances such as cochlear implants and the like.

    Part of their "civil rights movement" was the struggle to have public information relayed through hand signs - somewhat like handicap ramps. Anyhow, this still remains as an edifice of this struggle and as a public jobs programs for the deaf.

    As an aside, if you know ASL and meet a deaf single chick, you have a great chance of getting it in if you aren't horribly ugly. One of the perks of taking the class was going to deaf events where there was lots of drinking and lots of single deaf girls.

    Haha, is that the sign where you move your left index finger back and forth in the circle made from your right index finger and thumb?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yak-15
    https://www.handspeak.com/word/search/index.php?id=1929

    Us "hearies" really just need to learn a little to get by...

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  108. @Daniel Chieh
    "Woke" can be stolen. But failing that, there's always "redpill."

    “Woke” can be stolen.

    Maybe, but maybe not. “Racism” was redefined to mean bias against the preferred (non-white) classes of humanity. (How many hate crimes are non-whites prosecuted for?) But anti-white bigotry is harder to twist and pervert.

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  109. @Lot
    It is not a new term. I think black twitter made it more common.

    Circa the 1760s Kant said Hume awoke him from his dogmatic slumbers. Decades ago David Duke had an awakening.

    You are citing David Duke? Hmm.

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  110. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer
    @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.

    They had a plumb line, a compass and a square, and some sort of ruler made by any of several methods. It didn’t have to be accurate to other rulers. Just to itself, so Long as everyone used the same one.

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  111. @Luke Lea
    Steve wrote: "Diamond makes environmental differences seem so compelling that it’s hard to believe that humans would not become somewhat adapted to their homelands through natural selection."

    In his novel 1984 Orwell paints a totalitarian society in which the inhabitants have been conditioned to be able to believe two mutually contradictory propositions as the same time. If I remember, he calls it doublethink. I am coming more and more to think that multiculturalism (with its identity politics and mindless celebration of diversity) is in fact a totalitarian ideology in disguise. It is undoubtedly hegemonic on college campuses, in the corporate media, in both political parties, and most recently, as demonstrated by the James Damore affair, in Silicon Valley. As we drift inexorably towards a racially-stratified class society, our emergent globalist governing meritocracy love it because it turns out to be the ideal instrument to divide and conquer the democratic majority.

    multiculturalism (with its identity politics and mindless celebration of diversity) is in fact a totalitarian ideology in disguise

    Indeed. I had an argument over that very fact with one of my Indian-immigrant coworkers in the early 90′s. He could not understand why I did not love all cultures and want to learn more about them. I tried to explain that learning cultures had nothing to do with it. Destroying American culture was its purpose.

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  112. donut says:

    The LBJ cult is thriving in this country .

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  113. “Why are some races of humans so much more economically and scientifically productive than other races?”

    At this point, I’m banging my head against the wall, but I’ll ask nonetheless. What explains the differing rankings of productivity in an ideal environment?

    For example in the USA, using per capita income as a metric, it’s:

    1. Asian

    2. White

    3. Pacifics.

    4. Blacks

    5. Ameri-Indians

    6. Arabs?

    Yet, break it down by nationality and you have, Nigerians, for example, trouncing Viets and Bangladeshi, who are Asian. Perhaps somebody could bring up educational stats. But I’m pretty confident stating that Nigerians are superior to every Asian group bar the Chinese and the Brahmin Indians.

    The hard truth of the matter is if you take any group, even the vaunted Jews, the majority are stupid! It’s a good thing the stupid are corralled by their betters.

    Be glad Steve, Nigerians will be a large number of that 4 billion which for some reason terrifies you, even though it’s 83 years away.

    You’ll be dust then, Kimmy might have dropped a big one on Los Angeles, Martians might have invaded.

    Look to your gravestone Steve, we’ll be fine, and even if we aren’t, we’ll be dead.

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    • Replies: @Eagle Eye
    Immigrants to the U.S. are often highly ATYPICAL of the country of origin.

    Among Indians in the U.S., Brahmins and various merchant castes are over-represented relative to their proportion of the home country population.

    Nigeria seems to export more than its share of Igbos (aka Ibos) to the U.S. Recently, Muslims from all over Africa have been encouraged to move to Europe.

    Japan used to encourage farmers from certain areas to emigrate to the Americas.

    Chinese immigrants to the U.S. were until recently mostly from the Southern coastal areas. Within those areas, certain minority groups (e.g. Hakka, Toisan) are over-represented among immigrants to the U.S.

    Jews were more prominent than gentile Poles, Ukrainians etc. among emigrants from Russia's "Pale of Settlement."
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  114. @guest
    It's symbolic of the victory of the Def Comedy Jam...er, I mean Deaf Rights Movement*. Such are the many spoils of out Pokemon-pointing rival groups. You get to feel satisfied seeing a person standing there, and you get to feel happy knowing you force regular people to watch and think (hopefully for their sake not say) "Why is she there?" Your fellow diversicrats get to revel in the knowledge that they're rubbing normal people's noses in it. Certain others pretend it's entertaining, either because they're virtue-signalling or because they're idiots.

    It's not enough to win. You must also humiliate the other side. Most people won't be humiliated by the admittedly slight inconvenience of having to watch a person wave their hands around. But some will.

    *There's a rights movement for everything. Including Stale Pale Males, though they have to sit at the back of the Rights Bus.

    So we need a “meta rights” movements.

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  115. Steve,
    Glad you could riff off “matt” but I think it’s not clear that those war elephants came from Africa. Possibly they came via trade with India.

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    • Replies: @Lot
    I just read the great wikipedia article on war elephants. It said Indian elephants were the best for war. North African elephants, now extinct, were smaller ideal, while the sub-Saharans were too big. For a while the Romans were buying them from Sri Lanka.

    It also said Caesar might have brought a single one over when he invaded Britain.
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  116. Wilkey says:

    after observing American and Australian military men deposit upon jungle airfields vast quantities of delightful goods, they formed cargo cults to replicate the white man’s magic.

    It’s funny how much of the average person’s thinking, whether liberal or conservative, is driven by a kind of cargo cult mentality.

    “All we have to do is move Third Worlders to the First World to make them productive people,” etc. That’s a typical leftist though.

    But it also happens to people on the right. ‘We will magically become prosperous as adults simply by virtue of being white, of having been raised in the middle class, by mimicking the outward signs of prosperity, without actually putting in the hard work that our parents put in.’

    There really are more people who believe that than we would all like to believe.

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  117. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    Cochran:

    “Regional scores on IQ tests and other educational tests ( PISA, etc) do track regional differences in S&T achievements. Not perfectly – northeast Asians have the highest scores but have not made the largest contributions to the development of modern technology…”

    This could be due to the Toohey Factor and Keating Factor. In THE FOUNTAINHEAD, there are these archetypes. There is Roark the individualist, Wynand the enterpriser. There is Toohey the collectivist, Keating the toady conformist. What all four men have in common in ambition, but they go about it the wrong way. Roark has real talent and vision plus will and principle. He will not compromise. Wynand knows how to play the game and make deals to reach the top. Toohey is smart but he lacks vision and inspiration. Thus, he is envious of Roark. Also, he’s too proud to wallow in the filth like Wynand did to rise from the bottom to the top. Though he works for Wynand’s trashy rag, his job is to keep it ‘respectable’, the commander of public opinion. As for Keating, he loves success and money, but his path to success is to give his bosses what they want. In this, Keating has something in common with Wynand, but the difference is Keating is satisfied with approval and sufficient success. He hasn’t the will to rise to the very top and be the ruler of men. Even with success, he’s a toady.

    Now, any serious critic of literature knows that reality isn’t made up of archetypes or caricatures. While every person is more like ‘this’ than ‘that’, it’s not like the world is made up of perfect embodiment of ideas. While some people are more Roarkian, there is no perfect Roarks. Roarkians have to compromise too. And while some people are like Toohey, they are not 100% Tooheyean all the time. And while some people are essentially toadies, they aren’t toadies 24/7. So, there is an overlap of characteristics among all people. A person might be 70% Roarkian but also 10% Wynandian, 10% Keatingish, and 10% Tooheyean. But in the Randian universe, there are perfect archetypes, and when Wynand tries to be Roarkian, he fails and commits suicide in the end. And Keating is ultimately totally Keatingish, and Toohey is Tooheyian in waking and sleeping hours.

    Anyway, one thing THE FOUNTAINHEAD gets right is the importance of personality. If there are two people with 150 IQ but very different personalities, that will play a HUGE role in how they turn out. Also, a community with high IQ people with similar personalities and a community with high IQ people of varying personalities will also turn out differently.

    [MORE]

    Indeed, Roark is Roark largely because of his personality. While Rand intended Roark to be special in talent, suppose we imagine an alternative scenario where Roark, Toohey, Wynand, and Keating all have same talent and intelligence. BUT, Roark has Roark personality, Toohey has Toohey personality, Wynand has Wynand personality, and Keating has Keating personality. Despite equal innate talent, they might have ended up more or less like the characters in the novel because their personalities would have led them to different modes of behavior.

    According to Rand, the rise of the West owed to people like Roark, the unyielding and uncompromising individual. And such people tend to be difficult and rather unlikable. Roark isn’t likable despite being played by Gary Cooper. He comes across as arrogant and intolerant, like the Stampers in SOMETIMES A GREAT NOTION. (For some reason, Cooper got stuck in these roles later where he never budges. Like in HIGH NOON where, again, he isn’t very likable. Even the respectable business leader — played by George Bailey’s Uncle — wants him gone for the sake of more business and profits.) If all the great innovators or visionaries had been like Roark, they never would have gotten anywhere as they would have alienated most people. Most great innovators always had to compromise. It was this capacity to wheel-and-deal, along with the steadfast conviction of vision, that made the great advances possible. To be sure, a symbiotic relationship could develop between a difficult talent and wheeler-dealer enterpriser. Indeed, this is what happens in THE FOUNTAINHEAD. Wynand is smart but lacks inspiration. He’s a businessman, not a visionary. So, he makes the money and funds Roark’s vision. This symbiosis of opposite personalities has been one of the cornerstones of advancement. Many difficult artists had business partners who knew the game.

    When we compare East and West, why did East come to be defined by Tooheyism & Keatingism while the West(at its best) came to be defined by Roarkism & Wynandism? And these modes of personality still exist today to a large extent. East and West had roughly equal ability in IQ, but the West made the revolutionary breakthroughs. And even now, despite the advancement of the East in technology, most macro-innovations come from White Westerners.

    Maybe we need to look to personality. One reason could be there is a narrower range of personality traits among East Asians than among Westerners. Since there is more personality-commonality, those who seem different stick out more and are held in suspicion or contempt. It’s like the Japanese saying, ‘hammer the nail that sticks up’. And despite his great success, Japanese were always a bit unsure about Kurosawa, deemed the ‘most western’ director for his strong personality and individuality.

    In contrast, maybe there is more personality range among white folks. A figure that I can never forget is the Phineas guy in A SEPARATE PEACE. He isn’t necessarily smarter than other kids, but he has a certain charm that is very disarming. Thus, he loosens up the hierarchy and makes things possible. While most kids are eager to fit in and conform, he plays games with the system. And yet, it’s not gruff rebellion either. It’s simple merely to rebel as it’s easy to conform. Neither rebellion nor conformity requires special talent. The remarkable thing about the kid in A SEPARATE PEACE is he subverts rules without upsetting the order. It’s charm than harm, but it’s that very quality that makes his transgression all the more remarkable. He breaks the rules but wins more love from the authority than any other kid. In a way, the authority is impressed that he has the dash and the polish to pull something outlandish but all within good form. It’s irreverence but within mode of deference. In a way, it could be dismissed as a superficial talent, and in and of itself, it isn’t much. But in the world of power, an aspiring person has to (1) show he’s special (2) show he’s team-player. The bosses will look upon perfect conformists as reliable and useful but not leadership quality. And they will look unfavorably at those who are overly aggressive and confrontational. They’ll be seen as rude, arrogant, and difficult to work with. They need someone who can fit in but also have standout qualities. And this is where the Phinean Personality is crucial. Bill Clinton had this quality in spades, and Obama worked at it all his life; the lesson he learned is that blacks need to win over whites to rise to the very top, and it’s not by just acting angry and confrontational.

    This personality type is rare but more common among Westerners than among Easterners. One might attribute this to culture, but why did Eastern Culture become more conformist? Could it be because more people had more-or-less same kind of personality? When we see Asian movies, there tends to be rigid types of character-types. In contrast, there is the third kind of personality in the West. While the West has its rigid types too, there are the mercurial types who weave in and out through the cracks. In BRIDGE ON THE RIVER KWAI and MERRY CHRISTMAS MR. LAWRENCE, why do the Brits and Japanese seem so different even though they are remarkably same in many ways. Both cultures have a certain rigidity, discipline, sense of form and manners, and etc. And yet, they are like night and day. The difference is that among the Japanese, the social distinctions and obligations are clear and final. Among the British, while divisions and distinctions are very important, there are nevertheless subtleties that allow a kind of free interaction between higher and lower, especially if member of lower status has sufficient wit and charm. There is a kind of grudging appreciation of deviance or dissent if worded or executed properly among Westerners whereas the wrong step can get one’s ass whupped among the Japanese. Why did the culture develop so differently? Nicholas Wade addressed this issue in terms of temperament, which is related to personality.

    Anyway, power is never about mere ability or talent. Why? Because ability and talent are always a threat to the order… even if they may provide benefits for the order. Any order has a hierarchy and established system. Talent and ability means new people with superior smarts and vision make take the reins from the current authority. Also, innovation is always disruptive. Also, there is the matter of pride. When established ‘experts’ and wisemen are faced with new talent with new ideas(possibly better ones), it means their vaunted status will be lost. Loss of face is never pleasant.

    So, the Power fears talent, ability, and intelligence. Such qualities have a logic of their own. They seek freedom and meritocracy, and that means established powers will lose out to new ones. It’s like Titans feared the Olympians. And fathers fear sons in many stories.

    This is brutally demonstrated in the animal world. A monkey tribe has an alpha male and his loyal henchmen. But eventually a young monkey grows bigger and stronger and challenges the elder monkeys. And eventually, the young one wins and the elder monkeys are shunted aside. Their fate is ignominy if not death. Decline and defeat are especially hurtful in sports. Ali used to be the ‘greatest’ but looked pitiful and pathetic as a punching bag to Larry Holmes. At least Holmes felt sorry for Ali, his mentor. Many boxers gloat and ridicule the loser… .like young Ali did to many of his older opponents who lost to him. (Still, Ali had enough charm to wink wink suggest he was just clowning around. Tyson, in contrast, was a mean nasty bugger.)

    So, any system is afraid of ability. It needs and relies on ability, but an alarming display of new ability may be deemed as a threat to the system, to the order. Patriarchy was centered on fear of older men of younger men. Younger men are stronger than older men. Younger men can be more inspired and innovative than older men. Whether in brawn or brain, younger men have the energy lacking in older men. So, patriarchy was a ‘conspiracy’ by older men to keep younger males in check. This had benefits as young men, despite their talent and energy, tend to lack wisdom and perspective. It’s like the Mifune character in SEVEN SAMURAI is full of spunk but sometimes reckless and foolish. But, there is a downside to patriarchy in that youthful energies could be overly suppressed. In AMADEUS, the established elders do their best to marginalize the brilliant young Mozart.

    There is an envy and anxiety about the talent or special quality. It’s like the ugly rich sisters conspire against Cinderella. A part of human psyche looks up to the special/great talent, but another part tries to tear it down. When barbarians invade a great civilization, they are filled with envy and smash and loot everything. A game like football is about ‘lynching’ the best player. So, if a running back or receiver gets the ball, pile on him and smash him. Competition is seen as ‘may the best man win’, but it’s also about ‘lets work together to bring down the best man’. Roarkism is about ‘may the best man win’, and Tooheyism is about ‘lets work together to bring down the best man’. The best man is threatening to the rest partly out of envy. But it’s also because the best man may gain power and use it in ways that are good for him but harmful to the community. This is true enough of many of today’s globalist elites. Their talents are undeniable. If radical leftists hate them out of envy, those on the right hate them because they use their great wealth and influence to undermine national sovereignty(so that the nation will be part of the larger globalist empire).
    Talent is real but, in and of itself, it is apolitical. So, there is no guarantee that a person of great talent will be on your side or against your side.

    This anxiety about talent was stronger in the East than in the West. The East developed a means to identify talent through Confucian exams, but the system was set up so that the talent would be molded in total service to the system. The tests were not about free thinking or originality but about the talent to serve the system with wisdom based on rote memory and rigid manners. That way, talent was identified and used but also harnessed and strapped. The talent was suited in a rigid mental armor that could never think to go against the system. As such, disloyalty or betrayal became the gravest ‘sin’ in China and Japan.

    Now, the same kind of envy and anxiety existed in the West in regard to talent. Maybe the most famous example is Galileo whom the Church admitted was brilliant. But his discoveries in astronomy was deeply threatening to doctrine. Still, how did the Europeans manage to overcome envy and anxiety to make the breakthrough that the East failed to make. And here, it may have had something to do with racial personality. Perhaps, Europeans had a more varied personalities(just like they have more varied hair colors and eye colors and skin hues), and this made it less likely for them to form a collective emotional culture. Also, among theses personality types, maybe there were those who were more mercurial or Phineasian. Those with talent who could be charming, smooth, and disarming enough to be tolerated or accepted by the power. The varied personalities of Monty Python are amazing. There was a balance of bold challenge to the order and good spirits & humor that made it more palatable for the power to give the new guys a chance. In a way, that’s been the genius of US democracy. Elections are hotly fought but within certain bounds of decorum. Also, the rule says the winner, the new top dog, must be gracious to the loser than gloat and showboat and act like a jerk. And in Western sportsmanship, the winner shows grace to the loser. (It’s been destroyed by showboating Negroes who gloat and taunt and act like louts… beginning with Jack Johnson.) Anglos had a certain grace in winning and losing. But the Semitic personality seems to play by different rules… going by the rantings of Max Boot and his ilk.

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  118. jim jones says:
    @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_sV9luPnMk

    Showed this to a Filipino wife, certainly not a zombie movie watcher, and they loved it.

    This has already been done by “World War Z”

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  119. @Randal
    For all its errors (surely unavoidable in a book of such broad sweep), Diamond's book is still a good read. Here's my comment from your Taki article:

    Guns, Germs and Steel is a fantastic book, and one I have thought ought to be required reading for all adolescents wanting to begin to understand the world around them, provided it is followed by Michael Hart's much less well known Understanding Human History.

    Understanding Human History

    The combination is a particularly good one, because Guns, Germs and Steel is a hugely informative and educational tour de force despite being fundamentally incorrect in a key aspect of its overall conclusions, while Understanding Human History directly targets the precise reason why such an educated and intelligent analyst as Diamond came to be so wrong on such an important point - ideology and the refusal to view the facts dispassionately. And in doing so it directly targets the most profound ideologically-based delusion that most damagingly warps received opinion about the world throughout the societies of the modern US sphere. That delusion is anti-racism - the faith-based assertion that there cannot be genetically-based differences between groups of humans that are behaviourally significant, or significant in terms of outcomes.

    After reading and understanding both books, it is clear where and how Diamond rejects the simplest explanations for moral reasons, as he himself admits explicitly. That insight alone is more informative than all of the often very interesting, useful and informative facts and insights Diamond's work conveys, and far more important in the particular context of modern western culture.

    Guns, Germs and Steel followed by Understanding Human History is a key to recognising one of the most basic and most pervasive intellectual and moral pathologies of our culture.

    Guns, Germs and Steel followed by Understanding Human History is a key to recognising one of the most basic and most pervasive intellectual and moral pathologies of our culture.

    This is why they are worth spending the time to read?

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    • Replies: @Randal
    For sure, if like most young men people these days you are unaware of the degree to which you have been brainwashed by the Official Truth narrative on race and human genetics, or are vaguely aware of it but just assume it's a cost-free "for the greater good" matter of denying evil.

    For others, Diamond's enthusiastic subservience to that Official Truth will be occasionally annoying, but his book is still a great read, full of information and insights. Being wrong in one area does not preclude being informed and insightful in others. Hart's book is much shorter, and will only take a regular reader a few days to read, and is just a great summary of the key bit missing from Guns, Germs and Steel.
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  120. Lot says:
    @RadicalCenter
    Glad to hear it, but it looks like that state of affairs won't last much longer in San Diego:

    https://sdcdp.ngpvanhost.com/chairscorner/san-diego-democrats-flex-muscle-and-sweep-elections

    Another beautiful American city -- and Cali city -- headed for deterioration.

    The GOP has 5 out of 5 seats of the Board of Supervisors, which are very powerful in California, and actually picked up one seat in 2016. Though one of the GOP members, who represents the most hispanic district, is pretty liberal, and likely will be replaced by a hispanic dem. But we will still control the board 4-1.

    The Dems now have a 5-4 majority in the city counsel, however we have the mayor who can veto anything he does not like. We are also a strong-mayor city, so we hold the single most important local office in the county. And I would say the supervisors qualify as the next 5, so we have 6 out of 6 of the most important offices.

    The post you linked to is mostly the Dems bragging about picking up a few random city counsel seats in suburban towns. Whoop dee doo!

    Dems potentially could make big gains against US House Republicans in 2018 here, knocking off long-term incumbents like Issa and Rohrabacher. If they do that, then they would have something to brag about.

    Finally, keep in mind that we have a lot of hispanic office holders here in CA that come from poor families and are cheaply bought by conservative business groups. The fact we also have term limits means these guys know that politician is not a lifetime office like elsewhere, and if they want a good job with a big company after they term out, they better play ball.

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  121. Lot says:
    @Chrisnonymous
    Steve,
    Glad you could riff off "matt" but I think it's not clear that those war elephants came from Africa. Possibly they came via trade with India.

    I just read the great wikipedia article on war elephants. It said Indian elephants were the best for war. North African elephants, now extinct, were smaller ideal, while the sub-Saharans were too big. For a while the Romans were buying them from Sri Lanka.

    It also said Caesar might have brought a single one over when he invaded Britain.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There is indeed a lot of great stuff in that War Elephant article, like how the original pyrrhic victory was fought in Italy with war elephants:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_elephant
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  122. anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Thea
    I wish we understood better the economic fiasco we seem to be facing. It seems more urgent than understanding hbd right now.

    How does it work that we still can accrue such big loans without paying our huge debts?

    I imagine everyone with dual citizenship will jump ship to fairer pastures while us plains American and offspring are left to face the consequences. What will those be?

    People have been waiting for the ‘inevitable’ reversal from the gfc/2008. That is, massive inflation. Bloomberg TV keeps talking about the ‘Trump Reflation’ trade as one of their canned, go to explanations for market index moves. They feel compelled to say something, and I rather prefer ‘risk on’ and ‘risk off’ without any details. Reflation being a reversal of a lengthy secular trend of deflationary pressures.

    Instead, the US dollar has done rather too well since 2014 which further slowed economic growth. And the Fed has been closely waiting for a whiff of inflation to further increase rates. The inflation we have seen has been generated by government regulation and financing of the health and education sectors.

    Betting against US financial solidity has been a losing trade for almost a decade.

    When Japan starts paying down its debt is when you should get worried.

    If you want economic disaster porn, Zero Hedge will fill that need.

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  123. Joe Sweet says:
    @anonymous
    OT - I think this is bad optics on the part of Israel.

    In wake of Harvey devastation, Israel pledges $1m. to Houston's Jewish community

    I wonder how many times that amount the Houston Jewish community sends to Israel on an average year.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    Well, the United States government as a whole has pledged to send $38 billion over the next ten years. That sum does not include--and is dwarfed by--the cost of the deployment of our military in service of "the Jewish State."
    , @ATX Hipster
    Or Houston's neocon goy population.
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  124. @Joe Sweet
    I wonder how many times that amount the Houston Jewish community sends to Israel on an average year.

    Well, the United States government as a whole has pledged to send $38 billion over the next ten years. That sum does not include–and is dwarfed by–the cost of the deployment of our military in service of “the Jewish State.”

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  125. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    People in Papua New Guinea were fascinated by Cargo.

    Now, blacks see everything as ‘bling’.

    Rap culture is strange. It has blacks reverting to the most primitive of ‘instinctual’ behavior, the kind that brings about the ruin of civilization… BUT they love to pose with all the stuff made by advanced civilization: guns, sports cars, big mansions, swimming pools, fancy jewelry, pricey suits, etc.

    So, the effect is almost like watching a primitive tribe playing with modern gadgets but having NO IDEA how they were conceived or created.

    “I wanna act like a destructed demented thug driving around in a sports car made by engineers with advanced degrees.”

    But this is the official pop culture iconography of the West. Civilization with all that science, technology, and complex organization exists primarily to provide ‘blings’ for thug lords. (At least 007 was believed to be surrounded by fancy gadgets because he’s intelligent, sophisticated, and urbane.)

    Cochran says Africans and New Guineans don’t have the brains to take over the world, but, in fact, they are taking over the world. They got ‘attitude’ and ‘swagger’ backed by muscle and volume amplified by electronica that thrills the masses all over who now worship Negro as Da Lawd. Rule of Lawd.

    Iconographic or Idolatrous value has million times the power of mere intelligence in pop culture that is the core culture now. It’s like there are many more Mexicans in LA than blacks, but Mexers have no idol-power in music, sports, sensationalism, and oratory.
    So, even though intelligent races go to better schools and make more money than an average black, blacks have icono-power, and this rubs off on all blacks, which is why their bad behavior is overlooked and why America feels it owes something to all blacks all the time.
    And in UK, BBC is promoting Negro Worship, even making ancients and medievals and victorians out to be Africans. And how long before Royal Family marries with blacks?

    Because icono-power made blacks the lawd in pop culture, the general sentiment is everything exists to serve blacks. Media exists to promote blacks. White House exists to have black president. White wombs exist to have black babies. White lands exist to provide welfare for African marauders called ‘migrants’. White people loved to make Oprah rich and richer. Elevate the Negro to heaven.

    But as most blacks will not get those things, they will be filled with anger, and that will lead to endless handwringing about injustice.

    In a way, ‘racial injustice’ isn’t really about equality. It’s about “how come the lawdy race, the blacks, don’t have the best of everything?” If indeed Negroes are the top idolatrous race, then they are godly and surely every Negro deserves to have what Oprah and Obama got. Praising, enriching, worshiping, flattering, privileging, and revering blacks is what US culture is all about. This country got bad voodoo.

    Afrodolatry is the undoing of America.

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    • Replies: @Peter Akuleyev

    So, the effect is almost like watching a primitive tribe playing with modern gadgets but having NO IDEA how they were conceived or created.
     
    I think rap culture views us more like the way the nomadic populations have traditionally preyed on settled populations. The nomads - Mongols, Scythians, Huns, etc. - tend to see themselves as superior- stronger, tougher and more clever. They are the masters taking whatever they want from the dull earth-bound peasants who the Gods put on earth to provide for them. Gypsies are the same way.
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  126. @Lot
    I just read the great wikipedia article on war elephants. It said Indian elephants were the best for war. North African elephants, now extinct, were smaller ideal, while the sub-Saharans were too big. For a while the Romans were buying them from Sri Lanka.

    It also said Caesar might have brought a single one over when he invaded Britain.

    There is indeed a lot of great stuff in that War Elephant article, like how the original pyrrhic victory was fought in Italy with war elephants:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_elephant

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  127. @anonguy
    GG&S was a nice just so story. When I read it, the obvious paradox was obvious to me at least.

    He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition.

    Florida, famously narrow, is ground zero for invasive species, meaning that its own native species just aren't all that competitive. It is a net importer of invasive species.

    I'll give him that for making that notion really clear to me.

    GG&S was a nice just so story. When I read it, the obvious paradox was obvious to me at least.
    He makes some good points about having a wide longitude sweep for increased genetic competition.

    Been a while, but I thought it was a good book. I took the smart Yali stuff with a grain of salt. And I thought a few chapters in the back wrapping up were quite bad–really larded up with PC nonsense.

    But I thought his basic argument about coming up with a decent “crop package” of crops and animals as being critical and the larger longitudinal sweep across Eurasia providing the best options and wide transference were reasonable and cogent ideas that have some validity about why that region “took off” with civilization first.

    But then, of course–what Steve said. That “crop package” and eventually the “civilization” based on it is the new environment in which selection is occurring. Essentially there’s gene-culture co-evolution. Humans are now much more dramatically affecting the environment in which they are evolving.

    Diamond admits this. That’s the whole point of the issue of “germs” when the Europeans hit the New World. A bunch of evolved germs and some evolved resistance in Europeans for said germs. (Pretty well trod ground.) Diamond just doesn’t want to–for political and career reasons–want to think or say the obvious.

    But that’s par for the course. We have this absolutely bizarre situation where supposedly educated people prattle on about “evolution” and “science”, but somehow believe that “everyone is the same”. Or pressed, admit that there was–obvious–evolution of differences in appearance, maybe some evolution for resistance to disease, maybe some evolution to adapt to new foods (lactose tolerance, or alcohol tolerance) but never ever never ever any selection on brain function, even though our brains are humans main survival advantage and this whole process of settlement and civilization has obviously massively changed the nature of cognitive demands that allow one to “get ahead” in life.

    It’s stupid shit, but it’s the routine stupid shit that’s the ideological straightjacket that’s been imposed. And apparently very large numbers of supposedly “smart” and supposedly “educated” people are unable to penetrate it.

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  128. Randal says:
    @Opinionator
    Guns, Germs and Steel followed by Understanding Human History is a key to recognising one of the most basic and most pervasive intellectual and moral pathologies of our culture.

    This is why they are worth spending the time to read?

    For sure, if like most young men people these days you are unaware of the degree to which you have been brainwashed by the Official Truth narrative on race and human genetics, or are vaguely aware of it but just assume it’s a cost-free “for the greater good” matter of denying evil.

    For others, Diamond’s enthusiastic subservience to that Official Truth will be occasionally annoying, but his book is still a great read, full of information and insights. Being wrong in one area does not preclude being informed and insightful in others. Hart’s book is much shorter, and will only take a regular reader a few days to read, and is just a great summary of the key bit missing from Guns, Germs and Steel.

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    Thank you
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  129. @Randal
    For all its errors (surely unavoidable in a book of such broad sweep), Diamond's book is still a good read. Here's my comment from your Taki article:

    Guns, Germs and Steel is a fantastic book, and one I have thought ought to be required reading for all adolescents wanting to begin to understand the world around them, provided it is followed by Michael Hart's much less well known Understanding Human History.

    Understanding Human History

    The combination is a particularly good one, because Guns, Germs and Steel is a hugely informative and educational tour de force despite being fundamentally incorrect in a key aspect of its overall conclusions, while Understanding Human History directly targets the precise reason why such an educated and intelligent analyst as Diamond came to be so wrong on such an important point - ideology and the refusal to view the facts dispassionately. And in doing so it directly targets the most profound ideologically-based delusion that most damagingly warps received opinion about the world throughout the societies of the modern US sphere. That delusion is anti-racism - the faith-based assertion that there cannot be genetically-based differences between groups of humans that are behaviourally significant, or significant in terms of outcomes.

    After reading and understanding both books, it is clear where and how Diamond rejects the simplest explanations for moral reasons, as he himself admits explicitly. That insight alone is more informative than all of the often very interesting, useful and informative facts and insights Diamond's work conveys, and far more important in the particular context of modern western culture.

    Guns, Germs and Steel followed by Understanding Human History is a key to recognising one of the most basic and most pervasive intellectual and moral pathologies of our culture.

    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left. (Is there any other kind?)

    Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus.

    This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews.

    The Nazis had an industrialized country with railways, the ability to build gas chambers plus modern guns. Plus the target population was conveniently living in European cities.

    The early Conquistadors’ situation could not be more different. Let’s assume for the sake of argument that they were as bad as Hitler in wanting to kill them (that’s doubtful. They had the idea that they could be enslaved, sort of like serfs.)

    That would be a lot easier and cheaper than getting slaves from Africa.

    What means did the Spanish have in the 16th century? Primitive ships, very primitive guns, steel swords and some horses. Their supply line was very long. The only communication with Spain was via letters going back by ship. And hope that required items would be forthcoming on the next returning ship (assuming it didn’t sink).

    And the target population was spread over an immense area and some very rough terrain.

    The horses and steel weapons were certainly a big help in skirmishes but the Spanish were unbelievably outnumbered.

    But the crazy left is so desperate to blame every single problem on evil Europeans that they can’t think straight.

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    • Replies: @Randal

    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left.
     
    Not disagreeing with you about the crazy left, but my suggestion was not in any way dependent upon GGS being regarded as acceptable by them.
    , @guest
    "Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian and African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population...This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews."

    They can still be Nazis with disease as the cause, due to the Smallpox-Infested Blankets Narrative.
    , @Corn
    "Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus."

    I was talking to a young millenial woman recently and she mentioned the "genocide of the indigenous peoples". I pointed out that while there may be much in the history of white North America we wouldn't look back on with pride, the vast majority of Indians died of disease. I also pointed out it's probably not fair to blame the whites alive at the time because the germ theory of disease wasn't fleshed out til the mid 19th century. She changed the subject rather quickly.
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  130. @Anon
    People in Papua New Guinea were fascinated by Cargo.

    Now, blacks see everything as 'bling'.

    Rap culture is strange. It has blacks reverting to the most primitive of 'instinctual' behavior, the kind that brings about the ruin of civilization... BUT they love to pose with all the stuff made by advanced civilization: guns, sports cars, big mansions, swimming pools, fancy jewelry, pricey suits, etc.

    So, the effect is almost like watching a primitive tribe playing with modern gadgets but having NO IDEA how they were conceived or created.

    "I wanna act like a destructed demented thug driving around in a sports car made by engineers with advanced degrees."

    But this is the official pop culture iconography of the West. Civilization with all that science, technology, and complex organization exists primarily to provide 'blings' for thug lords. (At least 007 was believed to be surrounded by fancy gadgets because he's intelligent, sophisticated, and urbane.)

    Cochran says Africans and New Guineans don't have the brains to take over the world, but, in fact, they are taking over the world. They got 'attitude' and 'swagger' backed by muscle and volume amplified by electronica that thrills the masses all over who now worship Negro as Da Lawd. Rule of Lawd.

    Iconographic or Idolatrous value has million times the power of mere intelligence in pop culture that is the core culture now. It's like there are many more Mexicans in LA than blacks, but Mexers have no idol-power in music, sports, sensationalism, and oratory.
    So, even though intelligent races go to better schools and make more money than an average black, blacks have icono-power, and this rubs off on all blacks, which is why their bad behavior is overlooked and why America feels it owes something to all blacks all the time.
    And in UK, BBC is promoting Negro Worship, even making ancients and medievals and victorians out to be Africans. And how long before Royal Family marries with blacks?

    Because icono-power made blacks the lawd in pop culture, the general sentiment is everything exists to serve blacks. Media exists to promote blacks. White House exists to have black president. White wombs exist to have black babies. White lands exist to provide welfare for African marauders called 'migrants'. White people loved to make Oprah rich and richer. Elevate the Negro to heaven.

    But as most blacks will not get those things, they will be filled with anger, and that will lead to endless handwringing about injustice.

    In a way, 'racial injustice' isn't really about equality. It's about "how come the lawdy race, the blacks, don't have the best of everything?" If indeed Negroes are the top idolatrous race, then they are godly and surely every Negro deserves to have what Oprah and Obama got. Praising, enriching, worshiping, flattering, privileging, and revering blacks is what US culture is all about. This country got bad voodoo.

    Afrodolatry is the undoing of America.

    So, the effect is almost like watching a primitive tribe playing with modern gadgets but having NO IDEA how they were conceived or created.

    I think rap culture views us more like the way the nomadic populations have traditionally preyed on settled populations. The nomads – Mongols, Scythians, Huns, etc. – tend to see themselves as superior- stronger, tougher and more clever. They are the masters taking whatever they want from the dull earth-bound peasants who the Gods put on earth to provide for them. Gypsies are the same way.

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  131. Chet says:
    @Dieter Kief
    "After Diamond’s rather eye-rolling opening about high-IQ Papuans, his book settled down into a productive groove, working what has become the dominant trait of intellectual conventional wisdom in the 21st century: antiquarianism."

    There are two ways to make a wrong use of the past: To get lost in it (= first Historicism, now Aquarianism (great term)) - and to try to improve it (= (heart-wrenching) humanism). Diamond might be a mixture of both.

    The best of Dimonds writing is to be found in his latest book "The World Until Yesterday".This book features a lot of very detailed - reporting even - about: Early peasants - and their tendency to fight - proto-wars, lets say. Those chapters are eye-opening - and fit with shocking precision into the darker chapters of Erich Fromm's depiction of us human beings in "The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness".

    Diamond did so on the basis of decades of interaction with early peasants. He does know things about those people from experience, which is a great accomplishment.

    He might even love them - and at times - - - idealize them. For example by claiming, that their understanding of the world - and of existence, might be not only different from ours, but might - in the long run - turn out to be superior, because of the powers, the western civilization has developed (= to extinguish all human life at will in about 40 minutes - this might be the ost frightening one).

    I think, Diamond uses the word intelligence in "Guns Germs and Steele" in such a way, that he says: Imagine a deterioration of our industrialised culture, which - cf. "Collapse"... might occur any time - and think for a minute, who then would survive. And on that basis, he comes to the conclusion: It might turn out, that my beloved Papuans might - under such conditions of a collapsed industrial civilization - be the ones with the better performance/ survival rates.

    - I think, that that's what Diamond says in "Guns Germs and Steele". And in "Collapse" and in "The World Until Yesterday", too.

    Diamond redefines intelligence in such a way, that it is useful to make speculatins about the different survival rates of different civilizations under the supposition, that the industrialised world collapses. That would be the simple version of his argument. A more complex version would reflect on the contrafctual version of world history: The question, wether a world without the progress made by non-pacific islanders would be less devastating and less risky. (Diamond - as far as I recall, does not elaborate on this version of his thought).

    Well - with his broad-scale skepticism about the current state of the world, Diamond is neither irrational, nor without company (I hint at Heidegger and his dark versions of the "Gestell"...).

    What Diamond says about intelligence for example, is not what's discussed within the framework of IQ as a means to predict future behavior/ performance of people living in industrialized societies. I think, that's something else alltogether, and Diamond obfuscates such insights.

    I think Diamond is a great writer and adventurer, and explorer of the world of the proto-wars of early peasants, and a great birder and all. But he knows very little about modern society. Steve Sailer's insightful critique of Diamond is therefor very far from being unnecessary, or superflous. It's rather brilliant, really.

    Dieter Kief says:

    Diamond did so on the basis of decades of interaction with early peasants. He does know things about those people from experience, which is a great accomplishment.

    No. JD has no experience with “early peasants” and nobody does.
    In episode one of the National Geographic Program based on GGS, Diamond makes an astonishing statement,

    Instead of just reading about this lifestyle in archaeological books, I’ve been lucky enough to witness it first hand, to see for myself how we all lived 13,000 years ago, and how we found food.

    Anthropologist Stephen Corrie wrote, in reference to Diamond’s works, based largely on New Guinean natives,

    It is important to note that, although Diamond’s thesis is that we were all once “hunter-­gatherers” and that this is the main key to them being seen as our window into the past, in fact most New Guineans do little hunting. They live principally from cultivations, as they probably have for millennia. Diamond barely slips in the fact that their main foodstuff, sweet potato, was probably imported from the Americas, perhaps a few hundred or a thousand years ago. No one agrees on how this came about, but it is just one demonstration that “globalization” and change have impacted on Diamond’s “traditional” peoples for just as long as on everyone else. Disturbingly, Diamond knows these things, but he does not allow them to spoil his conclusions.

    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/30/savaging-primitives-why-jared-diamond-s-the-world-until-yesterday-is-completely-wrong.html

    This is actually a well-known fallacy, again from Corry:

    Britain’s foremost expert on prehistoric man, Chris Stringer of London’s Natural History Museum, for example, routinely cautions against seeing modern hunter–gatherers as “living fossils,” and repeatedly emphasizes that, like everyone else, their “genes, cultures and behaviors” have continued to evolve to the present. They must have changed, of course, or they simply would not have survived.

    Diamond’s use of other supposed stone-age-level tribes is fraught with the same problems, for example, with respect to the Yanomamo,

    Prior to 1492, these researchers say, this portion of central Amazonia was a prosperous, cosmopolitan, multiethnic network of big villages, fed by fish from the great river and reliant upon a multitude of forest products. When that network was thrown into turmoil by the arrival of European slavers and European diseases, the Yanomamö and many other groups fled into the hinterlands, where they now reside.
    If this is correct, these people are not “pure” or “pristine”; they are dispossessed. And their existence in small bands is reflective not of humankind’s ancient past but of a shattered society that has preserved its liberty by retreat. It would be risky to base conclusions about the evolution of society on the study of pockets of refugees, perhaps especially those who have survived both a holocaust and a diaspora.

    http://www.livinganthropologically.com/2013/02/06/yanomami-science-violence-empirical-data-facts/

    Modern primitives are not clones of “our” ancestors.

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    • Replies: @guest
    That renders even more annoying Diamond's insistance upon making history more (pseudo-)scientific, with "naturalistic experiments" (i.e. cherry picking evidence and inventing just-so theses) and such. Because I'd be fine with him keeping stuff from us for storytelling purposes. But if he's going to proselytize for Science, pushing into disciplines where it doesn't really fit (at least not according to current popular usage of the term), then he has a duty to be more honest.
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  132. Randal says:
    @Frau Katze
    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left. (Is there any other kind?)

    Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus.

    This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews.

    The Nazis had an industrialized country with railways, the ability to build gas chambers plus modern guns. Plus the target population was conveniently living in European cities.

    The early Conquistadors' situation could not be more different. Let's assume for the sake of argument that they were as bad as Hitler in wanting to kill them (that's doubtful. They had the idea that they could be enslaved, sort of like serfs.)

    That would be a lot easier and cheaper than getting slaves from Africa.

    What means did the Spanish have in the 16th century? Primitive ships, very primitive guns, steel swords and some horses. Their supply line was very long. The only communication with Spain was via letters going back by ship. And hope that required items would be forthcoming on the next returning ship (assuming it didn't sink).

    And the target population was spread over an immense area and some very rough terrain.

    The horses and steel weapons were certainly a big help in skirmishes but the Spanish were unbelievably outnumbered.

    But the crazy left is so desperate to blame every single problem on evil Europeans that they can't think straight.

    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left.

    Not disagreeing with you about the crazy left, but my suggestion was not in any way dependent upon GGS being regarded as acceptable by them.

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    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    I wonder if it's used in universities?
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  133. @Randal
    For sure, if like most young men people these days you are unaware of the degree to which you have been brainwashed by the Official Truth narrative on race and human genetics, or are vaguely aware of it but just assume it's a cost-free "for the greater good" matter of denying evil.

    For others, Diamond's enthusiastic subservience to that Official Truth will be occasionally annoying, but his book is still a great read, full of information and insights. Being wrong in one area does not preclude being informed and insightful in others. Hart's book is much shorter, and will only take a regular reader a few days to read, and is just a great summary of the key bit missing from Guns, Germs and Steel.

    Thank you

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    • Replies: @Randal
    You are very welcome, of course.
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  134. Jack D says:
    @Dieter Kief
    "After Diamond’s rather eye-rolling opening about high-IQ Papuans, his book settled down into a productive groove, working what has become the dominant trait of intellectual conventional wisdom in the 21st century: antiquarianism."

    There are two ways to make a wrong use of the past: To get lost in it (= first Historicism, now Aquarianism (great term)) - and to try to improve it (= (heart-wrenching) humanism). Diamond might be a mixture of both.

    The best of Dimonds writing is to be found in his latest book "The World Until Yesterday".This book features a lot of very detailed - reporting even - about: Early peasants - and their tendency to fight - proto-wars, lets say. Those chapters are eye-opening - and fit with shocking precision into the darker chapters of Erich Fromm's depiction of us human beings in "The Anatomy of Human Destructiveness".

    Diamond did so on the basis of decades of interaction with early peasants. He does know things about those people from experience, which is a great accomplishment.

    He might even love them - and at times - - - idealize them. For example by claiming, that their understanding of the world - and of existence, might be not only different from ours, but might - in the long run - turn out to be superior, because of the powers, the western civilization has developed (= to extinguish all human life at will in about 40 minutes - this might be the ost frightening one).

    I think, Diamond uses the word intelligence in "Guns Germs and Steele" in such a way, that he says: Imagine a deterioration of our industrialised culture, which - cf. "Collapse"... might occur any time - and think for a minute, who then would survive. And on that basis, he comes to the conclusion: It might turn out, that my beloved Papuans might - under such conditions of a collapsed industrial civilization - be the ones with the better performance/ survival rates.

    - I think, that that's what Diamond says in "Guns Germs and Steele". And in "Collapse" and in "The World Until Yesterday", too.

    Diamond redefines intelligence in such a way, that it is useful to make speculatins about the different survival rates of different civilizations under the supposition, that the industrialised world collapses. That would be the simple version of his argument. A more complex version would reflect on the contrafctual version of world history: The question, wether a world without the progress made by non-pacific islanders would be less devastating and less risky. (Diamond - as far as I recall, does not elaborate on this version of his thought).

    Well - with his broad-scale skepticism about the current state of the world, Diamond is neither irrational, nor without company (I hint at Heidegger and his dark versions of the "Gestell"...).

    What Diamond says about intelligence for example, is not what's discussed within the framework of IQ as a means to predict future behavior/ performance of people living in industrialized societies. I think, that's something else alltogether, and Diamond obfuscates such insights.

    I think Diamond is a great writer and adventurer, and explorer of the world of the proto-wars of early peasants, and a great birder and all. But he knows very little about modern society. Steve Sailer's insightful critique of Diamond is therefor very far from being unnecessary, or superflous. It's rather brilliant, really.

    If the ability to survive after a collapse is the standard for “intelligence” then cockroaches are even smarter than Papuans.

    Intelligence has a very real, specific and scientific meaning but there are a lot of people around who seem to want to muddle the definition because they don’t like the outcome when you apply the real meaning.

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    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    I agree.

    I might give in to Diamond's perspective in admitting, that cockroaches are not human - so, from a biblical standpoint, he would have the better end of the argument working for him.

    In a scientific context, his stanpoint is strong, as long as you don't accept the fact, that science is - well - a continuum of (sound=correct etc.) arguments.

    This is indeeed one of the crucial questions - and one of the big watersheds between modern and postmodern thinking.

    Modern thinking implies to at least try to understand that each field of knowledge follows it's own rules/laws - and that those rules/laws are the foundation of all of the realms of modern science/scientific thinking.

    Kant managed, to create a synthesis of the three big fields of scientific attempts - without fear, that those insights might shake the whole of modernity. He even believed, that modernity is strong because of it's acknowledgement of the differences in argumentation, that the three big fields that he found, yield :(1) sciences which count (physics, chemistry, etc.); 2) sciences which balance/formulate moral /ethical questions (=the law, for example), and 3) the aesthetical field, which is about tastes.

    The unifiying aspect of modernity can be found in the insight in it's fundamental dividedness (Hegel undertsood this Kantian point of unity in dividedness, and he understood quite well, why this insight was so big (important). Not that many people understood this.

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  135. @guest
    That sounds like dodging the intelligence question rather than arguing they're more intelligent. If I were to say, for instance, that my plumber has more intelligence than me, just so happens that his brainpower is in his hands, people would know I was at best speaking metaphorically. At worst, I would be an idiot. Because no one has brains in their hands.

    Everyone knows what intelligence means, roughly. It doesn't mean you'll have a happier life or be more in tune with man's purpose in nature. Doesn't mean you'll be better at survival if left on your own, either. No one thinks it does, so what are we talking about?

    Diamond can come up with some superlative to describe this Yali person's superiority over me. Then we can argue about it, or move on. But let's not talk around intelligence without talking about it. That irks me. Because he's not stupid. He knows what he's doing. He knows Yali and his people would never come up with questions like these, let alone the intellectual disciplines Diamond studied on his way up to be able to write books like Guns, Germs, and Steel. (Though he can formulate questions--which, contrary to Diamond, aren't very insightful and have been asked in various forms by countless white men, too--like why did white men sail to the New World with goodies instead of the other way around?)

    What an ingrate Diamond is. He lives in this (relatively) smart-person culture, and uses smart person culture to tear down smart person culture in favor of stupid person culture. But he won't admit it's stupid. He pretends it's smart, in its own way. Which he can only get away with by going just so far and refusing to go further in admitting intelligence is at issue.

    He's a conman, in other words. Or not that smart. Take your pick.

    He lives in this (relatively) smart-person culture, and uses smart person culture to tear down smart person culture in favor of stupid person culture. But he won’t admit it’s stupid. He pretends it’s smart, in its own way. Which he can only get away with by going just so far and refusing to go further in admitting intelligence is at issue.

    Yeah, right.

    My way to explain Diamond’s stand:

    a) He does love to be with them – which I think i s a great achievement and – together with his fine reporting – is his biggest accomplishment (a really big one – it will make him read for ages, I’d hold).

    b) – – There is this naggin’ – unfortunately counterfactual – point, that a world with only New Guinean early peasants and/or hunters & gatherers would be a world without the power to eradicate (not only…) human life, and a world without those millions and millions of half dead zombie-like consumerist people, which he doesn’t like at all (I understand this point, too).

    He tries to synthisize a) and b)

    - – – This leads him to the following solution: He – finally – puts respect (= all men is created equal) above factual analysis (=scientific truth). I could imagine that he even knows what he’s doing. If so though, he might not understand, that what he does is wrong by modern ethical standards.

    – Kant for example (and Goethe) – knew quite well, that it’s at times inappropriate, to tell the whole truth. What they would have loathed, though (=what they both did loath numerous times) was the idea, that somebody would have made wrong claims/statements intentionally.

    I guess – that is your and Steve Sailer’s (and my) big point against Diamond.

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  136. @Jack D
    If the ability to survive after a collapse is the standard for "intelligence" then cockroaches are even smarter than Papuans.

    Intelligence has a very real, specific and scientific meaning but there are a lot of people around who seem to want to muddle the definition because they don't like the outcome when you apply the real meaning.

    I agree.

    I might give in to Diamond’s perspective in admitting, that cockroaches are not human – so, from a biblical standpoint, he would have the better end of the argument working for him.

    In a scientific context, his stanpoint is strong, as long as you don’t accept the fact, that science is – well – a continuum of (sound=correct etc.) arguments.

    This is indeeed one of the crucial questions – and one of the big watersheds between modern and postmodern thinking.

    Modern thinking implies to at least try to understand that each field of knowledge follows it’s own rules/laws – and that those rules/laws are the foundation of all of the realms of modern science/scientific thinking.

    Kant managed, to create a synthesis of the three big fields of scientific attempts – without fear, that those insights might shake the whole of modernity. He even believed, that modernity is strong because of it’s acknowledgement of the differences in argumentation, that the three big fields that he found, yield :(1) sciences which count (physics, chemistry, etc.); 2) sciences which balance/formulate moral /ethical questions (=the law, for example), and 3) the aesthetical field, which is about tastes.

    The unifiying aspect of modernity can be found in the insight in it’s fundamental dividedness (Hegel undertsood this Kantian point of unity in dividedness, and he understood quite well, why this insight was so big (important). Not that many people understood this.

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    • Replies: @utu

    Intelligence has a very real, specific and scientific meaning but there are a lot of people around who seem to want to muddle the definition (Jack D.)

     

    How Kant would define intelligence? Would he make Jack D., Sailer and Cochran happy? BTW, how Jack D. defines intelligence?
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  137. utu says:
    @Dieter Kief
    I agree.

    I might give in to Diamond's perspective in admitting, that cockroaches are not human - so, from a biblical standpoint, he would have the better end of the argument working for him.

    In a scientific context, his stanpoint is strong, as long as you don't accept the fact, that science is - well - a continuum of (sound=correct etc.) arguments.

    This is indeeed one of the crucial questions - and one of the big watersheds between modern and postmodern thinking.

    Modern thinking implies to at least try to understand that each field of knowledge follows it's own rules/laws - and that those rules/laws are the foundation of all of the realms of modern science/scientific thinking.

    Kant managed, to create a synthesis of the three big fields of scientific attempts - without fear, that those insights might shake the whole of modernity. He even believed, that modernity is strong because of it's acknowledgement of the differences in argumentation, that the three big fields that he found, yield :(1) sciences which count (physics, chemistry, etc.); 2) sciences which balance/formulate moral /ethical questions (=the law, for example), and 3) the aesthetical field, which is about tastes.

    The unifiying aspect of modernity can be found in the insight in it's fundamental dividedness (Hegel undertsood this Kantian point of unity in dividedness, and he understood quite well, why this insight was so big (important). Not that many people understood this.

    Intelligence has a very real, specific and scientific meaning but there are a lot of people around who seem to want to muddle the definition (Jack D.)

    How Kant would define intelligence? Would he make Jack D., Sailer and Cochran happy? BTW, how Jack D. defines intelligence?

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    • Replies: @Jack D
    I would define it pretty much the same way that Spearman did.

    See:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G_factor_(psychometrics)

    We don't have a way of measuring intelligence directly the way you test for blood sugar (yet). Rather we get at it inferentially by giving people a series of different tasks to do. On any one task, you might be able to do particularly well because you happen to be very good at that particular task (stacking blocks in a certain way or repeating a string of digits backward). But if I give you enough tasks to do and combine the results, your strengths and weaknesses on particular tasks cancel out and we are left with a measure of your "mental horsepower" that is a measure of your overall ability to memorize, process and analyze novel data and situations.

    Contra Diamond, I think that would include the ability to deal with (God forbid) a post-apocalyptic world. Sure a Papuan could get back to the grass hut level of survival pretty quickly but it would require real intelligence to rebuild a civilization.
    , @Dieter Kief
    Kant would argue, that if you want to criticize somebody's scientific argument, you would have to argue from within your opponent's method/ perspective, chosen methodology etc. - say: You don't agree with some scientific results, you would have to prove that the way to find those was wrong and/or not appropriate etc. Basically: That it doesn't work.

    What Diamond does with the term intelligence is something different alltogether. He moves the goalposts, so to speak: Whereas IQ-science is (by and large) about predictability of behavior/ success/ failure within our knowledge-based modern societies, Diamond bypasses those proven (!) qualities of IQ-sience by a) hinting at subjective qualities of his personal experience with New Guinean hunters and gatherers and b) by hinting at the "burdon of progress, so to speak, which in it's maybe most frightening form consists of a little thought-experiment = the idea, that nuclear weapons (=results of our kind of societal/scientific a n d individual progress) might destroy all of humankind within forty minutes (and of course: That's only one of the big existential risks, that spring from progress...). And yes indeed - none of the big risks, that originate in the life-form of the hunter-gatherers comes even close to this kind of - - ultimate catastrophy.

    So - this argument has something going for it. I don't critisize Diamond for bringing up this argument - and I don't criticize heidegger for bringing up - essentially the same argument in an a bit aybe more elaborate way. But I do critizise Diamond, because of the inappropriate way, in which he confounds his civilization-critique with th ediscussion of intelligence. In this respect, Diamond lacks decency.

    But as I stated above already: I think Diamonds biggest achievements are not his sociological and proto- socio-psychological musings/ his cri
    titque of civilization, but his pure and sober reporting from the field, which is outstanding. To me, Diamond is one of the most interesting writers of our times. He is in my top fifty of our contemporaries worldwide - and quite easily.

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  138. @TelfoedJohn
    The Papuan tribe thought they could buy Lyndon B Johnson for $1600. The were naïve in terms of the amount, but not entirely wrong. Another tribe has a similar idea, but they are paying a bit more: http://m.jpost.com/US-Elections/US-Jews-contribute-half-of-all-donations-to-the-Democratic-party-468774

    The Papuan tribe thought they could buy Lyndon B Johnson for $1600. The were naïve in terms of the amount, but not entirely wrong. Another tribe has a similar idea, but they are paying a bit more … [link omitted]

    Your linked article didn’t have any money numbers, but what do you think, over the 4 years maybe 3 orders of magnitude more? It’s just like the old joke “we’ve already established who you are, we are just negotiating the price”, except, wait, what did the Papuans want to buy LBJ for again?

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  139. @Joe Stalin
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0_sV9luPnMk

    Showed this to a Filipino wife, certainly not a zombie movie watcher, and they loved it.

    Showed this to a Filipino wife, certainly not a zombie movie watcher, and they loved it.

    You have MULTIPLE Filipina wives, Joe? How do get off away with this? Is there a volume discount, is really what I’m getting at. Do you have a newsletter that I can subscribe to, to learn more?

    ;-}

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  140. @Jim Don Bob
    Agree completely. The cops here in the Peoples' Republic of ***** are the politest you will ever see. All the Dindus, including the latest Driving While Black Victim Michael Bennet (F**k ESPN) had to do was follow Chris Rocks advice, which all the YTs do automatically.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uj0mtxXEGE8

    De-policing black neighborhoods only hurts poor blacks.

    That was hilarious, J.D.! I’ve never seen much of Chris Rock, but just Michael Scott of The Office doing imitations of Chris Rock:

    Actually, that is even more hilarious (but you’ve gotta know the characters on the show). I am in tears, no kidding!

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  141. @Joe Sweet
    I wonder how many times that amount the Houston Jewish community sends to Israel on an average year.

    Or Houston’s neocon goy population.

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  142. Jack D says:
    @utu

    Intelligence has a very real, specific and scientific meaning but there are a lot of people around who seem to want to muddle the definition (Jack D.)

     

    How Kant would define intelligence? Would he make Jack D., Sailer and Cochran happy? BTW, how Jack D. defines intelligence?

    I would define it pretty much the same way that Spearman did.

    See:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G_factor_(psychometrics)

    We don’t have a way of measuring intelligence directly the way you test for blood sugar (yet). Rather we get at it inferentially by giving people a series of different tasks to do. On any one task, you might be able to do particularly well because you happen to be very good at that particular task (stacking blocks in a certain way or repeating a string of digits backward). But if I give you enough tasks to do and combine the results, your strengths and weaknesses on particular tasks cancel out and we are left with a measure of your “mental horsepower” that is a measure of your overall ability to memorize, process and analyze novel data and situations.

    Contra Diamond, I think that would include the ability to deal with (God forbid) a post-apocalyptic world. Sure a Papuan could get back to the grass hut level of survival pretty quickly but it would require real intelligence to rebuild a civilization.

    Read More
    • Agree: Johann Ricke
    • Replies: @utu
    We don’t have a way of measuring intelligence directly the way you test for blood sugar (yet). - there are two blood pressures. Are you open to different types of intelligence?


    "but it would require real intelligence to rebuild a civilization" - So what is that real intelligence. You haven't defined it yet.

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  143. Jack D says:
    @YetAnotherAnon
    The only news site you'll ever need!

    https://www.bbc.com/pidgin


    "Nigerian government dey complain as thousands of Resident doctors across di country don hang their coat say dem no work again."

    "Water resources minister, Rajiv Ranjan, don say na rats im blame for di flooding wey kill more than 500 people, come pursue another 12 million people comot house for im State of Bihar, India.
    Mr Ranjan say di rat dig hole put for inside the barriers wen dem use take block water; na dis one come make di barriers weak well-well sotay flood water pass through, begin cause palava for di people."


    De one we dem de read well well

    1 Serena Williams don born her first pickin
    2 Why dem dey call Hurricane human being name
    3 Hurricane Irma don reach Caribbean Islands dem
    4 Japan: 'North Korea no get bright future'
    5 Indian woman divorce husband because dem no get toilet
    6 North Korea dey warn Nigeria on top Twitter?
    7 Ghana import 30 million condoms but dem no use am
    8 Kenya: Opposition dey celebrate court ruling
    9 Hurricane Irma don reach category five
    10 Marvel's Black Panther Dey Finally Come Lagos
     

    Dis be de fron page from de New York Times don come year 2047.

    Read More
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  144. Jack D says:
    @Sunbeam
    "Its been years since I read “Guns Germs and Steel” but if I remember correctly, Diamond’s argument about Yali’s intelligence is that Yali hasn’t outsourced his memory and reasoning to books and electronic gadgets like people in more developed countries, so he retains more of his native intelligence."

    Really not wanting to be the devil's advocate here. But just in the spirit of pedantry, you don't get anything for free.

    It's pretty obvious how useful writing is and what's it's done for civilization. But there was a Greek (fairly famous, though the name absolutely escapes me) who lamented how writing had destroyed the ability of ... bards? muses? to recite really long works like the Iliad or Odyssey from memory. If you do a search you will find anecdotes about things like this here and there.

    Also there were a lot of manual skills that people developed that are lost in this modern era. I was reading a Joe Bageant article once about living in Belize (he was another Fred Reed type expat). He was astounded that a local carpenter he employed for something made dovetails for drawers and whatnot... with a machete. From what I remember he said it was pretty good work too.

    There was an article I read once about Jesus' profession (carpenter) at the time and place he practiced it. Measuring tools were for wimps. You eyeballed things and pretty much cut them to size the first time.

    Now I'm not saying that modern humans couldn't do things like memorize the Iliad or make a door in a reasonable time without a measuring tape. But we just don't have the milieu to develop things like that. And on rare occasions it is useful to be able to do it old school.

    Heck I remember my uncle had all kinds of tricks to do things in the woods. He was famous for cooking chickens or something by covering them in mud and ... doing something with a fire. If you had to pick someone to go D.B. Cooper with from an airplane, you'd have been much better off with him than me.

    I doubt that you can really build anything more than a log cabin (where the logs are not necessarily exactly the same length) just by eyeball but that doesn’t mean that you need a tape measure either. In a lot of carpentry, the important thing is that all the pieces be the same length so if I pick some arbitrary length (about “so” high) and mark that length off on a gauge stick or with a pair of dividers (like a compass) then I could build you a perfectly fine structure or piece of furniture without a ruler or even a standard system of measurement. Of course in such a system you can’t have standard size doors, etc. that you buy premade but if you are making everything on site you would be just fine.

    The Romans and even the Egyptians had lot of little tricks for building level and square. For level you can dig a little trench in the ground and fill it with water. For square you can use a 3,4,5 triangle. For plumb, a plumb bob ( a lead weight on a string). Combine a few of these tricks and you can build a perfectly fine structure. Probably the Romans knew more of these tricks than the Papuans ever will and we could rediscover them pretty quickly, if nothing else than by reading the Roman sources which the Papuan can’t.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Sunbeam
    There's a lot actually.

    I have no idea who this guy is or why he does it, but take a look at this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZGFTmK6Yk4&index=1&list=PLGnWLXjIDnpBVRqu5lz5JGaQxjPs7q3CJ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9AoGc-OTCk&index=2&list=PLGnWLXjIDnpBVRqu5lz5JGaQxjPs7q3CJ

    This man has mad skills. Absolutely mad.

    No offense to anyone here, but if the crap absolutely hit the fan I'd want him to be my best friend over absolutely everyone who has even glanced at this site.

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  145. @Randal

    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left.
     
    Not disagreeing with you about the crazy left, but my suggestion was not in any way dependent upon GGS being regarded as acceptable by them.

    I wonder if it’s used in universities?

    Read More
    • Replies: @Randal
    I'm not sufficiently familiar with anthropology and archaeology dept course reading lists to know. Is it?
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  146. guest says:
    @Frau Katze
    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left. (Is there any other kind?)

    Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus.

    This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews.

    The Nazis had an industrialized country with railways, the ability to build gas chambers plus modern guns. Plus the target population was conveniently living in European cities.

    The early Conquistadors' situation could not be more different. Let's assume for the sake of argument that they were as bad as Hitler in wanting to kill them (that's doubtful. They had the idea that they could be enslaved, sort of like serfs.)

    That would be a lot easier and cheaper than getting slaves from Africa.

    What means did the Spanish have in the 16th century? Primitive ships, very primitive guns, steel swords and some horses. Their supply line was very long. The only communication with Spain was via letters going back by ship. And hope that required items would be forthcoming on the next returning ship (assuming it didn't sink).

    And the target population was spread over an immense area and some very rough terrain.

    The horses and steel weapons were certainly a big help in skirmishes but the Spanish were unbelievably outnumbered.

    But the crazy left is so desperate to blame every single problem on evil Europeans that they can't think straight.

    “Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian and African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population…This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews.”

    They can still be Nazis with disease as the cause, due to the Smallpox-Infested Blankets Narrative.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    Yep, I've encountered the smallpox blanket episode a number of times in debating.

    I'm not sure how often this was done. You'd think the natives would soon get wise about gift blankets.

    I'm not denying that there was no bad behaviour at all (Pizarro with the Incas comes across as a psychopath).

    There's a lot of debating going on at West Hunter. I've been criticized for saying something that it isn't related to Cortes or the Spanish (somehow it came up as a tangent.) I said in the here and now that the welfare state causes women of lower intelligence to have more children, implying that the welfare state is dysgenic.

    Some guy is arguing with me but I can't understand his arguments.

    I also added that even if it was dysgenic, I thought the continuation of the welfare state far into the future was unlikely. Especially if it really is dysgenic. The state would be looking as bankruptcy.

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  147. Corn says:
    @Frau Katze
    You forget that GGS is not popular with the crazy left. (Is there any other kind?)

    Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus.

    This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews.

    The Nazis had an industrialized country with railways, the ability to build gas chambers plus modern guns. Plus the target population was conveniently living in European cities.

    The early Conquistadors' situation could not be more different. Let's assume for the sake of argument that they were as bad as Hitler in wanting to kill them (that's doubtful. They had the idea that they could be enslaved, sort of like serfs.)

    That would be a lot easier and cheaper than getting slaves from Africa.

    What means did the Spanish have in the 16th century? Primitive ships, very primitive guns, steel swords and some horses. Their supply line was very long. The only communication with Spain was via letters going back by ship. And hope that required items would be forthcoming on the next returning ship (assuming it didn't sink).

    And the target population was spread over an immense area and some very rough terrain.

    The horses and steel weapons were certainly a big help in skirmishes but the Spanish were unbelievably outnumbered.

    But the crazy left is so desperate to blame every single problem on evil Europeans that they can't think straight.

    “Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus.”

    I was talking to a young millenial woman recently and she mentioned the “genocide of the indigenous peoples”. I pointed out that while there may be much in the history of white North America we wouldn’t look back on with pride, the vast majority of Indians died of disease. I also pointed out it’s probably not fair to blame the whites alive at the time because the germ theory of disease wasn’t fleshed out til the mid 19th century. She changed the subject rather quickly.

    Read More
    • Replies: @guest
    "Genocide" is a rubbery term, and has been from the beginning. That girl was probably thinking in terms of murder, because that's what they want you to think. But there was definitely ethnic cleansing, which qualifies. Really any action that discriminates against minorities could be construed to qualify.
    , @Frau Katze
    Not a very combative SJW! You might even be able to redpill such a person.

    I've had loads of nasty comments by self-confident SJWs in online debates.
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  148. Sunbeam says:
    @Jack D
    I doubt that you can really build anything more than a log cabin (where the logs are not necessarily exactly the same length) just by eyeball but that doesn't mean that you need a tape measure either. In a lot of carpentry, the important thing is that all the pieces be the same length so if I pick some arbitrary length (about "so" high) and mark that length off on a gauge stick or with a pair of dividers (like a compass) then I could build you a perfectly fine structure or piece of furniture without a ruler or even a standard system of measurement. Of course in such a system you can't have standard size doors, etc. that you buy premade but if you are making everything on site you would be just fine.

    The Romans and even the Egyptians had lot of little tricks for building level and square. For level you can dig a little trench in the ground and fill it with water. For square you can use a 3,4,5 triangle. For plumb, a plumb bob ( a lead weight on a string). Combine a few of these tricks and you can build a perfectly fine structure. Probably the Romans knew more of these tricks than the Papuans ever will and we could rediscover them pretty quickly, if nothing else than by reading the Roman sources which the Papuan can't.

    There’s a lot actually.

    I have no idea who this guy is or why he does it, but take a look at this:

    This man has mad skills. Absolutely mad.

    No offense to anyone here, but if the crap absolutely hit the fan I’d want him to be my best friend over absolutely everyone who has even glanced at this site.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    I see.
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  149. guest says:
    @Chet
    Dieter Kief says:

    Diamond did so on the basis of decades of interaction with early peasants. He does know things about those people from experience, which is a great accomplishment.
     
    No. JD has no experience with "early peasants" and nobody does.
    In episode one of the National Geographic Program based on GGS, Diamond makes an astonishing statement,

    Instead of just reading about this lifestyle in archaeological books, I’ve been lucky enough to witness it first hand, to see for myself how we all lived 13,000 years ago, and how we found food.
     
    Anthropologist Stephen Corrie wrote, in reference to Diamond’s works, based largely on New Guinean natives,

    It is important to note that, although Diamond’s thesis is that we were all once “hunter-­gatherers” and that this is the main key to them being seen as our window into the past, in fact most New Guineans do little hunting. They live principally from cultivations, as they probably have for millennia. Diamond barely slips in the fact that their main foodstuff, sweet potato, was probably imported from the Americas, perhaps a few hundred or a thousand years ago. No one agrees on how this came about, but it is just one demonstration that “globalization” and change have impacted on Diamond’s “traditional” peoples for just as long as on everyone else. Disturbingly, Diamond knows these things, but he does not allow them to spoil his conclusions.
     
    http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2013/01/30/savaging-primitives-why-jared-diamond-s-the-world-until-yesterday-is-completely-wrong.html

    This is actually a well-known fallacy, again from Corry:

    Britain’s foremost expert on prehistoric man, Chris Stringer of London’s Natural History Museum, for example, routinely cautions against seeing modern hunter--gatherers as “living fossils,” and repeatedly emphasizes that, like everyone else, their “genes, cultures and behaviors” have continued to evolve to the present. They must have changed, of course, or they simply would not have survived.
     
    Diamond’s use of other supposed stone-age-level tribes is fraught with the same problems, for example, with respect to the Yanomamo,

    Prior to 1492, these researchers say, this portion of central Amazonia was a prosperous, cosmopolitan, multiethnic network of big villages, fed by fish from the great river and reliant upon a multitude of forest products. When that network was thrown into turmoil by the arrival of European slavers and European diseases, the Yanomamö and many other groups fled into the hinterlands, where they now reside.
    If this is correct, these people are not “pure” or “pristine”; they are dispossessed. And their existence in small bands is reflective not of humankind’s ancient past but of a shattered society that has preserved its liberty by retreat. It would be risky to base conclusions about the evolution of society on the study of pockets of refugees, perhaps especially those who have survived both a holocaust and a diaspora.
     
    http://www.livinganthropologically.com/2013/02/06/yanomami-science-violence-empirical-data-facts/

    Modern primitives are not clones of "our" ancestors.

    That renders even more annoying Diamond’s insistance upon making history more (pseudo-)scientific, with “naturalistic experiments” (i.e. cherry picking evidence and inventing just-so theses) and such. Because I’d be fine with him keeping stuff from us for storytelling purposes. But if he’s going to proselytize for Science, pushing into disciplines where it doesn’t really fit (at least not according to current popular usage of the term), then he has a duty to be more honest.

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  150. guest says:
    @Corn
    "Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus."

    I was talking to a young millenial woman recently and she mentioned the "genocide of the indigenous peoples". I pointed out that while there may be much in the history of white North America we wouldn't look back on with pride, the vast majority of Indians died of disease. I also pointed out it's probably not fair to blame the whites alive at the time because the germ theory of disease wasn't fleshed out til the mid 19th century. She changed the subject rather quickly.

    “Genocide” is a rubbery term, and has been from the beginning. That girl was probably thinking in terms of murder, because that’s what they want you to think. But there was definitely ethnic cleansing, which qualifies. Really any action that discriminates against minorities could be construed to qualify.

    Read More
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  151. @utu

    Intelligence has a very real, specific and scientific meaning but there are a lot of people around who seem to want to muddle the definition (Jack D.)

     

    How Kant would define intelligence? Would he make Jack D., Sailer and Cochran happy? BTW, how Jack D. defines intelligence?

    Kant would argue, that if you want to criticize somebody’s scientific argument, you would have to argue from within your opponent’s method/ perspective, chosen methodology etc. – say: You don’t agree with some scientific results, you would have to prove that the way to find those was wrong and/or not appropriate etc. Basically: That it doesn’t work.

    What Diamond does with the term intelligence is something different alltogether. He moves the goalposts, so to speak: Whereas IQ-science is (by and large) about predictability of behavior/ success/ failure within our knowledge-based modern societies, Diamond bypasses those proven (!) qualities of IQ-sience by a) hinting at subjective qualities of his personal experience with New Guinean hunters and gatherers and b) by hinting at the “burdon of progress, so to speak, which in it’s maybe most frightening form consists of a little thought-experiment = the idea, that nuclear weapons (=results of our kind of societal/scientific a n d individual progress) might destroy all of humankind within forty minutes (and of course: That’s only one of the big existential risks, that spring from progress…). And yes indeed – none of the big risks, that originate in the life-form of the hunter-gatherers comes even close to this kind of – – ultimate catastrophy.

    So – this argument has something going for it. I don’t critisize Diamond for bringing up this argument – and I don’t criticize heidegger for bringing up – essentially the same argument in an a bit aybe more elaborate way. But I do critizise Diamond, because of the inappropriate way, in which he confounds his civilization-critique with th ediscussion of intelligence. In this respect, Diamond lacks decency.

    But as I stated above already: I think Diamonds biggest achievements are not his sociological and proto- socio-psychological musings/ his cri
    titque of civilization, but his pure and sober reporting from the field, which is outstanding. To me, Diamond is one of the most interesting writers of our times. He is in my top fifty of our contemporaries worldwide – and quite easily.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    It comes to it that neither you nor Kant have any working definition of intelligence.
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  152. utu says:
    @Dieter Kief
    Kant would argue, that if you want to criticize somebody's scientific argument, you would have to argue from within your opponent's method/ perspective, chosen methodology etc. - say: You don't agree with some scientific results, you would have to prove that the way to find those was wrong and/or not appropriate etc. Basically: That it doesn't work.

    What Diamond does with the term intelligence is something different alltogether. He moves the goalposts, so to speak: Whereas IQ-science is (by and large) about predictability of behavior/ success/ failure within our knowledge-based modern societies, Diamond bypasses those proven (!) qualities of IQ-sience by a) hinting at subjective qualities of his personal experience with New Guinean hunters and gatherers and b) by hinting at the "burdon of progress, so to speak, which in it's maybe most frightening form consists of a little thought-experiment = the idea, that nuclear weapons (=results of our kind of societal/scientific a n d individual progress) might destroy all of humankind within forty minutes (and of course: That's only one of the big existential risks, that spring from progress...). And yes indeed - none of the big risks, that originate in the life-form of the hunter-gatherers comes even close to this kind of - - ultimate catastrophy.

    So - this argument has something going for it. I don't critisize Diamond for bringing up this argument - and I don't criticize heidegger for bringing up - essentially the same argument in an a bit aybe more elaborate way. But I do critizise Diamond, because of the inappropriate way, in which he confounds his civilization-critique with th ediscussion of intelligence. In this respect, Diamond lacks decency.

    But as I stated above already: I think Diamonds biggest achievements are not his sociological and proto- socio-psychological musings/ his cri
    titque of civilization, but his pure and sober reporting from the field, which is outstanding. To me, Diamond is one of the most interesting writers of our times. He is in my top fifty of our contemporaries worldwide - and quite easily.

    It comes to it that neither you nor Kant have any working definition of intelligence.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    I thought I'd have mentioned it: By and large: A reliable measure of predictabilty of societal success/failure on the basis of the intellectual ability of somebody compared to his (in the first place: contemporary) humans.

    Kant of course thought of intelligence only in terms of the intellectual ability (= das geistige Vermögen) of somebody, because nobody had really tried to measure intelligence - before - what was the exact year: 1890? In London? About. Kant died in 1804.
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  153. utu says:
    @Jack D
    I would define it pretty much the same way that Spearman did.

    See:

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G_factor_(psychometrics)

    We don't have a way of measuring intelligence directly the way you test for blood sugar (yet). Rather we get at it inferentially by giving people a series of different tasks to do. On any one task, you might be able to do particularly well because you happen to be very good at that particular task (stacking blocks in a certain way or repeating a string of digits backward). But if I give you enough tasks to do and combine the results, your strengths and weaknesses on particular tasks cancel out and we are left with a measure of your "mental horsepower" that is a measure of your overall ability to memorize, process and analyze novel data and situations.

    Contra Diamond, I think that would include the ability to deal with (God forbid) a post-apocalyptic world. Sure a Papuan could get back to the grass hut level of survival pretty quickly but it would require real intelligence to rebuild a civilization.

    We don’t have a way of measuring intelligence directly the way you test for blood sugar (yet). – there are two blood pressures. Are you open to different types of intelligence?

    “but it would require real intelligence to rebuild a civilization” – So what is that real intelligence. You haven’t defined it yet.

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  154. @guest
    "Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian and African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population...This is the crazy take on this: the Conquistadors killed them just as the Nazis killed Jews."

    They can still be Nazis with disease as the cause, due to the Smallpox-Infested Blankets Narrative.

    Yep, I’ve encountered the smallpox blanket episode a number of times in debating.

    I’m not sure how often this was done. You’d think the natives would soon get wise about gift blankets.

    I’m not denying that there was no bad behaviour at all (Pizarro with the Incas comes across as a psychopath).

    There’s a lot of debating going on at West Hunter. I’ve been criticized for saying something that it isn’t related to Cortes or the Spanish (somehow it came up as a tangent.) I said in the here and now that the welfare state causes women of lower intelligence to have more children, implying that the welfare state is dysgenic.

    Some guy is arguing with me but I can’t understand his arguments.

    I also added that even if it was dysgenic, I thought the continuation of the welfare state far into the future was unlikely. Especially if it really is dysgenic. The state would be looking as bankruptcy.

    Read More
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  155. @Corn
    "Diamond committed a major sin when he blamed Eurasian & African diseases for the admittedly huge drop in native population in the centuries following Columbus."

    I was talking to a young millenial woman recently and she mentioned the "genocide of the indigenous peoples". I pointed out that while there may be much in the history of white North America we wouldn't look back on with pride, the vast majority of Indians died of disease. I also pointed out it's probably not fair to blame the whites alive at the time because the germ theory of disease wasn't fleshed out til the mid 19th century. She changed the subject rather quickly.

    Not a very combative SJW! You might even be able to redpill such a person.

    I’ve had loads of nasty comments by self-confident SJWs in online debates.

    Read More
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  156. @utu
    It comes to it that neither you nor Kant have any working definition of intelligence.

    I thought I’d have mentioned it: By and large: A reliable measure of predictabilty of societal success/failure on the basis of the intellectual ability of somebody compared to his (in the first place: contemporary) humans.

    Kant of course thought of intelligence only in terms of the intellectual ability (= das geistige Vermögen) of somebody, because nobody had really tried to measure intelligence – before – what was the exact year: 1890? In London? About. Kant died in 1804.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    A reliable measure of predictabilty of societal success/failure on the basis of the intellectual ability of somebody compared to his (in the first place: contemporary) humans.

    Measure is not a definition. Are you saying that prior to invention of IQ tests there was no intelligence definition? One needs a paper and pencil to know what is intelligence? And then there is predictability. So "it" has to be extended in time. I do not think Kant would be too happy with the utter confusion of his follower.
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  157. @Sunbeam
    There's a lot actually.

    I have no idea who this guy is or why he does it, but take a look at this:

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=uZGFTmK6Yk4&index=1&list=PLGnWLXjIDnpBVRqu5lz5JGaQxjPs7q3CJ

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q9AoGc-OTCk&index=2&list=PLGnWLXjIDnpBVRqu5lz5JGaQxjPs7q3CJ

    This man has mad skills. Absolutely mad.

    No offense to anyone here, but if the crap absolutely hit the fan I'd want him to be my best friend over absolutely everyone who has even glanced at this site.

    I see.

    Read More
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  158. utu says:
    @Dieter Kief
    I thought I'd have mentioned it: By and large: A reliable measure of predictabilty of societal success/failure on the basis of the intellectual ability of somebody compared to his (in the first place: contemporary) humans.

    Kant of course thought of intelligence only in terms of the intellectual ability (= das geistige Vermögen) of somebody, because nobody had really tried to measure intelligence - before - what was the exact year: 1890? In London? About. Kant died in 1804.

    A reliable measure of predictabilty of societal success/failure on the basis of the intellectual ability of somebody compared to his (in the first place: contemporary) humans.

    Measure is not a definition. Are you saying that prior to invention of IQ tests there was no intelligence definition? One needs a paper and pencil to know what is intelligence? And then there is predictability. So “it” has to be extended in time. I do not think Kant would be too happy with the utter confusion of his follower.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Dieter Kief
    Wittgenstein elaborated on this subject a lot - there are a many things in God's wide world, which make only sense in the way, one makes use of them - there is not other sense to it, let alone a real sense.
    Kant was very strong about measurement. And indeed - by and large, that's what he detected: That a large subgroup of things we can understand consists of things we can measure. Intelligence can be measured now: Roundabout since the late 19 th century. Before that, it was not that big, because it was somewhat self explaining: Those who had success were looked upon as people of intelligence - and/ or wit.
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  159. songbird says:
    @Opinionator
    Such as?

    The list is pretty long, but mainly I’m thinking of political stuff, where so many motions are made, where there are so many bureaucrats, so many speeches, where so much fortune and sometimes blood is spent, but the whole thing relies on a kind of faith, where you can turn one thing into another thing, if only you invest enough energy and resources in it.

    For example, turning Iraq into a democracy, or closing some racial test gap. Richard Feynman used to talk a lot about cargo cult science. It wouldn’t surprise me if he used the term in relation to the government too.

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    • Replies: @Opinionator
    That is a helpful clarification.
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  160. @songbird
    The list is pretty long, but mainly I'm thinking of political stuff, where so many motions are made, where there are so many bureaucrats, so many speeches, where so much fortune and sometimes blood is spent, but the whole thing relies on a kind of faith, where you can turn one thing into another thing, if only you invest enough energy and resources in it.

    For example, turning Iraq into a democracy, or closing some racial test gap. Richard Feynman used to talk a lot about cargo cult science. It wouldn't surprise me if he used the term in relation to the government too.

    That is a helpful clarification.

    Read More
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  161. @utu
    A reliable measure of predictabilty of societal success/failure on the basis of the intellectual ability of somebody compared to his (in the first place: contemporary) humans.

    Measure is not a definition. Are you saying that prior to invention of IQ tests there was no intelligence definition? One needs a paper and pencil to know what is intelligence? And then there is predictability. So "it" has to be extended in time. I do not think Kant would be too happy with the utter confusion of his follower.

    Wittgenstein elaborated on this subject a lot – there are a many things in God’s wide world, which make only sense in the way, one makes use of them – there is not other sense to it, let alone a real sense.
    Kant was very strong about measurement. And indeed – by and large, that’s what he detected: That a large subgroup of things we can understand consists of things we can measure. Intelligence can be measured now: Roundabout since the late 19 th century. Before that, it was not that big, because it was somewhat self explaining: Those who had success were looked upon as people of intelligence – and/ or wit.

    Read More
    • Replies: @utu
    I do not think you are happy with your own answers.
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  162. Yak-15 says:
    @Anonymous
    You and every other swinging dick. The deaf are notoriously promiscuous and VD is rampant.

    It makes sense why deaf women would be promiscuous. They live their lives often isolated, unable to communicate and with an unattractive speech impediment. When they finally get some male attention they feel obligated to return it.

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  163. Yak-15 says:
    @utu
    I read about chauvinism of the deaf in Oliver Sacks Seeing Voices. One of their arguments was that by signing entirely different (richer) dynamic of multi-interlocutor conversation is possible.

    I found that to be somewhat true. The deaf use much more facial expression than speakers do. They appear like caricatures when they speak because it the best outlet to convey emotion.

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  164. Yak-15 says:
    @dr kill
    Haha, is that the sign where you move your left index finger back and forth in the circle made from your right index finger and thumb?

    https://www.handspeak.com/word/search/index.php?id=1929

    Us “hearies” really just need to learn a little to get by…

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  165. Yak-15 says:
    @Anonymous
    You and every other swinging dick. The deaf are notoriously promiscuous and VD is rampant.

    Sometimes the deaf professors from my college would come to my house’s parties. They were generally awesome people to be around who liked to have fun.

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  166. Eagle Eye says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist
    "Why are some races of humans so much more economically and scientifically productive than other races?"

    At this point, I'm banging my head against the wall, but I'll ask nonetheless. What explains the differing rankings of productivity in an ideal environment?

    For example in the USA, using per capita income as a metric, it's:

    1. Asian

    2. White

    3. Pacifics.

    4. Blacks

    5. Ameri-Indians

    6. Arabs?

    Yet, break it down by nationality and you have, Nigerians, for example, trouncing Viets and Bangladeshi, who are Asian. Perhaps somebody could bring up educational stats. But I'm pretty confident stating that Nigerians are superior to every Asian group bar the Chinese and the Brahmin Indians.

    The hard truth of the matter is if you take any group, even the vaunted Jews, the majority are stupid! It's a good thing the stupid are corralled by their betters.

    Be glad Steve, Nigerians will be a large number of that 4 billion which for some reason terrifies you, even though it's 83 years away.

    You'll be dust then, Kimmy might have dropped a big one on Los Angeles, Martians might have invaded.

    Look to your gravestone Steve, we'll be fine, and even if we aren't, we'll be dead.

    Immigrants to the U.S. are often highly ATYPICAL of the country of origin.

    Among Indians in the U.S., Brahmins and various merchant castes are over-represented relative to their proportion of the home country population.

    Nigeria seems to export more than its share of Igbos (aka Ibos) to the U.S. Recently, Muslims from all over Africa have been encouraged to move to Europe.

    Japan used to encourage farmers from certain areas to emigrate to the Americas.

    Chinese immigrants to the U.S. were until recently mostly from the Southern coastal areas. Within those areas, certain minority groups (e.g. Hakka, Toisan) are over-represented among immigrants to the U.S.

    Jews were more prominent than gentile Poles, Ukrainians etc. among emigrants from Russia’s “Pale of Settlement.”

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nigerian Nationalist
    That raises even murkier questions. The Igbo were arguably the least civilised people in the region prior to Balkie's Niger voyage in 1854. Their present success is mostly due to how much they embraced "Western civilisation" with gusto.

    So then the question, is success genetic, or simply a matter of the system applied. Are the Japanese successful because they're children of the Sun or because they coopted Western methods?

    Considering that the Japanese were always in China's shadow until the black ships, I favour the latter. Clearly, there are Western inventions: Scientific method e.t.c that are just superior modes of governance.
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  167. Randal says:
    @Frau Katze
    I wonder if it's used in universities?

    I’m not sufficiently familiar with anthropology and archaeology dept course reading lists to know. Is it?

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    • Replies: @Frau Katze
    I don't know. I'm not sure if it's worth the time to find out.

    In view of the controversy over the central role of imported diseases caused, I suspect the book isn't used.

    Diamond didn't even discuss the Spanish treatment of the natives. That's THE central point for the SJW crowd.

    It's interesting to note that Cortes had his very own SJW with him!

    He was a priest who saw the newly converted natives as his flock. He started sending letters back to Spain over any bad behaviour he saw.

    It's still not clear if he stuck completely to the truth or exaggerated some.

    But other Europeans soon got translations of the letters circulating in Europe. These were nations that were fighting with the Spanish in Europe. It really made the Spanish look bad.
    , @Anon
    It was used in my high school history class as a discussion and essay topic.
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  168. Randal says:
    @Opinionator
    Thank you

    You are very welcome, of course.

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  169. @Randal
    I'm not sufficiently familiar with anthropology and archaeology dept course reading lists to know. Is it?

    I don’t know. I’m not sure if it’s worth the time to find out.

    In view of the controversy over the central role of imported diseases caused, I suspect the book isn’t used.

    Diamond didn’t even discuss the Spanish treatment of the natives. That’s THE central point for the SJW crowd.

    It’s interesting to note that Cortes had his very own SJW with him!

    He was a priest who saw the newly converted natives as his flock. He started sending letters back to Spain over any bad behaviour he saw.

    It’s still not clear if he stuck completely to the truth or exaggerated some.

    But other Europeans soon got translations of the letters circulating in Europe. These were nations that were fighting with the Spanish in Europe. It really made the Spanish look bad.

    Read More
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  170. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Randal
    I'm not sufficiently familiar with anthropology and archaeology dept course reading lists to know. Is it?

    It was used in my high school history class as a discussion and essay topic.

    Read More
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  171. utu says:
    @Dieter Kief
    Wittgenstein elaborated on this subject a lot - there are a many things in God's wide world, which make only sense in the way, one makes use of them - there is not other sense to it, let alone a real sense.
    Kant was very strong about measurement. And indeed - by and large, that's what he detected: That a large subgroup of things we can understand consists of things we can measure. Intelligence can be measured now: Roundabout since the late 19 th century. Before that, it was not that big, because it was somewhat self explaining: Those who had success were looked upon as people of intelligence - and/ or wit.

    I do not think you are happy with your own answers.

    Read More
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  172. @Eagle Eye
    Immigrants to the U.S. are often highly ATYPICAL of the country of origin.

    Among Indians in the U.S., Brahmins and various merchant castes are over-represented relative to their proportion of the home country population.

    Nigeria seems to export more than its share of Igbos (aka Ibos) to the U.S. Recently, Muslims from all over Africa have been encouraged to move to Europe.

    Japan used to encourage farmers from certain areas to emigrate to the Americas.

    Chinese immigrants to the U.S. were until recently mostly from the Southern coastal areas. Within those areas, certain minority groups (e.g. Hakka, Toisan) are over-represented among immigrants to the U.S.

    Jews were more prominent than gentile Poles, Ukrainians etc. among emigrants from Russia's "Pale of Settlement."

    That raises even murkier questions. The Igbo were arguably the least civilised people in the region prior to Balkie’s Niger voyage in 1854. Their present success is mostly due to how much they embraced “Western civilisation” with gusto.

    So then the question, is success genetic, or simply a matter of the system applied. Are the Japanese successful because they’re children of the Sun or because they coopted Western methods?

    Considering that the Japanese were always in China’s shadow until the black ships, I favour the latter. Clearly, there are Western inventions: Scientific method e.t.c that are just superior modes of governance.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    It's not as much a matter of embracing Western science and technology, but rather a matter of being able to replicate Western science and technology. Ultimately, it comes down to intelligence and hard work.
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  173. Flip says:
    @Cwhatfuture
    A great deal of the population of the United States are believers in a giant cargo cult, or the precursor to it. What else would you call people who believe money can be conjured up by shuffling a few papers and talking into a can and muttering an incantation (aipassdisbill) "I pass this bill." For a great deal of our population that is exactly where money comes from.

    After we have no more money, and no one willing to lend it, people will still demand that we shuffle papers and talk into a can to produce it. They pretty much do already. Our Chinese masters will smile.

    “You have to choose between trusting to the natural stability of gold and the natural stability of the honesty and intelligence of the members of the government. And, with due respect to these gentlemen, I advise you, as long as the capitalist system lasts, to vote for gold.”
     
    -George Bernard Shaw

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  174. BB753 says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist
    That raises even murkier questions. The Igbo were arguably the least civilised people in the region prior to Balkie's Niger voyage in 1854. Their present success is mostly due to how much they embraced "Western civilisation" with gusto.

    So then the question, is success genetic, or simply a matter of the system applied. Are the Japanese successful because they're children of the Sun or because they coopted Western methods?

    Considering that the Japanese were always in China's shadow until the black ships, I favour the latter. Clearly, there are Western inventions: Scientific method e.t.c that are just superior modes of governance.

    It’s not as much a matter of embracing Western science and technology, but rather a matter of being able to replicate Western science and technology. Ultimately, it comes down to intelligence and hard work.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Eagle Eye
    Japanese emigration to the Americas was mostly a flight from relative poverty, and officially encouraged mostly as a safety valve, with vague hopes of building a Japanese diaspora.

    Japan's pre-Western contact culture had long fostered virtues including hard work, loyalty, diligence, respect for learning, numeracy and accuracy, and social acquiescence (euphemistically referred to as "harmony"). It is likely that over the course of Japanese history, these social imperatives affected and were affected by the genetic profiles of Japanese populations.

    , @Nigerian Nationalist
    No, it does not. No matter how intelligently and diligently you apply yourself to a task, or in this case governance, if your methods are flawed, your project is doomed.

    Did the Communists strike you as lacking in intelligence or hard-work?

    At the end of the day, it comes back to a point I try to make here constantly, it's not the genetics you have, but your institutions.
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  175. Eagle Eye says:
    @BB753
    It's not as much a matter of embracing Western science and technology, but rather a matter of being able to replicate Western science and technology. Ultimately, it comes down to intelligence and hard work.

    Japanese emigration to the Americas was mostly a flight from relative poverty, and officially encouraged mostly as a safety valve, with vague hopes of building a Japanese diaspora.

    Japan’s pre-Western contact culture had long fostered virtues including hard work, loyalty, diligence, respect for learning, numeracy and accuracy, and social acquiescence (euphemistically referred to as “harmony”). It is likely that over the course of Japanese history, these social imperatives affected and were affected by the genetic profiles of Japanese populations.

    Read More
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  176. @BB753
    It's not as much a matter of embracing Western science and technology, but rather a matter of being able to replicate Western science and technology. Ultimately, it comes down to intelligence and hard work.

    No, it does not. No matter how intelligently and diligently you apply yourself to a task, or in this case governance, if your methods are flawed, your project is doomed.

    Did the Communists strike you as lacking in intelligence or hard-work?

    At the end of the day, it comes back to a point I try to make here constantly, it’s not the genetics you have, but your institutions.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    Even with crappy institutions, the USSR was able to send satellites and cosmonauts into orbit. While Liberia has had nominally tbe same institutions as the USA, and is a permanent basket case.
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  177. BB753 says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist
    No, it does not. No matter how intelligently and diligently you apply yourself to a task, or in this case governance, if your methods are flawed, your project is doomed.

    Did the Communists strike you as lacking in intelligence or hard-work?

    At the end of the day, it comes back to a point I try to make here constantly, it's not the genetics you have, but your institutions.

    Even with crappy institutions, the USSR was able to send satellites and cosmonauts into orbit. While Liberia has had nominally tbe same institutions as the USA, and is a permanent basket case.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Nigerian Nationalist
    That you said nominally answers your statement. If Liberia had "literally" the same institutions as the US, you'd have a point.

    Further, the USSR's tech is generally regarded as a gift made possible due to repatriated German tech and knowledge, as well as literally copying the US, thanks to their spies.

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  178. @BB753
    Even with crappy institutions, the USSR was able to send satellites and cosmonauts into orbit. While Liberia has had nominally tbe same institutions as the USA, and is a permanent basket case.

    That you said nominally answers your statement. If Liberia had “literally” the same institutions as the US, you’d have a point.

    Further, the USSR’s tech is generally regarded as a gift made possible due to repatriated German tech and knowledge, as well as literally copying the US, thanks to their spies.

    Read More
    • Replies: @BB753
    "Nominally" and "literally" overlap. The word you were looking for was "effectively". Are you one of those genius African scrabble players Chanda Chisala raves about?

    I know, Russians aren't capable by themselves to sustain a high-tech civilization, unlike those smart Liberians like for instance General Butt Naked.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Butt_Naked
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  179. BB753 says:
    @Nigerian Nationalist
    That you said nominally answers your statement. If Liberia had "literally" the same institutions as the US, you'd have a point.

    Further, the USSR's tech is generally regarded as a gift made possible due to repatriated German tech and knowledge, as well as literally copying the US, thanks to their spies.

    “Nominally” and “literally” overlap. The word you were looking for was “effectively”. Are you one of those genius African scrabble players Chanda Chisala raves about?

    I know, Russians aren’t capable by themselves to sustain a high-tech civilization, unlike those smart Liberians like for instance General Butt Naked.

    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/General_Butt_Naked

    Read More
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