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Rob Reiner Makes His Stand Against Whole Foods in the Great Vacant Lot of Malibu
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Downtown Malibu: the City Hall is in the foreground, with the Great Vacant Lot of Malibu between it and the Malibu Colony on the shore

I write a lot about political battles over real estate development in Malibu, CA, the municipality of only 12,645 people that encompasses 27 miles of coastline west of Los Angeles, because they tend to be hilariously exaggerated versions of struggles played out all across America. And they usually involve celebrities, such as The Edge of U-2, which makes these environmental and zoning wars easier to follow. Plus, I’ve driven through Malibu a million times to go to the beach, although we’d usually drive further to get to less hostile, less anti-Val beaches.

Having watched the evolution of environmentalism among liberal Democrats in the Los Angeles area over the last 45 years, it’s really hard to take seriously the notion that modern liberalism is about Hope and Change and Opportunity and Equality and the Masses. It’s a lot more about: We’ve got a good thing here and we’re going to keep it.

For example, movie director and Democratic Party stalwart Rob Reiner, who played Meathead on All In the Family, is currently opposing a Republican politician / developer’s plan to build a Whole Foods organic grocery store on part of the giant empty field in the middle of downtown Malibu.

It’s not that Rob is against Whole Foods, it’s the principle of the thing: the idea that Malibu might change, that more people might come to Malibu, that people from the … San Fernando Valley might not just come to use the beach but would stay.

My entire life there has been a huge patch of dirt right where Pacific Coast Highway and Malibu Canyon Road meet, next to Surfrider Beach and the Malibu Colony where so many stars traditionally live. (The picture above shows the view of Central Malibu from Malibu Canyon Road. The wide grey building in the foreground is the Malibu city hall. Behind it is the Great Vacant Lot of Malibu.)

Now I don’t have the sharpest mind for moneymaking opportunities, but even I’ve occasionally had the thought filter into my mind: “You know, if you built something on this humongous vacant lot on a rare piece of flat land in the heart of Malibu, you could probably charge a lot of money for it.” For example, the same property on the Turkish Riviera would likely be covered in ocean-view high rises.

In Southern California, however, very few people have ocean-view properties, especially not second homes. Rob Reiner is one of the strikingly few Los Angelenos who can afford a second home in Malibu.

Lots of people in Los Angeles own a vacation home in the desert near Palm Springs, because that is a big expanse of what was Republican terrain (although Sonny Bono’s widow lost the Palm Springs seat in the House to a Latino Democrat in the last election). But Los Angeles is already a desert so the appeal of getting away to an even hotter desert has always eluded me. Getting away to the beach, however, is a great idea, which is why people like Rob Reiner do it, and don’t want you to do it.

Of course, I can also see Rob Reiner’s point: Malibu is nice just the way it is, and if you are a Malibuite already, why let in new people who will just make your nice place more crowded?

Of course, the United States of America has traditionally been kind of like the Malibu of the world. And it would seem to me that some of Rob Reiner’s thinking about Malibu might also apply to our country, but only dangerous extremists like me think analogically.

Here’s Reiner on Larry King a few months ago denouncing the Tea Party for not letting Speaker of the House Boehner make a deal with President Obama on immigration.

I would presume that it’s never occurred to Reiner that his defense of the borders of his second home’s municipality are somewhat like my defense of the border of my country, but if anybody brought it up, he would say that immigration restrictionists have an ugly history of xenophobic violence against outsiders.

But of course Reiner’s environmentalism is the adult face of Malibu’s notorious tradition of xenophobic violence against the less privileged (like us Valley Guys). From Wikipedia:

Malibu Locals Only

Malibu Locals Only (also known as “MLO”) is a group of youths local to Malibu, California, who have been associated with several violent attacks along with other criminal activity in the city.[1] Frequently involved with party, bar or beach area fights, the group has maintained a feeling of aversion toward residents of the San Fernando Valley region, as well as other outsiders who find their way into Malibu for recreation or leisure. …

Initially established in the 1960s by a group of Malibu surfers, the group sought to do two things; stop the San Fernando Valley surfers from using their beaches[2][3] (which were at the time, private), and protect students of Malibu who were the minority in High Schools at the time (because Malibu High School had not yet been constructed). … Today, the gang has been responsible for multiple instances of brutality.

From the Los Angeles Times in 1988:

Battles Waged Over Waves : Violence Among Surfers Swells During Summer

July 05, 1988|KENNETH J. GARCIA | Times Staff Writer

On a good summer day, when the southern swells hit the coast, the beaches from Venice to Ventura are among the best surfing spots in the country. These days, they are also among the toughest. …

The outer signs of the surf wars resemble those of Los Angeles’ more notorious gang wars: graffiti to mark off turf, “locals” quick to pounce when their boundaries have been crossed and mocking of rivals.

In Malibu, the dreaded “Vals”–surfers from the San Fernando Valley–are singled out for abuse. …

Surfers going to Malibu from the Valley are greeted by a series of spray-painted road signs saying, “No Vals,” “Vals Go Home” and “MLO,” meaning “Malibu Locals Only.” On Morning View Drive near Zuma Beach, one of the busiest in Los Angeles County, the pavement is painted with numerous variations of the “No Vals” theme, including the outline of a man’s figure with a gun nearby. The accompanying message: “Vals Die.”

“You can always tell the Vals,” surfer Randy Thompson said last week, pointing to a group of young surfers near a graffiti-covered wall at Surfrider State Beach. “They end up doing most of their surfing underwater.”

This battle in the surf wars has a long tradition.

Legend has it that during the 1960s one surfer tried to block the canyon roads during periods of large wave swells so that “Vals” would not be able to get to the Malibu beaches.

Now, obviously, growing up 27 miles from Malibu is relatively privileged. But that’s how everything works: relativistically.

 
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  1. dearieme says:

    Good Christ, how does a “municipality of only 12,645 people” need a City Hall as big as that? Three men in a tent should be enough.

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  2. Twinkie says:

    This is yet another example of why I cannot live in the West Coast. Necessary, useful things aren’t built because of things like views for wealthy property owners and gazillions of environmental impact studies for fish or what have you.

    In the Sun Belt, if an area needs a bridge, it is built. Pretty fast. Or the locality’s elected representatives take heat for their intransigence/incompetence.

    I drive around where I live and am often astounded by useful and requested things, such as bridges and stores, that are built seemingly overnight. Then I go visit the West Coast (areas I lived before) and see that such infrastructure that was in demand years ago is still yet to be built.

    I just don’t understand why the voters on the West Coast don’t revolt and instead continue to vote for the same set of political characters. Isn’t a definition of insanity doing the same thing and expecting a different result?

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    If you've seen Rob Reiner recently, perhaps as Jordan Belfort's father in The Wolf of Wall Street, or as Zooey Deschanel's character's father on her sitcom, you know that Malibu doesn't need a Whole Foods, as Rob is clearly in no danger of starving.

    I'm glad we got one nearby in NJ a couple of years ago though (built to anchor a renovated mall that had been a downscale laggard). It's like an adult candy store, full of local craft beer, wine, hard liquor, house-made pastries and breads, fancy indie chocolates imported from Brooklyn, etc. It also has its own food court of sorts where you can buy fresh made sushi, noodle bowls, argentine empanadas, etc., and there are plenty of polished wood tables and chairs in a sunny seating area if you want to eat in the store.

    , @Art Deco
    The bottom line was uttered decades ago by Truman Capote: you lose 1 point off your IQ every year you stay in California. The place is a collecting pool for all that is silly and meretricious in American life (assisted by Las Vegas and by the parts of Florida where the neon goes to die).
  3. 27 miles … hoo-wee. You could fit a LOT of poor African Ebola refugees in that space.

    Just sayin’.

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  4. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Jerry Buss was the first one to see value in Malibu, buying up properties there with a Midwestern school chum of his. When Buss got started, Malibu was pretty ag.

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  5. Fredrik says:

    Isn’t there a single developer who could play the race card? I mean, let’s argue that the poor Hispanics from South Central need more space and that there is space in Malibu. Furthermore, use the argument that no white enclaves must exist in LA County i.e. all opposition to the suggestions is derived from racism.

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  6. a rare piece of flat land in the heart of Malibu, you could probably charge a lot of money for it.

    Marx would have a conniption. Land speculation. Rent. Landlordism. Fuedalism. Give it away in tent-sized parcels to the homeless. Better yet, Ethiopians.

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  7. My first thought was the building is a Preparation H factory, or perhaps a Kotex distribution center. But, no, that’s the City Hall of a city that can well afford to build something aesthetically pleasing, that meshes well with the natural environment, and that pays homage to local history. Something future generations will look back on with pride and pleasure.

    Whoever said the Modernist dream of towers in a park ended up as boxes in a parking lot was more correct than he’ll ever know.

    But Malibu has ‘em all beat. A concrete box in a parking lot in a vacant lot!

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    In contrast, here's the Pasadena City Hall from 1927:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasadena_City_Hall

    , @Steve Sailer
    And here's the Beverly Hills City Hall finished at the bottom of the Depression in 1932:

    http://tanamatales.com/wp-content/uploads/2013/07/IMG_3294.jpg

  8. @HandsomeWhiteDevil
    My first thought was the building is a Preparation H factory, or perhaps a Kotex distribution center. But, no, that's the City Hall of a city that can well afford to build something aesthetically pleasing, that meshes well with the natural environment, and that pays homage to local history. Something future generations will look back on with pride and pleasure.

    Whoever said the Modernist dream of towers in a park ended up as boxes in a parking lot was more correct than he'll ever know.

    But Malibu has 'em all beat. A concrete box in a parking lot in a vacant lot!

    In contrast, here’s the Pasadena City Hall from 1927:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasadena_City_Hall

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    • Replies: @HandsomeWhiteDevil
    I was thinking of the Santa Barbara gov't buildings specifically, but the Pasadena City Hall is even more, WOW!

    But seriously, how could anyone think that a mere utilitarian, form follows function, less is more style of architecture represents an improvement over what had come before?

    Surely there must have been a European peasant or two in immediate post-Roman Europe who felt as I do now.

    Emerging from his mud & wattle hut, stepping under a carved marble lintel cannibalized from a Roman temple, clutching a debased copper coin featuring a stick figure representation of a local feudal lord, trips while on his way to market and finds a solid silver denarius with a dead god in high artistic relief, and wonders, "how did they ever make this like that?"
    , @Stealth
    What happened? Why are structures like this no longer built?
  9. @HandsomeWhiteDevil
    My first thought was the building is a Preparation H factory, or perhaps a Kotex distribution center. But, no, that's the City Hall of a city that can well afford to build something aesthetically pleasing, that meshes well with the natural environment, and that pays homage to local history. Something future generations will look back on with pride and pleasure.

    Whoever said the Modernist dream of towers in a park ended up as boxes in a parking lot was more correct than he'll ever know.

    But Malibu has 'em all beat. A concrete box in a parking lot in a vacant lot!

    And here’s the Beverly Hills City Hall finished at the bottom of the Depression in 1932:

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  10. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    In the UK, the so called ‘Green Party’ is supposed to be all about environmental protection. Yet the Green Party advocate a ‘border less’ Britain and massive uncontrolled third world immigration.
    Quite a paradox. A paradox only resolved when you understand that the ‘Greens’ are really just Marxists looking for a political home, which does not actually label itself Marxist.

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  11. @Steve Sailer
    In contrast, here's the Pasadena City Hall from 1927:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasadena_City_Hall

    I was thinking of the Santa Barbara gov’t buildings specifically, but the Pasadena City Hall is even more, WOW!

    But seriously, how could anyone think that a mere utilitarian, form follows function, less is more style of architecture represents an improvement over what had come before?

    Surely there must have been a European peasant or two in immediate post-Roman Europe who felt as I do now.

    Emerging from his mud & wattle hut, stepping under a carved marble lintel cannibalized from a Roman temple, clutching a debased copper coin featuring a stick figure representation of a local feudal lord, trips while on his way to market and finds a solid silver denarius with a dead god in high artistic relief, and wonders, “how did they ever make this like that?”

    Read More
  12. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @Twinkie
    This is yet another example of why I cannot live in the West Coast. Necessary, useful things aren't built because of things like views for wealthy property owners and gazillions of environmental impact studies for fish or what have you.

    In the Sun Belt, if an area needs a bridge, it is built. Pretty fast. Or the locality's elected representatives take heat for their intransigence/incompetence.

    I drive around where I live and am often astounded by useful and requested things, such as bridges and stores, that are built seemingly overnight. Then I go visit the West Coast (areas I lived before) and see that such infrastructure that was in demand years ago is still yet to be built.

    I just don't understand why the voters on the West Coast don't revolt and instead continue to vote for the same set of political characters. Isn't a definition of insanity doing the same thing and expecting a different result?

    If you’ve seen Rob Reiner recently, perhaps as Jordan Belfort’s father in The Wolf of Wall Street, or as Zooey Deschanel’s character’s father on her sitcom, you know that Malibu doesn’t need a Whole Foods, as Rob is clearly in no danger of starving.

    I’m glad we got one nearby in NJ a couple of years ago though (built to anchor a renovated mall that had been a downscale laggard). It’s like an adult candy store, full of local craft beer, wine, hard liquor, house-made pastries and breads, fancy indie chocolates imported from Brooklyn, etc. It also has its own food court of sorts where you can buy fresh made sushi, noodle bowls, argentine empanadas, etc., and there are plenty of polished wood tables and chairs in a sunny seating area if you want to eat in the store.

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  13. One of my favorite subjects. My sympathies are with the locals. You have to admit, they have (had) a point. We have the same issues here in Laguna Beach and Newport Beach.

    My beach! My waves! My chicks! Go home!

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  14. Hacienda says:

    There must be a yin/yang relationship between autism and fame. They go together.

    I’d rather live in E. LA than Malibu. Let the fools have it.

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  15. If I had the money, I’d make a good-faith offer on this land, with a proposal to fill it with dense, affordable housing, and I’d start taking applications from a storefront in Boyle Heights, making sure to place stories in the papers about how Esmeralda Rodriguez and her six teenage sons’ dream of owning a home was about to come true.

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    • Replies: @American dream
    Let's not forget her six teenage sons' American dream of opening six smoke shops. What's not to like?
  16. Art Deco says: • Website
    @Twinkie
    This is yet another example of why I cannot live in the West Coast. Necessary, useful things aren't built because of things like views for wealthy property owners and gazillions of environmental impact studies for fish or what have you.

    In the Sun Belt, if an area needs a bridge, it is built. Pretty fast. Or the locality's elected representatives take heat for their intransigence/incompetence.

    I drive around where I live and am often astounded by useful and requested things, such as bridges and stores, that are built seemingly overnight. Then I go visit the West Coast (areas I lived before) and see that such infrastructure that was in demand years ago is still yet to be built.

    I just don't understand why the voters on the West Coast don't revolt and instead continue to vote for the same set of political characters. Isn't a definition of insanity doing the same thing and expecting a different result?

    The bottom line was uttered decades ago by Truman Capote: you lose 1 point off your IQ every year you stay in California. The place is a collecting pool for all that is silly and meretricious in American life (assisted by Las Vegas and by the parts of Florida where the neon goes to die).

    Read More
  17. That great vacant lot could be home to a mixed use community with residential condominiums (with a certain percentage of low income units ) and ground floor commercial. The nearby street should be partially converted to a bike lane and there needs to be a bus/LRT lane that should connect with the LA inter regional transit system. Do you think those people would go for that? The city is really lacking in diversity. According to Wikipedia it is nearly 90 percent white.

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  18. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    As a surfer of the last several years in the Malibu area, I have never seen that kind of localism. I guess it’s of the past.

    The Anti-Vals definitely had a point. SurfRider is one of my least favorite places to surf because of the mix of good waves with multiple take-off zones and people with inconsistent skills causes a breakdown of surf etiquette. It’s a shit-show. I mostly go to a spot just north called “Colony Point.” I’ve only had pleasant experiences with other surfers there.

    * Surf etiquette is kindergarten level morality. Take turns. Don’t steal a wave.

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  19. Lurker says:

    Amazed by City Hall there, I had to double check the photo in case I was looking at the wrong building. I assumed it was a smallish industrial facility or a call centre or something. Ghastly.

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  20. manton says:

    That locals only business sounds just like Santa Cruz. We even had/have a valley to demonize, the Santa Clara Valley, which everyone now calls “Silicon.” But back in the ’70s and ’80s it was not quite the plutocratic enclave it is today. Actual middle class people lived in those ticky-tack middle class houses. The money in Atherton, etc. didn’t bother with us. They either went to Pebble/Carmel or Hawaii. It was people like Steve who came down from San Jose to get harassed by the SC surf and skate punks. Keyed cars and slashed tires were common. Fights over waves also very common. It’s probably still like that as the surf breaks are more crowded than ever.

    The Silicon Valley money has changed the town a lot. But the same dynamic applies–liberalism in Santa Cruz is at least 60% about keeping new people out. The SV execs are the only ones with the brute capital leverage to force their way in.

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    • Replies: @Palo Altan of old
    Of course we didn't go near Santa Cruz. In the Fifties and Sixties it was uniformly understood to be a place for the retired working and lower middle classes. And then along came that über liberal new UC campus and even tolerance for the place was gone.
    So we did indeed drive straight on down to Carmel or Pebble Beach; indeed, in our case, we ended up moving to the latter.
  21. Stealth says:
    @Steve Sailer
    In contrast, here's the Pasadena City Hall from 1927:

    http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pasadena_City_Hall

    What happened? Why are structures like this no longer built?

    Read More
  22. Luke Lea says: • Website

    This raises the interesting question of whether or not there is such a thing as an “optimum” population size for a country (including all the various places in a country)? Though most economist reportedly reject the idea of an optimum population size (or at least I have not seem them discuss this issue) the test would seem to be whether an additional person would make those already living in an area feel better off than they were before. The optimum would be to keep adding people until the point is reached beyond which people feel they are worse off than before. Is there a flaw in this argument (citerion)? Where is the literature on this subject?

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    It's like the concept of an optimum population for a locality. Usually, you start out with a very low density and locals are pretty enthusiastic about getting more people so they can afford amenities like electrification and sweers and grocery stores and then restaurants and their own high school and so forth. All those things have fixed cost elements, and the more people you can spread them over, the more of them you can afford. But after awhile, the marginal value of adding residents drops and Not In My Back Yardism emerges.

    I'm supersensitive to this because I'm from coastal California, but not real coastal California. For example, in a lot of accounts of the modern environmental movement, the key event was the January 1969 Santa Barbara Oil Spill. Not only was it a big mess, but locals realized: what do we need more messy industrial development for? We're rich enough to live in Santa Barbara already!

  23. peterike says:

    Reiner’s furious defense of Malibu is probably the only healthy, moral impulse he’s ever had.

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  24. The developers tore down the only skatepark in Malibu to make room for the Whole Foods.
    The next Malibu land battle is Trancas, so many of the folks living in Malibu west have a “Don’t Cross Creek Trancas” bumper sticker.

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  25. Robinson says:

    Mitch Heisman, in his fascinating Suicide Note, explains at length how Jews have come to terms with the paradox of being The Chosen while professing equality. He makes the point that Jews are not genetically identical to Gentiles – they don’t have the same degree of kinship altruism and eusociality, as a matter of fact, they are predisposed to dissent and insubordination. Their religion, specifically the meme of equality, is a technological corrective for this deficit. However, he states that following equality to its limits equals extinction, so the Jews needed to be Chosen by a God who will make exceptions to the altruistic rule for the sake of his chosens’ survival. Jews, after centuries of practice, have come to terms with the inconsistency and the hypocrisy required for survival. Gentiles are not psychologically wired to deal with such an internal conflict and their God and scripture require altruism unlimited, unto death, with no exceptions.

    OT – Heisman also makes a good point about why so many Jewish scientists are hostile to the Nature side of the Nature/Nurture argument – Nurture has been very effective for Jews, by their Nature they Nurture. Even the Nazis, who exalted biology over everything, didn’t dare to dismiss the importance of Nurture in the form of media and propaganda.

    Ironically, if Mitch was just White, and not White Jewish, all of this unflattering cultural introspection wouldn’t be so threatening to the kind of people who make books famous, and this opus of his would probably have at least earned him a Wikipedia page – after all, every serial killer has one.

    Be forewarned, don’t expect your culture to be complemented in Mitch’s “Note” – we are all bugs under a microscope in his irreverent, eccentric, ultra-reductionist view. I know a lot of what he writes is far-fetched, but no more so than stuff churned out by any other philosopher, especially modern ones like John Gray, Keith Stanovich or Alex Rosenberg.

    In my view, today’s Elite, having been nurtured in a Jewish formed academic environment, have imitated the altruistic-until-it-threatens-our-existence mentality, and they defend it without qualms. The Elite are the new Chosen, by meme inculcation.

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  26. e says:

    Good piece, Steve.

    It’s occurred to me on more than one occasion whenever I happened to catch Reiner on tv that he’s as stupid as his Mike Stivik character. It also occurred to me that he’s never understood that his character was being pilloried as much as Archie.

    BTW, I find it hilarious to think of surfer dudes as being toughs.

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    • Replies: @enemylimes
    Obviously never been surfing. I live in Byron Bay, Australia's surfing Mecca, and the local crew here has no compunction about busting a few out-of-town faces.

    Surfers are fit, strong, and fiercely protective of their breaks. All the peace and love bullshit comes from the chicks sitting on the beach making daisy chains and singing old Dylan songs.
  27. I’m reading Cary Elwes’s As You Wish on the making of The Princess Bride. In getting that movie made, Rob Reiner did at least one thing right.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Reiner started his career as a movie director by making seven straight movies that were at least pretty good, and in a wide range of genres:

    1992 A Few Good Men
    1990 Misery
    1989 When Harry Met Sally...
    1987 The Princess Bride
    1986 Stand by Me
    1985 The Sure Thing
    1984 This Is Spinal Tap

  28. TB2 [AKA "JB"] says:

    How much would it cost to bus a couple of hundred black youths to the Malibu beach daily in the summer? Seriously we could set up a nationwide charity organization. Or do one of those internet begging things. Two or three buses, maybe a free purple drink and bag of chips. If necessary we can limit it to Fridays and the weekends to control costs. The youths need to get away from the crime and chaos in the city, they need a little Beach Justice.

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    • Replies: @Dave Pinsen
    Is there a Fresh Air Fund in SoCal? http://www.freshair.org

    Malibu beaches are National Seashore, right? So a charity ought to be able to bring Compton kids there for some fresh air.
  29. Drogger says: • Website

    It must be wonderful being rich and blissfully ignorant like Rob Reiner.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "It must be wonderful being rich and blissfully ignorant like Rob Reiner."

    I suspect it is.

  30. fnn says:

    Swiss environmentalists want to apply the principles of Reinerism in Switzerland, but left-wing groups are unanimously opposed:

    http://www.reuters.com/article/2014/10/14/us-swiss-immigration-idUSKCN0I31QI20141014

    The Swiss government argued the initiative is not the right way to achieve the country’s environmental goals, and said it would damage the economy, an argument that did not stop voters from backing the February vote for immigration curbs.

    Left-wing groups including 35 political parties, trade unions and migrant groups are fighting against Ecopop, and on Tuesday Switzerland’s hospitality industry, which draws 44 percent of labor from outside Switzerland, also urged voters to reject it.

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  31. Marty says:

    In Santa Cruz in 1975, a local received a terrific beatdown in response to his hostility to “f****** valley people.” A bunch of us peaceful, high-GPA frat guys from Berkeley were enjoying a beach cottage on a Friday night when outraged surfer dude came along waving a bullwhip menacingly, right out of High Plains Drifter. One of our guys had played defensive tackle for Frank Kush before hurting his knee (Kush pulled his scholarship). Our guy courageously rushed dude and beat his face in.

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  32. Regarding the Malibu local gangs: A couple of years ago CNN did a features story called “Malibu surf gangs”. I thought it was some kind of parody, because Malibu (at least per official crime stats) has very low violent crime. Anyway, it was mainly about actor Matthew Maconaghey trying to surf in peace with his family in Malibu but the paparazzi were trying to surround him for quotes, interview, etc. He smiled politely but clearly didn’t like it. Meanwhile he went down to the surf’s edge to surf, while a couple of hooligans came out of nowhere to beat up some of the camerapersons and destroyed the cameras in the process. Did Matthew hire them to do that? We may never know. But the feature story continued to explain that Malibu Surf Gangs were known to do this throughout the ‘bu; they were “protecting” their turf from outsiders. Goodness gracious. So perhaps these gangs are just mimmicing the adult residents (e.g. Reiner, etc) behaviors of protecting their sandy turf.

    I got to visit Malibu in ’11. Was struck by how PCH has tons of traffic, but there’s very few businesses in actual Malibu. Certainly not what I was expecting. I mean, no major strip malls, no Ralphs, no mini malls for miles and miles. It was quickly easy to see that Malibu is mostly a residential area with the luxury elite sections much farther back from PCH’s main drag so as not to be seen and ogled (at least too directly) by the peones.

    Despite its reputation, I was also struck by how ordinary the accessible parts of Malibu seemed to be. Nothing particularly special, at least those areas that ordinary folks can walk on, about, and thru. It’s not like one large luxurious Rodeo Drive or Westwood’s main areas by comparison.

    Got to visit again last year during Christmastime. Went to Dukes. Locals seemed polite but distant, as in, they could tell who wasn’t from there and wanted nothing to do with you. The message was clear: if they do that to tourists, how must they treat Valleyites attempting to come in and crash their own private party in the canyons?

    PS: Will Rogers State park was quite a nice trek.

    Interesting place, Malibu. Probably better for those who live there and have it to spend.

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  33. Wilkey says:

    If we ever get another Republican in the White House, his first goal should be to expand public housing in places like Malibu, Marin County, etc. I mean, why the hell not? If (if?) the Left puts up opposition, he can note the lack of diversity in these towns and their declining numbers of blacks.

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  34. Marty says:

    I’ll never forget the hysterical cry, “f****** valley people!” in 1975 coming from a Santa Cruz beach guy waving a bullwhip, like in High Plains Drifter. We were visiting from Berkeley one friday night. One of our guys had played defensive tackle for Frank Kush. He rushed the guy, disarmed him, and beat his face in.

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  35. Anon says: • Disclaimer

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/nov/06/if-stalin-had-died/?insrc=toc

    A piece that is ideologically all over the place. It says Fascism was far less murderous than communism, but then says had it been for Stalin, there would have been no forced collectivization.
    It’s critical of the notion of ‘class’ in keeping with ‘new leftism’.

    ——-

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/nov/20/myth-chinese-super-schools/?insrc=hpss

    ————

    Read More
    • Replies: @Anon
    "A piece that is ideologically all over the place. It says Fascism was far less murderous than communism, but then says had it been for Stalin, there would have been no forced collectivization."

    The article concludes that Stalin won BECAUSE HE NEVER GAVE UP.

    Jews surely recognize this trait in others.
  36. OT but sorta iStevey:

    Some members of the Scots-Irish community want to purge the last remaining references to Arthur Godfrey’s name from Miami Beach:

    http://www.miamiherald.com/news/local/community/miami-dade/article3501994.html

    He owned a stake in a hotel that had “restrictive” policies, so he is now an quintupleplusungood person. (He is not yet an unperson – that will have to wait until the Revolution is a bit further along.)

    Yes, but what about the pictures of racist Indian-slaughtering slave-owners on our money? When are we going to get rid of those?

    Oh, my God … I actually referred to Native Americans as Indians! I’m sorry! I’m sorry! Let me go get a knife so I can carve a giant R in my chest!

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  37. Unrelated:

    Lonely Planet has made a few entries cautioning Israeli’s about how they’re unwelcome almost everywhere they go, from Chile to Bolivia to India to Thailand:

    http://www.ynetnews.com/articles/0,7340,L-4196793,00.html

    https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/forums/americas-south-america/bolivia/new-visa-requirement-for-israeli-tourists

    https://www.lonelyplanet.com/thorntree/forums/asia-indian-subcontinent/topics/israeli-tourists-in-india

    The comments are incredibly funny, consisting almost entirely of backpackers (many of them Israelis themselves) concurring wholeheartedly that Israeli tourists are by far the worst behaved, and of Jews (many of them Americans from Brooklyn) declaring the world to be anti-semitic nazis and calling for legal punishment of Lonely Planet, hotels banning Israeli tourists, etc.

    http://www.ynetnews.com/Ext/App/TalkBack/CdaViewOpenTalkBack/0,11382,L-4196793-2,00.html

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  38. Jefferson says:

    White privilege really applies more to rich White Democrats than it does to any other segment of the White population. Because the majority of voters in Malibu, California are rich White Democrats, never in a million years will Section 8 housing ever be created there.

    True White privilege is having the power to veto Section 8 housing from ever being created in your neighborhood. Only left wing White elites in this country have that power.

    White people working for Slate, The New York Times, and The Huffington Post have way more White privilege than Steve Sailer.

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    • Replies: @athEIst
    When I lived in Florissant(next to Ferguson) forty years ago, an area of Ferguson was undeveloped(vacant) land. That area was developed(if you can call it that) and section 8 housing was built-- a lot of it. If the people of Ferguson were rich instead of middle class, that wouldn't have happened.
  39. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    This is one of the reasons that I couldn’t live in the West. I guess my life in New England has made me a waspy snob, because I’m struck by the almost total lack of character and history in the built environment whenever I go out there . The weather and scenery can be beautiful, but nearly everything built by humans is bland and slick at best. In the Northeast the post-WWII ugliness is patched into the earlier traditional fabric, which softens its impact considerably, but out west you get the full dose. What traditional building there is is limited to a few downtown neighborhoods, and generally isn’t in the league of what was built during the same era in Philadelphia, Boston, or New York.

    I just recently visited the Bay Area for the first time ever. The culture and entrepreneurial energy there are worth seeing, but the quality of the built environment was pretty underwhelming. Although the architecture in the older San Francisco neighborhoods is quirky and interesting, in terms of real quality it doesn’t come close to Boston’s Back Bay or Beacon Hill.

    Palo Alto has nice weather and plantings, and probably a strict sign ordinance, but other than that it looks like a typical suburb. Even the most elite places are nothing special: the tech executives’ houses in Atherton don’t measure up to what you’ll find in Southampton or Palm Beach.

    The famous Silicon Valley headquarters wouldn’t be identifiable without the signs at the entrances. Aside from some multicolored bikes scattered around, the Google campus has absolutely no character whatsoever. You’d think a company that’s so changed the world would want to make a statement, but no: it’s a bunch of banal, featureless buildings straight out of a Dilbert cartoon.

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  40. The solution is obvious. Malibu is not taking in its fair share of immigrants and refugees. The residents who oppose this there, including Rob Reiner, are obviously racists and should be rebuked as such. I would say that lots of homeless shelters, immigrant housing, and section 8 housing should be constructed in Malibu. The L.A. train system should be extended all the way to the beach (Santa Monica as well as through Beverly Hill) and an extension line built to run all the way up the coast to, say, Pt. Magu. Maybe it could run all the way up the coast to Oxnard/Ventura.

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  41. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Speaking on behalf of locals, In the summer, val’s come in droves. It’s not a matter of small pockets of val’s here and there, or even large groups. In the summer it gets shoulder to shoulder. They don’t give way when a wave is called, they talk shit, and leave trash on the beach.
    It’s like going to a local bar you’ve never been to and throwing your weight around. You’ll get your ass kicked there too. There’s locals who’ve been surfing the same beach for 40 years! Show some respect, or somebody will learn you some. Simple.

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  42. rod1963 says:

    I don’t get why Meathead opposes the big box store in Malibu as they already have one with City Hall.

    You’d think with all the artistic types in the area they could have put up a city hall based on Greek/Roman architecture or Spanish Mission style. Oh yeah classic is passe’ among the artistic and architectural set, so we have to go with the modernist-brutalist approach, the beige box that looks like it was designed by North Korean Communist robots.

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  43. @Drogger
    It must be wonderful being rich and blissfully ignorant like Rob Reiner.

    “It must be wonderful being rich and blissfully ignorant like Rob Reiner.”

    I suspect it is.

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  44. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    In those days (see above) nobody one knew actually lived in Malibu. Nor do they now, come to think of it.
    One came down from the North and rented; whatever locals there were seemed to be able to tell us apart from Valley boys; at least we never had any trouble, nor saw nor heard any. Besides, Valley (“what valley?”) boys and Malibu locals were all the same to us.
    Still, it was much more comfortable living with the grandparents just one block East of Palisades Park in Santa Monica; cooler too, so we gave Malibu up pretty quickly.

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  45. @Percy Gryce
    I'm reading Cary Elwes's As You Wish on the making of The Princess Bride. In getting that movie made, Rob Reiner did at least one thing right.

    Reiner started his career as a movie director by making seven straight movies that were at least pretty good, and in a wide range of genres:

    1992 A Few Good Men
    1990 Misery
    1989 When Harry Met Sally…
    1987 The Princess Bride
    1986 Stand by Me
    1985 The Sure Thing
    1984 This Is Spinal Tap

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  46. Clyde says:

    Thankfully this blog anticipates the counter-intuitive. Most wealthy lib neighborhoods welcome or at least don’t mind a Whole Foods opening up. The president of Whole Foods has dared to make a few libertarian- conservative-pro-capitalist comments which make it easier for Meathead to go on his anti-organic food Jihad

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  47. Anon says: • Disclaimer
    @Anon
    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/nov/06/if-stalin-had-died/?insrc=toc

    A piece that is ideologically all over the place. It says Fascism was far less murderous than communism, but then says had it been for Stalin, there would have been no forced collectivization.
    It's critical of the notion of 'class' in keeping with 'new leftism'.

    -------

    http://www.nybooks.com/articles/archives/2014/nov/20/myth-chinese-super-schools/?insrc=hpss

    ------------

    “A piece that is ideologically all over the place. It says Fascism was far less murderous than communism, but then says had it been for Stalin, there would have been no forced collectivization.”

    The article concludes that Stalin won BECAUSE HE NEVER GAVE UP.

    Jews surely recognize this trait in others.

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  48. The elites of this country like Rob Reiner do harbor exactly the same instincts as all the poor schlubs who live in our fine country — they just draw the boundaries they believe matter differently.

    The schlubs see our country as the larger body they identify with, and draw their boundaries where our country does. The elites see their own class as the larger body they identify with, and draw their boundaries around that class.

    The elites really do think of themselves as a country unto themselves — a country to which they are unfailingly patriotic and loyal. They get the same sense of larger human fulfillment from their “country” that others do from a genuine nation. And this is what makes them dangerous in any country.

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  49. @Luke Lea
    This raises the interesting question of whether or not there is such a thing as an "optimum" population size for a country (including all the various places in a country)? Though most economist reportedly reject the idea of an optimum population size (or at least I have not seem them discuss this issue) the test would seem to be whether an additional person would make those already living in an area feel better off than they were before. The optimum would be to keep adding people until the point is reached beyond which people feel they are worse off than before. Is there a flaw in this argument (citerion)? Where is the literature on this subject?

    It’s like the concept of an optimum population for a locality. Usually, you start out with a very low density and locals are pretty enthusiastic about getting more people so they can afford amenities like electrification and sweers and grocery stores and then restaurants and their own high school and so forth. All those things have fixed cost elements, and the more people you can spread them over, the more of them you can afford. But after awhile, the marginal value of adding residents drops and Not In My Back Yardism emerges.

    I’m supersensitive to this because I’m from coastal California, but not real coastal California. For example, in a lot of accounts of the modern environmental movement, the key event was the January 1969 Santa Barbara Oil Spill. Not only was it a big mess, but locals realized: what do we need more messy industrial development for? We’re rich enough to live in Santa Barbara already!

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    And this would tend to jibe perfectly with your larger point about why elite areas tend to be small in population. It's the "us four, and no more" syndrome. Which then in turn only makes those elite areas even more desirable to live in by the 2-10% bracket. Maybe they can't afford to live there (and plus the elites don't want them to start moving in anyway) but they can dream big and hope that if they only work hard enough, maybe one day they or their children could in theory make the move into the elite area to live.

    Regarding the Santa Barbara oil spill, imagine if an oil spill were to occur in another part of real coastal California, say, in Malibu?

    Forget about Whole Foods or anything else being developed there for at least half a century.

  50. manton says:

    I love the old pre-WW2 architecture in Palo Alto and all over the Peninsula. Sure, there’s not much of it, comparatively speaking, but what there is, is gorgeous. Screamingly unaffordable. Given the notoriously low pay of the tech industry (compared to what the firms earn), I still can’t get my head around those prices. Are there really that many venture partners and start-up lottery winners?

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  51. manton says:

    Hardly anyone lived year-round in Malibu until the 80s, when movie people started to leave Beverly Hills in order to get away from gawkers and various unwashed. Plus, that’s when the foreign money started to pour in. Now it’s a flood.

    All that is sort of ironic because BH, which started out as another WASPy enclave of very WASPy LA, was eventually taken over by the movie people who felt decidedly unwelcome in Hancock Park, Loz Feliz, Bel Air, and (especially) Pasadena/San Marino. Since it was a separately incorporated city (with its own school district) they could eventually wrest control from the WASPs, which they had done by the mid-1950s.

    Back then Malibu was a beach house / weekend destination for rich West-Siders. Sort of what Santa Monica had been in the Thalberg era, but by then SM had gotten too crowded. Most of the houses in Malibu back then were quite forgettable, almost trailers.

    It was unincorporated LA County until 1991, when the new raft of permanent residents realized they needed to build that Great Wall of local regulation and made it a city. That’s part of why City Hall is so lame: Malibu wasn’t even a city all that long ago, and it was built in a particularly dismal era for architecture.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    "Most of the houses in Malibu back then were quite forgettable, almost trailers."

    There is still a trailer park in Malibu at Paradise Cove.

  52. Brutusale says:

    Shades of the denizens of Dogtown throwing chunks of concrete at interlopers trying to surf the P.O.P., as documented by Stacy Peralta in his excellent documentary Dogtown and the Z Boys.

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  53. Svigor says:

    I’m surprised no one has mentioned Terriers yet. The central plot was about an evil developer who wanted to make the sleepy town of Ocean Beach CA into a tourist attraction. I enjoyed it, so it got canceled.

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  54. @manton
    Hardly anyone lived year-round in Malibu until the 80s, when movie people started to leave Beverly Hills in order to get away from gawkers and various unwashed. Plus, that's when the foreign money started to pour in. Now it's a flood.

    All that is sort of ironic because BH, which started out as another WASPy enclave of very WASPy LA, was eventually taken over by the movie people who felt decidedly unwelcome in Hancock Park, Loz Feliz, Bel Air, and (especially) Pasadena/San Marino. Since it was a separately incorporated city (with its own school district) they could eventually wrest control from the WASPs, which they had done by the mid-1950s.

    Back then Malibu was a beach house / weekend destination for rich West-Siders. Sort of what Santa Monica had been in the Thalberg era, but by then SM had gotten too crowded. Most of the houses in Malibu back then were quite forgettable, almost trailers.

    It was unincorporated LA County until 1991, when the new raft of permanent residents realized they needed to build that Great Wall of local regulation and made it a city. That's part of why City Hall is so lame: Malibu wasn't even a city all that long ago, and it was built in a particularly dismal era for architecture.

    “Most of the houses in Malibu back then were quite forgettable, almost trailers.”

    There is still a trailer park in Malibu at Paradise Cove.

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    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Oh, my goodness. In a lot of the old Perry Mason episodes it seemed as though they were often holed up in Paradise Cove. A lot of defendants hailed from Paradise Cove. So even back then, PC was simply code word for Malibu.

    Same thing for the later show Mannix. Joe was constantly driving out to Malibu (except this time they called it Malibu) and a couple of episodes they actually showed trailer parks there.

    Keep thinking, "Trailer parks in Malibu. So Barbara Streisand and Cher don't mind having Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy's fourth cousins on their younger brothers sides for next door neighbors?'' Seriously? What's next, Billionaire Beach will soon give out a few trailer park permits?

    Something doesn't quite sound right for Malibu to still permit the existence of trailer parks. Let them move up the coast to Oxnard or something.
    , @Milo Minderbinder
    There is still a trailer park in Malibu at Paradise Cove.

    Isn't that where Jim Rockford kept his trailer: 29 Cove Road Malibu?
  55. Jefferson says:

    “Regarding the Malibu local gangs: A couple of years ago CNN did a features story called “Malibu surf gangs”. I thought it was some kind of parody, because Malibu (at least per official crime stats) has very low violent crime.”

    Malibu has a major gangsta problem yo. Haven’t you ever seen the film “Malibu’s Most Wanted” ? White males in the mean streets of Malibu fight for their lives everyday. Living in Malibu it’s do or die. In Malibu you’re either the butcher or the cattle.

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  56. josh says:

    A bit OT but did Netanyahu just admit that Israel killed JFK…and threaten obama? He used the term “grassy knoll” in a speech re Chickenshitgate. This term can ONLY be a reference to JFK.

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    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    No.

    This is the quote from Netanyahu in the translation with the alarming reference to "grassy knolls:" “When there are pressures on Israel to concede its security, the easiest thing to do is to concede. You get a round of applause, ceremonies on grassy knolls, and then come the missiles and the tunnels.” -

    See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2014/10/netanyahus-respond-chickenshit#sthash.UZjryIcK.dpuf

    Netanyahu was clearly referring to the 1993 ceremony on the sloping South Lawn of the White House in which Clinton presided over a handshake between Arafat and Rabin:

    http://whitehouse.c-span.org/Video/ByPresident/Bill-Clinton-With-Arafat-And-Rabin.aspx

    , @Jack D
    Netanyahu spoke in Hebrew and used the Hebrew word that means just plain "lawn". The "grassy knoll" reference was introduced by a newspaper translator. As Steve said, he was referring to the Clinton-Arafat-Rabin signing ceremony on the lawn of the White House.

    PS last year I visited the original "grassy knoll" in Dallas. It is basically the banked shoulder at the side of the road next to a highway overpass - a very underwhelming place, in no way proportionate to its mythical importance. The whole drama did not take place in some vast mythical field but at a city street intersection - the whole crime scene would fit on a football field. Oswald was 80 yards from Kennedy.

    I think in both cases, a journalist was trying to throw in a poetic flourish and sacrificed clarity in the process.
  57. Jefferson says:

    “The bottom line was uttered decades ago by Truman Capote: you lose 1 point off your IQ every year you stay in California. The place is a collecting pool for all that is silly and meretricious in American life (assisted by Las Vegas and by the parts of Florida where the neon goes to die).”

    And Ferguson, Missouri is a collecting pool for what ? America’s brightest ? The reason I brought up Ferguson is because you quite often defend that town and say it is not ghetto. I will take California over Ferguson, Missouri any day.

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  58. @josh
    A bit OT but did Netanyahu just admit that Israel killed JFK...and threaten obama? He used the term "grassy knoll" in a speech re Chickenshitgate. This term can ONLY be a reference to JFK.

    No.

    This is the quote from Netanyahu in the translation with the alarming reference to “grassy knolls:” “When there are pressures on Israel to concede its security, the easiest thing to do is to concede. You get a round of applause, ceremonies on grassy knolls, and then come the missiles and the tunnels.” –

    See more at: http://mondoweiss.net/2014/10/netanyahus-respond-chickenshit#sthash.UZjryIcK.dpuf

    Netanyahu was clearly referring to the 1993 ceremony on the sloping South Lawn of the White House in which Clinton presided over a handshake between Arafat and Rabin:

    http://whitehouse.c-span.org/Video/ByPresident/Bill-Clinton-With-Arafat-And-Rabin.aspx

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  59. @manton
    That locals only business sounds just like Santa Cruz. We even had/have a valley to demonize, the Santa Clara Valley, which everyone now calls "Silicon." But back in the '70s and '80s it was not quite the plutocratic enclave it is today. Actual middle class people lived in those ticky-tack middle class houses. The money in Atherton, etc. didn't bother with us. They either went to Pebble/Carmel or Hawaii. It was people like Steve who came down from San Jose to get harassed by the SC surf and skate punks. Keyed cars and slashed tires were common. Fights over waves also very common. It's probably still like that as the surf breaks are more crowded than ever.

    The Silicon Valley money has changed the town a lot. But the same dynamic applies--liberalism in Santa Cruz is at least 60% about keeping new people out. The SV execs are the only ones with the brute capital leverage to force their way in.

    Of course we didn’t go near Santa Cruz. In the Fifties and Sixties it was uniformly understood to be a place for the retired working and lower middle classes. And then along came that über liberal new UC campus and even tolerance for the place was gone.
    So we did indeed drive straight on down to Carmel or Pebble Beach; indeed, in our case, we ended up moving to the latter.

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  60. I remember one episode of All in the Family where the meathead lectures Archie that since the US is 12 percent black there should be plenty of black families in the area. He certainly doesn’t apply that same line of thinking to Malibu. In fact, he seems to do every thing possible to prevent that from happening.

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  61. manton says:

    Until last year, there was a trailer park on one of the prime locations on the Balboa Peninsula, overlooking both the harbor to the north and the beach to the south. But I was there this summer, and it was finally gone, being developed into I-don’t-know-what, but presumably condos.

    To this day, there are amazing trailer park spaces in prime spots on the central coast, from Carmel to West Santa Cruz.

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  62. Jacobite says: • Website

    Meh. Ever since before Gidget (which was filmed at Secos,) Surfrider Beach has always been a zoo whether you were a local or not. In the year or so I lived in L.A. I liked going to Zuma when the surf was flat because the sand is filled wall to wall with Valley Girls of skimpy attire and loose virtue. Other than that the long drive to Secos was well worth it. Awesome long(skate)boarding on all those smoothly paved mountain roads connecting the PCH to Mulholland Highway and the Valley too.

    The top surfers at the pier never lived in Malibu and came down the highway from LA anyhow.

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  63. Dave Pinsen says: • Website
    @TB2
    How much would it cost to bus a couple of hundred black youths to the Malibu beach daily in the summer? Seriously we could set up a nationwide charity organization. Or do one of those internet begging things. Two or three buses, maybe a free purple drink and bag of chips. If necessary we can limit it to Fridays and the weekends to control costs. The youths need to get away from the crime and chaos in the city, they need a little Beach Justice.

    Is there a Fresh Air Fund in SoCal? http://www.freshair.org

    Malibu beaches are National Seashore, right? So a charity ought to be able to bring Compton kids there for some fresh air.

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  64. Jefferson says:

    The fallacy of Section 8 housing is that apartment buildings and houses do not commit crimes, people commit crimes. Taking ghetto Blacks out of the hood and putting them in much nicer areas to live in does not mean ghetto Blacks are all of a sudden going to start acting like Singaporean people who are one of the most law abiding folks in the world.

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  65. @Steve Sailer
    It's like the concept of an optimum population for a locality. Usually, you start out with a very low density and locals are pretty enthusiastic about getting more people so they can afford amenities like electrification and sweers and grocery stores and then restaurants and their own high school and so forth. All those things have fixed cost elements, and the more people you can spread them over, the more of them you can afford. But after awhile, the marginal value of adding residents drops and Not In My Back Yardism emerges.

    I'm supersensitive to this because I'm from coastal California, but not real coastal California. For example, in a lot of accounts of the modern environmental movement, the key event was the January 1969 Santa Barbara Oil Spill. Not only was it a big mess, but locals realized: what do we need more messy industrial development for? We're rich enough to live in Santa Barbara already!

    And this would tend to jibe perfectly with your larger point about why elite areas tend to be small in population. It’s the “us four, and no more” syndrome. Which then in turn only makes those elite areas even more desirable to live in by the 2-10% bracket. Maybe they can’t afford to live there (and plus the elites don’t want them to start moving in anyway) but they can dream big and hope that if they only work hard enough, maybe one day they or their children could in theory make the move into the elite area to live.

    Regarding the Santa Barbara oil spill, imagine if an oil spill were to occur in another part of real coastal California, say, in Malibu?

    Forget about Whole Foods or anything else being developed there for at least half a century.

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  66. The funny thing is, the black kids and African refugees aren’t being imported to places like Malibu–which would delight the anti-California-ites on this thread–but to small towns and cities in Middle America, because unlike the people in Malibu the Middle Americans are too pussified (or thick) to defend their communities.

    Enjoy your vibrant enrichers, Vals.

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  67. @Steve Sailer
    "Most of the houses in Malibu back then were quite forgettable, almost trailers."

    There is still a trailer park in Malibu at Paradise Cove.

    Oh, my goodness. In a lot of the old Perry Mason episodes it seemed as though they were often holed up in Paradise Cove. A lot of defendants hailed from Paradise Cove. So even back then, PC was simply code word for Malibu.

    Same thing for the later show Mannix. Joe was constantly driving out to Malibu (except this time they called it Malibu) and a couple of episodes they actually showed trailer parks there.

    Keep thinking, “Trailer parks in Malibu. So Barbara Streisand and Cher don’t mind having Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy’s fourth cousins on their younger brothers sides for next door neighbors?” Seriously? What’s next, Billionaire Beach will soon give out a few trailer park permits?

    Something doesn’t quite sound right for Malibu to still permit the existence of trailer parks. Let them move up the coast to Oxnard or something.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Paradise Cove is a privately owned canyon in the western part of Malibu, out before you get to Zuma Beach. It has a restaurant on the beach, a beach you have to pay $20 to use (and the last time I went there had a very bad configuration to the floor of the sea causing ugly waves), and a venerable trailer park, most of whose residents intend to leave only feet first.
  68. Jefferson says:

    “According to TNC, White Supremacy is responsible for every problem confronting the Black community.”

    The ghosts of Bull Connor and J.Edgar Hoover still terrorize the African American community today.

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  69. @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Oh, my goodness. In a lot of the old Perry Mason episodes it seemed as though they were often holed up in Paradise Cove. A lot of defendants hailed from Paradise Cove. So even back then, PC was simply code word for Malibu.

    Same thing for the later show Mannix. Joe was constantly driving out to Malibu (except this time they called it Malibu) and a couple of episodes they actually showed trailer parks there.

    Keep thinking, "Trailer parks in Malibu. So Barbara Streisand and Cher don't mind having Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy's fourth cousins on their younger brothers sides for next door neighbors?'' Seriously? What's next, Billionaire Beach will soon give out a few trailer park permits?

    Something doesn't quite sound right for Malibu to still permit the existence of trailer parks. Let them move up the coast to Oxnard or something.

    Paradise Cove is a privately owned canyon in the western part of Malibu, out before you get to Zuma Beach. It has a restaurant on the beach, a beach you have to pay $20 to use (and the last time I went there had a very bad configuration to the floor of the sea causing ugly waves), and a venerable trailer park, most of whose residents intend to leave only feet first.

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  70. Svigor says:

    Tennessee Coates:

    if aliens were to compare the socioeconomic realities of the black community with the history of their treatment in this country, they would not be mystified.

    Aliens would classify blacks and whites as separate species, and be mystified at the resulting white anger.

    It is not sufficient to say that ninety-five out of every hundred Negroes are orderly and well behaved. The ninety-five must band themselves together to restrain or suppress the vicious five.

    95% of blacks aren’t orderly and well-behaved. 95% of blacks aren’t violent criminals, but that’s hardly the same thing. The best 10% of blacks are far less orderly and well-behaved than the best 10% of whites or yellows. The same goes for the next decile, and the next, and the next, all the way down. As a whole, blacks are far less orderly and well-behaved than whites or yellows.

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  71. Sutton says:

    Tell Meathead Donald Sterling will put up a tower on the property stuffed with Koreans.

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  72. @Steve Sailer
    "Most of the houses in Malibu back then were quite forgettable, almost trailers."

    There is still a trailer park in Malibu at Paradise Cove.

    There is still a trailer park in Malibu at Paradise Cove.

    Isn’t that where Jim Rockford kept his trailer: 29 Cove Road Malibu?

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  73. Jefferson says:

    “Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy”

    They are Rednecks with way more money in their bank accounts than the vast majority of SWPL types. Jeff Foxworthy and Larry The Cable Guy are some real life Beverly Hillbillies.

    They talk like they are from Deliverance, but they got enough money to purchase an apartment at Trump Towers.

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    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    You didn't fully quote me. I said their cousins on their younger brothers' sides. Yes, they personally have the bucks but not their extended redneck relatives all down the line distantly removed.

    You think Baabs and Cher would want them for next door neighbors all holed up in trailer parks?

    Also, Duck Dynasty. Yes, yes, yes, the Robertsons have bucks. But do all their relatives all down the line? Answer: No. AL, MS, and LA are all part of the Mississippi Delta Region, still among the US's most impoverished areas to live. Now transport about a thousand of them (many of them quite semi-literate, etc) and move 'em all into Malibu lickety split so the stars can experience true US diversity on a daily basis by having them for neighbors.

    Anyone remember Martin Sheen back in the 90s? When he invited tons of CA homeless to come to Malibu? They took him at his word and showed up in droves? How'd that work out for 'em??

    If you were to tell the Alisters "Guess what? We're gonna bus in about a thousand Huntsville, Alabama rednecks who've grown up eating possum fat, grits stuffed in squirrel meat and they don't wear nothin' fancier than Osh Kosh Overalls on a good day...." What do you think they'd do? Just smile and reply, "Ok, that's just swell by me! And while you're at it, stick them all down in Paradise Cove in the parks cause they'll enjoy it ever so much!"

    Really? They want that kind of diversity right next door in their precious hoods?

    I wouldn't take that bet if I were you.

    , @black sea
    Foxworthy's redneck schtick can be funny, but bear in mind that he's the son of an IBM executive and dropped out of Ga. Tech shortly before graduating. He then spent the next five years working for IBM, doing mainframe maintance. Not exactly a rednck profile.

    Oddly enough, and for reasons I don't know, Foxworthy did grow up in the Atlanta suburb of Hapeville, which is actually pretty redneck.

    I don't know anything about Larry the Cable Guy's background.
    , @Reg Cæsar

    “Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy”

    They are Rednecks with way more money…
     
    Larry's a Whitney. They haven't been "rednecks" (or the boreal equivalent) since Eli's day.

    But, yes, he's from a humbler branch.
  74. Jacobite says: • Website

    @Steve

    “Isn’t that where Jim Rockford kept his trailer: 29 Cove Road Malibu?”

    Yes.

    Read More
  75. @Jefferson
    "Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy"

    They are Rednecks with way more money in their bank accounts than the vast majority of SWPL types. Jeff Foxworthy and Larry The Cable Guy are some real life Beverly Hillbillies.

    They talk like they are from Deliverance, but they got enough money to purchase an apartment at Trump Towers.

    You didn’t fully quote me. I said their cousins on their younger brothers’ sides. Yes, they personally have the bucks but not their extended redneck relatives all down the line distantly removed.

    You think Baabs and Cher would want them for next door neighbors all holed up in trailer parks?

    Also, Duck Dynasty. Yes, yes, yes, the Robertsons have bucks. But do all their relatives all down the line? Answer: No. AL, MS, and LA are all part of the Mississippi Delta Region, still among the US’s most impoverished areas to live. Now transport about a thousand of them (many of them quite semi-literate, etc) and move ‘em all into Malibu lickety split so the stars can experience true US diversity on a daily basis by having them for neighbors.

    Anyone remember Martin Sheen back in the 90s? When he invited tons of CA homeless to come to Malibu? They took him at his word and showed up in droves? How’d that work out for ‘em??

    If you were to tell the Alisters “Guess what? We’re gonna bus in about a thousand Huntsville, Alabama rednecks who’ve grown up eating possum fat, grits stuffed in squirrel meat and they don’t wear nothin’ fancier than Osh Kosh Overalls on a good day….” What do you think they’d do? Just smile and reply, “Ok, that’s just swell by me! And while you’re at it, stick them all down in Paradise Cove in the parks cause they’ll enjoy it ever so much!”

    Really? They want that kind of diversity right next door in their precious hoods?

    I wouldn’t take that bet if I were you.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Wilkey
    "We’re gonna bus in about a thousand Huntsville, Alabama rednecks who’ve grown up eating possum fat, grits stuffed in squirrel meat..."

    If you're looking for a town to stand in for Redneck Central, Hunstville, Alabama is not the place. It's perhaps the best educated city in the state. The US space program got much of its start there, and it was once home to Wernher von Braun.
  76. manton says:

    “In the Fifties and Sixties it was uniformly understood to be a place for the retired working and lower middle classes.”

    Not exactly. It was not a retirement community and really still isn’t. Back then, it had three big industries: logging, fishing and tourism. The tourists were North Beach, Napa, and Central Valley Italians (or if not Italian, definitely Catholic). The fishing families in town were mostly Italian. The loggers were American mountain hick types. The people who owned the hotels and the Boardwalk (the Canfields) were more conventional WASPs.

    The working and lower middle classes could not “retire” in those days, but they could afford (if they were hard up) to stay in a cheap Beach Flat motel for a week or, if they had some more money, to rent a beach house for two weeks in Seabright or Twin Lakes.

    The university definitely changed everything, both for good and bad. It pumped a lot of money into the town. It brought a certain sophistication. For a city of 50,000, Santa Cruz has better cultural amenities than many cities of 500,000. Plus lots of SWPL shops, food stores, restaurants, wine bars and the like. But it also brought a lot of professional busy-bodies to town who are annoying. Then again, as Steve suggests, their hypocrisy serves a purpose, as it preserves to a certain extent the smallish character of the place. (Though Highway 1 is now a total PitA to traverse any time near rush hour.)

    In any event, I certainly prefer the old PacHeights and Peninsula snobs like you to the tech douchebags from out of state who now pour down to price us out of areas we’ve been in for 100 years. They are elbow-throwing pricks who do nothing for the town and everyone hates them. Your kind are at least real Californians.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Palo Altan of old
    Thank you manton, you are consistently enlightening. I liked your earlier post about Malibu as well. You should write a good long article on the subject of mid-Twentieth century coastal California (who cares about the rest?) and how and why it declined.
    By "uniformly understood" I meant by us ten year old snobs who rejoiced to be driven straight through such places in our daddys' Fleetwoods and Imperials. Some of us even had chauffeurs, or rather "drivers", as we were taught to call them.
    I would happily man the barricades with you against the wretched silicon boys (and boyz), who destroy whatever attracts their gorgon gaze. My earliest California ancestor arrived in 1849, made a fortune as an assayer in San Francisco (Moffat &Co), but then went back East and built the finest mansion yet seen on the Hudson, in Hyde Park. Sadly, a careless servant burned it down in 1899 and its seventy acres of gardens now make up the northern half of the Vanderbilt estate there.
    Thank God we had the sense to come back to what was once not merely the finest state in the union but the finest place to grow up in anywhere.
  77. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “I just recently visited the Bay Area for the first time ever. …

    …the quality of the built environment was pretty underwhelming.”

    About silicon valley (not so much SF or San Jose proper), much of the “built up” environment was built between the end of WWII and the end of the 1960s, very rapidly replacing what had been farms with large blocks of single-floor “tilt-up” buildings that could be constructed without needing much construction experience. (The place is a Cold War built-overnight phenomena, taking advantage of cheap land, the sort of thing Steve sometimes talks about.) The anonymous tilt-ups still dominate the place. Real estate is finally getting expensive enough to start tearing the old 60s-70s tilt-ups down and put up modern, multi-floor buildings…

    “…Palo Alto has nice weather and plantings, and probably a strict sign ordinance, but other than that it looks like a typical suburb. …

    …The famous Silicon Valley headquarters wouldn’t be identifiable without the signs at the entrances. Aside from some multicolored bikes scattered around, the Google campus has absolutely no character whatsoever. …”

    Google occupies the old SGI campus. (Which it has out-grown… it’s starting to have satellite campuses scattered around…)

    Traffic for all of this is still designed for a 1960s population, maybe a California with 15 million instead of near 40 million. It’s a mess.

    Read More
  78. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “Of course we didn’t go near Santa Cruz. In the Fifties and Sixties it was uniformly understood to be a place for the retired working and lower middle classes…”

    And:

    “…It was not a retirement community and really still isn’t. Back then, it had three big industries: logging, fishing and tourism.”

    In the 70s and 80s parts of Santa Cruz seemed to pretty much be retirement areas. Normal people could still live in the place and it was cheaper than over the hill. By the end of the 90s I noticed the older white waitresses telling me they were moving to places like Oregon because of the cost of living.

    It’s interesting that I think in 1880 you could get on a train in Boston and take it all the way to Santa Cruz. (The old line terminated at what’s now the largest wharf on the west coast.)

    Santa Cruz and the surrounding area seems to have been a popular place for religious retreats. So you got a lot of cheap “summer camp” type houses. In the 60s-80s a lot of them were still around, often built up a bit, of course. These probably helped give the place a reputation as a place to buy a cheap retirement home, before UC arrived in the mid-to-late 60s.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    Santa Cruz is the warmest, sunniest spot on the northern California ocean coastline because it's south-facing.
  79. I just want to know how Jim got approval to locate his trailer on Paradise Cove Road (aka “29 Cove Road”)?

    Read More
  80. @anonymous
    "Of course we didn’t go near Santa Cruz. In the Fifties and Sixties it was uniformly understood to be a place for the retired working and lower middle classes..."

    And:

    "...It was not a retirement community and really still isn’t. Back then, it had three big industries: logging, fishing and tourism."

    In the 70s and 80s parts of Santa Cruz seemed to pretty much be retirement areas. Normal people could still live in the place and it was cheaper than over the hill. By the end of the 90s I noticed the older white waitresses telling me they were moving to places like Oregon because of the cost of living.

    It's interesting that I think in 1880 you could get on a train in Boston and take it all the way to Santa Cruz. (The old line terminated at what's now the largest wharf on the west coast.)

    Santa Cruz and the surrounding area seems to have been a popular place for religious retreats. So you got a lot of cheap "summer camp" type houses. In the 60s-80s a lot of them were still around, often built up a bit, of course. These probably helped give the place a reputation as a place to buy a cheap retirement home, before UC arrived in the mid-to-late 60s.

    Santa Cruz is the warmest, sunniest spot on the northern California ocean coastline because it’s south-facing.

    Read More
    • Replies: @athEIst
    Yes and when you move here from (sigh) the Valley(silicon) that takes some getting used to. When you think you're going south, you're going east.
  81. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    The Silicon Valley Business Journal real estate reporter is on the case: “Tilt this! How a concrete tilt-up building gets built: Slideshow”, Nathan Donato-Weinstein Oct 5, 2014.

    “…The building type has not always been thought of as highly desirable. In Silicon Valley, tilt-ups gained wide use in the 1970s and 1980s, and that era was not known for its aesthetics. But Netzer noted that advances in technique and technology have made tilt-up concrete construction a lot more flexible and aesthetically attractive.

    …”Tilt-up is now a real consideration because of all the design possibilities,”…”

    Hum…

    “Do you have a favorite tilt-up building in the Valley?”

    Truly, beauty is in the eye of the beholder…

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    The leaning Tower of Pisa was a tilt up by natural causes or a natural tilt up in the making.

    Of course if you have a tilt up house and suffer from a touch of vertigo, well, it must be fun to take those stairs to the top. Jimmy Stewart could relate to that.
  82. Jacobite says: • Website

    You think Baabs and Cher would want them for next door neighbors all holed up in trailer parks?

    As though either one of them had high class families. All of Barbara’s (her given name) grandparents were shtetl Jews from Slavic lands and Cher was half-white white trash whose mother was married eight times.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    It really doesn't matter what their family trees began. What matters is where they're currently blooming RIGHT NOW.

    And right now, they've got the big mansions on the hill. And since they came from quite modest beginnings they've more than earned every cent of the dues that they had to pay to reach the top.

    Neither has a track record of publicly hanging out with the bottom 10% of US on a daily basis. Actually, they haven't hung out with the bottom....90-95% of US in several decades.

    Baabs has been in Malibu since early 70s and isn't about to lose what she can't take with her. Cher while arguably less wealthy is still quite well off, so to speak.

    After all, when the newest members of the right sort of folks finally get a piece of the pie, they generally don't want to return to the life of poverty that they once knew all to well. Seeing people that reminds them of their impoverished (relatively speaking) earlier lives simply isn't on their to do list.
  83. Wilkey says:
    @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    You didn't fully quote me. I said their cousins on their younger brothers' sides. Yes, they personally have the bucks but not their extended redneck relatives all down the line distantly removed.

    You think Baabs and Cher would want them for next door neighbors all holed up in trailer parks?

    Also, Duck Dynasty. Yes, yes, yes, the Robertsons have bucks. But do all their relatives all down the line? Answer: No. AL, MS, and LA are all part of the Mississippi Delta Region, still among the US's most impoverished areas to live. Now transport about a thousand of them (many of them quite semi-literate, etc) and move 'em all into Malibu lickety split so the stars can experience true US diversity on a daily basis by having them for neighbors.

    Anyone remember Martin Sheen back in the 90s? When he invited tons of CA homeless to come to Malibu? They took him at his word and showed up in droves? How'd that work out for 'em??

    If you were to tell the Alisters "Guess what? We're gonna bus in about a thousand Huntsville, Alabama rednecks who've grown up eating possum fat, grits stuffed in squirrel meat and they don't wear nothin' fancier than Osh Kosh Overalls on a good day...." What do you think they'd do? Just smile and reply, "Ok, that's just swell by me! And while you're at it, stick them all down in Paradise Cove in the parks cause they'll enjoy it ever so much!"

    Really? They want that kind of diversity right next door in their precious hoods?

    I wouldn't take that bet if I were you.

    “We’re gonna bus in about a thousand Huntsville, Alabama rednecks who’ve grown up eating possum fat, grits stuffed in squirrel meat…”

    If you’re looking for a town to stand in for Redneck Central, Hunstville, Alabama is not the place. It’s perhaps the best educated city in the state. The US space program got much of its start there, and it was once home to Wernher von Braun.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Got its start there, yes. Currently a major part of NASA, (more so than Canaveral, etc)? Uh, well....

    Boaz, a part of Etowah and Marshall counties in AL.

    Boaz, AL should suffice.

  84. @anonymous
    The Silicon Valley Business Journal real estate reporter is on the case: "Tilt this! How a concrete tilt-up building gets built: Slideshow", Nathan Donato-Weinstein Oct 5, 2014.


    "...The building type has not always been thought of as highly desirable. In Silicon Valley, tilt-ups gained wide use in the 1970s and 1980s, and that era was not known for its aesthetics. But Netzer noted that advances in technique and technology have made tilt-up concrete construction a lot more flexible and aesthetically attractive.

    ..."Tilt-up is now a real consideration because of all the design possibilities,"..."


    Hum...

    "Do you have a favorite tilt-up building in the Valley?"

    Truly, beauty is in the eye of the beholder...

    The leaning Tower of Pisa was a tilt up by natural causes or a natural tilt up in the making.

    Of course if you have a tilt up house and suffer from a touch of vertigo, well, it must be fun to take those stairs to the top. Jimmy Stewart could relate to that.

    Read More
  85. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    Funny (or hypocritical) how Rob Reiner doesn’t want a lot of newcomers moving into HIS immediate, particular area of America and changing things.

    But he has no problem with newcomers coming to just about everywhere ELSE in America and changing things.

    Read More
  86. Beach says:

    #74 Laguna Beach Fogey – It is not a question of Middle Americans being “pussified,” or “thick,” it is a matter of money, and the power that comes with it. An Average Joe of modest means is not in a position to donate hundreds of thousands of dollars to the campaign of his representative, who is then much more minded to do that constituent’s bidding, rather than sue him for trying to fight Section 8. It is much easier to “defend your community” when everyone living in it is rich.

    Read More
  87. athEIst says: • Website
    @Jefferson
    White privilege really applies more to rich White Democrats than it does to any other segment of the White population. Because the majority of voters in Malibu, California are rich White Democrats, never in a million years will Section 8 housing ever be created there.

    True White privilege is having the power to veto Section 8 housing from ever being created in your neighborhood. Only left wing White elites in this country have that power.

    White people working for Slate, The New York Times, and The Huffington Post have way more White privilege than Steve Sailer.

    When I lived in Florissant(next to Ferguson) forty years ago, an area of Ferguson was undeveloped(vacant) land. That area was developed(if you can call it that) and section 8 housing was built– a lot of it. If the people of Ferguson were rich instead of middle class, that wouldn’t have happened.

    Read More
  88. athEIst says:
    @Steve Sailer
    Santa Cruz is the warmest, sunniest spot on the northern California ocean coastline because it's south-facing.

    Yes and when you move here from (sigh) the Valley(silicon) that takes some getting used to. When you think you’re going south, you’re going east.

    Read More
  89. @Jacobite

    You think Baabs and Cher would want them for next door neighbors all holed up in trailer parks?
     
    As though either one of them had high class families. All of Barbara's (her given name) grandparents were shtetl Jews from Slavic lands and Cher was half-white white trash whose mother was married eight times.

    It really doesn’t matter what their family trees began. What matters is where they’re currently blooming RIGHT NOW.

    And right now, they’ve got the big mansions on the hill. And since they came from quite modest beginnings they’ve more than earned every cent of the dues that they had to pay to reach the top.

    Neither has a track record of publicly hanging out with the bottom 10% of US on a daily basis. Actually, they haven’t hung out with the bottom….90-95% of US in several decades.

    Baabs has been in Malibu since early 70s and isn’t about to lose what she can’t take with her. Cher while arguably less wealthy is still quite well off, so to speak.

    After all, when the newest members of the right sort of folks finally get a piece of the pie, they generally don’t want to return to the life of poverty that they once knew all to well. Seeing people that reminds them of their impoverished (relatively speaking) earlier lives simply isn’t on their to do list.

    Read More
  90. @Wilkey
    "We’re gonna bus in about a thousand Huntsville, Alabama rednecks who’ve grown up eating possum fat, grits stuffed in squirrel meat..."

    If you're looking for a town to stand in for Redneck Central, Hunstville, Alabama is not the place. It's perhaps the best educated city in the state. The US space program got much of its start there, and it was once home to Wernher von Braun.

    Got its start there, yes. Currently a major part of NASA, (more so than Canaveral, etc)? Uh, well….

    Boaz, a part of Etowah and Marshall counties in AL.

    Boaz, AL should suffice.

    Read More
  91. black sea says:
    @Jefferson
    "Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy"

    They are Rednecks with way more money in their bank accounts than the vast majority of SWPL types. Jeff Foxworthy and Larry The Cable Guy are some real life Beverly Hillbillies.

    They talk like they are from Deliverance, but they got enough money to purchase an apartment at Trump Towers.

    Foxworthy’s redneck schtick can be funny, but bear in mind that he’s the son of an IBM executive and dropped out of Ga. Tech shortly before graduating. He then spent the next five years working for IBM, doing mainframe maintance. Not exactly a rednck profile.

    Oddly enough, and for reasons I don’t know, Foxworthy did grow up in the Atlanta suburb of Hapeville, which is actually pretty redneck.

    I don’t know anything about Larry the Cable Guy’s background.

    Read More
  92. black sea says:

    When I was a teenager, at the dawn of the skateboard renaissance, I ordered a board from a California outfit called Valsurf. “Valsurf” was also written on the bottom of the board. Of course, I wondered what hell “Valsurf” meant, and some 40 years later I’ve finally gotten my answer.

    Thanks for straightening that out.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Steve Sailer
    There's a big Valsurf store in Valley Village, CA.
  93. @black sea
    When I was a teenager, at the dawn of the skateboard renaissance, I ordered a board from a California outfit called Valsurf. "Valsurf" was also written on the bottom of the board. Of course, I wondered what hell "Valsurf" meant, and some 40 years later I've finally gotten my answer.

    Thanks for straightening that out.

    There’s a big Valsurf store in Valley Village, CA.

    Read More
  94. Glaivester says: • Website

    If you want to fight Rob Reiner on issues like this, how about promoting 24aheaddotcom’s “Stop Amnesty Challenge?”

    Someone with a megaphone needs to demand that the amnesty promoters answer questions on topics like Reiner’s hypocrisy.

    Read More
  95. Jack D says:
    @josh
    A bit OT but did Netanyahu just admit that Israel killed JFK...and threaten obama? He used the term "grassy knoll" in a speech re Chickenshitgate. This term can ONLY be a reference to JFK.

    Netanyahu spoke in Hebrew and used the Hebrew word that means just plain “lawn”. The “grassy knoll” reference was introduced by a newspaper translator. As Steve said, he was referring to the Clinton-Arafat-Rabin signing ceremony on the lawn of the White House.

    PS last year I visited the original “grassy knoll” in Dallas. It is basically the banked shoulder at the side of the road next to a highway overpass – a very underwhelming place, in no way proportionate to its mythical importance. The whole drama did not take place in some vast mythical field but at a city street intersection – the whole crime scene would fit on a football field. Oswald was 80 yards from Kennedy.

    I think in both cases, a journalist was trying to throw in a poetic flourish and sacrificed clarity in the process.

    Read More
  96. We visited Santa Cruz this summer and found the place unbelievably dirty and tacky. There were loads of hippies, potheads, and tourist kids around. Even the surf was disappointing.

    Read More
  97. @Jefferson
    "Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy"

    They are Rednecks with way more money in their bank accounts than the vast majority of SWPL types. Jeff Foxworthy and Larry The Cable Guy are some real life Beverly Hillbillies.

    They talk like they are from Deliverance, but they got enough money to purchase an apartment at Trump Towers.

    “Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy”

    They are Rednecks with way more money…

    Larry’s a Whitney. They haven’t been “rednecks” (or the boreal equivalent) since Eli’s day.

    But, yes, he’s from a humbler branch.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    Wait, are you saying he's related to Eli Whitney? So then, Larry's family tree had...slave owners? Wow. Never saw that coming.

    Also keep in mind what I originally said was their extended families. It's obvious that both men have made careers out of playing to SWPL audiences with a Sean Hannity/Glenn Beck bent but it takes some IQ for their self-awareness mocking schtick.

    Who was that actor who played "Vern" in the movies? Guess he's not a redneck either.

    The Robertsons, by most account, at least their extended families are definitely rednecks. You can't fake that to that level.

  98. @Reg Cæsar

    “Larry the Cable Guy and Jeff Foxworthy”

    They are Rednecks with way more money…
     
    Larry's a Whitney. They haven't been "rednecks" (or the boreal equivalent) since Eli's day.

    But, yes, he's from a humbler branch.

    Wait, are you saying he’s related to Eli Whitney? So then, Larry’s family tree had…slave owners? Wow. Never saw that coming.

    Also keep in mind what I originally said was their extended families. It’s obvious that both men have made careers out of playing to SWPL audiences with a Sean Hannity/Glenn Beck bent but it takes some IQ for their self-awareness mocking schtick.

    Who was that actor who played “Vern” in the movies? Guess he’s not a redneck either.

    The Robertsons, by most account, at least their extended families are definitely rednecks. You can’t fake that to that level.

    Read More
  99. Anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “Also, Duck Dynasty. Yes, yes, yes, the Robertsons have bucks. But do all their relatives all down the line? Answer: No. AL, MS, and LA are all part of the Mississippi Delta Region, still among the US’s most impoverished areas to live. ”

    You need a geography lesson. Alabama is nowhere near the Mississippi Delta region.

    And the Robertsons are from Monroe, LA. It’s not really in the Delta, though it is close to the alluvial plain.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    LA is one of US's more impoverished states, sorry to say, along with MS and AL. These states are not in the top 20 or 25 of US's best economies, best universities, etc. Usually, the metrics of longest lifespan, best medical care, etc. you know, those markers that tend to indicate a state's overall health, wellbeing, etc. and these three just aren't leading America in these categories and haven't in....well ever. MS, AL, and LA (at least in their cities) do tend to have quite the high violent crime. Wonder why?

    Monroe is supposed to have been quite impoverished (back in the day that Phil would've been growing up) certainly wasn't the equivalent of say, St Louis or Denver.

    Also, as before, the Robertsons' family tree does not contain tons of Gates, Buffetts, Rockefellers, Fords, etc. They're fairly new money, and its fair to state that that money has not yet trickled down throughout the extended branches of their family tree.

    , @ben tillman

    And the Robertsons are from Monroe, LA. It’s not really in the Delta, though it is close to the alluvial plain.
     
    It was close enough for the founders of Delta Airlines, but you may be right.
  100. Mr. Anon says:

    “rondo says:
    November 1, 2014 at 11:39 pm GMT

    Here’s a home movie of Rock Hudson’s Malibu house in 1965″

    The phrase “home movie of Rock Hudson” does not make one inclined to follow a link.

    Read More
  101. @Anonymous
    "Also, Duck Dynasty. Yes, yes, yes, the Robertsons have bucks. But do all their relatives all down the line? Answer: No. AL, MS, and LA are all part of the Mississippi Delta Region, still among the US’s most impoverished areas to live. "

    You need a geography lesson. Alabama is nowhere near the Mississippi Delta region.

    And the Robertsons are from Monroe, LA. It's not really in the Delta, though it is close to the alluvial plain.

    LA is one of US’s more impoverished states, sorry to say, along with MS and AL. These states are not in the top 20 or 25 of US’s best economies, best universities, etc. Usually, the metrics of longest lifespan, best medical care, etc. you know, those markers that tend to indicate a state’s overall health, wellbeing, etc. and these three just aren’t leading America in these categories and haven’t in….well ever. MS, AL, and LA (at least in their cities) do tend to have quite the high violent crime. Wonder why?

    Monroe is supposed to have been quite impoverished (back in the day that Phil would’ve been growing up) certainly wasn’t the equivalent of say, St Louis or Denver.

    Also, as before, the Robertsons’ family tree does not contain tons of Gates, Buffetts, Rockefellers, Fords, etc. They’re fairly new money, and its fair to state that that money has not yet trickled down throughout the extended branches of their family tree.

    Read More
  102. manton says:

    There are a lot of street kids downtown, esp. on Pacific Avenue. Everywhere else, not so much. The Boardwalk and the main beach get a pretty down-market crowd. Lots of tattooed Okies and Mexicans.

    As for the surf, it’s consistently the best spot on the West Coast (unless you want really big waves, then go to Mavericks) but the waves are better in fall/winter.

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  103. @Jean Cocteausten
    If I had the money, I'd make a good-faith offer on this land, with a proposal to fill it with dense, affordable housing, and I'd start taking applications from a storefront in Boyle Heights, making sure to place stories in the papers about how Esmeralda Rodriguez and her six teenage sons' dream of owning a home was about to come true.

    Let’s not forget her six teenage sons’ American dream of opening six smoke shops. What’s not to like?

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  104. @manton
    "In the Fifties and Sixties it was uniformly understood to be a place for the retired working and lower middle classes."

    Not exactly. It was not a retirement community and really still isn't. Back then, it had three big industries: logging, fishing and tourism. The tourists were North Beach, Napa, and Central Valley Italians (or if not Italian, definitely Catholic). The fishing families in town were mostly Italian. The loggers were American mountain hick types. The people who owned the hotels and the Boardwalk (the Canfields) were more conventional WASPs.

    The working and lower middle classes could not "retire" in those days, but they could afford (if they were hard up) to stay in a cheap Beach Flat motel for a week or, if they had some more money, to rent a beach house for two weeks in Seabright or Twin Lakes.

    The university definitely changed everything, both for good and bad. It pumped a lot of money into the town. It brought a certain sophistication. For a city of 50,000, Santa Cruz has better cultural amenities than many cities of 500,000. Plus lots of SWPL shops, food stores, restaurants, wine bars and the like. But it also brought a lot of professional busy-bodies to town who are annoying. Then again, as Steve suggests, their hypocrisy serves a purpose, as it preserves to a certain extent the smallish character of the place. (Though Highway 1 is now a total PitA to traverse any time near rush hour.)

    In any event, I certainly prefer the old PacHeights and Peninsula snobs like you to the tech douchebags from out of state who now pour down to price us out of areas we've been in for 100 years. They are elbow-throwing pricks who do nothing for the town and everyone hates them. Your kind are at least real Californians.

    Thank you manton, you are consistently enlightening. I liked your earlier post about Malibu as well. You should write a good long article on the subject of mid-Twentieth century coastal California (who cares about the rest?) and how and why it declined.
    By “uniformly understood” I meant by us ten year old snobs who rejoiced to be driven straight through such places in our daddys’ Fleetwoods and Imperials. Some of us even had chauffeurs, or rather “drivers”, as we were taught to call them.
    I would happily man the barricades with you against the wretched silicon boys (and boyz), who destroy whatever attracts their gorgon gaze. My earliest California ancestor arrived in 1849, made a fortune as an assayer in San Francisco (Moffat &Co), but then went back East and built the finest mansion yet seen on the Hudson, in Hyde Park. Sadly, a careless servant burned it down in 1899 and its seventy acres of gardens now make up the northern half of the Vanderbilt estate there.
    Thank God we had the sense to come back to what was once not merely the finest state in the union but the finest place to grow up in anywhere.

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  105. enemylimes says: • Website
    @e
    Good piece, Steve.

    It's occurred to me on more than one occasion whenever I happened to catch Reiner on tv that he's as stupid as his Mike Stivik character. It also occurred to me that he's never understood that his character was being pilloried as much as Archie.

    BTW, I find it hilarious to think of surfer dudes as being toughs.

    Obviously never been surfing. I live in Byron Bay, Australia’s surfing Mecca, and the local crew here has no compunction about busting a few out-of-town faces.

    Surfers are fit, strong, and fiercely protective of their breaks. All the peace and love bullshit comes from the chicks sitting on the beach making daisy chains and singing old Dylan songs.

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  106. anonymous says: • Disclaimer

    “Got its start there, yes. Currently a major part of NASA, (more so than Canaveral, etc)? Uh, well….”

    Uhmm…

    “NASA in Huntsville begins race to finish new heavy-lift rocket by 2017″, “Given the go-ahead at last, NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center begins racing today to build “the most powerful rocket ever” to carry American astronauts back into deep space. …”

    Wikipedia: “…is the U.S. government’s civilian rocketry and spacecraft propulsion research center. The largest NASA center, MSFC’s first mission was developing the Saturn launch vehicles for the Apollo moon program. Marshall has been the agency’s lead center for Space Shuttle propulsion and its external tank; payloads and related crew training; International Space Station (ISS) design and assembly

    …NASA Headquarters announced that MSFC will lead the efforts on a new heavy-lift rocket that… is being called the Space Launch System (SLS)…”

    You might also be interested in the John C Stennis Space Center in Mississippi:

    “As of 2012, it is NASA’s largest rocket engine test facility. There are over 30 local, state, national, international, private, and public companies and agencies using SSC for their rocket testing facilities. …”

    One of the advantage of places like Mississippi and Louisiana is that large rocket boosters and booster components can be barged around, even barged to places like Canaveral.

    Read More
    • Replies: @Yojimbo/Zatoichi
    In other words, Dixie's politicians sure know how to bring home some needed government programs. Otherwise these states would be in more dire straits.

    The paradox: With NASA's continued work in AL and yet it has not translated into economic progress as a whole for the state of Alabama. Alabama is not in the top 20 economically successful states and hasn't been in quite a while. The state isn't ranked by having great universities (global level or national level), longest lifespans per state, best medical care, best quality air, water, etc.

    Very low cost of living in all three states which tend to equal lower paid wages, less per capita income, etc. AL, MS, LA don't have a Silicon Valley equivalent either; certainly would've heard of one among those states by now. Whatever things have occurred there is because of the federal government in the form of pork brought home by their politicians. Much like how in West Virginia many things are named after Robert Byrd.

    We DO however, tend to hear of high violent crime in these three states. Wonder why?

  107. @Anonymous
    "Also, Duck Dynasty. Yes, yes, yes, the Robertsons have bucks. But do all their relatives all down the line? Answer: No. AL, MS, and LA are all part of the Mississippi Delta Region, still among the US’s most impoverished areas to live. "

    You need a geography lesson. Alabama is nowhere near the Mississippi Delta region.

    And the Robertsons are from Monroe, LA. It's not really in the Delta, though it is close to the alluvial plain.

    And the Robertsons are from Monroe, LA. It’s not really in the Delta, though it is close to the alluvial plain.

    It was close enough for the founders of Delta Airlines, but you may be right.

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  108. @anonymous
    "Got its start there, yes. Currently a major part of NASA, (more so than Canaveral, etc)? Uh, well…."

    Uhmm...

    "NASA in Huntsville begins race to finish new heavy-lift rocket by 2017", "Given the go-ahead at last, NASA's Marshall Space Flight Center begins racing today to build "the most powerful rocket ever" to carry American astronauts back into deep space. ..."

    Wikipedia: "...is the U.S. government's civilian rocketry and spacecraft propulsion research center. The largest NASA center, MSFC's first mission was developing the Saturn launch vehicles for the Apollo moon program. Marshall has been the agency's lead center for Space Shuttle propulsion and its external tank; payloads and related crew training; International Space Station (ISS) design and assembly...

    ...NASA Headquarters announced that MSFC will lead the efforts on a new heavy-lift rocket that... is being called the Space Launch System (SLS)..."




    You might also be interested in the John C Stennis Space Center in Mississippi:

    "As of 2012, it is NASA's largest rocket engine test facility. There are over 30 local, state, national, international, private, and public companies and agencies using SSC for their rocket testing facilities. ..."

    One of the advantage of places like Mississippi and Louisiana is that large rocket boosters and booster components can be barged around, even barged to places like Canaveral.

    In other words, Dixie’s politicians sure know how to bring home some needed government programs. Otherwise these states would be in more dire straits.

    The paradox: With NASA’s continued work in AL and yet it has not translated into economic progress as a whole for the state of Alabama. Alabama is not in the top 20 economically successful states and hasn’t been in quite a while. The state isn’t ranked by having great universities (global level or national level), longest lifespans per state, best medical care, best quality air, water, etc.

    Very low cost of living in all three states which tend to equal lower paid wages, less per capita income, etc. AL, MS, LA don’t have a Silicon Valley equivalent either; certainly would’ve heard of one among those states by now. Whatever things have occurred there is because of the federal government in the form of pork brought home by their politicians. Much like how in West Virginia many things are named after Robert Byrd.

    We DO however, tend to hear of high violent crime in these three states. Wonder why?

    Read More

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